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View Full Version : Other Sports The letter of the law or douchebag?


BigRichard
05-11-2010, 04:24 PM
This guy is a douchebag if you ask me. What is your take?

F you if repost

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/highschool/05/11/track.controversy/index.html?xid=cnnbin&hpt=Sbin

Remember the story of the college softball player who hit the game-winning homer and blew out her knee as she trotted around first base, but was carried to second, third and home by opposing players -- even though she represented the decisive run in a game that determined the championship?

This is not that story.

This is the story of a high school pole vaulter whose successful leap in the last event won the meet and the league championship for her team -- until an opposing coach pointed out she should be disqualified for breaking a rule, reversing the outcome so that his team captured victory and the league title.

The girl's infraction? Wearing a friendship bracelet.

The debatable moment in sportsmanship occurred April 29 in South Pasadena, Calif., where the visiting girls team from Monrovia High was seeking its first-ever Rio Hondo League title against longtime powerhouse South Pasadena High.

With the teams separated by a few points and only the pole vault remaining, Monrovia needed a second-place finish in the event to secure the victory and obtain the title. Both teams gathered around the pole vault pit, loudly celebrating and agonizing over every clearance and miss. Although South Pasadena's Rachel Ma led at 7-feet-6, two Monrovia girls had cleared 7-feet to give their team the lead.

But South Pasadena's best vaulter, Robin Laird, had not competed yet. Now she stood at the top of the runway, preparing for her first vault of the long day -- an attempt at 7-feet-6 that could win the event, the meet and the league title. The crowd fell silent. A crosswind was blowing. Laird began to sprint down the runway through the gauntlet of spectators, but suddenly stopped; something didn't feel right.

"I was feeling nervous," she would later say, "because the whole league championship was on the line."

Laird walked back to the top of the runway, gained her composure, then took off again. This time everything was in sync. She planted the pole, lifted herself into the air and soared easily over the bar to give her team a 66-61 victory. While half the crowd cheered and the other half groaned, Monrovia coach Mike Knowles reacted by pointing to his wrist and gesturing toward Laird, who was wearing a thin, colorful string bracelet.

"This is my 30th year coaching track," Knowles said a few days later. "I know a lot of rules and regulations."

The rule in this case -- Section 3, Article 3 of the National Federation of State High School Associations -- is clear: "Jewelry shall not be worn by contestants." So is the penalty, and in the time it takes to read "the competitor is disqualified from the event," South Pasadena's win was transformed into a 65-62 victory for Monrovia.

South Pasadena coach P.J. Hernandez was dumbfounded.

"I said, 'Coach [Knowles], you really want it to come down to this?' " Hernandez recalled.

When Laird was informed that she had been disqualified because of her bracelet, she burst into tears.

"It wasn't so much that I had been disqualified, personally," Laird said. "It was that I had just lost the league championship that my coaches and teammates had worked so hard for ... I had just lost it with this little piece of string on my wrist."

When the ruling was announced, Monrovia's athletes and supporters erupted into a reflexive cheer and South Pasadena's reacted with stunned resentment. But people on both sides mostly retreated into schools of thought, pondering issues of sportsmanship vs. gamesmanship, the letter of the law vs. its spirit and what lesson to derive from what had just happened.

Even Monrovia athletic director Randy Bell struggled to process the outcome. "I don't think it was anything people were particularly proud of," he said. "A rule was invoked, and correctly so, but I don't think anybody was excited to win that way."

Knowles, 54, is in his first season at Monrovia, but he has won a lot during a career in which he coached Pasadena's storied Muir High to nine CIF-Southern Section championships, three California state championships and one mythical national championship.

"It's unfortunate, that's all I can say," Knowles said. "It's unfortunate for the young lady. But you've got to teach the kids that rules are rules."

South Pasadena's Hernandez doesn't dispute the technical validity of Knowles' call, Laird's obligation to have followed the rule or even the life lesson to be learned by everyone involved. But Hernandez thinks the scope of this teaching moment ought to be broadened to examine when the teaching could have best taken place.

