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mlyonsd
06-10-2010, 08:42 PM
Letter TO Representative Cliff Stearns (R-FL 6th)

Subject:
Wave the Jones Act - Accept Outside Help

To:
President Barack Obama (http://www.chiefsplanet.com/congressorg/bio/userletter/?id=3181&letter_id=5338123081)
Rep. Cliff Stearns
Sen. Bill Nelson (http://www.chiefsplanet.com/congressorg/bio/userletter/?id=10892&letter_id=5338123081)
Sen. George LeMieux (http://www.chiefsplanet.com/congressorg/bio/userletter/?id=11718&letter_id=5338123081)

June 10, 2010

I hate to say this but President Obama and the administration is a joke and what they are telling the public is totally BS especially with regards to this massive oil crisis.

As far back as mid May there were 17 countries that offered to help with containing and cleaning up the oil spill disaster. Some of the best clean up ships owned by Belgian, Dutch and the Norwegian firms are NOT being used nor is their knowledge. They are far more advanced in this type of situation then the U.S. is and probably BP.

Other countries with the expertise in oil clean-up protocols that offered their services are: Canada, Mexico, Korea, Croatia, France, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Russia, Spain, Sweden, the United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom and Vietnam. Also, the organizations also offered their assistance: the European Union, including the European Maritime Safety Agency, the environmental unit of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, and the United Nations Environment Program and the International Maritime Organization.

Coast Guard Lt. Commander, Chris O'Neil, the reason why says is because they do not meet "the operational requirements of the Unified Area Command." One of those operational requirements is that vessels comply with the Jones Act.

The Jones Act is a protectionist law that requires vessels working in US waters be built in the US and be crewed by US workers. However, our illustrious President can wave the Jones Act with the strike of a pen like President George W. Bush administration did in the days following hurricane Katrina.

White House Spokesman Robert Gibbs said when asked about the waiver being granted, "If there is the need for any type of waiver, that would obviously be granted, but, we've not had that problem thus far."

Okay, So how long is this laid back administration going to wait before they issue a waver of the Jones Ace and allow the outside countries to come in and help. Hasn't enough of our coastline already been affected? Haven't enough people lost their jobs and more then likely their livelihood? Hasn't the habitat and environment in the gulf and along our shores suffered enough? When is enough? When the oil goes around the tip of Florida and connects with the Gulf Stream and affects the entire eastern United States.

SORRY TO SAY MR. PRESIDENT BUT THAT IS TO LATE AS A MATTER OF FACT NOT WAVING THE JONES ACT FOR THE LAST 52 DAYS WAS A BIG MISTAKE. THE LONGER YOU CONTINUE TO REFUSE TO NOT WAVE THE ACT THE BIGGER YOUR MISTAKE BECOMES. YES WE WILL HOLD YOU AND YOU ADMINISTRATION ACCOUNTABLE FOR ONE OF THE LARGEST ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTERS IN HISTORY. SOMETHING NICE TO BE TAGGED WITH....THE PRESIDENT THAT WAITED TO LONG.

The tide can be turned (no pun intended) if you wave the Jones Act and allow these outside countries that are waiting to give us aid to do so. Also, the tide can turn for you if you finally show the American People that you finally took control.

Visiting the gulf does not good because when you leave and go back to your cozy office in the White House the States, people and businesses are still left to deal with the problem that they look out the window and see every day.

WAVE THE JONES ACT AND DO IT NOW AND STOP THE POLITICS!!!!!

http://www.congress.org/congressorg/bio/userletter/?letter_id=5338123081

Chiefshrink
06-10-2010, 08:57 PM
Of course he refused help from other countries. He wanted to take advantage of the crisis to demonize the capitalistic oil industry as good Marxists always take advantage of doing when given the chance. He just didn't plan on this loooooooong of a crisis which has come back to bite him in the ass.

He put off Jindal as long as he could until his poll #'s started tanking even furthur because if he would have addressed Jindal's requests immediately it makes Jindal look like a leader who knows what he is doing in a crisis:rolleyes:

blaise
06-11-2010, 06:03 AM
Shouldn't he have said Waive the Jones Act?

mlyonsd
06-11-2010, 08:33 AM
Shouldn't he have said Waive the Jones Act?

ROFL Good catch. That's the way it sits on the congress web site.

