PDA

View Full Version : News A beach, a jogger, a failing plane, and death


38yrsfan
03-17-2010, 03:59 PM
http://www.foxnews.com/us/2010/03/15/plane-hits-kills-man-hilton-head-sc-beach/

A beach, a jogger, a failing plane, and death

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. (AP) Robert Gary Jones was a pharmaceutical salesman on a business trip, looking forward to getting home to celebrate his daughter's third birthday. He was enjoying a moment to himself on this resort island, jogging on the beach and listening to his iPod. Officials say the Woodstock, Ga., man neither saw nor heard what struck him from behind Monday evening: A single-engine plane making an emergency landing.

The Lancair IV-P aircraft, which can be built from a kit, had lost its propeller and was "basically gliding" as it hit and instantly killed Jones, said Ed Allen, the coroner for Beaufort County on the South Carolina coast.
"There's no noise," said aviation expert Mary Schiavo, a former inspector general for the National Transportation Safety Board. "So the jogger, with his ear buds in, and the plane without an engine, you're basically a stealth aircraft. Who would expect to look up?"

The pilot, Edward I. Smith of Chesapeake, Va., and his lone passenger both walked away from the crash landing near the Hilton Head Marriott Resort and Spa.

Marshall Clary was sitting in his home office overlooking the beach when the crash happened about 6:10 p.m. He said he heard nothing when the plane hit Jones and didn't realize something was wrong until he heard emergency helicopters overhead a short time later.

From his back deck, he saw the plane in the water about 100 yards from where emergency responders used a sheet to cover the bloodied body of a man wearing jogging shorts.
Jones, a 38-year-old salesman for pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline, was in Hilton Head on a business trip and was looking forward to returning home for his daughter's birthday Wednesday, his mother said.

Pauline Jones, of Dunedin, Fla., described him as "great son, a wonderful husband," She said he lived in the northern Atlanta suburbs with his wife, Jennifer, their daughter and a 5-year-old son.

"I was never so shocked in all my life," Pauline Jones said, her voice shaking.

"They say that God only gives you what you can handle. I said, 'You know what, I've reached my max.'"

The plane took off from Orlando, Fla., at 4:45 p.m. Monday and was en route to Virginia when it started leaking oil at about 13,000 feet, said Joheida Fister, spokeswoman for Hilton Head Island fire and rescue.

Fister said the pilot determined he couldn't make it to Hilton Head Airport. He told authorities oil on the windshield blocked his vision and the propeller had come off, forcing him to attempt a landing on the beach.

Smith confirmed he was flying the plane when he returned to the scene Tuesday, when the four-seater aircraft was hoisted onto a trailer hitched to a pickup truck and towed from beach. Speaking in a subdued voice, Smith said he didn't want to talk about the crash.

"I've got a lot of issues going on right now," Smith said. "I've got a plane that's all torn up. And I've got a young man that I killed."

Authorities did not identify the passenger who was flying with Smith.
The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were investigating, Fister said.

NTSB spokesman Keith Holloway said no cause had been determined for the crash. He said the plane was being transported to Virginia, where investigators would inspect it. Holloway said interviews would also be conducted with the pilot and any witnesses.

"We don't know what occurred, especially since we haven't actually examined the aircraft," Holloway said. "We are still gathering facts."
An FAA spokeswoman referred inquiries to the NTSB.

Schiavo, the former NTSB official, said Smith made the right choice in landing on the beach rather than attempting a water landing. The aircraft likely wasn't carrying flotation equipment.

"Planes like this sink like a rock," she said.

Even with oil smeared on the windshield, Schiavo says the pilot should have been able to see through a small window on the side of the plane and possibly yell out to anyone below. Still, there may have been little time to try to avoid hitting the jogger, she said.

The airplane model that killed Jones has a turbine engine and can fly up to 370 mph, according to the Lancair Web site. The "fastbuild kit" for the IV-P model, which has a pressurized cabin, is listed as costing $129,000 and is "fully FAA approved," the site says.

The plane "could be easily built in one's home shop" and "has proven over the years to be very safe, reliable and extremely low in maintenance," the site says.

