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View Full Version : Home and Auto Building a house - I need your tips Chiefs Planet!


Hoover
04-25-2010, 07:40 AM
Now that the Chiefs and a dominate secretary, still no 3-4 NT, and not much talent at LB, I thought I could ask you guys for advice on another matter - building a house.

We have bought a lot and have a floor plan that we have customized.

What other things do I need to keep an eye on as we begin the building process.

milkman
04-25-2010, 07:42 AM
Make sure you hire huys with character.

DeezNutz
04-25-2010, 07:47 AM
What other things do I need to keep an eye on as we begin the building process.

Everything. Every day. Because they will fuck things up, constantly.

Hoover
04-25-2010, 07:59 AM
$hit Milkman. I guess I shouldn't have hired Bam Morris and Tamarick Vanover as my builders. Son of a....

Hog Farmer
04-25-2010, 08:13 AM
Get a couple playmakers for sure

Buehler445
04-25-2010, 08:17 AM
Everything. Every day. Because they will fuck things up, constantly.

This. Be involved.

My recommendation is to ask questions if you don't understand. We have a contractor building an office for us and he tells me that a lot of time sub-contractors fuck shit up. He gave me an example where one of the framers that put up a frame on a house he worked on put all the doors right on the walls so he couldn't trim them out. Be there and be active. I would meet with the contractor and see if the customizations you made will work well.

That being said, DO NOT change your plans. Make goddamn sure you don't change anything in your plans at all. Nothing. That will cost you an infinite amount of money.

If you are loading up on insulation and efficiency stuff (like you should do) talk to a tax accountant today and see what documentation you need to have to get the tax credit.

Don't go cheap on structure or insulation. Finish stuff can be replaced. Make damn sure the floor will hold up to Armageddon, and the walls are thick enough to stuff twice as much insulation as you need in them. The extra lumber costs more. It just does, but it is worth it.

Be patient. Seriously.

My parents have just gotten through gutting a house and starting over and are now building an office building, so if you have specific questions about what to expect, PM me.

Congrats dude. That's a big deal.

Hoover
04-25-2010, 08:18 AM
I made sure the builder had one hell of a return man. I don't want to waste money on a guy who fu@ks around at Lowes. He needs to get back to the job site.

DJay23
04-25-2010, 08:41 AM
My father-in-law is a custom homebuilder. He has a lot of competition from slick fly by night builders who popped up during the housing boom. He's been around for 20 years and builds a quality product. So my advice is, check out whoever you go with thoroughly. Go to open houses, talk to people who have built recently to see what it's like to work with the current staff and to people who have been in their homes for some time. Just to see how it's held up over time. Find out if the builder has a good reputation among local codes enforcement as well.

Also, check to see if the homebuilder has any lawsuits filed against them and what the merits are of those. There is a competitor of my FIL who managed to continue to sell his product despite the fact that he had as many as 10 lawsuits against him, filed by former clients who's houses literallly started to fall apart (He's now out of business but those clients are still stuck with half built homes and no builder, or new homes that have been condemned).

Another thing is a smart salesperson sells to the wife. More often than not, she is the one who makes the design and decor decisions. So be aware of that.

Remember, if you are quoted a cheaper price, there is a reason. Better to pay for quality than to save a few bucks. In the long run, you may find that your framers are actually landscapers and that your frame was never properly fastened to the foundation (actual lawsuit here locally).

HonestChieffan
04-25-2010, 09:04 AM
Dont let wife make changes after the first nail is driven.

The Bad Guy
04-25-2010, 09:08 AM
My wife and I are looking at purchasing land to build our first house. Everyone tells us we are crazy and that the cost will get way over our heads.

I'm a stubborn bastard.

Buehler445
04-25-2010, 09:09 AM
My wife and I are looking at purchasing land to build our first house. Everyone tells us we are crazy and that the cost will get way over our heads.

I'm a stubborn bastard.

It will. You must budget accordingly.

mlyonsd
04-25-2010, 09:29 AM
First, Building and Zoning Commission. Make sure you understand what rules you must follow for the lot and area you purchased in. Take your plans with you.

