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orange
07-02-2010, 06:31 PM
http://pre.cloudfront.goodinc.com/posts/post_full_1277929221obesity.jpg

http://www.good.is/post/this-is-where-you-re-fat/

orange
07-02-2010, 06:32 PM
An update on our collective waistline: The Trust for America's Health has a new report out, with the blunt title "F as in Fat," and the news isn't good. The map above shows America's obesity rates state by state. They hover in the 25 to 30 percent range. To put that in perspective, in 1991, no state had an obesity rate higher than 20 percent.

The report also notes the relationship between income and weight: "35.3 percent of adults earning less than $15,000 per year were obese compared with 24.5 percent of adults earning $50,000 or more per year." Part of the problem there is that a salad costs more than a Big Mac. So that's something to remedy. More cycling and walking would help, too.

Colorado has the lowest obesity rate at 19 percent. Apparently a year-round routine of uninterrupted mountain biking, rock climbing, and snowboarding more than offsets the side effects of the munchies.

Via Matt Yglesias

Mr. Flopnuts
07-02-2010, 06:35 PM
:shake: Jesus. How long until it's the skinny kids being made fun of in school and in society?

Mr. Flopnuts
07-02-2010, 06:35 PM
LMAO If there's ever a need for a draft, we're fucked.

Mr. Laz
07-02-2010, 06:42 PM
LMAO If there's ever a need for a draft, we're ****ed.
might be the best thing to ever happen if it tweren't for dat pesky war/dying part.

Pasta Giant Meatball
07-02-2010, 06:43 PM
LMAO If there's ever a need for a draft, we're ****ed.

No shit, we'd have an army of soldiers trained by Modern Warfare and Mountain Dew

Mr. Flopnuts
07-02-2010, 06:47 PM
No shit, we'd have an army of soldiers trained by Modern Warfare and Mountain Dew

Could be our saving grace. That little bit of extra hand eye coordination could come in handy considering our soldiers would have about 3-6 months less of weapons training than an opposing Nation.

While they were improving their gun skills, we'd be doing Calisthenics. ROFL

Mr. Flopnuts
07-02-2010, 06:48 PM
Oh, and L-O-L to the idiots that say people in the Pacific Northwest are more healthy.

ClevelandBronco
07-02-2010, 07:13 PM
And now we celebrate.

Sorry, no cake for the rest of you.

Fish
07-02-2010, 07:19 PM
It's times like these when we could use more man-eating predators loose in the wild...

ThaVirus
07-02-2010, 07:25 PM
It's times like these when we could use more man-eating predators loose in the wild...

I concur. Survival of the fittest, baby!

CrazyPhuD
07-02-2010, 09:56 PM
:shake: Jesus. How long until it's the skinny kids being made fun of in school and in society?

Personally I'm wondering when the obese kids start dying of heart attacks at the age of 9. I wonder if only then will the wake up call be made.

BigChiefFan
07-02-2010, 10:06 PM
Reminds me of the kids movie Wall-E, where the captains of the ship all become increasingly fatter with every generation.

RJ
07-02-2010, 10:16 PM
This map looks about right based on what I have seen in my travels.

Baconeater
07-02-2010, 10:25 PM
Not really surprising, I don't imagine there are a lot of fatasses clamoring to move to Colorado. I find it hard to believe that Minnesota and Wisconsin are right with the national average, those two states seemed to be far worse than any other place I've been to.

irishjayhawk
07-02-2010, 11:39 PM
:shake: Jesus. How long until it's the skinny kids being made fun of in school and in society?

Actually, I think that's already the case. As with anything in school, the extremes are made fun of. Nerdy/dumb, skinny/obese. Everyone's supposed to be in the middle.

KCrockaholic
07-02-2010, 11:52 PM
I see plenty of obese people in Colorado every day. I don't care what the stats say, I don't really believe them. I think most people think that because Colorado has more outdoor, physical activities to do that the people must be skinny. Sure some are...Maybe on the west side. But Co Springs is not a healthy city at all...Well at least when compared to what people make it out to be. I mean, what do these people do? Go around weighing every person in every state? Obviously not, because I haven't been weighed once since I moved to Colorado.

Dave Lane
07-02-2010, 11:53 PM
Rule 1: Cardio: cuz when the zombie invasion starts the fatties are the first to go. This one comes up in Zombieland and clearly makes alot of sense. How many fat people do you see at the end of the world when its zombies doing the ending?

boogblaster
07-02-2010, 11:55 PM
F off you skinny bastards ...

Miles
07-03-2010, 12:11 AM
I see plenty of obese people in Colorado every day. I don't care what the stats say, I don't really believe them. I think most people think that because Colorado has more outdoor, physical activities to do that the people must be skinny. Sure some are...Maybe on the west side. But Co Springs is not a healthy city at all...Well at least when compared to what people make it out to be. I mean, what do these people do? Go around weighing every person in every state? Obviously not, because I haven't been weighed once since I moved to Colorado.