HonestChieffan
06-11-2010, 09:06 AM
The letter was from a constituent. Sumtimes thay spel funy

BucEyedPea
06-11-2010, 10:39 AM
Well, didn't anyone know Iran offered to help? How come they're not on that list? They've had to fix numerous oil spills in their Gulf. They have the experience. We don't because we haven't had as many being a capitalist country.

Guess we don't like any other country being pesky interventionists here in America.

morphius
06-11-2010, 10:53 AM
Of course he refused help from other countries. He wanted to take advantage of the crisis to demonize the capitalistic oil industry as good Marxists always take advantage of doing when given the chance. He just didn't plan on this loooooooong of a crisis which has come back to bite him in the ass.

He put off Jindal as long as he could until his poll #'s started tanking even furthur because if he would have addressed Jindal's requests immediately it makes Jindal look like a leader who knows what he is doing in a crisis:rolleyes:
I really had wondered if he took the approach, or lack thereof, that he did to try and push for Cap and Trade.

Bwana
06-11-2010, 01:01 PM
Barry Barry Barry. :shake: I'm surprised he isn't trying to pin it on Bush.

BucEyedPea
06-11-2010, 01:55 PM
Barry Barry Barry. :shake: I'm surprised he is trying to pin it on Bush.

Barack and the Democrats—The Ultimate Victims.

blaise
06-11-2010, 02:00 PM
It would be cool if Barry just started carrying an actual Bush Card. Then whenever a tough situation came up he could pull it out of his wallet and say, "You know what? Put this on my Bush card."

The Mad Crapper
06-11-2010, 02:11 PM
It would be cool if Barry just started carrying an actual Bush Card. Then whenever a tough situation came up he could pull it out of his wallet and say, "You know what? Put this on my Bush card."

http://www.moonbattery.com/inchargeyet.jpg

mlyonsd
06-11-2010, 02:45 PM
It would be cool if Barry just started carrying an actual Bush Card. Then whenever a tough situation came up he could pull it out of his wallet and say, "You know what? Put this on my Bush card."

If true I'm afraid not waiving the Jones Act isn't one that card could be played on:

The Jones Act is a protectionist law that requires vessels working in US waters be built in the US and be crewed by US workers. However, our illustrious President can wave the Jones Act with the strike of a pen like President George W. Bush administration did in the days following hurricane Katrina.

go bowe
06-11-2010, 05:29 PM
It would be cool if Barry just started carrying an actual Bush Card. Then whenever a tough situation came up he could pull it out of his wallet and say, "You know what? Put this on my Bush card."ROFL ROFL ROFL

go bowe
06-11-2010, 05:33 PM
If true I'm afraid not waiving the Jones Act isn't one that card could be played on:if true it makes no sense not to take whatever help we can from the rest of the world...

Lord knows we have helped all of them enough...

bevischief
06-12-2010, 06:35 PM
we are doomed...

mlyonsd
06-12-2010, 09:06 PM
I was at my own birthday party last night and a wedding reception today....what's the status on this? Has the Jone's Act been waived so Obama isn't lying anymore?

orange? Help me out here.

orange
06-12-2010, 09:22 PM
I was at my own birthday party last night and a wedding reception today....what's the status on this? Has the Jone's Act been waived so Obama isn't lying anymore?

orange? Help me out here.

Okay, I'll be happy to help you. BP claims they don't need the help. BP claims. Because BP will be paying for it.

As for the administration, they just gave BP a 48-hour ultimatum.

Got it?


Coast Guard to BP: Speed up spill cleanup

By Jay Reeves and Ray Henry - The Associated Press
Posted : Saturday Jun 12, 2010 17:25:57 EDT

ORANGE BEACH, Ala. — The Coast Guard has demanded that BP step up its efforts to contain the oil gushing into the Gulf of Mexico by the end of the weekend, telling the British oil giant that its slow pace in stopping the spill is becoming increasingly alarming as the disaster fouled the coastline in ugly new ways Saturday.

The Coast Guard sent a testy letter to BP’s chief operating officer that said the company urgently needs to pick up the pace and present a better plan to contain the spill by the time President Obama arrives on Monday for his fourth visit to the beleaguered coast. The letter, released Saturday, follows nearly two months of tense relations between BP and the government, and it reflects the growing frustration over the company’s inability to stop the largest environmental disaster in U.S. history.