Oh, and congrats.

ChiefButthurt
04-25-2010, 10:07 AM
I have a couple of suggestions.

1) If you can't be there a good portion of the construction process, hire an inspector, one that's close to your project.

2) Pick most of the items prior to construction. Lights, door hardware. plumbing fixtures, carpet, wall colors, countertop, wood flooring, ceramic tile. The process takes a tremendous amount of time and doing this through the building process will exhaust you. Don't skimp on the finishes, they are exposed for you to see forever.

3) Add 3000.00 to the budget for lights, they are expensive.

4) Include landscaping in your building plans, it's expensive and alot of hard work to do after you build.

5) Plan ahead for the driveway placement. The further back on the lot you place the house the more cash you'll need for the driveway.

6) Build that three car garage OR build that extra two car garage NOW, you won't have the money to do it later.

7) Be aware of the drainage around your lot. Don't set your foundation too low, you'll regret the wet basement. Ever notice the old farmhouse in the country in setting on a hill?

8) Build at least 2.5 or more baths in your house.

9) I have more, but my two fingers are tired.

Buehler445
04-25-2010, 11:20 AM
2) Pick most of the items prior to construction. Lights, door hardware. plumbing fixtures, carpet, wall colors, countertop, wood flooring, ceramic tile. The process takes a tremendous amount of time and doing this through the building process will exhaust you.


This is good advice, all the deciding is a pain in the ass. If I were you, I'd do as much as you could the same. It'll save you money.

7) Be aware of the drainage around your lot. Don't set your foundation too low, you'll regret the wet basement. Ever notice the old farmhouse in the country in setting on a hill?


If your contractor doesn't talk to you extensively about this, shoot him, bury him in the foundation, and get another one.

Rain Man
04-25-2010, 03:34 PM
Whatever the architect and contractor recommend for lighting should be doubled. Always put in more lights than you think you'll need, because you'll need them. Same with outlets, though those are usually required by code.

If your architect is like mine was, they'll be more interested in design than cost control. Be prepared to tell the architect no a lot if he/she is recommending components. I had to battle mine to avoid putting a $1,000 light fixture in a hallway where the eventual $250 fixture works just great.

Put a few fun elements in, even if it costs a bit more. Don't just go standard stock design and components, or you'll regret it in a few years.

If possible, find a big empty parking lot and chalk in the floor plan in actual dimensions and walk around in it.

ClevelandBronco
04-25-2010, 03:39 PM
Step 2: Save up and get a wall plan next.

mlyonsd
04-25-2010, 03:40 PM
Whatever the architect and contractor recommend for lighting should be doubled.

Consider sconce lights on dimmers in every main room. They are awesome.

Rain Man
04-25-2010, 03:45 PM
Oh, yeah. Dimmers on every light switch. Dimmers are great. If I come to bed late, I can turn on the lights leading to the bedroom without waking up my wife and save a bad toe stub.

bevischief
04-25-2010, 05:59 PM
Granite counter tops...

Rain Man
04-25-2010, 06:02 PM
Spend the extra fifty bucks and be sure that the shower head is taller than you and your wife. I've never understood why a lot of houses and hotels have shower heads that about six inches shorter than the top of my head, so I have to bend over to rinse my head. It makes me want to take a machine pistol to the entire construction industry, but then again I have a fiery temper.

mlyonsd
04-25-2010, 06:10 PM
Spend the extra fifty bucks and be sure that the shower head is taller than you and your wife. I've never understood why a lot of houses and hotels have shower heads that about six inches shorter than the top of my head, so I have to bend over to rinse my head. It makes me want to take a machine pistol to the entire construction industry, but then again I have a fiery temper.

And if I might add, don't go skimpy in the master bath when it comes to shower/tub. I screwed up by pinching pennies in that area.

I bought a shower/tub combo that isn't big enough to take a real comfortable soak. I'm over 6 feet tall and if I decide to take a bath it's like fitting a whale into a sardine can. Maybe too much information but you'll thank me for the advice someday.

