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View Full Version : Life Todays question #2 from CPers:


Frankie
03-14-2010, 03:28 PM
After 2 years of slowly working on it, I'm almost done with the front addition to my house. The work has turned my front yard into a jungle of prehistoric looking weeds and growths. Now that the snow has melted and the combination of weed and mud is out I am thinking about using someone's advice in sprinkling Borax to kill off everything so I can prepare the ground for re-sodding. Do you agree with this or do you advise against it? Why? I like the lawn experts on this bb to chime in.

tyton75
03-14-2010, 03:32 PM
rent a lawn tiller

Frankie
03-14-2010, 03:37 PM
rent a lawn tiller

Suppose it uproots the weeds enough? I don't know much about these things. But when i had the very back of my backyard tilled years ago it turned into a big mess of wild growths for years.

SNR
03-14-2010, 03:39 PM
Antifreeze > Borax

tyton75
03-14-2010, 03:39 PM
worked for me on my front yard.. just used good seed

they get pretty deep

JOhn
03-14-2010, 03:40 PM
Antifreeze > Borax

:thumb:

seclark
03-14-2010, 03:51 PM
lawn tiller
dial before you dig
sec

Rain Man
03-14-2010, 03:51 PM
I'd keep the prehistoric weeds. Combine those with a feeder and you'll end up with a nice yardful of pterodactyls flitting around.

seclark
03-14-2010, 03:53 PM
I'd keep the prehistoric weeds. Combine those with a feeder and you'll end up with a nice yardful of pterodactyls flitting around.

i hate cleaning pterodactyl shit off my blocked up 72 gremlin.
sec

Delano
03-14-2010, 03:55 PM
Frankie, if you want to accomplish this by yourself, it will take a year or two for the weeds to disappear and the grass to establish. If the weeds have been growing long enough, there is a seedbank in the soil.

First, allow the weeds to grow enough to absorb herbicide. I'd wager that most of your herbaceous weeds are cool-season plants, so a May application of Glyphosate (ask a landscape center employee for available types) will do the trick to kill the emerged plants. After the vegetation is brown, cut it away or till it, your choice. If the weeds have gone to seed, try to remove all seed. Because there is more weed seed in the soil from previous years, you will soon see new plants emerging. Spray another round of glyphosate when they are large enough. Till again in preparation for a fall planting of your grass of choice. Make sure your mix has a fast growing seed in the mix (we use perennial rye grass in SoDak).

The next year, you will probably need to apply a broadleaf control herbicide and overseed with your long-term preferred grass.

As for woody vegetation, the best method is mechanical removal. If you can't remove the plant and it's roots, cut the shrub off at the stump and apply a herbicide with Triclopyr (Garlon 3A if you can get it). After an initial treatment, you may see some sprouts coming from the roots of the woody plants. Your best bet is spraying the foliage with the Triclopyr and a surfactant.

Most of this post was my attempt to apply my experience restoring natural areas to your urban environment - I hope it helps.

Baconeater
03-14-2010, 03:58 PM
Your neighbors gotta be loving this.

KS Smitty
03-14-2010, 04:03 PM
From what I understand about using borax is that you dilute it in water and apply it that way. If you sprinkle it you may have hot spots where nothing will grow. I have also heard that it isn't 100% effective.
Are you planning on laying sod or using plugs or seeding?
A cheap and effective way to kill weeds is to use newspapers at least 6 layers deep over the area and leave it there for about 6 weeks or so. This is not very attractive but it sounds like it's not very pretty right now.
Or as suggested go get a tiller and till to a depth of 4-6" and then sprinkle a pre-emergent so prevent any seeds from germinating.

KCbroncoHATER
03-14-2010, 06:45 PM
http://www.scotts.com/smg/learn/annualProgramBuilder/apbstep1.jsp?stp=2&navId=300031&parentId=100006&_requestid=3915220&zip=66106

Follow the directions and you will have a outstanding lawn.

Saul Good
03-14-2010, 07:15 PM
Anyone have tips on changing from bluegrass to fescue? I'm giving up on bluegrass, as it's just a disaster in this part of the country. I've got soil issues as well (lot of clay).

Frankie
03-14-2010, 09:14 PM
Frankie, if you want to accomplish this by yourself, it will take a year or two for the weeds to disappear and the grass to establish. If the weeds have been growing long enough, there is a seedbank in the soil.

First, allow the weeds to grow enough to absorb herbicide. I'd wager that most of your herbaceous weeds are cool-season plants, so a May application of Glyphosate (ask a landscape center employee for available types) will do the trick to kill the emerged plants. After the vegetation is brown, cut it away or till it, your choice. If the weeds have gone to seed, try to remove all seed. Because there is more weed seed in the soil from previous years, you will soon see new plants emerging. Spray another round of glyphosate when they are large enough. Till again in preparation for a fall planting of your grass of choice. Make sure your mix has a fast growing seed in the mix (we use perennial rye grass in SoDak).

The next year, you will probably need to apply a broadleaf control herbicide and overseed with your long-term preferred grass.

As for woody vegetation, the best method is mechanical removal. If you can't remove the plant and it's roots, cut the shrub off at the stump and apply a herbicide with Triclopyr (Garlon 3A if you can get it). After an initial treatment, you may see some sprouts coming from the roots of the woody plants. Your best bet is spraying the foliage with the Triclopyr and a surfactant.

Most of this post was my attempt to apply my experience restoring natural areas to your urban environment - I hope it helps.
Thanks man. I'll follow this.

LaChapelle
03-14-2010, 09:17 PM
It all makes goat milk

Frankie
03-14-2010, 09:53 PM
Your neighbors gotta be loving this.

Nah, I have mowed whatever has grown there regularly.

Buehler445
03-14-2010, 11:19 PM
Frankie, if you want to accomplish this by yourself, it will take a year or two for the weeds to disappear and the grass to establish. If the weeds have been growing long enough, there is a seedbank in the soil.

First, allow the weeds to grow enough to absorb herbicide. I'd wager that most of your herbaceous weeds are cool-season plants, so a May application of Glyphosate (ask a landscape center employee for available types) will do the trick to kill the emerged plants. After the vegetation is brown, cut it away or till it, your choice. If the weeds have gone to seed, try to remove all seed. Because there is more weed seed in the soil from previous years, you will soon see new plants emerging. Spray another round of glyphosate when they are large enough. Till again in preparation for a fall planting of your grass of choice. Make sure your mix has a fast growing seed in the mix (we use perennial rye grass in SoDak).

The next year, you will probably need to apply a broadleaf control herbicide and overseed with your long-term preferred grass.

As for woody vegetation, the best method is mechanical removal. If you can't remove the plant and it's roots, cut the shrub off at the stump and apply a herbicide with Triclopyr (Garlon 3A if you can get it). After an initial treatment, you may see some sprouts coming from the roots of the woody plants. Your best bet is spraying the foliage with the Triclopyr and a surfactant.

Most of this post was my attempt to apply my experience restoring natural areas to your urban environment - I hope it helps.

Glyphosate is roundup. It kills everything. But it only kills what's alive and actively growing. If you're not going to plant anything until fall, I would try to apply something with residual control. I don't know if you can get anything legal for lawns, but it will keep you from spraying roundup after every rain.

If you're not going to plant it until fall, I wouldn't till it. You will be at risk for erosion (if you're in KC it will be from rain). Plus if you leave residue from dead weeds, it will provide a canopy and not allow sprouting weeds to get sunlight and will cause fewer of them to grow.

When you do decide to plant, till it probably twice to make sure you have a nice seed bed. Try to get some organic matter in the soil when you till. I would see if you can find some processed manure, but you may not be able to find that. If you can't till in some peat moss or potting soil or something. Organic matter will allow the plant to absorb nutrients better. Get some starter fertilizer and apply it right after you plant and pretty frequently after germination. Don't use regular fertilizer or it will burn it until it gets some size.

After you have a nice seed bed, plant the grass, rake it in and keep it wet for a few days, but don't let it wash.

There will be weed seeds for a number of years (those damn things last forever). So you will need to apply some 2-4D. I think retail it is weed-b-gon or something. Just make sure the label says 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. That will kill broadleaf weeds in your grass but won't kill the grass. Note that it won't kill any unwanted grass that may have come up. Don't get any on any flowers or trees. They are broadleaves.

If you're going to have a nice lawn it will take work. Good luck.