"Mike Knowles was down by the pole vault pit, kind of waiting and sitting there, keeping an eye on our girl, waiting for her to attempt the vault and then make the call, " said Hernandez. "I am upset that he wanted to win so badly that he would do it that way. We feel sportsmanship is important, too, and that it is in question with him in this situation."

Knowles denied he was lying in wait.

"I didn't notice the bracelet until after she cleared the height and walked by," he insisted. "[I had] a sinking feeling for her. I didn't want to have to do it. But it's a real rule -- it's in the book -- not something I made up. About 10 years ago, I had a girl who wore an earring in the 4x400 relay and it ended up costing us a CIF title. I feel bad for what happened, but I guarantee you she'll never wear jewelry during a track meet again."

Laird, a senior who will be attending -- but probably not pole vaulting -- the University of Southern California next year, says, "I find it hard to believe" that Knowles did not see the friendship bracelet when she took that aborted trip down the runway. "But I don't want to say for sure that he saw it," she said. "It isn't my place to say that."

Laird disgustedly tore the friendship bracelet off her wrist after being disqualified, and she concedes that Knowles is right about her mistakenly wearing one again in competition -- or maybe ever.

"As of right now, I am not wearing one," she said. "Although I do still have a tan line on my wrist. That's my scarlet letter."

Reerun_KC
05-11-2010, 04:27 PM
Douchebag coach....

siberian khatru
05-11-2010, 04:28 PM
I didn't realize Billy Martin was alive and coaching track.

Rooster
05-11-2010, 04:28 PM
**** her. Don't wear a bracelet if those are the rules.

blaise
05-11-2010, 04:29 PM
It's a douchebag move. No question about it.

ClevelandBronco
05-11-2010, 04:32 PM
It should be a poll.

Douchebag.

BigRichard
05-11-2010, 04:33 PM
If it was me I probably would have walked up to the girl and whispered "Nice job. Next time you better remember to remove your jewelry cause the next guy might not be as nice and call you on it."

MOhillbilly
05-11-2010, 04:34 PM
i dont have a problem with it.

vailpass
05-11-2010, 04:34 PM
I wonder if his team thinks he's a douchebag coach?

TrebMaxx
05-11-2010, 04:37 PM
Douchebag move by the coach calling foul. But on the other hand, her own coach should have instructed all team members of the rules or at the least instructed her to remove the bracelet before she competed.

MOhillbilly
05-11-2010, 04:38 PM
its about winning. no mercy.

Valiant
05-11-2010, 04:39 PM
Douchebag...

Sofa King
05-11-2010, 04:40 PM
He's a prick.... she's a stupid girl who should have known better....

Frazod
05-11-2010, 04:41 PM
What a lowlife bastard. :shake:

chiefzilla1501
05-11-2010, 04:42 PM
Complete douche bag move. And I can promise you that every single person on that team hates him for it. Winning is one thing. But knowing you won in that way is another thing.

I'm a competitor. I want to know I won with a fight. The coach should have told her to take the bracelet off before she jumped rather than waiting for her to jump and then calling her out on it.

Rain Man
05-11-2010, 04:42 PM
He almost certainly knew she was wearing it before the attempt. A real adult would have mentioned it before the jump and had her take it off if it was that big a deal. Instead, he scarred her for a long time just so he could get a plaque.

I wouldn't want to win that way even if someone else noticed it.

BigRichard
05-11-2010, 04:43 PM
Douchebag move by the coach calling foul. But on the other hand, her own coach should have instructed all team members of the rules or at the least instructed her to remove the bracelet before she competed.

I agree with you 100%. Her coach is the one to blame for the mistake. But yet the other coach is still a douchebag for calling it.

ClevelandBronco
05-11-2010, 04:43 PM
its about winning. no mercy.

In professional sports, I agree. When it comes to amateur sports, not so much.

chiefzilla1501
05-11-2010, 04:44 PM
Douchebag move by the coach calling foul. But on the other hand, her own coach should have instructed all team members of the rules or at the least instructed her to remove the bracelet before she competed.

When I played baseball, people used to get in trouble all the time for wearing jewelry. It's not something you think about or something you notice most of the time.

It's not like the bracelet gives her some kind of competitive advantage. It's probably a safety precaution more than anything.