Rain Man
04-25-2010, 06:19 PM
Just FYI, I ran the numbers a couple of years ago on the tradeoff between building a kitchen and just going out to eat or having food delivered and not having a kitchen. It's actually about five years if you do it right, but if you're going to move at some point you might lose some resale value if there's no kitchen.

Rain Man
04-25-2010, 06:22 PM
I had a perfect setup to have a secret room hidden behind a bookshelf, but my wife and the architect ignored my plans. It would've cost less than $1,000, too. I'm still mad about that.

So if you can do it, build in a bookshelf with a secret room behind it.

Rain Man
04-25-2010, 06:24 PM
Another great thought that I had came a little too late in our kitchen remodel.

Imagine this: you have a small weight-sensitive pad on the kitchen floor. When your dog or cat steps on it, it starts a small stream of water down a little path and off a little waterall into a drain. Voila! You never have to worry about a water dish, and your pet gets to enjoy both fresh running water and independence.

rwalke10
04-25-2010, 06:49 PM
My wife and I are looking at purchasing land to build our first house. Everyone tells us we are crazy and that the cost will get way over our heads.

I'm a stubborn bastard.

Depends on what you want. We did that, but it wasn't our 1st place, and we were our own GC's. doing about 50% of the work ourselves. YES, it is very expensive. Any house is actually, and land isn't getting any cheaper.

Having said all that, we love it out in the country (literally, we're 9 miles from the nearest town on 20A.) We'll be in our place 4 yrs this summer. Wish I would have done it 20 years ago. Do it, you won't be sorry. Just map out a financial plan, stick to your budget, but allow an additional 10% for things that you will inadvertantly forget about and things that go up in cost.

mlyonsd
04-25-2010, 06:52 PM
About kitchens.....that's where everyone hangs out, at a party, family, whatever. Make it huge.

Braincase
04-25-2010, 07:02 PM
Are you going with a bar style 7 foot pool table, and 8-foot billiards table or a 9-foot snooker table?

Groves
04-25-2010, 07:45 PM
Fire pole. It's a 'can't miss' option.

Buehler445
04-25-2010, 09:55 PM
Spend the extra fifty bucks and be sure that the shower head is taller than you and your wife. I've never understood why a lot of houses and hotels have shower heads that about six inches shorter than the top of my head, so I have to bend over to rinse my head. It makes me want to take a machine pistol to the entire construction industry, but then again I have a fiery temper.

This. My shower head hits my shoulder. It makes me hate life.

Also, get a 1-piece shower/tub/whatever-you're-going-to-do. From everything I've heard, 1-piece is the way to go.

Buehler445
04-25-2010, 09:55 PM
Oh, and another thing, 36" doors. Do it.

BWillie
04-25-2010, 09:58 PM
Stripper pole and strobe lights

Rain Man
04-25-2010, 10:08 PM
Telephone pole. Got to have one of those.

PatriotReign
04-26-2010, 12:13 PM
Spend the extra fifty bucks and be sure that the shower head is taller than you and your wife. I've never understood why a lot of houses and hotels have shower heads that about six inches shorter than the top of my head, so I have to bend over to rinse my head. It makes me want to take a machine pistol to the entire construction industry, but then again I have a fiery temper.

Whats a machine pistol?;)

seclark
04-26-2010, 12:22 PM
good advice in this thread. imo, the best is go w/the original design and try not to make any changes.

also, if you can, try to do what you can, yourself. with our house, i ran all the electrical and cat5 wiring. put in all the outlets and light switches. the wife did almost all of the painting and staining. saves you some big $$, and i know you're a cheap mofo, hoover.;)

good luck!
sec

DeepPurple
04-26-2010, 02:06 PM
This was awhile ago, in fact thirty years ago when I was 30 in 1980 and lived in Pensacola, Florida. I had already owned three new homes in five years and watched the last two go up completely from scratch.

I went out and bought a lot in a new up and coming sub-division, 100'x150' for $15,000, in fact the Parade of Homes was scheduled for the following year. Meaning all the top builders in Pensacola would build one of their best models and everything would be on display a couple of weeks when completed.

Using a t-square and a template I made a fairly precise drawing of a home layout that I desired. Since this was not commercial property no architect was required in Florida, only what's called a residential designer. My designer drew the plans to scale and created an exterior view from every side plus a spec sheet with all materials needed and made seven sets of prints for $270. His price was 10 cents a square foot and my design was 2700 square feet under roof, which included the 2 car garage. Since I was building a rancher I wasn't too concerned about load bearing walls, in Florida single story is the predominate style.

I had a neighbor who was a outside salesman for a building supply company and I gave him a spec sheet and he gave me estimates on every item from lumber to roofing shingles to windows and doors. It was roughly $20,000, just something to take to the bank later.

Next I went to the largest and nicest new sub-division in town and looked for homes that were being framed. I found the foreman on two different homes and asked if they would be interested. I ended up hiring one of the crews and for $1 a square foot they would dry in the home. Essentially for $2700 they framed the home, set the trusses, installed the windows covered the trusses with plywood and covered the roof with felt paper and the outside of the framing with styrofoam and plywood corners.

The framer referred me to a concrete crew to build the foundation, essentially once you get going, everyone will lead you to someone else. Whether it's a roofer or a carpet company, they have all worked with someone and are familiar with their work and quality. The main thing was for the bank to approve my construction loan and they wanted three estimates on every major job. So the biggest job was the legwork going around Pensacola and getting all these estimates.

When I finally made it to the bank, as soon as I mentioned who was my framing crew, the loan manager smiled and said that's great. Basically that is the major hurdle, getting a good framer.

Along the way I also had many people come by the job site and offer all types of services, for example I had a central vacumn system put in. During framing this is the best time to have that done.

Also during construction I took no short cuts, I sprayed foam insulation into all the corners and t's, used 6" stud exterior walls instead of 2x4's. Cast iron bath tubs and ceramic tile showers, trash compactor, flat top stoves, Heatilator fireplace, 5 ceiling fans, you name it I put it in. That also included an 18'x36' swimming pool and a 15'x30' screened porch with 5 sliding doors from the home.

Once we broke ground I had every crew lined up to work with exact start dates. I never had two crews in the same area on the same day. If a painter was inside I could have someone else working but only on the outside. My subs told me they never had anyone so detailed oriented, I would call each one to make sure they would be there on a certain day and everything was free of their work area. The entire construction took 11 weeks and there was never a day that work was not being done. Grand total spent on the construction of the home was $57,000. Then there was the $15,000 for the lot and $7700 for the pool. Roughly $80,000 total and I lived in the home for 18 months and then resold it for $129,000, I walked away with about $50,000. So you see why a lot of people get in to the building business, and that is back when a home was a half to a third of what they sell for today in Florida.

Hog Farmer
04-26-2010, 04:26 PM
Nice story. Makes me want to go build a house.

SenselessChiefsFan
04-26-2010, 04:29 PM
Start with the foundation.

Hog Farmer
04-26-2010, 04:40 PM
I know this Mexican guy that built a house completely out of concrete, walls, roof, everything. That's OK, except for the dumbass forgot to run any electrical.

rwalke10
04-26-2010, 05:16 PM
There are things you can save a few dinero on now if $$ is tight. There are things you should not skimp on even if that is the case.

CAN SAVE ON:
Carpet (you may decide you don't like it anyway. Keep it 5yr and replace it)
Lighting VERY easy to upgrade at a later date. Builders NEVER give you enough of an allowance to do it the way you want anyway...
Driveways asphalt (or even gravel) instead of concreter
Wallpaper; easy to add later
Ceiling Insulation (above R30) Easy to blow in later, but tax deductable now.

SOMETIMES CAN SAVE A LITTLE ON:
Appliances - At least get energy star. Will save $ and have tax advantages right now
Plumbing fixtures (easy to upgrade later)
Setback Thermostat (if you both work and house is empty while away).

DO NOT SKIMP ON:
Square footage (get it all now, even if its unfinished like a basement or utility room)
Wall Insulation; I love foam, but at least do 2x6 plastic wrapped exterior wall.
Windows. Get Low E, gas filled double panes. Amazing the savings you'll realize. I prefer casements since double-hung seem to loosen up in the hole after a few years. Casements latch closed against the seal.
HVAC (furnace-A/C) 15 SEER (efficiency rating) is best bang for the buck. 13 is the min allowed by law. Ground Source Heat Pump is best on the market. Double the cost up front, but payback is about 8-9 years (if that long, been awhile since I ran the #'s)...
Countertops and Kitchen Cabinets. Best to get what you want now. Wives are always proudest of kitchens and bathrooms, which leads me to:
Master Bath. When momma isn't happy...
Shower/tub stalls and jacuzzi, etc. (one piece units have to go in before sheetrock, unless you want to rip out an exterior wall.) Then its hard to match siding sometimes, cause it never seems to fail you will f one or two up when taking it off

Extras:
On demand water heater.
Ceiling fans in bedrooms and family room
Attic fan (can save some $$ at 80 degrees and cooler)
Insulated Garage doors (most standard nowadays)
Hydronic Heat (I have it and LOVE it)
Floor/Wall Tile. Somewhat expensive to rip out and change, but if you do it yourself you can save some $$
Storm Room. Many times a separate, lockable, concrete walled room in the basement underneath the front porch. Place for the family to collect to in any emergency, also a good place to secure valuables such as collections, guns, etc. Put a HEAVY, STEEL door on it.

Have the contractors leave any extra carpet, tile, linoleum, siding, etc. when they're done. That way if you accidently damage one, you have a replacement. These items change almost seasonally, almost impossible to match at a later date.

I developed a friendship with my rough in crew on one house, and they used some scrap framing lumber and made me a kick ass workbench across the back wall of my garage. Cost me a case of beer, which I helped consume <grin>

One more thing. IF your floorplan exists in the real world, walk thru it, making sure every doorway has a light switch next to it (you'd be surprised how many forget one, or cost it out).

IF you decide to be your own general contractor, be forewarned it isn't all rosy like another posted. His worked out absolutely perfect and he was lucky. What often times happens is (in a normal housing market), The general contractor will keep his subs working all the time (so he can keep available anytime HE needs them; keeps his timetable much shorter).

While I agree its an excellent idea to use his subs, you have to remember the loyalty is to the general contractor, they will use you as fill in work--they are NOT going to jepordize their day to day meal ticket for a onsie job, and you can't really blame them. The only downside to using them is extra time. You aren't always able to script the subs to an exact day on a onsie job, at least around the KC area anyways. Weather delays, subs are sometimes a bit independent (may take off a day now and then for something that came up). Also, sometimes special order stuff can take MUCH longer than the selling place will admit (or even know about). Did I say that sometimes stuff can take longer to get? Ok...

Anyway, not trying to scare you off, but just open your eyes to a few things you may or may not be aware of. It's extremely satisfying to build your own place, and you can do it however you want (I live in a 8k sf barn)...you're only limited by your imagination (and a luck lotto ticket)

bevischief
04-26-2010, 06:04 PM
Lots of bud light...

Pioli Zombie
04-26-2010, 06:21 PM
Have a 20 year plan. Keep getting your wifes hopes up until it gets the the point she is so bitter and used to disappointment that all she'll do is piss and moan about everything you do and she'll be reduced to settling for dreams of one day living in a broken down duplex with your parents.

Pioli Zombie
04-26-2010, 06:25 PM
There are things you can save a few dinero on now if $$ is tight. There are things you should not skimp on even if that is the case.

CAN SAVE ON:
Carpet (you may decide you don't like it anyway. Keep it 5yr and replace it)
Lighting VERY easy to upgrade at a later date. Builders NEVER give you enough of an allowance to do it the way you want anyway...
Driveways asphalt (or even gravel) instead of concreter
Wallpaper; easy to add later
Ceiling Insulation (above R30) Easy to blow in later, but tax deductable now.

SOMETIMES CAN SAVE A LITTLE ON:
Appliances - At least get energy star. Will save $ and have tax advantages right now
Plumbing fixtures (easy to upgrade later)
Setback Thermostat (if you both work and house is empty while away).

DO NOT SKIMP ON:
Square footage (get it all now, even if its unfinished like a basement or utility room)
Wall Insulation; I love foam, but at least do 2x6 plastic wrapped exterior wall.
Windows. Get Low E, gas filled double panes. Amazing the savings you'll realize. I prefer casements since double-hung seem to loosen up in the hole after a few years. Casements latch closed against the seal.
HVAC (furnace-A/C) 15 SEER (efficiency rating) is best bang for the buck. 13 is the min allowed by law. Ground Source Heat Pump is best on the market. Double the cost up front, but payback is about 8-9 years (if that long, been awhile since I ran the #'s)...
Countertops and Kitchen Cabinets. Best to get what you want now. Wives are always proudest of kitchens and bathrooms, which leads me to:
Master Bath. When momma isn't happy...
Shower/tub stalls and jacuzzi, etc. (one piece units have to go in before sheetrock, unless you want to rip out an exterior wall.) Then its hard to match siding sometimes, cause it never seems to fail you will f one or two up when taking it off

Extras:
On demand water heater.
Ceiling fans in bedrooms and family room
Attic fan (can save some $$ at 80 degrees and cooler)
Insulated Garage doors (most standard nowadays)
Hydronic Heat (I have it and LOVE it)
Floor/Wall Tile. Somewhat expensive to rip out and change, but if you do it yourself you can save some $$
Storm Room. Many times a separate, lockable, concrete walled room in the basement underneath the front porch. Place for the family to collect to in any emergency, also a good place to secure valuables such as collections, guns, etc. Put a HEAVY, STEEL door on it.

Have the contractors leave any extra carpet, tile, linoleum, siding, etc. when they're done. That way if you accidently damage one, you have a replacement. These items change almost seasonally, almost impossible to match at a later date.

I developed a friendship with my rough in crew on one house, and they used some scrap framing lumber and made me a kick ass workbench across the back wall of my garage. Cost me a case of beer, which I helped consume <grin>

One more thing. IF your floorplan exists in the real world, walk thru it, making sure every doorway has a light switch next to it (you'd be surprised how many forget one, or cost it out).

IF you decide to be your own general contractor, be forewarned it isn't all rosy like another posted. His worked out absolutely perfect and he was lucky. What often times happens is (in a normal housing market), The general contractor will keep his subs working all the time (so he can keep available anytime HE needs them; keeps his timetable much shorter).

While I agree its an excellent idea to use his subs, you have to remember the loyalty is to the general contractor, they will use you as fill in work--they are NOT going to jepordize their day to day meal ticket for a onsie job, and you can't really blame them. The only downside to using them is extra time. You aren't always able to script the subs to an exact day on a onsie job, at least around the KC area anyways. Weather delays, subs are sometimes a bit independent (may take off a day now and then for something that came up). Also, sometimes special order stuff can take MUCH longer than the selling place will admit (or even know about). Did I say that sometimes stuff can take longer to get? Ok...

Anyway, not trying to scare you off, but just open your eyes to a few things you may or may not be aware of. It's extremely satisfying to build your own place, and you can do it however you want (I live in a 8k sf barn)...you're only limited by your imagination (and a luck lotto ticket)

Fuck, that was as long as GoChiefs article.

rwalke10
04-26-2010, 06:29 PM
****, that was as long as GoChiefs article.

True that. :eek: Just trying to save him some $$'s ;)

Jenson71
04-26-2010, 11:57 PM
Make sure you have a lot of storage room and closet space. Whatever you think you need, multiply it by 1.5 and go with that.

Fairplay
04-27-2010, 05:45 AM
Whatever you think you need, multiply it by 1.5 and go with that.



That's how i measure my member.

