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View Full Version : Life I want to move...suggestions on how to do so?


thecoffeeguy
06-10-2010, 01:14 PM
I have been thinking about moving out of Southern California for quite some time now. With my growing family, the cost to live in Southern California as well as how busy it is getting here, I really feel the need for a change, almost a fresh start somewhere.

My wife and I have been talking about it more and more and my wife is on board with moving as well. We have talked about a few other states and cities, but nothing concrete on where we want to go. We will due our due diligence and research the cites that interest us and will end up visiting them to make sure that is a place we would be happy.

With that above, how does one go about actually moving? What I mean is, the whole finding a job process. Do most people just move first then look for a job, or just find a job then move? Not much of a risk taker and always error on the side of caution.

It just seems that people move all the time and make it look so easy. It appears to be a daunting task, but perhaps it is not?

I would imagine, best case scenario is to find a job with a company in the perspective city. Be even better if they pay for the move.

Granted, I do have a 2 1/2 year old and another on the way, so it is not like I am a bachelor and can wing it by just moving and finding a job.

Anyone have some suggestions to go about this?
I am guessing it will take some time to find a job in another state or city. My guess is 12-18 months to find a good job in a place I would like to live.

I currently work in IT (have been for 12 years), but have thought about getting into teaching. We shall see though.

With that, I appreciate any insight and suggestions anyone might have.

Thanks in advance.

TCG

mikeyis4dcats.
06-10-2010, 01:14 PM
join the Big 10.

big nasty kcnut
06-10-2010, 01:16 PM
Look for a job then move then work that how i do it.

DA_T_84
06-10-2010, 01:18 PM
join the Big 10.

beat me.

KCrockaholic
06-10-2010, 01:25 PM
Olathe, KS

Rain Man
06-10-2010, 01:29 PM
Find a job first unless you enjoy gambling your life savings.

If your funds allow, pick one or more finalist cities and be prepared to travel there to network. E-mail employers, tell them that you're planning to relocate into the area, and can you meet with them while you're househunting. That way you get to know the city, you have an excuse for contacting employers and asking for an interview, and you can start the networking process. Networking around is essential to finding a job, which makes it harder if you don't live in the city or have any contacts.

If funds allow, you could also rent the cheapest apartment you can find so you can have a local address for your job search.

blaise
06-10-2010, 01:30 PM
Look for a job first. I don't think too many employers these days are interested in paying for any kind of move.
I think you'd need a job in order to get a lease or a mortgage, anyway, wouldn't you? Unless you have a bunch of cash saved.
This is the way I've done it in the past. Look for jobs in the new city and be willing to travel there for an interview, and a follow up interview, if needed. If you're moving to a fairly large city you'll want the job before you find a place to live because you could end up spending a lot of time commuting. If you live in a city like DC or Dallas, Houston or Atlanta and you get a job on the opposite side of the city from where you chose to live, your commute could be a nightmare, especially if you have to drop your kids off at daycare or school in the morning before work.
My family and I have moved to different cities 6 or 7 times over the last 12 years or so. The way we've done it since we had kids is this: Once you have your city chosen, look for schools that are rated well. You can usually find that information on the internet on a site like greatschools, or the state's site. Once you know where the good school districts are located start looking for housing and jobs in that part of town. I know your kid is 2 1/2 years old and not in school yet, but it's something to think about. Especially if you don't want move again when the kid is ready for kindergarten.
You may also want to look at Money Magazine's annual list of best places to live to get an idea of some locations that are attractive.

blaise
06-10-2010, 01:30 PM
Olathe, KS

Honestly, I think that's sound advice. It's a great place to live if you have kids.

Bwana
06-10-2010, 01:31 PM
I want to move...suggestions on how to do so?


