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petegz28
06-16-2010, 11:52 AM
http://greensummitdispatch.com/index.php/2010/06/obama-oil-spill-waterloo/

Stuart FL, June 16, 2010 – While here in Southern Florida I’ve been asking a lot of questions of residents in this coastal city. It does not take long for the conversations to turn to the oil spill and the lack of success at containing or stopping the leak.

I spoke to a local Fishing Boat Captain and his mate who had little to say other than it was certainly coming this way, and that it was a terrible shame. His business is volume driven. The more tourists he can put on his boat the better he does. His prices are incredibly reasonable at $20.00 for observers and $40.00 for those who will fish and require a fishing license. You go out either at eight in the morning or at one in the afternoon and they can accommodate up to fifty-six people on board.

There are at least three families that depend on that boat and the tourist season to provide a living for the full year. This is not a large business but if you count the number of those types of businesses here in the southeastern coast of Florida, you can see that they will be affected greatly if the oil comes up the coast as it is expected.

Much like Jimmy Carter’s ABC’s Nightline predecessor counted the days in captivity, so now every news cast is showing the number of days that oil has been spilling into the Gulf.

Reuters today has a very good timeline of the gulf oil spill (http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE65F05V20100616) that when you quickly review it you can see how poorly aimed are President Obama’s statements and actions.

Nine Days after the accident, President Obama pledged the total available resources of the US, including the military to contain the spill. Why wait seven days? Why not the morning after?

Ten Days after the accident, in a terrible economy, the administration announces a moratorium on drilling until the causes of the incident are known. How is this helping contain the spill? What specifically have they done to contain the spill while BP works on stopping it?

Twelve Days after the accident, President Obama travels the region and nothing much comes of it. How is that helping contain the spill, or the citizens of the affected area?

Twenty Four Days after the accident, President Obama slams companies involved for trying to pass the buck. How is the President helping the situation with his comments?

Thirty Eight Days after the accident, President Obama tours Louisiana and paraphrases a well worn line from President Truman, “I am the president, the buck stops with me”. How is that visit and the sound bite helping to contain the spill? Where are all the resources available to the US and other deep water drilling countries who can help?

Forty Two Days after the accident, the administration’s Justice Department launches a Criminal and Civil investigation into the explosion and spill. How is that helping contain the spill? Where are the ships and the booms and all the tools at the disposal of the United States of America?

Forty Five Days after the accident, President Obama tours the area and warns BP not to skimp on compensation to residents and businesses. How is that helping contain the spill?

Forty Nine Days after the accident, President Obama oft criticized comment about “who’s ass to kick” hits the airwaves, and just about every media outlet. How is kicking someone’s rear end going to help contain the spill? Have all the countries with deep sea drilling been contacted and asked for help in the last forty nine days?

Fifty Days after the accident, the administration tells BP that they must pay salaries of thousands of workers idled due to the moratorium on drilling. How is that helping contain the spill?

Fifty Five Days after the accident, the administration calls for BP executives to come to the White House for a meeting. Why has it taken Fifty Five Days, and how is this going to help contain the spill? Have we asked other countries for help, and where are our resources?

Fifty Six Days after the accident, President Obama gives an empty speech to the nation on prime time.

…Because there has never been a leak this size at this depth, stopping it has tested the limits of human technology. That’s why just after the rig sank, I assembled a team of our nation’s best scientists and engineers to tackle this challenge — a team led by Dr. Steven Chu, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist and our nation’s Secretary of Energy. Scientists at our national labs and experts from academia and other oil companies have also provided ideas and advice.
But make no mistake: We will fight this spill with everything we’ve got for as long as it takes. We will make BP pay for the damage their company has caused. And we will do whatever’s necessary to help the Gulf Coast and its people recover from this tragedy…
These words echo the same rhetoric from the first fifty five days. There is nothing in it that truly means anything. It says “We will…” future tense. How about “We are fighting this spill with everything we have, and we’ll worry about placing blame once it is all contained and we prevent further damage to the coastlines?” Why is all the talk from the administration about who to blame, who’s ass to kick, and who has to pay for what? Why is the discussion about inaction rather than action?