That's what bothers me the most.

MOhillbilly
05-11-2010, 04:44 PM
Complete douche bag move. And I can promise you that every single person on that team hates him for it. Winning is one thing. But knowing you won in that way is another thing.

I'm a competitor. I want to know I won with a fight. The coach should have told her to take the bracelet off before she jumped rather than waiting for her to jump and then calling her out on it.

you foul out, you foul out. plain and simple. Its up to the coach/handler to make the call to the judge. If its an advantage, you take it. period.

CoMoChief
05-11-2010, 04:45 PM
Rules are rules whether they are dumb or not.

But if the HS officials didn't notice it, or just didn't care. Then the coach shouldn't have either. It's not like she was wearing this bracelet in just this one event (I'm assuming that she may have competed in other events as well). She's probably worn this bracelet in previous meets as well.

Bullshit move no doubt, but gotta give props to the coach for knowing such a rule, when no one else was paying attention.

Garcia Bronco
05-11-2010, 04:45 PM
rules are the rules. She wore it all day...meaning they had already lost long before then. Oh well. I wouldn't have called it, but I wouldn't coach those sports anyway.

Pitt Gorilla
05-11-2010, 04:46 PM
Complete douche.

MOhillbilly
05-11-2010, 04:47 PM
In professional sports, I agree. When it comes to amateur sports, not so much.

if it were my coach and someone was called for a foul and then fouled out and lost the game i would take the win and be happy w/ it.

ClevelandBronco
05-11-2010, 04:48 PM
Rules are rules whether they are dumb or not.

But if the HS officials didn't notice it, or just didn't care. Then the coach shouldn't have either. It's not like she was wearing this bracelet in just this one event (I'm assuming that she may have competed in other events as well). She's probably worn this bracelet in previous meets as well.

Bullshit move no doubt, but gotta give props to the coach for knowing such a rule, when no one else was paying attention.

I would go out of my way to avoid congratulating the coach if my kid was on his team.

Then I'd have a long discussion with my kid.

MOhillbilly
05-11-2010, 04:49 PM
Rules are rules whether they are dumb or not.

But if the HS officials didn't notice it, or just didn't care. Then the coach shouldn't have either. It's not like she was wearing this bracelet in just this one event (I'm assuming that she may have competed in other events as well). She's probably worn this bracelet in previous meets as well.

Bullshit move no doubt, but gotta give props to the coach for knowing such a rule, when no one else was paying attention.

Bullshit its up to the coach to do everything within his power to bring home a W.

ClevelandBronco
05-11-2010, 04:49 PM
if it were my coach and someone was called for a foul and then fouled out and lost the game i would take the win and be happy w/ it.

Enjoy.

Frazod
05-11-2010, 04:55 PM
Bullshit its up to the coach to do everything within his power to bring home a W.

If you've never seen That Championship Season, you should rent it sometime. Movie based on a play about the aftermath of winning at all costs.

Swanman
05-11-2010, 04:56 PM
Yes it is a rule, but if the douche coach knew anything about the big picture, he would think about the fact that the bracelet did not give her any sort of advantage (in fact probably hindered her if anything) and that should have driven the decision. It's complete form over substance.

That whole story feels like it came out of the book Atlas Shrugged.

CoMoChief
05-11-2010, 04:58 PM
Bullshit its up to the coach to do everything within his power to bring home a W.

Winning fair n square is one thing.

Winning because you're pointing out a technicality that has no bearing on the results of their performances is cheap. That coach knows he won because of some bullshit technicality. If he can live with that then so be it. But I can bet you that even people at his own school wouldn't approve of this.

But ....rules are rules I guess.

CoMoChief
05-11-2010, 05:00 PM
I would go out of my way to avoid congratulating the coach if my kid was on his team.

Then I'd have a long discussion with my kid.

I agree. I sure as hell wouldnt feel like a winner after winning something like that.

chiefzilla1501
05-11-2010, 05:02 PM
if it were my coach and someone was called for a foul and then fouled out and lost the game i would take the win and be happy w/ it.

This is not even remotely the same thing. A foul is a part of the game and when one fouls, you disadvantage the other team. Granted, the rule's stupid, but it's in place, likely, for safety reasons. NOt because it gives any kind of unfair advantage.

If I was the coach, no way in hell I'd pull a prick move like that. This is amateur sports. Teaching these kids sportsmanship is a hell of a lot more important. If I'm a parent/athlete, I would despise the fact that I won because my coach was an overcompetitive asshole.

Bwana
05-11-2010, 05:05 PM
Douche and STUPID fucking rule.

Braincase
05-11-2010, 05:12 PM
If the rule states "jewelry", than "jewelry" should be defined. Webster's Online defines jewelry as: objects of precious metal often set with gems and worn for personal adornment.

A piece of string is not jewelry. The coach is a douche.

big nasty kcnut
05-11-2010, 05:14 PM
I think it unfair cause it seem to be a arcane rule that not a lot people knew about. That he is a bitch and fuck his win at all cost attitude he should of told the girl so she wouldn't get dq. I hope he get what coming to him in term of being fired or lose in a similar fashion.

siberian khatru
05-11-2010, 05:16 PM
its about winning. no mercy.

http://robertsontrainingsystems.com/img/userPics/1241100168_74291.jpg

Pants
05-11-2010, 05:18 PM
if it were my coach and someone was called for a foul and then fouled out and lost the game i would take the win and be happy w/ it.

I agree with you 100% if that foul gave the team that committed it some sort of an advantage. Winning due to a retarded technicality is not really winning at all, and the kids know it deep down inside. They got beat. Technicality that has nothing to do with performance reversed the call.

Coach = complete douchebag and obviously cares more about his resume than the kids.

Dicky McElephant
05-11-2010, 05:21 PM
If the rule states "jewelry", than "jewelry" should be defined. Webster's Online defines jewelry as: objects of precious metal often set with gems and worn for personal adornment.

A piece of string is not jewelry. The coach is a douche.

This.

I wouldn't consider a piece of string to be jewelry.

lostcause
05-11-2010, 05:29 PM
Bring her in for a look

GoHuge
05-11-2010, 05:29 PM
I think it's ridiculous. Rules are rules, but a douchebag is a douchebag.

If I was the coach of the girl's team that lost I would challenge the rule of what actually constitues something being considered "jewelry." If they have that rule surely they'd have to classify what is or isn't jewelry. A piece of string? Somebody should have asked Coach D-bag if he'd give his wife a piece of string as a present? Of course he wouldn't. So why does it apply to the girl?

Maybe it's because nobody here was in that moment, but nobody thought about challenging that stupid rule? Go to any god damn jewelry store and ask them to show you the "piece of string" section. I've got a feeling you wouldn't have much luck. You leave a term open to interpretation and you can find a way to get around it. I'm as competetive as anyone, but who wants to win like that in amateur sports? What message does that send? Even if you get beat fair and square if you look hard enough you might find a way to win on a technicality? Those are as rewarding as moral victories and in KC we know good those feel!!! :rolleyes:

Gonzo
05-11-2010, 05:30 PM
This is complete bullshit. Like a friendship bracelet gives her an advantage? Give me a fucking break.

If I were on the winning team, I would fedex that trophy to that girl asap.
This coach should rot in hell.
Posted via Mobile Device

Predarat
05-11-2010, 05:32 PM
Sensei Kreese would agree with what that coach did.

http://media.80stees.com/images/extraLarge/KKID023_LG2.jpg

Iowanian
05-11-2010, 05:33 PM
I hope he is held to the same standards and expectations in his remaining career as a teacher and coach.

Dicky McElephant
05-11-2010, 05:36 PM
Sensei Kreese would agree with what that coach did.

http://media.80stees.com/images/extraLarge/KKID023_LG2.jpg

Yeah but he wouldn't agree with REPOST!

DaFace
05-11-2010, 05:40 PM
It should be a poll.

Douchebag.

I agree. Hope the OP is OK with me adding one...