Joseph Bartels, chief executive officer of Lancair International, the Oregon-based company that produces the aircraft kits, said Tuesday that the kit produces a "light, fast and strong aircraft."

"This particular aircraft is one of about 1,000 sold either as kits or completed," Bartels said, though he added he had no specific knowledge about the airplane that had crashed. He said the firm does not produce the engine, which is purchased separately, he said.

Bartels, who had seen online news photos of the damaged plane, called the landing "miraculous" given the damage to it, but also expressed sorrow at the deadly outcome.

Over-Head
03-17-2010, 07:52 PM
Here's the plane

http://www.lancair.com/Main/iv_ivp.html


..."It was a revolutionary and lofty goal back in 1990: To design and produce a 345 mph, four seat, pressurized aircraft that could be easily built in one’s home shop. Now, more than ten years later and after continual refinement, the Lancair IV has truly proven itself to be incredibly fast, efficient, safe, reliable, comfortable and now more than ever, easy to build. Over the years we have pioneered many "industry firsts" with this aircraft. To begin with, it is one of only four single engine piston aircraft in the history of aviation to achieve a pressurized cabin. The Lancair IV-P not only maintains an enviable 5.0 psi cabin differential, it has proven over the years to be very safe, reliable and extremely low in maintenance. Today, the vast majority of "IV" owners all around the world opt for the pressurized model. It is the ultimate compliment to cabin comfort and has helped to make the "IV-P" one of the world’s best personal cross-country machines. It truly combines airliner speeds and comfort with levels of freedom and economy never before possible."



Fastbuild Kit: $129,900 (IV-P)
Finished Plane Estimate:
$350,000 - $550,000

milkman
03-17-2010, 07:56 PM
Where is Tattoo when you need him?

Stanley Nickels
03-17-2010, 08:19 PM
Re: News A beach, a jogger, a failing plane, and death

I'll take: What is "Lost"?, Alex

Goldmember
03-17-2010, 08:25 PM
Where is Tattoo when you need him?

I feel guilty for laughing at this

JD10367
03-17-2010, 08:32 PM
"Dude, I'm playing ten bucks on Powerball."

"Aw, man, why you throwing your money away on that shit? Do you know how astronomical the odds are? You've got a better chance of being killed by a crippled plane gliding to a landing as you jog on the beach!"

notorious
03-17-2010, 08:50 PM
Pilots are trained to not endanger others around them when they have an emergency.

I have had two engine failures (single engine planes), and was not lucky enough to have all of the room they had.


Why didn't they put the plane in the fucking water? This death could have been easily avoided.

String the pilot up by his balls.

milkman
03-17-2010, 08:54 PM
Pilots are trained to not endanger others around them when they have an emergency.

I have had two engine failures (single engine planes), and was not lucky enough to have all of the room they had.


Why didn't they put the plane in the ****ing water? This death could have been easily avoided.

String the pilot up by his balls.

From the article

Schiavo, the former NTSB official, said Smith made the right choice in landing on the beach rather than attempting a water landing. The aircraft likely wasn't carrying flotation equipment.

"Planes like this sink like a rock," she said.

notorious
03-17-2010, 09:14 PM
From the article

Pop the doors open right before landing (just like they should have done on the beach) and bail after landing. I am assuming the water isn't very deep next to the beach. Low-wing airplanes give you a clear exit to the surface if need be.


I would rather put down in open water then risk hitting something/somebody on the beach.

Besides, 13000 feet should have given them plenty of time to glide to an airport to put down. That type of aircraft is probably loaded with every type of navigational equipment know to man. Simply push the button labeled "nearest", select airport, and glide to a safe landing.

milkman
03-17-2010, 09:18 PM
Pop the doors open right before landing (just like they should have done on the beach) and bail after landing. I am assuming the water isn't very deep next to the beach. Low-wing airplanes give you a clear exit to the surface if need be.


I would rather put down in open water then risk hitting something/somebody on the beach.

I don't own a plane, nor do I fly them, but wouldn't you be just a little busy trying to land teh plane to be pooping doors open?

I honestly don't know.

And what if there's someone in the water?

notorious
03-17-2010, 09:18 PM
He probably wanted to save all of his hard work and risk someone's life then total the airplane by putting it in the water.