If as President Obama said last night, “We now have nearly 30,000 personnel who are working across four states to contain and clean up the oil. Thousands of ships and other vessels are responding in the Gulf. And I’ve authorized the deployment of over 17,000 National Guard members along the coast. ” why is the conversation not about how to coordinate the efforts, to marshal the resources of the US and any other nation capable of helping contain this slow moving but apparently unstoppable disaster from ruining lives?

Actions, Mr. President, speak louder than words. The actions of the Obama administration are far from helpful and far more focused on the placing of blame. To me, here in the Midwest it seems that the house is about to catch fire and we’re running around inside trying to figure out who to blame rather then dial 911 and getting the fire department out here. We seem to be, as a nation, focused on meetings, regulations and blame-placing rather than going out and grabbing a water hose and trying to put out the fire.

Perhaps we’re too far from Washington to understand the power of regulations and blame placing in containing the spill. But here in Missouri we have an old proven saying “Show Me”.

Mr. President, show us that you can lead us to solutions, not more taxes and blame placing.

Respectfully Submitted,
The Lee’s Summit Conservative

Ebolapox
06-16-2010, 11:56 AM
well written.

Donger
06-16-2010, 12:02 PM
I'd love to put the blame on the continuing spill at Obama's feet, but I can't. What do people expect him to do?

go bowe
06-16-2010, 12:09 PM
siphon the oil using the enormous suckitude of congress?

petegz28
06-16-2010, 12:12 PM
I'd love to put the blame on the continuing spill at Obama's feet, but I can't. What do people expect him to do?

Well, let's see, Donger. Waiting 2 months before he even discussed the issue with CEO of BP is unacceptable. As the article indicates, where is the National Guard? Where is the Navy? Where is the request for help from other countries, states, communitues and volunteers?

The article was spot on. As Obama walks around talking about kicking ass and filing criminal charges, he has done little if anything to actually put any action together to protect the coast from the leaking oil.

Do I expect him to plug the leak? No. Do I expect him to take actions to help prevent the spread of the spill and cleanup efforts? Yes.

KC Dan
06-16-2010, 12:15 PM
I'd love to put the blame on the continuing spill at Obama's feet, but I can't. What do people expect him to do?
Three words - "BE A LEADER"!

Donger
06-16-2010, 12:23 PM
Well, let's see, Donger. Waiting 2 months before he even discussed the issue with CEO of BP is unacceptable. As the article indicates, where is the National Guard? Where is the Navy? Where is the request for help from other countries, states, communitues and volunteers?

The article was spot on. As Obama walks around talking about kicking ass and filing criminal charges, he has done little if anything to actually put any action together to protect the coast from the leaking oil.

Do I expect him to plug the leak? No. Do I expect him to take actions to help prevent the spread of the spill and cleanup efforts? Yes.

What is the navy or the Coast Guard going to do? Do they have containment booms?

I can agree that maybe he should ask for outside help, however. That's a valid point.

petegz28
06-16-2010, 12:27 PM
What is the navy or the Coast Guard going to do? Do they have containment booms?

I can agree that maybe he should ask for outside help, however. That's a valid point.

You know, you're right. I guess we can't get booms to them for them to put out? Funny, we can get the National Guard sandbags and everything else they need to prevent floods but I guess we can't get booms to Naval and Coast Guard ships to deploy?

BucEyedPea
06-16-2010, 12:27 PM
I'm closer to the oil spill than anyone in southern Florida. I am two blocks from the Gulf Coast in central Florida. I think it's a little unfair to call this Obama's waterloo as if one man can fix this leak when scientists and businessman familiar with this industry haven't been able to fix it. He may have been the "messiah" to many but he never was to me. I expect his progressive and socialist supporters will hold him to god-like standards though. They're doing that right now. It's an impossible standard. If govt is so bad at running industry then how can anyone on the right think govt can do a good job stopping this leak. I don't care what the public in general think....it's too tall an order.

petegz28
06-16-2010, 12:28 PM
Obama right now, as I type this is giving his reply from the meeting this morning. And all he can do is talk about how much money BP is upping.

