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View Full Version : Education Gov. Christie tells teacher to find a different job


HonestChieffan
05-26-2010, 05:15 PM
Love it. Teacher gets it from the Gov....some of the people are nothing but parasites.



N.J. Gov. Chris Christie defends cuts, promotes property tax cap in Rutherford
Tuesday, May 25, 2010
LAST UPDATED: TUESDAY MAY 25, 2010, 10:21 PM
BY HERB JACKSON

RUTHERFORD — Governor Christie on Tuesday told a borough teacher to find another job if she did not feel she was compensated enough as he defended his state budget cuts and promoted a plan to cap annual growth in property tax collections.

He also told an 89-year-old former mayor she'd have to wait until next spring for a rebate she'd been getting for more than a decade in the late summer. And he told a parent that cuts to services, including the local library, are needed because "we are out of money."

A largely friendly crowd of about 150 people turned out in a church gymnasium to hear Christie deliver a half-hour talk that trashed greedy public employee unions and state laws that handcuff local officials trying to control spending.

He then opened the floor to questions. A few were softballs, including the declaration by Clara Nebot of Bergenfield that Christie is "a god" to her relatives in Florida.

But borough teacher Rita Wilson, a Kearny resident, argued that if she were paid $3 an hour for the 30 children in her class, she’d be earning $83,000, and she makes nothing near that.

"You’re getting more than that if you include the cost of your benefits," Christie interrupted.

When Wilson, who has a master’s degree, said she was not being compensated for her education and experience, Christie said:

"Well, you know then that you don’t have to do it." Some in the audience applauded.

Christie said he would not have had to impose cuts to education if the teachers union had agreed to his call for a one-year salary freeze and a 1.5 percent increase in employee benefit contributions.

"Your union said that is the greatest assault on public education in the history of the state," Christie said. "That’s why the union has no credibility, stupid statements like that."

Surrounded by reporters after she spoke, Wilson said she was shaking from the encounter, and worried she might get in trouble for speaking out.

Christie has outlined a "toolkit" to address New Jersey’s property taxes, which on average are among the highest in the country. The centerpiece is a proposed constitutional amendment that would impose a 2.5 percent cap on the annual increase in the local property tax levy, which is the total amount of taxes collected each year from towns, school boards and county government.

"What it’s going to do is impose discipline on every level of government," Christie said, adding that 30 years of previous efforts by Trenton to control property taxes failed.

Christine Beidel said she was worried that Christie was trying to control local communities' ability to raise money at the same time cuts in state aid to the borough could force the local library to close.

"You’re cutting and cutting and cutting and there's no way to make up the difference," she said.

Christie told her that unlike the federal government, the state cannot print money. He said that under his proposal, a community could exceed the 2.5 percent cap if the increase is approved in a local referendum.

Margaret Schak, who was mayor of Rutherford in 1976, asked about the state program that "freezes" the amount that senior citizens who meet income requirements have to pay in property taxes. The program, created in 1997, provides a rebate to offset any increase a homeowner pays.

Christie said he wasn't cutting the program, but he was temporarily preventing newly eligible seniors from enrolling. He also said he was going to change the program from a rebate paid in the late summer or fall to a tax credit put on the tax bill the following spring.

That means Schak, who said her rebate was about $2,400 last year, will not get a check this year and instead will have to wait until 2011 for the credit to lower her tax bill.

The meeting at the parish gymnasium of First Presbyterian Church on Ridge Road is the third Christie has held to tout his property tax plan. He urged the audience to contact their state legislators to support the package.

patteeu
05-26-2010, 11:13 PM
This guy is awesome.

mikey23545
05-27-2010, 12:01 AM
He's too good to be kept all to one state...I think New Jersey needs to share in 2012...:D

Taco John
05-27-2010, 12:29 AM
I repeat. This guy is awesome.

Chiefspants
05-27-2010, 12:39 AM
Yeah, teachers are unimportant.

Taco John
05-27-2010, 12:43 AM
Yeah, teachers are unimportant.

From zero to "they're feeding our elders dog food" in a jiffy.

Nobody said teachers are unimportant.

Warrior5
05-27-2010, 03:38 AM
Yeah, teachers are unimportant.