The dispute escalated on the same day that ominous new signs of the tragedy emerged on the beaches of Alabama. Waves of unsightly brown surf hit the shores in Orange Beach, leaving stinking, dark piles of oil that dried in the hot sun and extended up to 12 feet from the water’s edge for as far as the eye could see.

It was the worst hit yet to Alabama beaches. Tar-like globs have washed up periodically throughout the disaster, but Saturday’s pollution was significantly worse.

“This is awful,” said Shelley Booker of Shreveport, La., who was staying in a condominium with her teenage daughter and her friends near the deserted beach about 100 miles from the site of the spill.

Scientists have estimated that anywhere between about 40 million gallons to 109 million gallons of oil have spewed into the Gulf since a drilling rig exploded April 20, killing 11 workers. The latest cap installed on the blown-out well is capturing about 650,000 gallons of oil a day, but large quantities are still spilling into the sea.

The Coast Guard initially sent a letter to BP on Wednesday asking for more details on its plans to contain the oil. BP responded, saying a new system to trap much more oil should be complete by mid-July. That system’s new design is meant to better withstand the force of hurricanes and could capture about 2 million gallons of oil daily when finished, the company said.

But Coast Guard Rear Adm. James A. Watson said in a follow-up letter Friday he was concerned that BP’s plans were inadequate, especially in light of revised estimates this week that indicated the size of the spill could be up to twice as large as previously thought.

“BP must identify in the next 48 hours additional leak containment capacity that could be operationalized and expedited to avoid the continued discharge of oil. ... Recognizing the complexity of this challenge, every effort must be expended to speed up the process,” Watson said in the letter addressed to chief operating officer Doug Suttles.

Suttles said the company will respond to the letter by Sunday night.

“We’ve got a team of people looking to see, can we accelerate some items that are in that plan and is it possible to do more,” Suttles said as he spoke to workers at a command center where he thanked BP employees and contractors for their work in cleaning up the spill. “There are some real challenges to do that, including safety.”

The letter and deadline come just before Obama is set to visit the Gulf Coast on Monday and Tuesday. On Saturday, Obama reassured British Prime Minister David Cameron that his frustration over the oil spill in the Gulf was not an attack on Britain.

The two leaders spoke by phone for 30 minutes to soothe trans-Atlantic tensions over the spill. Cameron also has been under pressure to get Obama to tone down the criticism, fearing it will hurt the millions of British retirees holding BP stock that has taken a beating in recent weeks.

Cameron’s office said the prime minister told Obama of his sadness at the disaster, while Obama said he recognized that BP was a multinational company and that his frustration “had nothing to do with national identity.”

BP is hard at work trying to find new ways to capture more oil, but officials say the only way to permanently stop the spill is a relief well that will drill sideways into the broken well and plug it with cement.

Right now, a containment cap sitting over a well pipe is siphoning off around 653,100 gallons of oil to a ship the ocean surface. That oil is then unloaded to tankers and taken ashore.

To boost its capacity, BP also plans to trap oil using lines that earlier shot heavy drilling mud deep into the well during a failed attempt to stop the flow. This time, those lines will work in reverse. Oil and gas from the well will flow up to a semi-submersible drilling rig where it will be burned in a specialized boom that BP estimates can vaporize a maximum 420,000 gallons of oil daily. Another ship should be in place by mid-July to process even more oil.

News that the federal government had given BP until the end of the weekend to speed up the oil containment was met with raised eyebrows and long sighs as locals gathered to barbecue, drink beer and listen to classic rock at a fishing benefit in Pointe a la Hache, La.

“I’ll believe it when I see it,” said Dominic Bazile, a firefighter.

Meanwhile, Gulf states affected by the disaster are putting the squeeze on BP, seeking to protect their interests amid talk of the possibility that BP may eventually file for bankruptcy.

The attorney general in Florida and the state treasurer in Louisiana want BP to put a total of $7.5 billion in escrow accounts to compensate the states and their residents for damages now and in the future. Alabama doesn’t plan to take such action, while Mississippi and Texas haven’t said what they will do.

As of the end of March, BP had only $6.8 billion in cash and cash equivalents available.