What about plans of action????? JFC, this guy is brain dead.

petegz28
06-16-2010, 12:29 PM
I'm closer to the oil spill than anyone in southern Florida. I am two blocks from the Gulf Coast in central Florida. I think it's a little unfair to call this Obama's waterloo as if one man can fix this leak when scientists and businessman familiar with this industry haven't been able to fix it. He may have been the "messiah" to many but he never was to me.

Again, another post from someone that wants to ignore what is being said. No one is expecting him to get the leak plugged. People are expecting him to actually do things about containing the spill. How many times in the OP article was "contain the spill" used???

CoMoChief
06-16-2010, 12:30 PM
Within the first week Obama, BP, Dept of Agriculture, Env safety, engineers, scientists, and reps from other oil companies all should have gotten together to pitch ideas. PERIOD. There is absolutely no reason at all why this shouldn't have been done as soon as that thing exploded.

Baby Lee
06-16-2010, 01:20 PM
I've debated whether to pass this along, but I guess I will with the proviso that it's one person's account of what was related by another, BUT it was passed along from a doctorate in mechanical engineering concerning what was related to him by a vice-president of a large petrol concern.

They were teleconferencing on a tech issue, and the VP said every single project [top hat, junk shot, etc] has been employed solely due to government dictate. They've had a proprietary tech all [on industry side] agree would succeed, but the government has stopped them from trying. The govt comes back after every effort and informs them what attempt WILL be employed next.

Donger
06-16-2010, 01:22 PM
I've debated whether to pass this along, but I guess I will with the proviso that it's one person's account of what was related by another, BUT it was passed along from a doctorate in mechanical engineering concerning what was related to him by a vice-president of a large petrol concern.

They were teleconferencing on a tech issue, and the VP said every single project [top hat, junk shot, etc] has been employed solely due to government dictate. They've had a proprietary tech all agree would succeed, but the government has stopped them from trying. The govt comes back after every effort and informs them what attempt WILL be employed next.

Okay, if accurate, that's just plain stupid.

petegz28
06-16-2010, 01:23 PM
Okay, if accurate, that's just plain stupid.

Not if your are trying to capitalize on the crisis.

Hydrae
06-16-2010, 01:23 PM
Excellent article. Rep to Phobia! :D

petegz28
06-16-2010, 01:31 PM
I've debated whether to pass this along, but I guess I will with the proviso that it's one person's account of what was related by another, BUT it was passed along from a doctorate in mechanical engineering concerning what was related to him by a vice-president of a large petrol concern.

They were teleconferencing on a tech issue, and the VP said every single project [top hat, junk shot, etc] has been employed solely due to government dictate. They've had a proprietary tech all [on industry side] agree would succeed, but the government has stopped them from trying. The govt comes back after every effort and informs them what attempt WILL be employed next.

If true that could be devistating to Obama. "Oh, we had a fix but I wouldn't let them use it"

Phobia
06-16-2010, 10:13 PM
Excellent article. Rep to Phobia! :D

I can't take any credit other than forming a partnership with the guy. He's a quality writer. I'm hoping to partner with a liberal viewpoint very soon.

Dave Lane
06-17-2010, 01:01 AM
I'd love to put the blame on the continuing spill at Obama's feet, but I can't. What do people expect him to do?

This times a million. I wouldn't blame Bush if he was in office why blame a president at all other than to just be a hater. I may as well blame Fred Phelps at least he is praying for disaster to befall the US. Why not blame the junior senator from North Carolina whoever that is. It makes as much sense.

Dave Lane
06-17-2010, 01:02 AM
Oh and a major dumb ass article.

Phobia
06-17-2010, 05:15 AM
Wait a minute, Dave. You didn't like an article written by a guy who calls himself the Lee's Summit Conservative? This is shocking and perplexing. I'm not sure how my day will go now that it started so backwards.

Deberg_1990
06-17-2010, 06:44 AM
How much oil is down there? What if they just let it continue to leak...how long before it would just run dry?

BucEyedPea
06-17-2010, 07:58 AM
Again, another post from someone that wants to ignore what is being said.
I wasn't commenting only on what was being said, Speech Nazi. I'll add whatever I think relates to this crisis.