Christie said he would not have had to impose cuts to education if the teachers union had agreed to his call for a one-year salary freeze and a 1.5 percent increase in employee benefit contributions.

That sums it all up. She should be bitching at the teacher's union instread of Christie.

The guy is kicking ass and actually attacking the problem. DC could learn a thing or two from what he's doing.

mikey23545
05-27-2010, 04:24 AM
Yeah, teachers are unimportant.

Obviously that is how you felt throughout your education....

InChiefsHell
05-27-2010, 05:13 AM
Wow, this guy is something else. Punching the unions right in the mouth...

Chief Henry
05-27-2010, 06:55 AM
The guy is kicking ass and actually attacking the problem. DC could learn a thing or two from what he's doing.


:clap:

Amnorix
05-27-2010, 07:30 AM
Hard to argue with someone who is preaching fiscal sanity amidst the endless calls for spiraling fiscal madness.

Amnorix
05-27-2010, 07:33 AM
One last thought -- you see this in business all the time. When times are good, the company leans towards expansion, may have a "deal guy" CEO who is good at finding new business, broadening the base and engaging in deals to expand.

When times are tough for an extended period, the focus turns to operations, improving efficiencies, and running a leaner operation.

The problem with government is that it NEVER has operations guys. Nobody ever cares about running leaner operations or being more efficient, except in pathetic fits and starts. Programs started can NEVER end. People hired practically CAN'T be let go.

It's a very serious problem and a big part of our federal and state governments being so heavily in the red.

petegz28
05-27-2010, 07:43 AM
O!
M!
G!

A 1 year salary freeze????

People will go broke???

WTF will they do for food???

How will they afford their utilities???

Welcome to the rest of the country, lady!!! Before I was laid off I had not received a rasie for 3 straight years. My benefit contributions were cut. My 401k match was eliminated.

Somehow I still manage to eat well and all my utiliies are on and running.

KC Dan
05-27-2010, 08:42 AM
One last thought -- you see this in business all the time. When times are good, the company leans towards expansion, may have a "deal guy" CEO who is good at finding new business, broadening the base and engaging in deals to expand.

When times are tough for an extended period, the focus turns to operations, improving efficiencies, and running a leaner operation.

The problem with government is that it NEVER has operations guys. Nobody ever cares about running leaner operations or being more efficient, except in pathetic fits and starts. Programs started can NEVER end. People hired practically CAN'T be let go.

It's a very serious problem and a big part of our federal and state governments being so heavily in the red.This x Eleventy billion. Your best post ever!

healthpellets
05-27-2010, 09:04 AM
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AndChiefs
05-27-2010, 09:06 AM
Maybe it's just me but...

$83,000/$3 an hour = 27,667 hours worked

365 days in a year * 24 hours a day = 8,760 hours

She is one hardworking teacher.

Unless of course I misread that and she believes she should get paid $3 for every student in the class which is...

83,000/(3*30)=922 hours worked @ $90/hr.

Let's say she works 8 hours a day. 922/8 = 115 days *7/5 (since we shouldn't include Saturday and Sunday) = 161 days or a little over 5 months.

Either way, her math is not just off...it's remarkably awful.

patteeu
05-27-2010, 09:45 AM
Maybe it's just me but...

$83,000/$3 an hour = 27,667 hours worked

365 days in a year * 24 hours a day = 8,760 hours

She is one hardworking teacher.

Unless of course I misread that and she believes she should get paid $3 for every student in the class which is...

83,000/(3*30)=922 hours worked @ $90/hr.

Let's say she works 8 hours a day. 922/8 = 115 days *7/5 (since we shouldn't include Saturday and Sunday) = 161 days or a little over 5 months.

Either way, her math is not just off...it's remarkably awful.

It's definitely the latter and if you figure 23 students and 6 hour days (or 20 students and 7 hour days), you get something close to 9 months.

No matter how you slice it though, that's a lot of dough to pay the Mr. Kotters of the world when it's obvious that there are plenty of people who maybe couldn't cut it in engineering or business school who are both willing to and capable of stepping in to take their place. :Poke:

Taco John
05-27-2010, 09:59 AM
That video is great. I wonder if the voters put a move on to draft this guy for the presidency. This guy would absolutely change the tone of the debates.

Amnorix
05-27-2010, 10:11 AM
It's definitely the latter and if you figure 23 students and 6 hour days (or 20 students and 7 hour days), you get something close to 9 months.



Depends on how you count those 20 vacation weeks per year they get, I guess.


:Poke: Kotter :D

FAX
05-27-2010, 10:17 AM
One last thought -- you see this in business all the time. When times are good, the company leans towards expansion, may have a "deal guy" CEO who is good at finding new business, broadening the base and engaging in deals to expand.

When times are tough for an extended period, the focus turns to operations, improving efficiencies, and running a leaner operation.

The problem with government is that it NEVER has operations guys. Nobody ever cares about running leaner operations or being more efficient, except in pathetic fits and starts. Programs started can NEVER end. People hired practically CAN'T be let go.

It's a very serious problem and a big part of our federal and state governments being so heavily in the red.

There is iron in your words of green, Mr. Amnorix.

On occasion, however, a cutter is voted into office based on a campaign of eliminating waste, reducing spending, and achieving something resembling fiscal responsibility.

But the problem is that, since politicians make "promises" in order to get elected, many of these "promises" are eventually realized in the form of legislation which ultimately adds to the expense side of governmental budgets. As electorate demographics change or as political dynamics shift, so do the context and substance of the "promises". Eventually, you have program after program, one atop another, piled to the bureaucratic stratosphere. It's simply more than can be corrected in one election cycle ... or ten, probably.

FAX

Amnorix
05-27-2010, 10:29 AM
There is iron in your words of green, Mr. Amnorix.

On occasion, however, a cutter is voted into office based on a campaign of eliminating waste, reducing spending, and achieving something resembling fiscal responsibility.

But the problem is that, since politicians make "promises" in order to get elected, many of these "promises" are eventually realized in the form of legislation which ultimately adds to the expense side of governmental budgets. As electorate demographics change or as political dynamics shift, so do the context and substance of the "promises". Eventually, you have program after program, one atop another, piled to the bureaucratic stratosphere. It's simply more than can be corrected in one election cycle ... or ten, probably.

FAX

I agree with every word, but the ones voted into Congress on an austerity program are few and far between and can never get their agenda through. And, as you say, even those sometimes give in to the pressure and do what the rest of their Congressmates are doing -- look for ways to bring the bacon home to their state.

Not sure who the last President is that ran on fiscal austerity, really. Reagan, maybe. Bush 1 pledged no new taxes, but that's not really austerity. Bush 2 lauded his business credentials, but I can't remember much about anything other than budget cuts. Certainly he didn't spend much time/effort on running a leaner operation or improving any kind of efficiency.

Clinton had Gore take at least a small axe to federal regulations, seeking to smooth things out. That's an efficinecy boost. But the era of balanced budgets was partly due to the 1994 tax increases, but as mcuh was the dot com boom and the inability of either party to get any major initiatives through Congress.

Hell, it was probably Truman in '48 or Ike in '52.

Chiefspants
05-27-2010, 10:36 AM
From zero to "they're feeding our elders dog food" in a jiffy.

Nobody said teachers are unimportant.

I apologize for my overreaction, but I cannot stand it when teachers are constantly bashed within this forum. I realize that there are some teachers who do nothing beyond the bare minimum and rush out the door once 3:10 rolls around. However, last year I had three teachers who shaped the direction of my entire life, if those individuals had decided to pursue a different profession, I still would have been just as clueless about what direction I wanted to take with my life.

Obviously, those who are crafting the education of our entire nation's population are rather important individuals, especially those who are making a positive difference in a child's life with each passing year.

Chiefnj2
05-27-2010, 10:43 AM
I repeat. This guy is awesome.

You can have him.

Chiefnj2
05-27-2010, 10:44 AM
O!
M!
G!

A 1 year salary freeze????

People will go broke???

WTF will they do for food???

How will they afford their utilities???

Welcome to the rest of the country, lady!!! Before I was laid off I had not received a rasie for 3 straight years. My benefit contributions were cut. My 401k match was eliminated.

Somehow I still manage to eat well and all my utiliies are on and running.

No offense, but you live in Kansas. The cost of living in NJ is much higher.

Brock
05-27-2010, 10:56 AM
Teachers in Kansas are underpaid too. Teachers know this going in.

FishingRod
05-27-2010, 10:58 AM
There is iron in your words of green, Mr. Amnorix.

On occasion, however, a cutter is voted into office based on a campaign of eliminating waste, reducing spending, and achieving something resembling fiscal responsibility.

But the problem is that, since politicians make "promises" in order to get elected, many of these "promises" are eventually realized in the form of legislation which ultimately adds to the expense side of governmental budgets. As electorate demographics change or as political dynamics shift, so do the context and substance of the "promises". Eventually, you have program after program, one atop another, piled to the bureaucratic stratosphere. It's simply more than can be corrected in one election cycle ... or ten, probably.

FAX

Rep 10 bears

kaplin42
05-27-2010, 10:59 AM
Again I will say that the California legislature should be sitting down and taking notes. The unions here, especially the teacher's union and sheriff's union are way out of control. Sad thing is they have bought and paid for the officials that run this state, and it shows. We are $19 Billion in debt for THIS YEAR.

What a joke this state is.

Chiefnj2
05-27-2010, 11:02 AM
Teachers in Kansas are underpaid too. Teachers know this going in.

Which is why the underpaid teachers are reluctant to give up the benefits and small wage increases they negotiated years prior. It isn't a situation where if the economy rebounds they get a bonus to make up for lost wages.

mlyonsd
05-27-2010, 11:04 AM
There is iron in your words of green, Mr. Amnorix.

On occasion, however, a cutter is voted into office based on a campaign of eliminating waste, reducing spending, and achieving something resembling fiscal responsibility.

But the problem is that, since politicians make "promises" in order to get elected, many of these "promises" are eventually realized in the form of legislation which ultimately adds to the expense side of governmental budgets. As electorate demographics change or as political dynamics shift, so do the context and substance of the "promises". Eventually, you have program after program, one atop another, piled to the bureaucratic stratosphere. It's simply more than can be corrected in one election cycle ... or ten, probably.

FAX

There's nothing wrong with 'promises' politicians make, if there is a true need for something.

Where they seem to get into trouble is telling you whose going to pay for that 'promise'. It's always the other guy. Heck, nobody really cares about a new bridge to nowhere if the other guy has to pay for it. You want health care for everyone? No problem, the other guy will pay for it.

This country would be a lot better off if there was some kind of a flat tax so that every new expenditure was partially paid for by everyone. That would make people pay a lot closer attention to what our elected idiots are up to. IMO of course.

ClevelandBronco
05-27-2010, 11:12 AM
I apologize for my overreaction, but I cannot stand it when teachers are constantly bashed within this forum. I realize that there are some teachers who do nothing beyond the bare minimum and rush out the door once 3:10 rolls around. However, last year I had three teachers who shaped the direction of my entire life, if those individuals had decided to pursue a different profession, I still would have been just as clueless about what direction I wanted to take with my life.

Obviously, those who are crafting the education of our entire nation's population are rather important individuals, especially those who are making a positive difference in a child's life with each passing year.

How sweet and meaningless. You seem to have what it takes to go into education.

petegz28
05-27-2010, 11:12 AM
No offense, but you live in Kansas. The cost of living in NJ is much higher.

Don't give a fuck where it is. A shitload of people all over the country are dealing with frozen wages if not losing their job entirely.

petegz28
05-27-2010, 11:13 AM
Which is why the underpaid teachers are reluctant to give up the benefits and small wage increases they negotiated years prior. It isn't a situation where if the economy rebounds they get a bonus to make up for lost wages.

So quit and find a new job.

patteeu
05-27-2010, 11:16 AM
No offense, but you live in Kansas. The cost of living in NJ is much higher.

People in NJ are free to move to Kansas if they want to experience that lower cost of living.

Taco John
05-27-2010, 11:20 AM
You can have him.

I hope to.



http://www.enchantedlearning.com/history/us/symbols/presidentialseal/color.GIF

Taco John
05-27-2010, 11:21 AM
There's nothing more useless than someone with a high degree complaining that they're not being paid for that degree. You get degrees because they make you competitive. If you're not being paid for your degree, it's because you've become complacent.

healthpellets
05-27-2010, 11:23 AM
That video is great. I wonder if the voters put a move on to draft this guy for the presidency. This guy would absolutely change the tone of the debates.

he's too fat. there's a huge fat bias in this country, and fat people contribute just as much as thin people.

all things being equal to an independent voter, they'll vote for the "more attractive" candidate.

now, if he were to drop 100 lbs and merely be overweight instead of morbidly obese, then we'd be in business.

Amnorix
05-27-2010, 11:29 AM
he's too fat. there's a huge fat bias in this country, and fat people contribute just as much as thin people.

all things being equal to an independent voter, they'll vote for the "more attractive" candidate.

now, if he were to drop 100 lbs and merely be overweight instead of morbidly obese, then we'd be in business.

Sadly, I agree. We haven't had a seriously overweight president since Taft. And in case anybody wasn't REALLY sure, that was waaay before television.

healthpellets
05-27-2010, 11:31 AM
btw, the teacher that wants to make 83K per year actually makes 86K per year.

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/blogs/beltway-confidential/nj-teacher-who-complained-to-gov-chris-christie-that-she-wasnt-paid-83k-she-deserved-actually-makes-86k-94951164.html

NJ Teacher who complained to Gov. Chris Christie she deserved $83k actually makes $86k

By: Mark Hemingway
Commentary Staff Writer
05/26/10 3:48 PM EDT

Yesterday, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie had a little dust-up with teacher Rita Wilson. Upset over Christie’s education budget, Wilson complained that she wasn’t paid enough and got sharp rebuke from the governor:

But borough teacher Rita Wilson, a Kearny resident, argued that if she were paid $3 an hour for the 30 children in her class, she’d be earning $83,000, and she makes nothing near that.

“You’re getting more than that if you include the cost of your benefits,” Christie interrupted.

When Wilson, who has a master’s degree, said she was not being compensated for her education and experience, Christie said:

“Well, you know then that you don’t have to do it.” Some in the audience applauded.

Christie said he would not have had to impose cuts to education if the teachers union had agreed to his call for a one-year salary freeze and a 1.5 percent increase in employee benefit contributions.

“Your union said that is the greatest assault on public education in the history of the state,” Christie said. “That’s why the union has no credibility, stupid statements like that.”

Surrounded by reporters after she spoke, Wilson said she was shaking from the encounter, and worried she might get in trouble for speaking out.

Hmm. Well, based on this PDF from the Rutherford, New Jersey Board of Education — it looks like Ms. Wilson makes a salary of $86,389. (http://www.rutherfordschools.org/boardofed/boardofed/minutes/minutes2009/MT071309.min.pdf)

Amnorix
05-27-2010, 11:34 AM
Which is why the underpaid teachers are reluctant to give up the benefits and small wage increases they negotiated years prior. It isn't a situation where if the economy rebounds they get a bonus to make up for lost wages.

I have tremendous respect for teachers and the jobs they do, and the sacrifices they make.

But the reality is that when everything is considered -- the hours worked, the (many) weeks of vacation, the job stress / job security, benefits and especially pensions, they are extremely well compensated by just about any standard you care to name. Are they going to get rich? No. But compared to many equally hard workign stiffs, they have it pretty good. Too good, in the opinion of many, especially in light of the current fiscal crises facing governments at all levels.

I'm not saying cut everyone's salary by 50%. But a freaking one year job freeze isn't the end of the world when jobs are being slashed and salaries are being frozen everywhere.

ClevelandBronco
05-27-2010, 11:39 AM
btw, the teacher that wants to make 83K per year actually makes 86K per year.

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/blogs/beltway-confidential/nj-teacher-who-complained-to-gov-chris-christie-that-she-wasnt-paid-83k-she-deserved-actually-makes-86k-94951164.html

It doesn't say to whom she should send the rebate.