———

Associated Press writers Melissa Nelson in Pensacola Beach, Fla.; Tamara Lush in Pointe a la Hache, La.; Dave Martin in Orange Beach; Jill Lawless in London; and Harry R. Weber in Houston contributed to this report. Henry reported from Schriever, La.

orange
06-12-2010, 09:29 PM
I was at my own birthday party last night and a wedding reception today....what's the status on this? Has the Jone's Act been waived so Obama isn't lying anymore?

orange? Help me out here.

p.s. Note that that's not a letter FROM Cliff Stearns; that's a letter TO Cliff Stearns - from someone or other. I guess you read that wrong, huh.

Here's another word of advice - I don't put a lot of faith in the legal opinions of anonymous letter writers. But that's just me.

headsnap
06-12-2010, 09:34 PM
Okay, I'll be happy to help you. BP claims they don't need the help. BP claims. Because BP will be paying for it.

As for the administration, they just gave BP a 48-hour ultimatum.

Got it?

Seriously!!!!!

That answer is just politics... Obama just has to have his boogeyman...

FVCK what BP claims!!!!

that 48-hour ultimatum should have been done 480x2 hours ago!

mlyonsd
06-13-2010, 09:44 AM
p.s. Note that that's not a letter FROM Cliff Stearns; that's a letter TO Cliff Stearns - from someone or other. I guess you read that wrong, huh.

Here's another word of advice - I don't put a lot of faith in the legal opinions of anonymous letter writers. But that's just me.

You are correct, I did misinterpret who wrote the letter. I've adjusted the starter accordingly.

mlyonsd
06-13-2010, 09:55 AM
Okay, I'll be happy to help you. BP claims they don't need the help. BP claims. Because BP will be paying for it.

As for the administration, they just gave BP a 48-hour ultimatum.

Got it?

Coast Guard to BP: Speed up spill cleanup

By Jay Reeves and Ray Henry - The Associated Press
Posted : Saturday Jun 12, 2010 17:25:57 EDT

ORANGE BEACH, Ala. — The Coast Guard has demanded that BP step up its efforts to contain the oil gushing into the Gulf of Mexico by the end of the weekend, telling the British oil giant that its slow pace in stopping the spill is becoming increasingly alarming as the disaster fouled the coastline in ugly new ways Saturday.

The Coast Guard sent a testy letter to BP’s chief operating officer that said the company urgently needs to pick up the pace and present a better plan to contain the spill by the time President Obama arrives on Monday for his fourth visit to the beleaguered coast. The letter, released Saturday, follows nearly two months of tense relations between BP and the government, and it reflects the growing frustration over the company’s inability to stop the largest environmental disaster in U.S. history.

The dispute escalated on the same day that ominous new signs of the tragedy emerged on the beaches of Alabama. Waves of unsightly brown surf hit the shores in Orange Beach, leaving stinking, dark piles of oil that dried in the hot sun and extended up to 12 feet from the water’s edge for as far as the eye could see.

It was the worst hit yet to Alabama beaches. Tar-like globs have washed up periodically throughout the disaster, but Saturday’s pollution was significantly worse.

“This is awful,” said Shelley Booker of Shreveport, La., who was staying in a condominium with her teenage daughter and her friends near the deserted beach about 100 miles from the site of the spill.

Scientists have estimated that anywhere between about 40 million gallons to 109 million gallons of oil have spewed into the Gulf since a drilling rig exploded April 20, killing 11 workers. The latest cap installed on the blown-out well is capturing about 650,000 gallons of oil a day, but large quantities are still spilling into the sea.

The Coast Guard initially sent a letter to BP on Wednesday asking for more details on its plans to contain the oil. BP responded, saying a new system to trap much more oil should be complete by mid-July. That system’s new design is meant to better withstand the force of hurricanes and could capture about 2 million gallons of oil daily when finished, the company said.

But Coast Guard Rear Adm. James A. Watson said in a follow-up letter Friday he was concerned that BP’s plans were inadequate, especially in light of revised estimates this week that indicated the size of the spill could be up to twice as large as previously thought.

“BP must identify in the next 48 hours additional leak containment capacity that could be operationalized and expedited to avoid the continued discharge of oil. ... Recognizing the complexity of this challenge, every effort must be expended to speed up the process,” Watson said in the letter addressed to chief operating officer Doug Suttles.

Suttles said the company will respond to the letter by Sunday night.