No one is expecting him to get the leak plugged. People are expecting him to actually do things about containing the spill. How many times in the OP article was "contain the spill" used???

Same difference. No one so far, private or public has had a solution for that either. That's what an engineer or scientist is for not a politician. There really isn't a whole lot he can do about containing it. No president is expect to have that kind of expertise. He's not the Messiah. That's why his own supporters in the media are going after him now...because he failed at being God.

Now stop ignoring what was being said.

BucEyedPea
06-17-2010, 08:04 AM
They were teleconferencing on a tech issue, and the VP said every single project [top hat, junk shot, etc] has been employed solely due to government dictate. They've had a proprietary tech all [on industry side] agree would succeed, but the government has stopped them from trying. The govt comes back after every effort and informs them what attempt WILL be employed next.

Well, if this is truly the case, then it is the belief in govt as a religion or the secular God the left believes in as superior to business interests that is the root of the problem here. That falls not just on Obama and his administration but the whole philosophy of the lefties and their irrational hatred of private business or corporations.

alpha_omega
06-17-2010, 08:21 AM
I wouldn't blame Bush if he was in office why blame a president at all ...

You might not, but others would.

Chiefshrink
06-17-2010, 08:40 AM
Excellent write up Phobs! Coincides with the behind the scenes details of this WSJ piece yesterday a.m:thumb:

Hey all you Marxist Libs!!! Would have loved to see how differently Palin would have handled this environmental catastrophe:D

Oh but she is an "uneducated bumbling dolt" with no experience, right???:rolleyes:

Let's review: She has successfully governed a State and has quite a bit of success dealing with oil cos. hmmm::hmmm::hmmm: Yet she is a "bumbling uneducated dolt"?:spock:

Bottom line: Inept and Incompetent Obama is getting severely "HUMBLED"! And the funny part is that he is bringing much of this on himself by his "inaction" which is purposeful for politicizing his agenda while the folks in the gulf suffer for his "politicizing".:shake:


http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703627704575298851812383216.html?mod=WSJ_hpp_MIDDLENexttoWhatsNewsTop

Slippery Start: U.S. Response to Spill Falters
Officials Changed Their Minds on Key Moves, and Disagreements Flared Between Agencies; Boom Taken Away From Alabama

By JEFFREY BALL And JONATHAN WEISMAN

On May 19, almost a month after BP PLC's Deepwater Horizon rig exploded, the White House tallied its response to the resulting oil spill. Twenty thousand people had been mobilized to protect the shore and wildlife. More than 1.38 million feet of containment boom had been set to trap oil. And 655,000 gallons of petroleum-dispersing chemicals had been injected into the Gulf of Mexico.


Investors were relieved by BP's decision to suspend dividends, hoping it would ease pressure on the company over its handling of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. Grainne McCarthy, David Weidner and Guy Chazan discuss. Also, David Wessel discusses America's system of home ownership, saying that although it has been celebrated for putting so many families into their own homes, it has become, as one economist put it, "a case study in failure."
.That same day, as oil came ashore on Louisiana's Gulf coast, thousands of feet of boom sat on a dock in Terrebonne Parish, waiting for BP contractors to install it. Two more days would pass before it was laid offshore.

The federal government sprang into action early following the vast BP oil spill. But along the beaches and inlets of the Gulf, signs abound that the response has faltered.

A Wall Street Journal examination of the government response, based on federal documents and interviews with White House, Coast Guard, state and local officials, reveals that confusion over what to do delayed some decision-making. There were disagreements among federal agencies and between national, state and local officials.

A Journal examination shows that the effort to contain the Gulf spill was hobbled by confusion and disagreements among federal, state and local officials.
.The Coast Guard and BP each had written plans for responding to a massive Gulf oil spill. Both now say their plans failed to anticipate a disaster threatening so much coastline at once. The federal government, which under the law is in charge of fighting large spills, had to make things up as it went along.