Brock
05-27-2010, 11:39 AM
Which is why the underpaid teachers are reluctant to give up the benefits and small wage increases they negotiated years prior. It isn't a situation where if the economy rebounds they get a bonus to make up for lost wages.

Yes, of course. But it doesn't make any difference whether you live in NJ or Kansas, teachers are taking paycuts and losing their jobs everywhere. The comparative cost of living doesn't make any difference.

healthpellets
05-27-2010, 11:43 AM
It doesn't say to whom she should send the rebate.

i've already supplied her with my address.

healthpellets
05-27-2010, 11:46 AM
Yes, of course. But it doesn't make any difference whether you live in NJ or Kansas, teachers are taking paycuts and losing their jobs everywhere. The comparative cost of living doesn't make any difference.

that's happening in many industries in addition to education.

maybe NJ should do what KC did but take it one step further, and additionally make it state-wide.

just fire them all. every single one. everyone gets to reapply. during the application process, each can submit a salary of which they feel deserving.

then this lady can have her 83k if she can justify it. and the kids will get teachers who have a solid track record of performance.

ClevelandBronco
05-27-2010, 11:46 AM
i've already supplied her with my address.

Actually, it ought to go back whence it came. Anyone here know anyone from New Jersey? :evil:

petegz28
05-27-2010, 11:49 AM
Rita O'Neill-Wilson HS 16 4 86,389

LMAO

patteeu
05-27-2010, 11:57 AM
Actually, it ought to go back whence it came. Anyone here know anyone from New Jersey? :evil:

LMAO

SHTSPRAYER should apply for a teaching job.

ClevelandBronco
05-27-2010, 11:59 AM
LMAO

SHTSPRAYER should apply for a teaching job.

Where is he anyway? Did I miss something?

healthpellets
05-27-2010, 12:00 PM
btw, i freakin love that we had the opportunity to see how this teacher truly views her job. she wants $3 per child. who else gets paid per child? babysitters. it seems she views herself as a babysitter. awesome. she really does need a raise.

patteeu
05-27-2010, 12:05 PM
Where is he anyway? Did I miss something?

:shrug: He's The Mad Crapper now, but I haven't seen him in a couple of days.

Garcia Bronco
05-27-2010, 12:19 PM
You can have him.

SOLD!

AndChiefs
05-27-2010, 01:32 PM
It's definitely the latter and if you figure 23 students and 6 hour days (or 20 students and 7 hour days), you get something close to 9 months.

No matter how you slice it though, that's a lot of dough to pay the Mr. Kotters of the world when it's obvious that there are plenty of people who maybe couldn't cut it in engineering or business school who are both willing to and capable of stepping in to take their place. :Poke:

Except the article states she has 30 students which means you should use 30 not 23 or 20.


It doesn't matter anyways because it appears she makes more than that already anyways. Man does she have it awful.

blaise
05-27-2010, 01:36 PM
She didn't look like she was missing too many meals.

petegz28
05-27-2010, 01:50 PM
I just hope for the sake of her students that she does not teach math.

patteeu
05-27-2010, 03:36 PM
Except the article states she has 30 students which means you should use 30 not 23 or 20.


It doesn't matter anyways because it appears she makes more than that already anyways. Man does she have it awful.

Yeah. 9 months, 30 students, $3 per student per hour, and 5 hour days works out pretty close. Forget about bankers hours, check out those teachers' hours!

AndChiefs
05-27-2010, 03:42 PM
Yeah. 9 months, 30 students, $3 per student per hour, and 5 hour days works out pretty close. Forget about bankers hours, check out those teachers' hours!

Where do I sign up?

ChiefaRoo
05-27-2010, 04:07 PM
There's nothing more useless than someone with a high degree complaining that they're not being paid for that degree. You get degrees because they make you competitive. If you're not being paid for your degree, it's because you've become complacent.

I completely agree. Some of the worst employees I ever hired were those with advanced degrees. They're 24 years old, up to their eyeballs in debt and think they can walk in and get paid in their degreed field like they're 20 year employees with a proven record of production. They're usually quitters. I'll take three smart guys who are hungry to learn and give them a masters degree in their field while they work. If only one survives the process they'll make up for it in production and then I have a fully operational and competent employee.