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View Full Version : Life Spinoff Thread: If you are ever in need of a hospital in Wichita


pr_capone
06-09-2010, 10:24 AM
you are going to get better care at St. Francis (or any of the Via Christi satellites) or the homeless guy who lives in the park and does surgery with a dirty plastic spork than you will by going to Wesley.

This hospital is HORSESHIT.

Instead of keeping to a schedule with pain meds, they ask her to buzz in whenever she wants some. So she buzzes in and no one shows up for 10-15 minutes.

You buzz the front desk to ask for the meds and the tone of the person on the other line makes it seem like you are an inconvenience and a bother.

Ok, they finally get here with the pain meds and my wife is in bed shaking in pain with tears streaming down her face and the nurse needs to scan her wrist and punch into the computer for 3 minutes BEFORE she gets the meds? BULLSHIT.

Give her the f'ing meds then type that shit in. Don't make her wait because you flunked typing class in school and type with two fingers.

Last rant. There is a machine in the room beeping for 10 damn minutes before anyone comes in here to check on it. Yeah, I realize its just an IV monitor but that beeping keeps up both awake. More than once I've seen nurses walk right on by and not do anything to the monitor. Then I get scolded for hitting the silence button. Tell you what, get here in under 10 minutes next time or I'm gonna start pushing buttons again.

I am ****ing pissed.

The only saving grace on the 4th floor of this hospital is a nurse named Loretta who has taken excellent care of the missus.

Baconeater
06-09-2010, 10:26 AM
Well, we all know what hospital Badgirl is working at now.

JD10367
06-09-2010, 10:31 AM
We have websites that review restaurants, music, porn, whatnot. Is there a website that reviews doctors and hospitals? There should be.

Here in Rhode Island, we have two large hospitals: Rhode Island Hospital, and Kent Hospital. I found out the hard way that Kent Hospital sucks balls. I spent an overnight in their ER slowly going blind in one eye. I went in around 11pm with a retina tearing loose; the right side of my vision was dark. They didn't do shit for me except make me wait there. I sat there in the ER watching my vision slowly fade from right to left. By dawn, I could only see the top left corner of the thing I was looking at. When I finally saw a doc, he shined a penlight into my eye and said, "Yeah, your retina's detached, here's a name and address for you to go see a specialist in the morning." For that, they later billed me $75 for the ER visit. I didn't even get a fucking Tylenol or a pillow; they wanted $75 for the privilege of sitting there all night while they ignored me. I sucked it up and paid them their $75 to get them off my back. They then sent me another bill for an ADDITIONAL $75. I sent them back a letter telling them where they could put their bill. Now, I don't give a shit if I get into a head-on car crash right in front of the door, I'll make the ambulance guy drive me the half-hour to the other hospital.

cdirty
06-09-2010, 11:39 AM
I was born at Wesley.

RedNFeisty
06-09-2010, 11:44 AM
Sorry to hear the Misses is having a rough time. Hope the surgery went well at least and still praying for a speedy recovery!!

St. Joe is wonderful, had all three of my children there. The staff is amazing and the pain meds are free flowing, the last two were c-sections which hurt like a bitch.

tooge
06-09-2010, 11:44 AM
you need to have the wife take a shit in her bed and then tell the nurse you had an accident due to the pain

HemiEd
06-09-2010, 11:53 AM
I was born at Wesley.

So was my youngest, and my little brother and sister. It does not appear to be the same since it was purchased by HCA. $$$$$$$$$

But I did spend the night there, setting with my Dad after a surgery about 5 years ago, no problems.

Der Flöprer
06-09-2010, 12:16 PM
I'd document every last instance while I was there and I'd make sure the nurses watched me taking notes. I'd also find out what state agency handles those complaints and ask the head nurse on that floor if she had the number to call them.

Dicky McElephant
06-09-2010, 12:18 PM
I'd document every last instance while I was there and I'd make sure the nurses watched me taking notes. I'd also find out what state agency handles those complaints and ask the head nurse on that floor if she had the number to call them.

This.

Let them know that you're recording everything that's happening and that you will be contacting someone about it.

chiefsnorth
06-09-2010, 12:22 PM
They do have to document things like dispensing medication. Same everywhere.

pr_capone
06-09-2010, 12:28 PM
They do have to document things like dispensing medication. Same everywhere.

Sure. Document it after you give it to her. If it were some prescription strength tylenol for a bad headache then fine... document, then dispense. When you have a woman shaking and crying from how bad something hurts... just do the right fucking thing and give the woman her meds.

You can write shit down as she is starting to feel better.

Like just now, we called the nurse 25 minutes ago for some ibprofin. She just NOW walked in and said she was just told that we needed some.

Absolute CRAP.

Fat Elvis
06-09-2010, 12:32 PM
I was born at Wesley.

I was born at this Wesley:

Then in 1921, The Salvation Army Wichita started a hospital for unmarried mothers in the entirely renovated old Wesley Hospital at 1103 N. Saint Francis.


http://www.usc.salvationarmy.org/usc/www_usc_kan.nsf/vw-sublinks/3A6E8FA8199DA3F786257566005AABD4?openDocument

Mr. Plow
06-09-2010, 12:34 PM
I understand your frustrations. I had a different experience all together though. Had my 3 youngest kids at Wesley and had nothing but excellent care. My youngest was born early with some fluid in her lungs and a few other issues. She was in the NICU for 8 days and other than 1 nasty nurse.....everyone was great.

FAX
06-09-2010, 12:42 PM
I like the idea of documenting the problems, Mr. pr_capone.

By the way, you mentioned that the reason you went to this particular hospital was due to your insurance terms. I'm curious what kind of insurance that is? On what grounds were you required to use this particular hospital?

FAX

pr_capone
06-09-2010, 12:44 PM
I like the idea of documenting the problems, Mr. pr_capone.

By the way, you mentioned that the reason you went to this particular hospital was due to your insurance terms. I'm curious what kind of insurance that is? On what grounds were you required to use this particular hospital?

FAX

Our insurance is through Aetna. Apparently Wesley is their preffered health care provider. Had we gone to St. Francis it would have been "out of network" and we would have been on the hook for much much more.

pr_capone
06-09-2010, 12:54 PM
half hour later... still no ibprofin in sight.

RedNFeisty
06-09-2010, 01:01 PM
Sure. Document it after you give it to her. If it were some prescription strength tylenol for a bad headache then fine... document, then dispense. When you have a woman shaking and crying from how bad something hurts... just do the right ****ing thing and give the woman her meds.

You can write shit down as she is starting to feel better.

Like just now, we called the nurse 25 minutes ago for some ibprofin. She just NOW walked in and said she was just told that we needed some.

Absolute CRAP.

I think it is about time you start bitching very loudly and find someone higher up the chain of command to bitch at.

mikeyis4dcats.
06-09-2010, 01:08 PM
Sure. Document it after you give it to her. If it were some prescription strength tylenol for a bad headache then fine... document, then dispense. When you have a woman shaking and crying from how bad something hurts... just do the right ****ing thing and give the woman her meds.

You can write shit down as she is starting to feel better.

Like just now, we called the nurse 25 minutes ago for some ibprofin. She just NOW walked in and said she was just told that we needed some.

Absolute CRAP.

you cannot. they must verify you are prescribed the meds BEFORE dispensing them. What you are asking them to do is akin to walking into Walgreens and asking for meds and saying the doctor will call the scrip in later.

Doesn't work that way. As far as the schedule, your wife is the only one who knows if she is in pain. She is responsible for asking for more meds as she needs them in this instance. Not all patients are the same, and some do not WANT meds on a set schedule.

Sorry man, I feel your pain, and know it sucks to sit there and watch a loved one in distress, but there are laws and reasons for how they do things.

Demonpenz
06-09-2010, 01:14 PM
My dad's heart transplant was there. I thought it was the best care ever.

pr_capone
06-09-2010, 01:17 PM
you cannot. they must verify you are prescribed the meds BEFORE dispensing them. What you are asking them to do is akin to walking into Walgreens and asking for meds and saying the doctor will call the scrip in later.

Doesn't work that way. As far as the schedule, your wife is the only one who knows if she is in pain. She is responsible for asking for more meds as she needs them in this instance. Not all patients are the same, and some do not WANT meds on a set schedule.

Sorry man, I feel your pain, and know it sucks to sit there and watch a loved one in distress, but there are laws and reasons for how they do things.

If she had just landed in the room I would agree with you. And the first few times that this took place I understood why. This is the 3rd day she has been in this room. The nurses know exactly what medicine she is prescribed and how much to give her.

Either way... things are looking like I am going to get to take her home today *crosses fingers*.

FAX
06-09-2010, 01:19 PM
Our insurance is through Aetna. Apparently Wesley is their preffered health care provider. Had we gone to St. Francis it would have been "out of network" and we would have been on the hook for much much more.

Thanks, man.

So, basically, a crappy hospital lowballed Aetna and makes up the difference by providing substandard care. Is that about it?

One of the persons I would contact about this nonsense is your insurance agent.

As for "documenting" pain meds in your room, here's how it works in a normal hospital (assuming you're not provided with a self-administering pain medication system). 1) You ring the nurse station, 2) They say "Can I help you?" over the intercom, 3) You complain of pain and ask for meds, 4) A while later they come in your room, 5) The nurse checks your wrist band, 6) She asks you how much pain you're feeling on a 1-10 scale, 7) You answer, 8) She gives you the meds.

I have been in the hospital more times than I can remember ... well over 100 times in my brief lifetime. I have never, ever had a nurse enter in a bunch of information into a computer in my room before giving me a pain med. Never. Ever.

FAX

pr_capone
06-09-2010, 01:25 PM
Thanks, man.

So, basically, a crappy hospital lowballed Aetna and makes up the difference by providing substandard care. Is that about it?

One of the persons I would contact about this nonsense is your insurance agent.

As for "documenting" pain meds in your room, here's how it works in a normal hospital (assuming you're not provided with a self-administering pain medication system). 1) You ring the nurse station, 2) They say "Can I help you?" over the intercom, 3) You complain of pain and ask for meds, 4) A while later they come in your room, 5) The nurse checks your wrist band, 6) She asks you how much pain you're feeling on a 1-10 scale, 7) You answer, 8) She gives you the meds.

I have been in the hospital more times than I can remember ... well over 100 times in my brief lifetime. I have never, ever had a nurse enter in a bunch of information into a computer in my room before giving me a pain med. Never. Ever.

FAX

They bring a cart with a computer every time they come in here to administed meds. Then then scan her wristband, scan the meds, type a bunch of stuff in, THEN they give her the meds. One of the "episodes" that the missus had where it was a 10/10 pain the scanner would not scan and she had to leave the room to get a new label printed.

She has instructions on the chart that state what meds she can have. Why not give her the meds before running around trying to get another label printed leaving her in agony.

Dunno... don't get it. Hopefully we are out of here sooner than later.

DaFace
06-09-2010, 01:26 PM
Hospitals are stressful places. We were perfectly happy with the care my dad got there two weeks ago.
Posted via Mobile Device

DaFace
06-09-2010, 01:28 PM
They bring a cart with a computer every time they come in here to administed meds. Then then scan her wristband, scan the meds, type a bunch of stuff in, THEN they give her the meds. One of the "episodes" that the missus had where it was a 10/10 pain the scanner would not scan and she had to leave the room to get a new label printed.

She has instructions on the chart that state what meds she can have. Why not give her the meds before running around trying to get another label printed leaving her in agony.

Dunno... don't get it. Hopefully we are out of here sooner than later.

Would you rather they occasionally give people the wrong drugs?
Posted via Mobile Device

FAX
06-09-2010, 01:28 PM
They bring a cart with a computer every time they come in here to administed meds. Then then scan her wristband, scan the meds, type a bunch of stuff in, THEN they give her the meds. One of the "episodes" that the missus had where it was a 10/10 pain the scanner would not scan and she had to leave the room to get a new label printed.

She has instructions on the chart that state what meds she can have. Why not give her the meds before running around trying to get another label printed leaving her in agony.

Dunno... don't get it. Hopefully we are out of here sooner than later.

Here's my guess;

There's been a past problem in that hospital with missing narcotics. I've never heard of this procedure, nor have I experienced these methods and, as I mentioned, I have had a lot of experience.

I'll bet that the hospital administration has instituted more stringent procedures because they were in trouble with the feds.