“We’ve got a team of people looking to see, can we accelerate some items that are in that plan and is it possible to do more,” Suttles said as he spoke to workers at a command center where he thanked BP employees and contractors for their work in cleaning up the spill. “There are some real challenges to do that, including safety.”

The letter and deadline come just before Obama is set to visit the Gulf Coast on Monday and Tuesday. On Saturday, Obama reassured British Prime Minister David Cameron that his frustration over the oil spill in the Gulf was not an attack on Britain.

The two leaders spoke by phone for 30 minutes to soothe trans-Atlantic tensions over the spill. Cameron also has been under pressure to get Obama to tone down the criticism, fearing it will hurt the millions of British retirees holding BP stock that has taken a beating in recent weeks.

Cameron’s office said the prime minister told Obama of his sadness at the disaster, while Obama said he recognized that BP was a multinational company and that his frustration “had nothing to do with national identity.”

BP is hard at work trying to find new ways to capture more oil, but officials say the only way to permanently stop the spill is a relief well that will drill sideways into the broken well and plug it with cement.

Right now, a containment cap sitting over a well pipe is siphoning off around 653,100 gallons of oil to a ship the ocean surface. That oil is then unloaded to tankers and taken ashore.

To boost its capacity, BP also plans to trap oil using lines that earlier shot heavy drilling mud deep into the well during a failed attempt to stop the flow. This time, those lines will work in reverse. Oil and gas from the well will flow up to a semi-submersible drilling rig where it will be burned in a specialized boom that BP estimates can vaporize a maximum 420,000 gallons of oil daily. Another ship should be in place by mid-July to process even more oil.

News that the federal government had given BP until the end of the weekend to speed up the oil containment was met with raised eyebrows and long sighs as locals gathered to barbecue, drink beer and listen to classic rock at a fishing benefit in Pointe a la Hache, La.

“I’ll believe it when I see it,” said Dominic Bazile, a firefighter.

Meanwhile, Gulf states affected by the disaster are putting the squeeze on BP, seeking to protect their interests amid talk of the possibility that BP may eventually file for bankruptcy.

The attorney general in Florida and the state treasurer in Louisiana want BP to put a total of $7.5 billion in escrow accounts to compensate the states and their residents for damages now and in the future. Alabama doesn’t plan to take such action, while Mississippi and Texas haven’t said what they will do.

As of the end of March, BP had only $6.8 billion in cash and cash equivalents available.

———

Associated Press writers Melissa Nelson in Pensacola Beach, Fla.; Tamara Lush in Pointe a la Hache, La.; Dave Martin in Orange Beach; Jill Lawless in London; and Harry R. Weber in Houston contributed to this report. Henry reported from Schriever, La.


That article addresses containment at the well site, not collection at the shoreline.

orange
06-13-2010, 11:24 AM
That article addresses containment at the well site, not collection at the shoreline.

Far too long to repeat here:

http://mediamatters.org/research/201006110023
http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2010/06/11/95780/transcript-of-adm-thad-allens.html
http://www.enewspf.com/index.php/latest-news/latest-national/16871-press-briefing-by-national-incident-commander-for-deepwater-bp-oil-spill-response-june-10-2010

Short form - they are using aid from other countries - including skimmers. They haven't needed to waive the Jones Act for any of it. Meanwhile, there are still thousands of domestic resources available.

....

There's only so much you can do with skimmers. The surface oil is not the problem, it's the underwater plumes. That's my own take.

Dylan
06-13-2010, 11:37 PM
Obama really should have stayed in Chicago as a street organizer



Houston Chronicle

U.S. and BP slow to accept Dutch expertise
By LOREN STEFFY

Three days after the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico, the Dutch government offered to help.

It was willing to provide ships outfitted with oil-skimming booms, and it proposed a plan for building sand barriers to protect sensitive marshlands.

The response from the Obama administration and BP, which are coordinating the cleanup: “The embassy got a nice letter from the administration that said, ‘Thanks, but no thanks,'” said Geert Visser, consul general for the Netherlands in Houston.

Now, almost seven weeks later, as the oil spewing from the battered well spreads across the Gulf and soils pristine beaches and coastline, BP and our government have reconsidered.

U.S. ships are being outfitted this week with four pairs of the skimming booms airlifted from the Netherlands and should be deployed within days. Each pair can process 5 million gallons of water a day, removing 20,000 tons of oil and sludge.