Chazno
04-27-2010, 10:03 AM
That's how i measure my member.

Something I learned in school. Multiplying by 1 really doesnt change anything. ROFL

Chazno
04-27-2010, 10:21 AM
Funny contractor story:

My cousin was building a house, and the foundation guys were there putting together the forms for his foundation. As part of the foundation they were putting a Storm Shelter in (like 12" concrete walls, 10x6 room).

Anyway my cousin shows up to the site and starts walking around the form checking things out. He comes up on something odd and points it out. "Whats that?" he says. The workers turn to him and tell him it the storm shelter. My cousin responds. "Really?, Wheres the door?" The geniuses had had set the form up to completely enclose the storm shelter. He left for lunch and came back to find they opened up a 3ft tall door which still was incorrect.

tooge
04-27-2010, 10:24 AM
get heated tile in the bathroom, its the best feature ever. Also, suspend the garage if you can afford it to open space underneath for a killer mancave, storage, etc.

boogblaster
04-27-2010, 11:19 AM
Use material from China .. it has health-related properties ...

Rain Man
04-27-2010, 12:39 PM
Use material from China .. it has health-related properties ...


Oh, that reminds me. Be sure to have your feng shui consultant come in early, preferably just after the framing and foundation are built. That way, if you need to change stuff it'll be less expensive than doing it after everything is done.

locomoulds
04-27-2010, 01:03 PM
I own a lighting store in Florida. If you have any questions on lighting let me know. I have alot of contacts in KC in the lighting business. A safe number to budget for lights is .5 - 1 precent of the price of the house. So if your house is 200k, 2k in lights is a fair number.

Also, I agree with Rainman put dimmers on everything. They make incandescent bulbs very energy efficient and double your bulb life.

mlyonsd
04-27-2010, 01:07 PM
I own a lighting store in Florida. If you have any questions on lighting let me know. I have alot of contacts in KC in the lighting business. A safe number to budget for lights is .5 - 1 precent of the price of the house. So if your house is 200k, 2k in lights is a fair number.

Also, I agree with Rainman put dimmers on everything. They make incandescent bulbs very energy efficient and double your bulb life.

Only going to say this one more time. Sconce lighting on dimmers are very very versatile. I didn't do enough of them when I built the house.

RJ
04-27-2010, 02:01 PM
In my line of work I am often dealing with customers who are building a new home. Some of them seem to enjoy the experience, some do not. The people who seem to enjoy it the least are those who decided to be their own GC. I have met very few of those who would do it again given the choice. There is more to being the GC than hiring the subs. After what I have watched others go through I would never attempt it myself.

JMO, of course, and someone knowledgeable in the construction field might have better luck. But it looks to me like the stress and headaches isn't nearly worth the savings. Not to mention the long term impact on your expensive new dream home.

Jenson71
04-27-2010, 02:04 PM
Oh, that reminds me. Be sure to have your feng shui consultant come in early, preferably just after the framing and foundation are built. That way, if you need to change stuff it'll be less expensive than doing it after everything is done.

:facepalm:

RJ
04-27-2010, 02:08 PM
Also, on the subject of flooring.....the labor costs to install cheap flooring are the same as the labor costs to install quality flooring. So you might has well have a good product put down the first time. Also, since the floors are towards the end of the job, make sure to keep enough money available for the products you want. I've had many a customer who had to buy base grade carpet because they upgraded everything else in the house and were running on fumes at the end.

kepp
04-27-2010, 02:15 PM
Just the tips?

Scaga
04-27-2010, 03:09 PM
Double the comment about the shower head height. Greatest thing ever . Also, if you have a shower insert, make sure to have tile installed above it.

If you're in to Christmas lights on the house, have outlets installed in the eves, with a switch in the coat closet. Saves a ton of time and the cost is pretty cheap.

You can pick up cheap lights at Lowe's, ect that will save a ton when it comes to lighting the "out of the way areas" (pantry, walk-in closets, laundy room)

Pay attention to where they are placing the water spigots outside. I made that mistake.