He will have to live with his decision the rest of his life.

notorious
03-17-2010, 09:22 PM
I don't own a plane, nor do I fly them, but wouldn't you be just a little busy trying to land teh plane to be pooping doors open?

I honestly don't know.

And what if there's someone in the water?


In the emergency procedures, you are instructed to open doors before touchdown. If the plane hits hard, then the doors could be jammed closed and you could be trapped in a burning aircraft.


If the guy owned a Turbine Lancair, he has a shit ton of hours and should know how to land a plane under distress. Doing emergency procedures is like breathing (or should be) for pilots.


I am not getting on you Milkman, you are asking some good questions.

milkman
03-17-2010, 09:25 PM
In the emergency procedures, you are instructed to open doors before touchdown. If the plane hits hard, then the doors could be jammed closed and you could be trapped in a burning aircraft.


If the guy owned a Turbine Lancair, he has a shit ton of hours and should know how to land a plane under distress. Doing emergency procedures is like breathing (or should be) for pilots.


I am not getting on you Milkman, you are asking some good questions.

If I thought you were getting on me, I'd be far more adversarial in my questions and responses.

I just learned something, actually a couple of things, so it's all good.

notorious
03-17-2010, 09:32 PM
If I thought you were getting on me, I'd be far more adversarial in my questions and responses.




I got you. On CP, you never know, though.


You've always been cool in my book. :)

I will be honest, I read the story and got emotional. When I had my engine failures, I handled the situation, but it was pretty intense. I have a lot more time then most pilots, and just assume that people should make good decisions. Everyone is different, some people freeze, others rise to the occasion, and others just have bad luck.

I stepped out of line. I can only compare what was going through the pilot's mind with my own experiences. Only he knows what that particular situation was really like.

Hopefully he and the family of the deceased can eventually live their lives normally again.

WoodDraw
03-17-2010, 09:34 PM
I stepped out of line. I can only imagine what was going through the pilot's mind. Only he knows what that particular situation was really like.



That's the important part. I have searched through a few articles, and not one has described the emergency issues. What a crazy situation. We'll see what the NTSB finds out.

notorious
03-17-2010, 09:40 PM
That's the important part. I have searched through a few articles, and not one has described the emergency issues. What a crazy situation. We'll see what the NTSB finds out.



He should be considered lucky that it was a clean break. If he lost only part of the prop while in flight, there probably would have been two deaths instead of one.

Whoever did the home-build has to be shitting their pants right now.

Ebolapox
03-17-2010, 09:49 PM
I thought this was a kennedy thread AHTHANKYOU!

Reerun_KC
03-18-2010, 08:24 AM
WOW! Speachless... A whole freaking ocean and you hit a guy jogging?

WTF was he thinking?

MOhillbilly
03-18-2010, 09:05 AM
what the **** runs through your mind as your puttin along 13000 ft up and the propeller comes off?

Id bet the butthole pucker in that plane was 100%.

TinyEvel
03-18-2010, 09:22 AM
Notice what he mentions first:

"I've got a lot of issues going on right now," Smith said. "I've got a plane that's all torn up. And I've got a young man that I killed."

TinyEvel
03-18-2010, 09:22 AM
Notice what he mentions first:

"I've got a lot of issues going on right now," Smith said. "I've got a plane that's all torn up. And I've got a young man that I killed."

JD10367
03-18-2010, 09:39 AM
I don't own a plane, nor do I fly them, but wouldn't you be just a little busy trying to land teh plane to be pooping doors open?

Trust me, if you're in an experimental single-engine, and you're going down, you're doing a LOT of pooping. :D

I know very little about general aviation, but I have a friend who's a pilot and I've been up a few times in a Cessna. For those who haven't been in a small plane, especially an older model, it's akin to getting into a 1978 Datsun that has wings. However, as was pointed out, the visibility is excellent, they have a good glide ratio, and there are plenty of places you can put down that AREN'T on top of a jogger's head.

Reerun_KC
03-18-2010, 09:44 AM
what the **** runs through your mind as your puttin along 13000 ft up and the propeller comes off?

Id bet the butthole pucker in that plane was 100%.