PM Report: BP Halts Dividend, Earmarks $20 Billion
10:00

BP said it was suspending dividend payments for much of this year and created a $20 billion fund to pay injured parties. Alan Murray and Joe White discuss. Also, Steven Gillon, a presidential historian discusses Barack Obama's leadership style in the context of other presidents who have faced serious crises.
.Federal officials changed their minds on key moves, sometimes more than once. Chemical dispersants to break up the oil were approved, then judged too toxic, then re-approved. The administration criticized, debated and then partially approved a proposal by Louisiana politicians to build up eroded barrier islands to keep the oil at bay.

"We have to learn to be more flexible, more adaptable and agile," says Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the federal government's response leader, in an interview. Because two decades have passed since the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska, he says, "you have an absence of battle-hardened veterans" in the government with experience fighting a massive spill. "There's a learning curve involved in that."

It is unclear to what extent swifter or more decisive action by the government would have protected the Gulf's fragile coastline. The White House's defenders say the spill would have overwhelmed any defense, no matter how well coordinated.

.President Barack Obama, in his address to the nation Tuesday night, said that "a mobilization of this speed and magnitude will never be perfect, and new challenges will always arise." He added: "If there are problems in the operation, we will fix them."

Under federal law, oil companies operating offshore must file plans for responding to big spills. The Coast Guard oversees the preparation of government plans. In the event of a spill, the oil company is responsible for enacting its plan and paying for the cleanup, subject to federal oversight. If the spill is serious enough, the government takes charge, directing the response.

BP's plan, submitted to the Minerals Management Service, envisioned containing a spill far larger than government estimates of the Gulf spill. Among other things, it said it would hire contractors to skim oil from the water, spray chemical dispersants on the slick and lay boom along the coast.

Response Scorecard

.Two pictures are emerging of the government's response to the U.S.'s biggest environmental disaster. The federal government was engaged early on and responded forcefully. But along the beaches and inlets of the Gulf of Mexico, there are plenty of signs that the response has faltered. See details on three flanks: boom, chemical dispersants and berms.
.The Coast Guard's spill-response plan for the area around New Orleans, updated in August 2009, said that laying boom would be one of the main ways to protect the coastline.

When Adm. Allen took charge of fighting the BP spill, he found that both sets of plans were inadequate for such a large and complex spill.

"Clearly some things could have been done better," says a BP spokesman about the company's response, which he says has been "unparalleled."

President Obama first heard of the problem the night of April 20, when a senior National Security Council aide pulled him aside to tell him a drilling rig 50 miles off the Louisiana coast had exploded. It would be "potentially a big problem," the aide said.

Adm. Allen, then the Coast Guard's commandant, was dispatched to the scene; he later said he knew right away the spill would be serious. The next day, Interior Department Deputy Secretary David Hayes flew to Louisiana to set up a command center, leaving Washington in such haste that he had to buy a change of underwear at a Louisiana K-Mart.

On April 22, the day the rig sank, the president convened his first Oval Office meeting on the disaster, with Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and others. As far as they knew, no oil was leaking.

Two days later, the White House received word that oil was escaping into the Gulf. White House science adviser John Holdren, an environmental scientist, pulled aside two top security officials, White House counterterrorism adviser John Brennan and National Security Council chief of staff Denis McDonough. He pressed them on what secret technology the government had—a submarine, for example—that could help, Mr. McDonough recalls.

The answer was none.

On the evening of April 28, the NSC's Mr. McDonough and a White House aide interrupted a meeting in the White House's secure situation room. Oil was gushing faster than previously believed. Officials now expected the oil sheen to reach the Louisiana coast the next day.

.The federal government's priority was to keep the oil offshore, partly by laying boom. The coast has hundreds of miles of inlets, islands and marshes, which makes that strategy difficult. "There's not enough boom in the world to boom from Texas to Florida, so we're doing triage," Benjamin Cooper, a Coast Guard commander, told shrimpers and other residents in Dulac, La., in mid-May.

There were problems from the start. The first weekend in May, when the president made his initial trip to the region, the water was rough. Contractors hired by BP to lay boom off St. Bernard Parish, east of New Orleans, mostly stayed ashore, says Fred Everhardt, a councilman. Shrimpers took matters into their own hands, laying 18,000 feet of boom that weekend, compared to the roughly 4,000 feet laid by the BP contractor, Mr. Everhardt says. BP did not respond to requests for comment about the incident.

Edwin Stanton, the Coast Guard official in charge of the New Orleans region, says workers overseen by the government had laid tens of thousands of feet of boom the first week of the spill. But he acknowledges problems getting it to the right place. He says the Coast Guard decided it needed to accommodate local parish presidents, who all demanded boom even though they all didn't equally need it. Without the competing demands, he says, "we might have been able to use what boom we had to greater effect."

To make matters worse, the government didn't have the right kind of boom. Boom built for open ocean is bigger and stronger than that made for flat, sheltered water. The bigger boom is expensive and was in short supply, Mr. Stanton says.

"We really didn't have the appropriate boom sizes," he says. "I think we would have liked to put out open-water boom at the big passes, but we just didn't have enough."

As the oil spread east, Alabama Gov. Bob Riley wanted to stop it from crossing into Perdido Bay, a key to Alabama and Florida's fishing and tourism industries. In mid-May, the governor and Coast Guard officials worked out a plan to hold the oil back using heavy boom built for open ocean. Alabama authorities scoured the globe for the boom they needed, says a spokesman for the governor.

In late May, they found it in Bahrain and flew it to the Alabama coast. Days later, the Coast Guard gave it to Louisiana.

Mr. Riley was furious. The Coast Guard and Alabama authorities instead deployed lighter boom. On June 10, oil breached Perdido Bay.

"This isn't a fight between Louisiana and Alabama, it's not between governors," the governor's spokesman says. "But it is incredibly disappointing to have those resources taken from us."

A spokesman for Adm. Allen says the boom was needed to protect a bay in Louisiana, and was taken "well before oil was in sight off Alabama."

Louisiana officials, frustrated that the boom wasn't working, proposed building sand "berms" along the coast to block oil from reaching shore. Dredges would suck sand from the sea floor and spray it in a protective arc along barrier islands. On May 11, state officials asked the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for an emergency permit to build some 130 miles of berms.

Several federal agencies criticized the proposal. In written comments to the Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency said the berms might not be built in time to stop oil from hitting shore. It worried the process might spread oil-tainted sand and change the water's flow, possibly hurting marshes. White House officials also were skeptical.

Frustrated by the delay, Louisiana's Republican governor, Bobby Jindal, sent the Louisiana Army National Guard to plug gaps in barrier islands, for which the state had legal authority.

EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson was worried about another threat: the use of dispersants, chemicals designed to break oil into particles that can be digested by bacteria. BP was using unprecedented amounts—about 1.3 million gallons so far, according to federal officials.

According to EPA data, one dispersant, Corexit 9500, is especially toxic to the shrimp and fish used in tests. But it was available in large quantities, so that's what BP was using.

On May 10, with the boom and berm plans foundering, Ms. Jackson met about 25 Louisiana State University scientists to discuss the spill. Most of the scientists urged her not to let BP spray dispersants directly at the leaking well without more research, recalls Robert Carney, one of the LSU professors. Ms. Jackson responded that the EPA was "under extreme pressure from BP" to approve the move, Mr. Carney recalls. An EPA official confirmed Ms. Jackson met with the LSU scientists.

Five days later, the EPA said it would let BP spray the dispersant on the wellhead.

In mid-May, large globs of oil started washing ashore.

The EPA, under pressure from scientists and environmental groups, abruptly turned against using the dispersant Corexit. On May 20, a day after Ms. Jackson was grilled by lawmakers, the EPA said it had given BP until that night to find a less-toxic alternative or explain why it couldn't. "We felt it was important to ensure that all possible options were being explored," Ms. Jackson said.

BP responded in a letter that makers of other dispersants wouldn't be able to supply large volumes for 10 to 14 days. It said it intended to keep using Corexit, which it said "appears to have fewer long-term effects than other dispersants."

In Terrebonne Parish, BP contractors still hadn't installed the boom, angering Coast Guard officials. "I could just see the fury in their eyes," Michel Claudet, parish president, says of the Coast Guard officials. The poor coordination with BP contractors, he says, "was just a common occurrence." Boom installation finally began on May 21.

Interior Secretary Salazar lit into BP on a trip to Louisiana, threatening to "push them out of the way" and let the government take over ground-level operations. He was contradicted by the Coast Guard's Adm. Allen, who suggested the government didn't have the technical know-how to fight the spill alone.

On May 24, the EPA's Ms. Jackson said the agency wouldn't stop BP from using Corexit, after all, given the lack of alternatives. She said BP would have to "significantly" cut the amount it was using while it and the EPA looked for a better approach.

Louisiana's Gov. Jindal was losing patience. That same day, Homeland Security Secretary Napolitano traveled to Gulf and poured cold water on Louisiana's berm plan. The administration, she said, was looking into "some responses that would be as effective" without the environmental risks.

Standing by Ms. Napolitano, Mr. Jindal didn't disguise his frustration. "We know we have to take action and take matters into our own hands if we are going to win this fight to protect our coast," he said.

On May 27, the administration changed course on the berms. The Corps of Engineers authorized construction of about 40 miles of the 130 miles of berm proposed by Louisiana. Complicating matters, Adm. Allen ordered BP to pay for only a small portion of the 40 miles, to "assess" their effectiveness.

Mr. Obama got an earful when he met state and parish officials the next day on a visit to Grand Isle, a barrier island south of New Orleans. BP crews had arrived prior to the president's arrival and worked feverishly to tidy up the beaches. They left after he flew out.

Before leaving, the president ordered Adm. Allen to look into building more berms. On June 1, Adm. Allen convened a meeting in New Orleans, where Gov. Jindal and parish chiefs demanded BP pay for more berms. The next day, Adm. Allen said the administration was ordering BP to pay for all 40 miles authorized. The work began Sunday.

Write to Jeffrey Ball at jeffrey.ball@wsj.com and Jonathan Weisman at jonathan.weisman@wsj.com

Dave Lane
06-17-2010, 01:40 PM
Wait a minute, Dave. You didn't like an article written by a guy who calls himself the Lee's Summit Conservative? This is shocking and perplexing. I'm not sure how my day will go now that it started so backwards.

I think its retarded to assume that anyone anywhere could do something about the leak. If they could it would be fixed plain and simple. And to the guy who's "friend" knows that everyone knows and universally agrees how to stop the leak but the government stopped them nonsense, please! If BP knew how to fix this they would have done it already. Its their profits and exposure that are at risk. The government is not going to say no you can't do that.

petegz28
06-17-2010, 02:01 PM
I wasn't commenting only on what was being said, Speech Nazi. I'll add whatever I think relates to this crisis.



Same difference. No one so far, private or public has had a solution for that either. That's what an engineer or scientist is for not a politician. There really isn't a whole lot he can do about containing it. No president is expect to have that kind of expertise. He's not the Messiah. That's why his own supporters in the media are going after him now...because he failed at being God.

Now stop ignoring what was being said.

No, you will not!!! :D

banyon
06-17-2010, 02:14 PM
If true that could be devistating to Obama. "Oh, we had a fix but I wouldn't let them use it"

That CAN'T be the conclusion, as BP assuredly would be jumping up and down screaming at the top of their lungs what this alternative is that they're not being allowed to do (unless it's the stupid "nuke em" idea).

petegz28
06-17-2010, 02:18 PM
That CAN'T be the conclusion, as BP assuredly would be jumping up and down screaming at the top of their lungs what this alternative is that they're not being allowed to do (unless it's the stupid "nuke em" idea).

I'm not so sure. They were pretty buddy-buddy with Obama before all this started. Typically though, I would agree.

Phobia
06-17-2010, 03:54 PM
I think its retarded to assume that anyone anywhere could do something about the leak. If they could it would be fixed plain and simple. And to the guy who's "friend" knows that everyone knows and universally agrees how to stop the leak but the government stopped them nonsense, please! If BP knew how to fix this they would have done it already. Its their profits and exposure that are at risk. The government is not going to say no you can't do that.

Well, I agree with that on the surface. But the government has more resources available to it than does BP. I'm not suggesting Obama himself should know how to fix it or that he personally can do anything at all but I think that the U.S. government can probably open more doors than BP. Perhaps I'm naive.