At that rate, how much more oil could have been removed from the Gulf during the past month?

The uncoordinated response to an offer of assistance has become characteristic of this disaster's response. Too often, BP and the government don't seem to know what the other is doing, and the response has seemed too slow and too confused.

Federal law has also hampered the assistance. The Jones Act, the maritime law that requires all goods be carried in U.S. waters by U.S.-flagged ships, has prevented Dutch ships with spill-fighting equipment from entering U.S. coastal areas.

“What's wrong with accepting outside help?” Visser asked. “If there's a country that's experienced with building dikes and managing water, it's the Netherlands.”

Even if, three days after the rig exploded, it seemed as if the Dutch equipment and expertise wasn't needed, wouldn't it have been better to accept it, to err on the side of having too many resources available rather than not enough?

BP has been inundated with well-intentioned cleanup suggestions, but the Dutch offer was different. It came through official channels, from a government offering to share its demonstrated expertise.

Many in the U.S., including the president, have expressed frustration with the handling of the cleanup. In the Netherlands, the response would have been different, Visser said.

There, the government owns the cleanup equipment, including the skimmers now being deployed in the Gulf.

“If there's a spill in the Netherlands, we give the oil companies 12 hours to react,” he said.

If the response is inadequate or the companies are unprepared, the government takes over and sends the companies the bill.

While the skimmers should soon be in use, the plan for building sand barriers remains more uncertain. Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal supports the idea, and the Coast Guard has tentatively approved the pro-ject. One of the proposals being considered was developed by the Dutch marine contractor Van Oord and Deltares, a Dutch research institute that specializes in environmental issues in deltas, coastal areas and rivers. They have a strategy to begin building 60-mile-long sand dikes within three weeks.

That proposal, like the offer for skimmers, was rebuffed but later accepted by the government. BP has begun paying about $360 million to cover the costs. Once again, though, the Jones Act may be getting in the way. American dredging companies, which lack the dike-building expertise of the Dutch, want to do the work themselves, Visser said.

“We don't want to take over, but we have the equipment,” he said.

While he battles the bureaucracy, the people of Louisiana suffer, their livelihoods in jeopardy from the onslaught of oil.

“Let's forget about politics; let's get it done,” Visser said.

Loren Steffy is the Chronicle's business columnist. His commentary appears Sundays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Contact him at loren.steffy@chron.com.

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/business/steffy/7043272.html

HonestChieffan
06-14-2010, 09:15 AM
They cannot spin out of this issue.

Chief Faithful
06-14-2010, 09:18 AM
Of course he refused help from other countries. He wanted to take advantage of the crisis to demonize the capitalistic oil industry as good Marxists always take advantage of doing when given the chance. He just didn't plan on this loooooooong of a crisis which has come back to bite him in the ass.

He put off Jindal as long as he could until his poll #'s started tanking even furthur because if he would have addressed Jindal's requests immediately it makes Jindal look like a leader who knows what he is doing in a crisis:rolleyes:

Never let an opportunity for a crisis go to waste.

thecoffeeguy
06-14-2010, 09:18 AM
Okay, I'll be happy to help you. BP claims they don't need the help. BP claims. Because BP will be paying for it.

As for the administration, they just gave BP a 48-hour ultimatum.

Got it?


Coast Guard to BP: Speed up spill cleanup

By Jay Reeves and Ray Henry - The Associated Press
Posted : Saturday Jun 12, 2010 17:25:57 EDT

ORANGE BEACH, Ala. — The Coast Guard has demanded that BP step up its efforts to contain the oil gushing into the Gulf of Mexico by the end of the weekend, telling the British oil giant that its slow pace in stopping the spill is becoming increasingly alarming as the disaster fouled the coastline in ugly new ways Saturday.

The Coast Guard sent a testy letter to BP’s chief operating officer that said the company urgently needs to pick up the pace and present a better plan to contain the spill by the time President Obama arrives on Monday for his fourth visit to the beleaguered coast. The letter, released Saturday, follows nearly two months of tense relations between BP and the government, and it reflects the growing frustration over the company’s inability to stop the largest environmental disaster in U.S. history.

The dispute escalated on the same day that ominous new signs of the tragedy emerged on the beaches of Alabama. Waves of unsightly brown surf hit the shores in Orange Beach, leaving stinking, dark piles of oil that dried in the hot sun and extended up to 12 feet from the water’s edge for as far as the eye could see.