Gadzooks
05-11-2010, 05:43 PM
http://robertsontrainingsystems.com/img/userPics/1241100168_74291.jpg

ROFL. He's a good coach. This piddley kind of stuff happens in the NHL quite often when coaches question the length/ curve of an opposing player's stick.:eek:

DaFace
05-11-2010, 05:47 PM
I do actually wonder about calling a friendship bracelet "jewelry" (as mentioned above). It's a piece of string. If you had fifty of them, it would be an arm band, which are worn all the time.

If they really wanted to press the issue, I'd wonder if it would be overturned. Not sure who is responsible for that stuff or what level of protest is allowed, though.

LaChapelle
05-11-2010, 05:47 PM
and people want cat killers to get prison time
people fucked up

Predarat
05-11-2010, 05:51 PM
Yeah but he wouldn't agree with REPOST!


Damn it i'm too slow lol its my leg that got swept in that one.

BigRichard
05-11-2010, 05:53 PM
I agree. Hope the OP is OK with me adding one...

Go right ahead. I thought about doing it but decided against it.

philfree
05-11-2010, 05:53 PM
So it was a piece of string? If it wasn't metal or didn't have jewels on it then I argue that it was a piece of string and not jewelry at all. How 'bout a rubber band? Is that jewelry too? If I were them I'd try an appeal before I let the douchebag have the victory.


PhilFree:arrow:

Iowanian
05-11-2010, 05:57 PM
I expect Mr T to come forward and Pitty this Fool!

Predarat
05-11-2010, 05:58 PM
I think the other coach should have argued it was technicially not jewlery.

philfree
05-11-2010, 05:59 PM
So it was a piece of string? If it wasn't metal or didn't have jewels on it then I argue that it was a piece of string and not jewelry at all. How 'bout a rubber band? Is that jewelry too? If I were them I'd try an appeal before I let the douchebag have the victory.







PhilFree:arrow:

LOL Reposted Repost!


PhilFree:arrow:

ClevelandBronco
05-11-2010, 06:00 PM
If you've never seen That Championship Season, you should rent it sometime. Movie based on a play about the aftermath of winning at all costs.

Good stuff. Mitchum, Martin Sheen, Bruce Dern, Paul Sorvino. Haven't seen it in years.

Param
05-11-2010, 06:01 PM
I bet there was HGH in that string. Good move by the opposing coach to point it out.

DJ's left nut
05-11-2010, 06:01 PM
It's high school athletics -- douchebag.

Douchebag squared since there's no way in hell that coach wasn't watching and waiting for her to do it. You cannot convince me that the guy didn't know about the bracelet well before the jump.

It's like the pine-tar incident with George Brett. Billy Martin knew about the pine-tar the entire game (speculation is that he knew about it for weeks) but was going to wait until the right time to call it to the umpires attention.

Major league baseball -- okay. High School pole vault (a sport nobody really gives a shit about anyway) -- definitely not okay. And then to say "well she won't be wearing jewelry to another event, I taught her a lesson" is even less okay.

Douche move all the way.

siberian khatru
05-11-2010, 06:03 PM
Good stuff. Mitchum, Martin Sheen, Bruce Dern, Paul Sorvino. Haven't seen it in years.

And written by Father Karras from "The Exorcist."

Rain Man
05-11-2010, 06:04 PM
If the rule states "jewelry", than "jewelry" should be defined. Webster's Online defines jewelry as: objects of precious metal often set with gems and worn for personal adornment.

A piece of string is not jewelry. The coach is a douche.

That's an excellent point.



On another front, the other coach should demand to see whether any of the douche's girls have nipple or genital piercings. Rules are rules.

ClevelandBronco
05-11-2010, 06:05 PM
I mean, it's not like she circumvented the salary cap or something. :D

Rain Man
05-11-2010, 06:06 PM
On a whole other point....7-6? In the pole vault? I think I could vault that using a baseball bat.

Coyote
05-11-2010, 06:17 PM
Douche
It matches the old joke about the city lawyer out in the country. Clear day. ceiling and visibility unlimited. Approaching a Stop sign with no on coming traffic or obstructions, he slows down but doesn't come to a complete Stop. Country Sherrif pulls him over. Lawyer begins to argue about the spirit of the law and his full compliance with all safety related aspects. Country Sheriff doesn't say anything-just starts wailing on him with his night stick. Sheriff asks the lawyer if he wants him to slow down or to come to a complete stop? Who's right? Perspective.

Dicky McElephant
05-11-2010, 06:20 PM
On a whole other point....7-6? In the pole vault? I think I could vault that using a baseball bat.

They're women.....give them a break. :D

Frazod
05-11-2010, 06:50 PM
Good stuff. Mitchum, Martin Sheen, Bruce Dern, Paul Sorvino. Haven't seen it in years.

Neither have I. It's available on DVD. There's also a newer version I had never heard of directed by Sorvino, starring him as the coach, with Gary Sinise, Vincent D'Onofrio and Tony Shalhoub as the players. I'd really like to see that one, too.

listopencil
05-11-2010, 07:29 PM
Douchebag.

Consistent1
05-11-2010, 07:29 PM
Complete ass move. I bet the irony is that the guy would be willing to cheat in any way to win as long as he didn't get caught. If he is such a good coach he would know that isn't winning. I would be prayin' the other squad showed up all lookin' like JaMarcus cuz all that bling ain't gonna do nuthin' but hurt.Unless the shit is real tight and all the light comin off it blinds the other squad.Seriously though...weak.
Posted via Mobile Device

whoman69
05-11-2010, 07:42 PM
If its such a harsh infraction then one would think it would be well known. I would also think that if its an infraction then the meet officials would tell the person about it ahead of time. I'm wondering if coach would have called the same thing if it hadn't been to decide the meet? I think its always douchbaggery for an infraction to be called after the fact. The league thought so in the pine tar game.

Groves
05-11-2010, 08:22 PM
One part of the story I'd be interested in is the what in blazes was the other coach doing? Did he not pursue the mini-sweat band argument or the itsnotmetal line of defense? You'd think there would be an instant list of ways to protest the protest and at least get a ruling postponed or something. He's got a job to bring home a W, too.

Was he out smelling cinnamon rolls or something?

You can bet he won't let that happen again.

cdcox
05-11-2010, 08:29 PM
On a whole other point....7-6? In the pole vault? I think I could vault that using a baseball bat.

The men's high jump record is 6" higher.

I think the difference is that men tend to eat more meat (such as found in BBQ) which contributes to strong muscles, while women are eating bread, cinnamon rolls, and chocolate chip cookies.

wazu
05-11-2010, 08:41 PM
Sounds like a valuable life lesson. And the girl who was disqualified will receive mini-celebrity status after all. Isn't that worth more than a stupid tournament win? She probably planned the whole fiasco.

siberian khatru
05-11-2010, 08:42 PM
The men's high jump record is 6" higher.

I think the difference is that men tend to eat more meat (such as found in BBQ) which contributes to strong muscles, while women are eating bread, cinnamon rolls, and chocolate chip cookies.

ROFL

Don't forget, they get bloated for awhile every month, too.

Iowanian
05-11-2010, 10:05 PM
http://eatliver.com/img/2008/2781.jpg

WilliamTheIrish
05-11-2010, 10:22 PM
I didn't realize Billy Martin was alive and coaching track.


HAHAHAHA! That POS. August 23.

WilliamTheIrish
05-11-2010, 10:26 PM
Oh. And I vote Billy Martin is still a douche. Even in death.

Pitt Gorilla
05-11-2010, 10:33 PM
If the rule states "jewelry", than "jewelry" should be defined. Webster's Online defines jewelry as: objects of precious metal often set with gems and worn for personal adornment.

A piece of string is not jewelry. The coach is a douche.This. Hopefully, the losing team challenges the definition.

ForeverChiefs58
05-11-2010, 10:55 PM
I wonder if this coach use to teach karate?

http://digitalderek.typepad.com/sawxblog/photos/2007/playoffs/world_series/sweep_the_leg_johnny.jpg

warpaint*
05-11-2010, 11:05 PM
I appreciate the gamesmanship but I would not be happy to win that way.

HotRoute
05-11-2010, 11:30 PM
he would not have made that call if she would have missed that final vault, therefore he is a douche

KcMizzou
05-11-2010, 11:59 PM
Douche.

