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Fat Elvis
04-18-2010, 07:50 PM
I've googled it, but I haven't found a definitive answer; can you patent a method or a process?

FAX
04-18-2010, 07:51 PM
Yes.

FAX

ClevelandBronco
04-18-2010, 08:02 PM
I'm going to have to disagree with Mr. FAX on this. Unless you have a special piece of software or hardware that's a key to the process, my understanding is that you cannot be protected by patent.

For instance, if you come up with a new way to milk a goat using only a screwdriver, good for you, but anyone can do it since screwdrivers exist, goats exist and getting milk from them is already done.

Fairplay
04-18-2010, 08:03 PM
No

Bugeater
04-18-2010, 08:04 PM
Yes, please share your idea with me.

Ari Chi3fs
04-18-2010, 08:05 PM
No.


Yes.

FAX
04-18-2010, 08:09 PM
I'm going to have to disagree with Mr. FAX on this. Unless you have a special piece of software or hardware that's a key to the process, my understanding is that you cannot be protected by patent.

For instance, if you come up with a new way to milk a goat using only a screwdriver, good for you, but anyone can do it since screwdrivers exist, goats exist and getting milk from them is already done.

I'm going to have to disagree with your disagreement, Mr. ClevelandBronco. I was one of the founders of a company that acquired a process patent. I remember it well because it cost us a bloody fortune. In our case, it was a video production process that utilized existing technologies (hardware and software). The process, however, was deemed sufficiently unique that the patent was awarded.

FAX

ClevelandBronco
04-18-2010, 08:12 PM
I'm going to have to disagree with your disagreement, Mr. ClevelandBronco. I was one of the founders of a company that acquired a process patent. I remember it well because it cost us a bloody fortune. In our case, it was a video production process that utilized existing technologies (hardware and software). The process, however, was deemed sufficiently unique that the patent was awarded.

FAX

I bow to your experience.

FAX
04-18-2010, 08:13 PM
I bow to your experience.

And I bow to your bowing.

FAX

Bugeater
04-18-2010, 08:15 PM
No.


Yes.
Maybe.

acesn8s
04-18-2010, 08:17 PM
And I bow to your bowing.

FAXDamn Japanese

Fat Elvis
04-18-2010, 08:20 PM
I'm going to have to disagree with your disagreement, Mr. ClevelandBronco. I was one of the founders of a company that acquired a process patent. I remember it well because it cost us a bloody fortune. In our case, it was a video production process that utilized existing technologies (hardware and software). The process, however, was deemed sufficiently unique that the patent was awarded.

FAX

Mr. Fax, you may well be my new BFF. The particular process that I am thinking about patenting utilizes existing hardware and software, but my method utilizes it in a field that is completely unrelated to what it was originally intended, and it is unique within the field that I would apply the process.

FAX
04-18-2010, 08:26 PM
Mr. Fax, you may well be my new BFF. The particular process that I am thinking about patenting utilizes existing hardware and software, but my method utilizes it in a field that is completely unrelated to what it was originally intended, and it is unique within the field that I would apply the process.

As I mentioned, Mr. Fat Elvis, ours was a "process" that utilized existing technologies. Heck, as far as I know, other people were using the same "process" that we patented ... we just filed the patent in order to create value in the company. And, because no one else had taken the time or initiative to file previously, we go it through. It cost a lot of money, though ... not sure it was worth it in the end.

So far as I am aware, the process must be unique and withstand a search ... the search is the most expensive part, as I recall. What am I saying? Every part was expensive.

As for the "field" in which the process would be applied, I'm not certain you could patent that part. In other words, it's the unique process itself that can be patented ... not the application. Then again, I'm not a patent attorney so please seek professional guidance.

FAX

Amnorix
04-18-2010, 08:41 PM
You can definitely patent a particular process. I agree with Fax that I'm concerned about trying to patent a process just for use in a previously unexploited field. My understanding, like his, is that the process itself should be unique, not it's application. But though I'm an attorney I'm not a patent attorney, which is a highly specialized field.

And, as Fax also said, getting a patent is not an inexpensive process.

And I think Fax also said something about you seeking professional guidance. That is definitely the right idea as well.

So, in short, I could've just posted his response and replied "This", but I figured I should type alot more words to achieve teh same result instead.

Bugeater
04-18-2010, 08:42 PM
You can definitely patent a particular process. I agree with Fax that I'm concerned about trying to patent a process just for use in a previously unexploited field. My understanding, like his, is that the process itself should be unique, not it's application. But though I'm an attorney I'm not a patent attorney, which is a highly specialized field.

And, as Fax also said, getting a patent is not an inexpensive process.

And I think Fax also said something about you seeking professional guidance. That is definitely the right idea as well.

So, in short, I could've just posted his response and replied "This", but I figured I should type alot more words to achieve teh same result instead.
This.

-King-
04-18-2010, 08:50 PM
You can definitely patent a particular process. I agree with Fax that I'm concerned about trying to patent a process just for use in a previously unexploited field. My understanding, like his, is that the process itself should be unique, not it's application. But though I'm an attorney I'm not a patent attorney, which is a highly specialized field.

And, as Fax also said, getting a patent is not an inexpensive process.

And I think Fax also said something about you seeking professional guidance. That is definitely the right idea as well.

So, in short, I could've just posted his response and replied "This", but I figured I should type alot more words to achieve teh same result instead.

ROFLROFLROFL

Gonzo
04-18-2010, 08:57 PM
Can I patent my masturbation process? As far as I know, I'm the only one utilizing it.

I call it, "The turpentine technique."

Jenson71
04-18-2010, 09:01 PM
Can I patent my masturbation process? As far as I know, I'm the only one utilizing it.

I call it, "The turpentine technique."

I do that one, too.

Fat Elvis
04-18-2010, 09:27 PM
You can definitely patent a particular process. I agree with Fax that I'm concerned about trying to patent a process just for use in a previously unexploited field. My understanding, like his, is that the process itself should be unique, not it's application. But though I'm an attorney I'm not a patent attorney, which is a highly specialized field.

And, as Fax also said, getting a patent is not an inexpensive process.

And I think Fax also said something about you seeking professional guidance. That is definitely the right idea as well.

So, in short, I could've just posted his response and replied "This", but I figured I should type alot more words to achieve teh same result instead.

You can charge more if you type out a longer responce. Imagine preparing a brief that simply said, "This." in regard to a precedent.

btlook1
04-18-2010, 09:31 PM
I'm going to have to disagree with your disagreement, Mr. ClevelandBronco. I was one of the founders of a company that acquired a process patent. I remember it well because it cost us a bloody fortune. In our case, it was a video production process that utilized existing technologies (hardware and software). The process, however, was deemed sufficiently unique that the patent was awarded.

FAX

So Mr. Fax
Your company got a patent for a process? I have no experience but what did your patent gain you by getting it? Just curious.

Fairplay
04-18-2010, 09:31 PM
I do that one, too.



Copy cat.

JohnnyV13
04-18-2010, 09:58 PM
I used to practice bio tech patent law.

Yes, you can patent a process, and a product by process patent (a patent of a particular product produced by a specified process), as well as product patents and design patents (which are usually for packaging for particular products). In fact, many products can require 3 different patents (or more), to receive full protection.