Your emergency procedures. A B C's then your reverse 7 checks.

A = Aviation, No matter what you fly the airplane...

B = Best field, find a place to land, commit to it and safely land in that place.

C = Communicate, 121.5 on the radio (mayday) and 7700 on the transponder.

Reverse 7, (at this point) shut the fuel off, pull the mixture and throttle our, shut the key off and ALT side of the master switch. Leave radios on for communication.

Before touch down, open the doors so you dont get stuck inside...

That is ALL that should be going through your mind.. Anything else and you will have a screw up.

ClevelandBronco
03-18-2010, 09:45 AM
"Life's a beach and then you die" t-shirts are 50% off this week only.

JD10367
03-18-2010, 09:49 AM
I think it's pretty clear that this guy chose:

1.) Save my life.
2.) Save my plane.
3.) F**k whoever's in my way.

I'm mostly speaking out my ass but I'd think, if you have a problem at 13,000 feet, you should probably be able to glide a 747 to a landing if you know what you're doing and you have control of everything (i.e. no hydraulic issues and you can control flaps, ailerons, rudder, elevator). A plane the size of his could pick any urban runway, any decent-sized road, probably even put it down on a sports field somewhere.

notorious
03-18-2010, 11:25 AM
I think it's pretty clear that this guy chose:

1.) Save my life.
2.) Save my plane.
3.) F**k whoever's in my way.

I'm mostly speaking out my ass but I'd think, if you have a problem at 13,000 feet, you should probably be able to glide a 747 to a landing if you know what you're doing and you have control of everything (i.e. no hydraulic issues and you can control flaps, ailerons, rudder, elevator). A plane the size of his could pick any urban runway, any decent-sized road, probably even put it down on a sports field somewhere.

Lancairs have a long TO/and Landing distance. Even so 2000-2500 feet would have been more then enough.


I think he was trying to save his plane above all else, too. Fuck the plane, that's what his super expensive insurance is for (especially on a turbine).

notorious
03-18-2010, 11:33 AM
Your emergency procedures. A B C's then your reverse 7 checks.

A = Aviation, No matter what you fly the airplane...

B = Best field, find a place to land, commit to it and safely land in that place.

C = Communicate, 121.5 on the radio (mayday) and 7700 on the transponder.

Reverse 7, (at this point) shut the fuel off, pull the mixture and throttle our, shut the key off and ALT side of the master switch. Leave radios on for communication.

Before touch down, open the doors so you dont get stuck inside...

That is ALL that should be going through your mind.. Anything else and you will have a screw up.

It was a turbine, so believe it or not it is an even simpler checklist.

13,000 feet above an elevation of 0 gave him a TON of options to glide to.

I wish I had that kind of time when I lost my first engine.

On my first one I was climbing north of Clarendon, Tx. at about 1:30am. Oil pressure zeroed and the engine wanted to rattle out of the cowl. I managed to get that brick of a plane back to the runway with a lot less altitude then this guy. Ended up throwing a rod through the top of the block.

2nd one was a partial over the Quivera Wetlands. Broke the crankshaft in half but managed to baby it to Lyons.

Never lost a prop, though........It should have helped his glide ratio a bunch.

ChiefGator
03-18-2010, 11:38 AM
Fastbuild Kit: $129,900 (IV-P)
Finished Plane Estimate:
$350,000 - $550,000

I'm just curious.. how does this jump from $129,9 to 350k-550k so quick? Is that the estimate it would cost me to actually build it?

Reerun_KC
03-18-2010, 11:42 AM
It was a turbine, so believe it or not it is an even simpler checklist.

13,000 feet above an elevation of 0 gave him a TON of options to glide to.

I wish I had that kind of time when I lost my first engine.

On my first one I was climbing north of Clarendon, Tx. at about 1:30am. Oil pressure zeroed and the engine wanted to rattle out of the cowl. I managed to get that brick of a plane back to the runway with a lot less altitude then this guy. Ended up throwing a rod through the top of the block.

2nd one was a partial over the Quivera Wetlands. Broke the crankshaft in half but managed to baby it to Lyons.

Never lost a prop, though........It should have helped his glide ratio a bunch.

I missed that note, Yes your right. bring it back over the gate to shut off fuel and feather prop...