It was the worst hit yet to Alabama beaches. Tar-like globs have washed up periodically throughout the disaster, but Saturday’s pollution was significantly worse.

“This is awful,” said Shelley Booker of Shreveport, La., who was staying in a condominium with her teenage daughter and her friends near the deserted beach about 100 miles from the site of the spill.

Scientists have estimated that anywhere between about 40 million gallons to 109 million gallons of oil have spewed into the Gulf since a drilling rig exploded April 20, killing 11 workers. The latest cap installed on the blown-out well is capturing about 650,000 gallons of oil a day, but large quantities are still spilling into the sea.

The Coast Guard initially sent a letter to BP on Wednesday asking for more details on its plans to contain the oil. BP responded, saying a new system to trap much more oil should be complete by mid-July. That system’s new design is meant to better withstand the force of hurricanes and could capture about 2 million gallons of oil daily when finished, the company said.

But Coast Guard Rear Adm. James A. Watson said in a follow-up letter Friday he was concerned that BP’s plans were inadequate, especially in light of revised estimates this week that indicated the size of the spill could be up to twice as large as previously thought.

“BP must identify in the next 48 hours additional leak containment capacity that could be operationalized and expedited to avoid the continued discharge of oil. ... Recognizing the complexity of this challenge, every effort must be expended to speed up the process,” Watson said in the letter addressed to chief operating officer Doug Suttles.

Suttles said the company will respond to the letter by Sunday night.

“We’ve got a team of people looking to see, can we accelerate some items that are in that plan and is it possible to do more,” Suttles said as he spoke to workers at a command center where he thanked BP employees and contractors for their work in cleaning up the spill. “There are some real challenges to do that, including safety.”

The letter and deadline come just before Obama is set to visit the Gulf Coast on Monday and Tuesday. On Saturday, Obama reassured British Prime Minister David Cameron that his frustration over the oil spill in the Gulf was not an attack on Britain.

The two leaders spoke by phone for 30 minutes to soothe trans-Atlantic tensions over the spill. Cameron also has been under pressure to get Obama to tone down the criticism, fearing it will hurt the millions of British retirees holding BP stock that has taken a beating in recent weeks.

Cameron’s office said the prime minister told Obama of his sadness at the disaster, while Obama said he recognized that BP was a multinational company and that his frustration “had nothing to do with national identity.”

BP is hard at work trying to find new ways to capture more oil, but officials say the only way to permanently stop the spill is a relief well that will drill sideways into the broken well and plug it with cement.

Right now, a containment cap sitting over a well pipe is siphoning off around 653,100 gallons of oil to a ship the ocean surface. That oil is then unloaded to tankers and taken ashore.

To boost its capacity, BP also plans to trap oil using lines that earlier shot heavy drilling mud deep into the well during a failed attempt to stop the flow. This time, those lines will work in reverse. Oil and gas from the well will flow up to a semi-submersible drilling rig where it will be burned in a specialized boom that BP estimates can vaporize a maximum 420,000 gallons of oil daily. Another ship should be in place by mid-July to process even more oil.

News that the federal government had given BP until the end of the weekend to speed up the oil containment was met with raised eyebrows and long sighs as locals gathered to barbecue, drink beer and listen to classic rock at a fishing benefit in Pointe a la Hache, La.

“I’ll believe it when I see it,” said Dominic Bazile, a firefighter.

Meanwhile, Gulf states affected by the disaster are putting the squeeze on BP, seeking to protect their interests amid talk of the possibility that BP may eventually file for bankruptcy.

The attorney general in Florida and the state treasurer in Louisiana want BP to put a total of $7.5 billion in escrow accounts to compensate the states and their residents for damages now and in the future. Alabama doesn’t plan to take such action, while Mississippi and Texas haven’t said what they will do.

As of the end of March, BP had only $6.8 billion in cash and cash equivalents available.

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Associated Press writers Melissa Nelson in Pensacola Beach, Fla.; Tamara Lush in Pointe a la Hache, La.; Dave Martin in Orange Beach; Jill Lawless in London; and Harry R. Weber in Houston contributed to this report. Henry reported from Schriever, La.

You think Obama would have done this, oh, I dont know, say 30 days ago or something. It only took him 50 days to do something? :facepalm: