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BigRedChief
03-25-2010, 02:47 PM
<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Senate passes health care 'fixes' bill

By the CNN Wire Staff


STORY HIGHLIGHTS

NEW: Pelosi says Congress has votes to pass health care "fixes" bill later Thursday
Package of changes to health care reform bill now goes back to House
Republicans found violations in two provisions, forcing the bill back to the House
Spokesman for Senate majority leader says Dems "confident" package will pass


White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel talks to Wolf Blitzer about behind-the-scenes politics in the White House in the aftermath of the health care vote. The exclusive interview on "The Situation Room (http://www.cnn.com/CNN/Programs/situation.room/)," 5 p.m. ET on CNN.

Washington (CNN) -- The Senate passed the slightly altered health care "fixes" bill 56-43 Thursday, sending it back to the House of Representatives.

Senate Republicans forced two minor provisions involving student loan funding to be stripped from the bill, but the changes would not affect the law President Obama enacted Tuesday.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Democrats have the votes to pass the measure later Thursday and send it to Obama to be signed into law -- thereby wrapping up its work on President Obama's top domestic priority.

Pelosi dismissed the significance of Senate Republicans' success in forcing the proposed "fixes" bill back to the House of Representatives, which previously passed the measure Sunday night along with the Democrats' underlying reform plan.

Pelosi said the House had the votes to pass health care reform Sunday night and "we'll have it today." She added lawmakers want to "finish our work up today."
The GOP has vowed to use every parliamentary tool available to undermine the new law. Republican leaders forced the Senate to begin deliberations on a series of proposed amendments starting Wednesday night. The Senate did not adjourn until 2:45 a.m. Thursday.

The Senate reconvened at 9:45 a.m. to consider additional GOP proposals which, among other things, are designed to force Democrats to cast unpopular votes in the run-up to November's midterm elections.

On Wednesday night, Senate (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/U_S_Senate) Democrats easily defeated the first of 29 amendments introduced by Republicans, which challenged provisions in the bill such as those involving changes to Medicare funding. Also defeated were attempts to send the measure to committee for reconsideration -- which would effectively kill it -- and other amendments intended to strip provisions from the bill.
House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Maryland, said Thursday the problems found by Senate Republicans were minor and indicated he expected the House to approve the package of changes later Thursday.

"My presumption is that they've found that the problems that exist" are "small" and "technical," Hoyer told CNN's "American Morning."

The Senate "will send the bill back, my expectation is, sometime this afternoon. And [then the House] will pass the bill and send it on to the president."
The Democrats' "fixes" bill was necessary to get a reluctant House to pass the Senate's health care reform (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/Health_Care_Reform) measure Sunday night.

The compromise package would add more than $60 billion to the overall plan's cost, partly by expanding insurance subsidies for middle- and lower-income families. It would also expand Medicare's prescription drug benefit while scaling back the bill's taxes on expensive insurance plans.
Democratic (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/U_S_Democratic_Party_Politics) senators complained that Republicans (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/U_S_Republican_Party_Politics) had shut down committee hearings for a second straight day as part of a strategy of obstruction in protest of the health care bill.

Sen. Carl Levin, D-Michigan, and Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Missouri, told a news conference the GOP tactic was delaying work on vital issues.

"It's unconscionable," said Levin, who as chair of the Armed Services Committee was supposed to conduct a hearing with a top U.S. military commander in Korea who had flown in for the hearing. "Our national security cannot be held hostage to disagreements over a health care policy."
McCaskill had planned an oversight hearing on problems with contracts to train local police departments in Afghanistan. She said the Senate rule that allows the minority party to block committee action was "really dumb" and should be dropped.

"Disagree with us, debate us, vote no," she said. "But to use a rule to stop us from working -- that dog just doesn't hunt from where I come from. That doesn't even makes sense. That's why people in American think we are clueless here."

Levin said he "pleaded" with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky to prevent the blocking of a second day of hearings. A GOP objection on Tuesday also closed down committee work.

"It seems to me this is an example of how the obstructionism around here has gotten mindless," Levin said.

A GOP leadership aide would not directly respond to Levin's charge, but noted that Democrats canceled hearings Tuesday so that senators could attend the White House signing ceremony for the health care bill.
CNN's Tom Cohen, Alan Silverleib, Ted Barrett and Deirdre Walsh contributed to this report.
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CoMoChief
03-25-2010, 03:17 PM
-McCaskill"
"Disagree with us, debate us, vote no," she said. "But to use a rule to stop us from working -- that dog just doesn't hunt from where I come from. That doesn't even makes sense. That's why people in American think we are clueless here."


No Claire....American's think you're clueless for passing a unconstitutional HC bill.

Chief Henry
03-25-2010, 06:37 PM
OOPS !


62% of Americans want the repubhlicans to keep fighting this Obama Cluster Care bill.
33% of Americans want the republicans to stop the fight of Obamas Cluster Care.

CBS poll

BigRedChief
03-25-2010, 08:32 PM
OOPS !


62% of Americans want the repubhlicans to keep fighting this Obama Cluster Care bill.
33% of Americans want the republicans to stop the fight of Obamas Cluster Care.

CBS poll
Nothing left to fight. You need a Republican president, a 60 seat majority in the senate and a majority in the house. Good luck with that when you only have less than 30% of the country that supports your politics ROFL


<TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD>House passes Senate's health care 'fixes' bill

By the CNN Wire Staff


STORY HIGHLIGHTS

NEW: House passes Senate health care "fixes" bill
The vote ended legislative action on Obama's top domestic priority
Senate Republicans had found violations in two provisions, forcing bill back to House

White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel talks to Wolf Blitzer about behind-the-scenes politics in the White House in the aftermath of the health care vote. The exclusive interview on "The Situation Room (http://www.cnn.com/CNN/Programs/situation.room/)," 5 p.m. ET on CNN.

Washington (CNN) -- The House of Representatives passed the health care "fixes" bill Thursday to send the measure to President Obama's desk.

The vote ended legislative action on Obama's top domestic priority by approving changes to the broader health care reform bill the president signed into law earlier this week.
The so-called fixes bill, approved by a 56-43 vote in the Senate earlier Thursday, makes changes in the overall health care reform measure signed into law Tuesday by Obama.
Senate Republicans forced two minor provisions involving student loan funding to be stripped from the bill, but the changes would not affect the law Obama enacted Tuesday.
A Senate Republican Budget Committee memo said the violations raised by GOP senators involved Pell grant spending that won't immediately affect the federal budget, and therefore was ineligible for inclusion in the measure. That's because the measure was being passed under reconciliation rules, which apply only to budget-related measures.
On Sunday, the House passed both the overall health care bill and the accompanying fixes bill as part of a complicated legislative process necessary to overcome unanimous Republican opposition.

Republicans used every parliamentary tool available to try to undermine both the overall health care (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/Health_Care_Reform)bill and the fixes measure. They forced the Senate to begin deliberations on a series of proposed amendments starting Wednesday night. The Senate did not adjourn until 2:45 a.m. Thursday.
The Senate reconvened at 9:45 a.m. to consider additional GOP proposals which, among other things, were designed to force Democrats to cast unpopular votes in the run-up to November's midterm elections.

The Democrats' fixes bill was necessary to get a reluctant House to pass the Senate's health care reform measure unchanged. If there had been any changes to that initial bill, it would have had to go back to the Senate for another vote, which almost certainly would have failed. Since a special election earlier this year in which Democrats lost the Senate seat formerly held by Sen. Ted Kennedy, the party has not had enough votes to overcome a Republican filibuster.
That situation prompted the two-bill strategy Democrats are using. After passing the Senate (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/U_S_Senate) bill without changes, House Democrats passed the fixes bill Sunday to alter provisions they did not like. Because the bill was being handled under the reconciliation rules in the Senate, only 51 votes were needed for passage.

The compromise package would add more than $60 billion to the overall plan's cost partly by expanding insurance subsidies for middle- and lower-income families. It also would expand Medicare's prescription drug benefit while scaling back the bill's taxes on expensive insurance plans.

Among the GOP amendments to the fixes bill defeated by Democrats were a provision to eliminate new penalties being imposed on businesses whose workers use federally subsidized insurance.

In addition, Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Oklahoma, proposed that drugs for erectile dysfunction, such as Viagra and Cialis, be prohibited to sex offenders, and Sen. John McCain, R-Arizona, sought to strike so-called "sweetheart deals," such as an extra $300 million in Medicaid funds for Louisiana.
Republicans are "not serious about helping this bill," Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, said Wednesday. They are concerned only with "throwing roadblocks in front of anything we do."
Republicans (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/U_S_Republican_Party_Politics) raised points of order against the fixes bill on two provisions, and the Senate parliamentarian ruled them legitimate. Democrats (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/U_S_Democratic_Party_Politics) lacked the 60 votes necessary to override the ruling.
CNN's Ted Barrett, Tom Cohen, Alan Silverleib, Lisa Desjardins and Deirdre Walsh contributed to this report.

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RedNeckRaider
03-25-2010, 08:37 PM
Nothing left to fight. You need a Republican president, a 60 seat majority in the senate and a majority in the house. Good luck with that when you only have less than 30% of the country that supports your politics ROFL


<TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD>House passes Senate's health care 'fixes' bill

By the CNN Wire Staff


STORY HIGHLIGHTS

NEW: House passes Senate health care "fixes" bill
The vote ended legislative action on Obama's top domestic priority
Senate Republicans had found violations in two provisions, forcing bill back to House

White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel talks to Wolf Blitzer about behind-the-scenes politics in the White House in the aftermath of the health care vote. The exclusive interview on "The Situation Room (http://www.cnn.com/CNN/Programs/situation.room/)," 5 p.m. ET on CNN.

Washington (CNN) -- The House of Representatives passed the health care "fixes" bill Thursday to send the measure to President Obama's desk.

The vote ended legislative action on Obama's top domestic priority by approving changes to the broader health care reform bill the president signed into law earlier this week.
The so-called fixes bill, approved by a 56-43 vote in the Senate earlier Thursday, makes changes in the overall health care reform measure signed into law Tuesday by Obama.
Senate Republicans forced two minor provisions involving student loan funding to be stripped from the bill, but the changes would not affect the law Obama enacted Tuesday.
A Senate Republican Budget Committee memo said the violations raised by GOP senators involved Pell grant spending that won't immediately affect the federal budget, and therefore was ineligible for inclusion in the measure. That's because the measure was being passed under reconciliation rules, which apply only to budget-related measures.
On Sunday, the House passed both the overall health care bill and the accompanying fixes bill as part of a complicated legislative process necessary to overcome unanimous Republican opposition.

Republicans used every parliamentary tool available to try to undermine both the overall health care (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/Health_Care_Reform)bill and the fixes measure. They forced the Senate to begin deliberations on a series of proposed amendments starting Wednesday night. The Senate did not adjourn until 2:45 a.m. Thursday.
The Senate reconvened at 9:45 a.m. to consider additional GOP proposals which, among other things, were designed to force Democrats to cast unpopular votes in the run-up to November's midterm elections.

The Democrats' fixes bill was necessary to get a reluctant House to pass the Senate's health care reform measure unchanged. If there had been any changes to that initial bill, it would have had to go back to the Senate for another vote, which almost certainly would have failed. Since a special election earlier this year in which Democrats lost the Senate seat formerly held by Sen. Ted Kennedy, the party has not had enough votes to overcome a Republican filibuster.
That situation prompted the two-bill strategy Democrats are using. After passing the Senate (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/U_S_Senate) bill without changes, House Democrats passed the fixes bill Sunday to alter provisions they did not like. Because the bill was being handled under the reconciliation rules in the Senate, only 51 votes were needed for passage.

The compromise package would add more than $60 billion to the overall plan's cost partly by expanding insurance subsidies for middle- and lower-income families. It also would expand Medicare's prescription drug benefit while scaling back the bill's taxes on expensive insurance plans.

Among the GOP amendments to the fixes bill defeated by Democrats were a provision to eliminate new penalties being imposed on businesses whose workers use federally subsidized insurance.

In addition, Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Oklahoma, proposed that drugs for erectile dysfunction, such as Viagra and Cialis, be prohibited to sex offenders, and Sen. John McCain, R-Arizona, sought to strike so-called "sweetheart deals," such as an extra $300 million in Medicaid funds for Louisiana.
Republicans are "not serious about helping this bill," Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, said Wednesday. They are concerned only with "throwing roadblocks in front of anything we do."
Republicans (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/U_S_Republican_Party_Politics) raised points of order against the fixes bill on two provisions, and the Senate parliamentarian ruled them legitimate. Democrats (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/U_S_Democratic_Party_Politics) lacked the 60 votes necessary to override the ruling.
CNN's Ted Barrett, Tom Cohen, Alan Silverleib, Lisa Desjardins and Deirdre Walsh contributed to this report.

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Dang Red we have always seen politics differently but to see you revel in this shameful bill and the actions taken to get it done is disappointing~

petegz28
03-25-2010, 08:45 PM
Dang Red we have always seen politics differently but to see you revel in this shameful bill and the actions taken to get it done is disappointing~

Blaspheme!!! He was against the bill.....before he was for it.ROFL

BigRedChief
03-25-2010, 08:45 PM
Dang Red we have always seen politics differently but to see you revel in this shameful bill and the actions taken to get it done is disappointing~It's just more of the same BS that has been going on in Washington forever. I expected better from Obama but Republicans have no right to bitch about the system because they don't want it changed.

The bill was passed with a majority in the house, a 60 vote majority in the senate. This reconciliation bill wasn't a big part of the bill. A lot got rid of crap like the Cornhusker kickback etc.

I want to see some chit get done in Washington. Unless Obama kicks ass and takes names its not going to get done. I'm happy that he did that and now maybe we can get some finacial reform, maybe some "real" illegal immigrant reform etc.

petegz28
03-25-2010, 08:49 PM
It's just more of the same BS that has been going on in Washington forever. I expected better from Obama but Republicans have no right to bitch about the system because they don't want it changed.

The bill was passed with a majority in the house, a 60 vote majority in the senate. This reconciliation bill wasn't a big part of the bill. A lot got rid of crap like the Cornhusker kickback etc.

I want to see some chit get done in Washington. Unless Obama kicks ass and takes names its not going to get done. I'm happy that he did that and now maybe we can get some finacial reform, maybe some "real" illegal immigrant reform etc.

Your wish is his command. Currently on the plate:

1. Forcing banks to reduce if not eliminate mortgage payments for the unemployed

2. Amnesty is set to be granted here in the next few months