Rain Man
03-18-2010, 11:44 AM
I'm just curious.. how does this jump from $129,9 to 350k-550k so quick? Is that the estimate it would cost me to actually build it?


Flight attendants.

notorious
03-18-2010, 11:45 AM
I'm just curious.. how does this jump from $129,9 to 350k-550k so quick? Is that the estimate it would cost me to actually build it?

The engine.

Turbines are very high in price but you get an engine that weighs half as much, with 50-75% more power, has a 3500 hour engine overhaul (vs. 2000 for normal) and is a LOT more reliable

notorious
03-18-2010, 11:46 AM
Flight attendants.

Sign me up.......

fan4ever
03-18-2010, 11:54 AM
Using the anti-gun logic, why isn't anyone blaming the IPod?

ChiefGator
03-18-2010, 11:57 AM
Flight attendants.

Hmmm.. the reminds me... I wonder if Hooter's airline is still running....

And how disappointed I was to find it stopped...

http://www.mopo.ca/2006/03/hooters-airline-calls-it-quits.html

Rain Man
03-18-2010, 12:10 PM
Hmmm.. the reminds me... I wonder if Hooter's airline is still running....

And how disappointed I was to find it stopped...

http://www.mopo.ca/2006/03/hooters-airline-calls-it-quits.html

Wow, the great irony is that it was run out of Myrtle Beach. If the pilot had only flown Hooters Air, the jogger would still be alive today.

MOhillbilly
03-18-2010, 12:12 PM
Your emergency procedures. A B C's then your reverse 7 checks.



You got it all wrong

A) Scream like a bitch

B) Shit pants

C) Get out on wing and flap arms like amotherfucker.

D)Scream like a bitch

E) Remind yourself of that joke about the last thing a bug sees after it hits a windshield.
'asshole' is the punchline.

Ebolapox
03-18-2010, 12:28 PM
I thought this was a kennedy thread AHTHANKYOU!

come ON, people! get it? kennedy thread?

william kennedy smith: beach (rape)

ted kennedy (didn't a jogger find the wreckage in Chappaquiddick?)

jfk jr: failing plane, death

tim tapdancing tebow, people!

Rain Man
03-18-2010, 12:38 PM
come ON, people! get it? kennedy thread?

william kennedy smith: beach (rape)

ted kennedy (didn't a jogger find the wreckage in Chappaquiddick?)

jfk jr: failing plane, death

tim tapdancing tebow, people!



The lack of grassy knoll references makes it too much of a stretch. Sorry.

Otter
03-18-2010, 01:52 PM
I think the real irony is that the guy was jogging when it happened.

If he would have stayed out late the night before and slept in all he would probably be dealing with is a hangover and being woken up by sirens in the morning to retrieve the plane that the crash landed outside his motel room.

The beaches are virtually deserted down there this time of year. Talk about bad timing.

Frazod
03-18-2010, 01:54 PM
I think the real irony is that the guy was jogging when it happened.

If he would have stayed out late the night before and slept in all he would probably be dealing with is a hangover and being woken up by sirens in the morning to retrieve the plane that the crash landed outside his motel room.

The beaches are virtually deserted down there this time of year. Talk about bad timing.

His body was probably hauled away by three fat guys who smoke. :D

Buck
03-18-2010, 01:55 PM
I dont get why he didn't try to land it in the really shallow water, I'm talking about the water thats up to your knees at most.

This is pretty inexcusable. You take another mans life over yours, I'm pretty sure you have a moral obligation to value the safety of others over you when you decide to start flying planes.

MahiMike
03-18-2010, 02:04 PM
In the emergency procedures, you are instructed to open doors before touchdown. If the plane hits hard, then the doors could be jammed closed and you could be trapped in a burning aircraft.


If the guy owned a Turbine Lancair, he has a shit ton of hours and should know how to land a plane under distress. Doing emergency procedures is like breathing (or should be) for pilots.


I am not getting on you Milkman, you are asking some good questions.

Good input. Thanks. Does seem like they could have had skimmed along the point where the water hits the beach. Not sure if it was low tide or high. Low tide conditions woulda been pretty easy to skim like a board.