Rent a Uhaul? :shrug:

http://www.google.com/url?source=imgres&ct=img&q=http://www.chicagonow.com/blogs/garrard-mcclendon-live/uhaul.jpg&sa=X&ei=uC4RTPfIAZz4MPqusPAC&ved=0CAQQ8wc4AQ&usg=AFQjCNH2e25rdDMKpoPN6v5kfvjM7WpsEg

kc rush
06-10-2010, 01:32 PM
I personally would make a list of cities I'd be interested in and compare them online first. I'd check for cost of living, job availability, school quality, and if there are things there that I would enjoy doing.

After narrowing things down a bit, I'd take a mini-vacation to check out to those places in person before sending out resumes. I wouldn't move until I had a job in hand.

If you do move after getting the job, maybe you can negotiate some moving expenses with your hire.

MichaelH
06-10-2010, 01:46 PM
I'd decide on where you want to live and whether its urban, suburban or country. I'd also check the job market and the schools in that area. It's very hard to move into an unknown area without asking people that live there.

My wife and I moved along with our 2 1/2 year old son from Pennsylvania to North Carolina in July of 2000. I had family that lived within 30 miles but nobody that lived near where we had chosen to live. My wife accepted a job as a teacher and I thought it would be nice to live in the same neighborhood as the school. Then I saw the neighborhood. I am a country boy and her school was in an urban ghetto. I was really naive but fortunately we didn't buy a house in that area. We rented an apartment for a few years until we got to know where we wanted to live and found the good schools for our child. Ten years later I can't say we made a bad decision and am happy we moved. But with the economy today, it's much more of a gamble.

Mr. Flopnuts
06-10-2010, 02:13 PM
A lot of people are telling you to find a job first and that's great advice. But it's unrealistic in today's market. Jobs are so tight that you're going to have a hard time finding someone to interview you over the phone, and then hire you from 2000 miles away. The IT field is probably not going to land you a wine and dine session followed by an offer with a big, fat relocation deal attached to it.

Chances are if you want to move that bad, you're going to have to figure out where you want to be, and go. I would make sure to do some research on the job market in the cities you are considering. Other than that though, it's a crapshoot. That's life anyways though, isn't it?

luv
06-10-2010, 02:20 PM
A lot of people are telling you to find a job first and that's great advice. But it's unrealistic in today's market. Jobs are so tight that you're going to have a hard time finding someone to interview you over the phone, and then hire you from 2000 miles away. The IT field is probably not going to land you a wine and dine session followed by an offer with a big, fat relocation deal attached to it.

Chances are if you want to move that bad, you're going to have to figure out where you want to be, and go. I would make sure to do some research on the job market in the cities you are considering. Other than that though, it's a crapshoot. That's life anyways though, isn't it?

Or just not throw in the negotiation for the help with moving. If you go before finding a job, you'd be paying for the move yourself anyway. I'd say tell them that you are relocating, that's the reason you need some notice in scheduling the interview, but that you want to be there face to face. If they interview you, like you, and want to hire you, maybe they'll offer to help you move.

Mr. Flopnuts
06-10-2010, 02:24 PM
Or just not throw in the negotiation for the help with moving. If you go before finding a job, you'd be paying for the move yourself anyway. I'd say tell them that you are relocating, that's the reason you need some notice in scheduling the interview, but that you want to be there face to face. If they interview you, like you, and want to hire you, maybe they'll offer to help you move.

It definitely couldn't hurt to try. One advantage I think you'll have is where you live now. You're surrounded by technology and that will be appealing to prospective employers depending on where you're going.

Demonpenz
06-10-2010, 02:30 PM
Find a job first is what chumps do. Throw your hat over the fence if you want to make sure you get over the fence

CaliforniaChief
06-10-2010, 02:30 PM
If you decide to move to Leawood, I can hook you up with a realtor./Bill Cowher, John Henderson, Mike Shanahan

38yrsfan
06-10-2010, 02:35 PM
I made a major relocation about a dozen years ago. I had a great job but disliked the weather where I was living, and the crowds, and the .... anyway, decided to just move. Plans were reduce all debt or as much as possible, save as much as possible. Started 18 months before planned move time.

Mine was a bit different as I wanted to spend time with my aging parents so we moved everything to their town and put it in storage.

When were ready to start looking for a new place to live (we had a short list) the trip started. Spent 100 days camping and looking at different locations as we started from soutern New Mexico and headed north finally ending up in the Coeur d'alene are. Liked the area, jobs were available, decided to stay, rented a place, got a job, got the stuff from storage and brought it up. Soon bought a house and have managed to stay employed.

Had kids aged 4,5 and 9 at the time of the move along with multiple pets along - quite the camping adventure. Having a resourceful and competent wife was a huge plus as so much of the camping part was new to her.

tooge
06-10-2010, 02:59 PM
Honestly, I think that's sound advice. It's a great place to live if you have kids.

and dont mind traffic and chain restaurants and strip malls and no trees.

blaise
06-10-2010, 03:15 PM
and dont mind traffic and chain restaurants and strip malls and no trees.

There's a lot of trees in Olathe. And compared to most cities the traffic is nothing.

Hog Farmer
06-10-2010, 04:44 PM
I have worked for four different companies in the last 24 years and always found the job first and then moved. I was always management and therefore the company paid for my moving expense.

I suggest moving to a smaller type community where you get to know people that you deal with. The pay may not be as high but the quality of life and living expenses more than compensate for it. It's nice to be able to walk in to the local coffee shop and 10 people shout out , "Hey ,there's jerk off "

The Mad Crapper
06-10-2010, 06:26 PM
I have been thinking about moving out of Southern California for quite some time now. With my growing family, the cost to live in Southern California as well as how busy it is getting here, I really feel the need for a change, almost a fresh start somewhere.

My wife and I have been talking about it more and more and my wife is on board with moving as well. We have talked about a few other states and cities, but nothing concrete on where we want to go. We will due our due diligence and research the cites that interest us and will end up visiting them to make sure that is a place we would be happy.

With that above, how does one go about actually moving? What I mean is, the whole finding a job process. Do most people just move first then look for a job, or just find a job then move? Not much of a risk taker and always error on the side of caution.

It just seems that people move all the time and make it look so easy. It appears to be a daunting task, but perhaps it is not?

I would imagine, best case scenario is to find a job with a company in the perspective city. Be even better if they pay for the move.

Granted, I do have a 2 1/2 year old and another on the way, so it is not like I am a bachelor and can wing it by just moving and finding a job.

Anyone have some suggestions to go about this?
I am guessing it will take some time to find a job in another state or city. My guess is 12-18 months to find a good job in a place I would like to live.

I currently work in IT (have been for 12 years), but have thought about getting into teaching. We shall see though.

With that, I appreciate any insight and suggestions anyone might have.

Thanks in advance.

TCG

In this economy, unless your current employer can offer you a transfer, you will have a hard time finding work in another state if you don't already work there.

Think about it, they get hundreds maybe thousands of applications, they have to set up interviews, and they are going to thin the herd long before that by following a matrix that includes chucking all the out of state app's.

Even if your resume is stellar, chances are there are dozens more just like it of applicants who can be contacted and come in for an interview within 24 hrs. And even if you get an interview---

Are you going to pay for a plane ticket, just for an interview? If they call you up and say be here in 3 days, and you have to schedule a flight on such short notice you will pay out the ass.

My advice is get the hell out of Southern Ca. and buy a house (in alot of states a mortgage and taxes is cheaper than renting) then look for a job.

CA's got to be worse than NJ and I'm THIS CLOSE I CAN TASTE IT to finally being out of here for good.

Gracie Dean
06-10-2010, 06:30 PM
WE have always moved for a job.

After college hubby was hired IT at Wallyworld Corporate...they moved us.

We wanted to come home (back to KS) so hubby had several phone interviews and then a final interview in person . We moved ourselves home.

DaKCMan AP
06-10-2010, 06:30 PM
Get a number of perspectives on your prospective cities.

bevischief
06-10-2010, 06:44 PM
get a job to pay for it...