Phobia
05-12-2010, 12:23 AM
The rule sucks. The circumstances suck. Do you think somebody really gains a competitive edge by stepping one foot onto the white line? Do they gain an edge exchanging a baton outside of the exchange zone? There are dozens of rules that suck but they're rules. The coach was within his rights. Would I have done it? I dunno. It's pretty crappy all the way around.

MoreLemonPledge
05-12-2010, 12:25 AM
Dammit, I meant to vote for Douchebag, not Letter of the Law.

Chiefs Rool
05-12-2010, 12:30 AM
it's a dumb rule

Phobia
05-12-2010, 01:02 AM
it's a dumb rule

Not really. Considering kids get their fingers ripped off their hands tangling in bracelets and necklaces during hurdles or jumping events, it's not dumb at all. It's designed for the kids' protection. It's not a new thing either. The rule existed when I ran HS track 20+ years ago.

KCFalcon59
05-12-2010, 07:18 AM
If the rule states "jewelry", than "jewelry" should be defined. Webster's Online defines jewelry as: objects of precious metal often set with gems and worn for personal adornment.

A piece of string is not jewelry. The coach is a douche.

This. How is a string considered jewelry? The meet officials should have told the coach to STFD and STFU.

The coach is a douche. I doubt he would have called out one of his own players for wearing a string.

SenselessChiefsFan
05-12-2010, 07:25 AM
I put letter of the law. As a guy who was on a team, I always wanted a coach that would go to battle for us in any way possible.

But, after thinking about it..... I wouldn't want to win that way. I wish I could change my vote.

Rooster
05-12-2010, 08:26 AM
you foul out, you foul out. plain and simple. Its up to the coach/handler to make the call to the judge. If its an advantage, you take it. period.

I guess we are in the minority here MOhillbilly. I agree with you. The girl broke the rules, period. You do not pass Go and you do not collect $200.

In a world where everyone gets a ribbon for trying and juice box no matter how bad you suck, it's kinda nice to see a kid actually learn a life lesson.

jidar
05-12-2010, 08:28 AM
I spent a little bit of time struggling with this one before I realized that years of watching my children in youth sports is turning me into a douchebag.
I have little doubt that the majority of the coaches and other sports parents would do this in a heartbeart to get the win... but it really doesn't have to be that way. It's douchebaggery.

Hound333
05-12-2010, 08:34 AM
As a track coach myself, we overlook this type of stuff all the time. We do however know what coaches are the d-bags and will report it. It is against the rules and he is within his right to call it. He just needs to know that every single one of his athletes will be looked at very closely now. His athletes will not be allowed to tie their shoes incorrectly.

Chiefs Rool
05-12-2010, 08:42 AM
The rule sucks. The circumstances suck. Do you think somebody really gains a competitive edge by stepping one foot onto the white line? Do they gain an edge exchanging a baton outside of the exchange zone? There are dozens of rules that suck but they're rules. The coach was within his rights. Would I have done it? I dunno. It's pretty crappy all the way around.

well, okay then. I never played track so I wasn't aware of that. I guess my thoughts on this is that rules are rules, that girls coach should have noticed that and said something or at least read the rule book to all of the players before the season started.

Old Dog
05-12-2010, 08:43 AM
I can see both sides of this coin.
Was it a douche move, absolutely but I imagine that her coach knew about this rule (or at least I would hope so) and should have informed her to remove anything that could possibly be considered jewelry*.
When I used to judge field events I told numerous athlets that they needed to remove jewelry (rings, necklaces, braclets, ear rings, whatever) just to avoid any "douchbaggery" such as this but IT IS still a rule.




*As jewelry is defined as "an ornamental device worn by persons", this fits the definition.

Phobia
05-12-2010, 09:11 AM
This. How is a string considered jewelry? The meet officials should have told the coach to STFD and STFU.

The coach is a douche. I doubt he would have called out one of his own players for wearing a string.

It's not about the jewelry. It's about removing hazards from events. It would be a freak accident but she could catch that bracelet on a pole falling to the mat and suffer an awful fracture.

Again, it's a legitimate rule but the circumstances really suck.