FAX

pr_capone
06-09-2010, 01:30 PM
Would you rather they occasionally give people the wrong drugs?
Posted via Mobile Device

If she had landed in the room today after surgery... yeah, I get it. But after the 3rd day and already having given her one dose of the same meds earlier in the day (and several more in the past few days)... I would think it would be pretty safe to say that its ok to give her the same med.

Then again... I'm not a doctor, a nurse, nor did I stay in a Holiday inn Express last night. :D

Demonpenz
06-09-2010, 01:35 PM
Did you happen to see the helicopter on top of the hospital... I am not going to say it isn't or it is, but it looked alot like a certain 80's tv helicopter

pr_capone
06-09-2010, 01:37 PM
Did you happen to see the helicopter on top of the hospital... I am not going to say it isn't or it is, but it looked alot like a certain 80's tv helicopter

/goes off to look for Airwolf

Demonpenz
06-09-2010, 01:44 PM
helll noo it's the screamin mimi from riptide!

KCChiefsMan
06-09-2010, 01:44 PM
yup and all that and it will probably cost your tens of thousands of $$$$

chiefsnorth
06-09-2010, 01:48 PM
Sure. Document it after you give it to her. If it were some prescription strength tylenol for a bad headache then fine... document, then dispense. When you have a woman shaking and crying from how bad something hurts... just do the right fucking thing and give the woman her meds.

You can write shit down as she is starting to feel better.

Like just now, we called the nurse 25 minutes ago for some ibprofin. She just NOW walked in and said she was just told that we needed some.

Absolute CRAP.

They have to document and verify everything first and there are compelling reasons why. Someone doing what you are asking for, breaking narcotics policy could be putting their job in jeopardy. Can't do it.
Posted via Mobile Device

DaFace
06-09-2010, 01:53 PM
If she had landed in the room today after surgery... yeah, I get it. But after the 3rd day and already having given her one dose of the same meds earlier in the day (and several more in the past few days)... I would think it would be pretty safe to say that its ok to give her the same med.

Then again... I'm not a doctor, a nurse, nor did I stay in a Holiday inn Express last night. :D

Well, all I'm saying is that once every month or two you hear about people in hospitals being mistaken for another patient and having a toe cut off when they were there for an ear injury or something like that. I'm sure that they've put a ton of processes in place to try and prevent mistakes from being made.

My great aunt was in the hospital battling cancer a while back when the nurse came in and tried to give her an insulin shot for her diabetes. She wasn't diabetic. They tried to scan the little barcode, and it rejected it. Mistake averted.

In that case, an insulin shot wouldn't have killed her, but I'm sure there are others that could have caused major problems. Is it as efficient as just going in and sticking a needle in? Probably not. But given the alternative, it's probably what they need to do.

I am sorry to hear that your wife is having so many troubles, though. Don't take my disagreement with your assessment of the situation as a lack of empathy.

pr_capone
06-09-2010, 02:06 PM
Well, all I'm saying is that once every month or two you hear about people in hospitals being mistaken for another patient and having a toe cut off when they were there for an ear injury or something like that. I'm sure that they've put a ton of processes in place to try and prevent mistakes from being made.

My great aunt was in the hospital battling cancer a while back when the nurse came in and tried to give her an insulin shot for her diabetes. She wasn't diabetic. They tried to scan the little barcode, and it rejected it. Mistake averted.

In that case, an insulin shot wouldn't have killed her, but I'm sure there are others that could have caused major problems. Is it as efficient as just going in and sticking a needle in? Probably not. But given the alternative, it's probably what they need to do.

I am sorry to hear that your wife is having so many troubles, though. Don't take my disagreement with your assessment of the situation as a lack of empathy.

I understand and appreciate the empathy. I'm positive that it is the policy and procedure of the hospital and that there is good reason for it.. just seems like her situation the response would be obvious.

Nothing to be done about it though.

mikeyis4dcats.
06-09-2010, 03:30 PM
If she had just landed in the room I would agree with you. And the first few times that this took place I understood why. This is the 3rd day she has been in this room. The nurses know exactly what medicine she is prescribed and how much to give her.

Either way... things are looking like I am going to get to take her home today *crosses fingers*.

when life and death are at stake, things are done the same way every time. You need to remember that nurses see dozens of patients during every 12 hour shift, and they can't and shouldn't rely on memory when doing things that could kill you. Medications are closely watched for drug interaction, allergies, and legal control. What you were given yesterday may have changed. For example when my wife was in for the birth of our son recently, they changed the type pain meds she was on after the first cycle to minimize the risk of drug dependency. Also, the nurse doesn't know without looking it up that the doctor or specialist was in an hour ago and possibly precribed an additional treatment or med that would necessitate a change in treatment.

Just Passin' By
06-09-2010, 04:28 PM
when life and death are at stake, things are done the same way every time. You need to remember that nurses see dozens of patients during every 12 hour shift, and they can't and shouldn't rely on memory when doing things that could kill you. Medications are closely watched for drug interaction, allergies, and legal control. What you were given yesterday may have changed. For example when my wife was in for the birth of our son recently, they changed the type pain meds she was on after the first cycle to minimize the risk of drug dependency. Also, the nurse doesn't know without looking it up that the doctor or specialist was in an hour ago and possibly precribed an additional treatment or med that would necessitate a change in treatment.

Nurses take 'report' at the beginning of every shift. They already know the status of the patients, the med situation and pretty much everything else, particularly if the patient has been there for a few days.

The nurses at the hospital in question are simply screwing up.

Gonzo
06-09-2010, 04:39 PM
One thing I'll chime in on is that the Kansas Heart Hospital in northeast Wichita is pretty awesome. I was their security director about 3 months after they opened the doors 11 yrs ago and they've already tripled in size. They were great people.
Posted via Mobile Device

pr_capone
06-09-2010, 05:55 PM
YEh... Galatia Heart Hospital. Good people there.

That said, the checkout process begins in 5... 4... 3... 2...

w00t!

Gracie Dean
06-09-2010, 06:06 PM
sorry you are having a bad time there. When I spent 14 days there Nov/Dec they were the best. Got IV meds every 4 hours and then pills every 6. I was pain free the entire time...

Gracie Dean
06-09-2010, 06:12 PM
I was on the 10th floor. There was a computer in my room they just popped down the cover and entered the stuff. Yes each time they asked my my pain level and scanned stuff in. I was there 14 days and they did it the same way each time.

The key is to ask for meds before you need them and by the time you get them, you are on schedule. Course after a while I got a morphine drip (the equivilant...allergic to morphine)

Gracie Dean
06-09-2010, 06:13 PM
Nurses take 'report' at the beginning of every shift. They already know the status of the patients, the med situation and pretty much everything else, particularly if the patient has been there for a few days.

The nurses at the hospital in question are simply screwing up.

No, the nurses are following procedure.

However, you can request to speak to the floor supervisor. I had one nurse run out of the room when I puked and got it all over my bed and gown and floor...the housekeeper cleaned it and me up.

I spoke to someone in charge, the house keeper got a raise and the nurse (contracted) was not asked back

threebag02
06-09-2010, 06:43 PM
Hope your wife has a speedy recovery and she gets her pain meds

Gracie Dean
06-09-2010, 06:49 PM
after my last stay, they called in several meds to the pharmacy to have them ready when we got there. I didn't really know what all there would be.

Got to wallyworld and I had 4 different prescriptions waiting. One was for 150 10 mg Lortabs. I was to take 2 every 4 hours ... LORDY I did nothing but sleep. I backed my self off them and now only take one 5 mg every 6 hours

bevischief
06-09-2010, 07:12 PM
after my last stay, they called in several meds to the pharmacy to have them ready when we got there. I didn't really know what all there would be.

Got to wallyworld and I had 4 different prescriptions waiting. One was for 150 10 mg Lortabs. I was to take 2 every 4 hours ... LORDY I did nothing but sleep. I backed my self off them and now only take one 5 mg every 6 hours

Lortabs suck. Need too many to way a much to make a difference.

Gracie Dean
06-09-2010, 07:30 PM
Lortabs suck. Need too many to way a much to make a difference.

what works for you?

bevischief
06-09-2010, 07:47 PM
Vicodin is my friend. We came to terms after my burns last summer. Should have been sent to a burn unit.

listopencil
06-09-2010, 09:16 PM
you need to have the wife take a shit in her bed and then tell the nurse you had an accident due to the pain


This.