It is quite noticeable around Denver where even moderately overweight people really stick out. Legitimately obese people are a fairly rare sighting.

Springs is kind of bizzaro Colorado anyway.

Baconeater
07-03-2010, 12:12 AM
I see plenty of obese people in Colorado every day. I don't care what the stats say, I don't really believe them. I think most people think that because Colorado has more outdoor, physical activities to do that the people must be skinny. Sure some are...Maybe on the west side. But Co Springs is not a healthy city at all...Well at least when compared to what people make it out to be. I mean, what do these people do? Go around weighing every person in every state? Obviously not, because I haven't been weighed once since I moved to Colorado.
Yeah I wondered what criteria they are using as well, and who knows where they get the information. Health records I guess, but maybe that just means the skinnier healthier people see a Dr more regularly there and are therefore tracked better than in other states. And funny you mentioned Colorado Springs, maybe it was just the area I was in when I visited but that city was pretty dumpy, especially when compared to the other cities along the front range.

Dave Lane
07-03-2010, 12:12 AM
I see plenty of obese people in Colorado every day. I don't care what the stats say, I don't really believe them. I think most people think that because Colorado has more outdoor, physical activities to do that the people must be skinny. Sure some are...Maybe on the west side. But Co Springs is not a healthy city at all...Well at least when compared to what people make it out to be. I mean, what do these people do? Go around weighing every person in every state? Obviously not, because I haven't been weighed once since I moved to Colorado.

Dude have you been to Kentucky or Mississippi lately? Holy fuck!

KCrockaholic
07-03-2010, 12:20 AM
I certainly have not been to Kentucky or Mississippi lately, but what I'm saying is that Colorado is not the "supreme" health state that so many people, or websites such as Yahoo! make it out to be. Maybe it's just Colorado Springs...But like I always tell people, if you want to see the true beauty of Colorado, stay away from the eastern side and make your way towards Estes Park, Aspen, and Grand Junction.

Pitt Gorilla
07-03-2010, 12:23 AM
I could have told you about the fat f*cks in Oklahoma and Arky. These people have NO desire to move at all.

irishjayhawk
07-03-2010, 12:24 AM
Weirdly, there seems to be a correlation between obesity rates and voting preferences but only barely.

Miles
07-03-2010, 12:36 AM
I certainly have not been to Kentucky or Mississippi lately, but what I'm saying is that Colorado is not the "supreme" health state that so many people, or websites such as Yahoo! make it out to be. Maybe it's just Colorado Springs...But like I always tell people, if you want to see the true beauty of Colorado, stay away from the eastern side and make your way towards Estes Park, Aspen, and Grand Junction.

You are basing those observations on Springs and it really is just Springs that may be like that. I'm not at all trying to rip on your city but it's not really a good representation of Colorado at all.

Estes Park is also very much on the Eastern side. IMO my preference of scenery in this state is in the Southern parts near Durango and Telluride.

KCrockaholic
07-03-2010, 02:48 AM
You are basing those observations on Springs and it really is just Springs that may be like that. I'm not at all trying to rip on your city but it's not really a good representation of Colorado at all.

Estes Park is also very much on the Eastern side. IMO my preference of scenery in this state is in the Southern parts near Durango and Telluride.

Rip away. It's not "my" city. I hate Colorado Springs. I'm moving back to KC asap, and likely looking for a place in Olathe. But I certainly wouldn't say Estes is "very much" on the eastern side. That's putting it in the same category as Greeley or Fowler IMO. It's northern and a bit west of Denver. Durango is a very nice area as well, but I'm not sure about Telluride. I don't even recall hearing of it...But I'll take your word for it.

Miles
07-03-2010, 03:19 AM
Rip away. It's not "my" city. I hate Colorado Springs. I'm moving back to KC asap, and likely looking for a place in Olathe. But I certainly wouldn't say Estes is "very much" on the eastern side. That's putting it in the same category as Greeley or Fowler IMO. It's northern and a bit west of Denver. Durango is a very nice area as well, but I'm not sure about Telluride. I don't even recall hearing of it...But I'll take your word for it.

Springs is pretty much the asshole of this state from what I have experienced. Too bad that your experience living in Colorado was living in Springs and I can't fault you at all for fleeing back to KC. Denver is a very great city to live in if you are considering other options.

Estes is very much on the eastern side of the mountains as well.

NewChief
07-03-2010, 06:38 AM
I certainly have not been to Kentucky or Mississippi lately, but what I'm saying is that Colorado is not the "supreme" health state that so many people, or websites such as Yahoo! make it out to be. Maybe it's just Colorado Springs...But like I always tell people, if you want to see the true beauty of Colorado, stay away from the eastern side and make your way towards Estes Park, Aspen, and Grand Junction.

It's Colorado Springs. I've been there. It's an anomaly for front range towns. I've lived in Colorado (and quite a few other places), and it is by far and noticeably healthier than other areas. There are some meccas of healthy living in other areas (Portland, OR comes to mind), often on towns that have a reputation for outdoor recreation, but Colorado, as a state, is obviously healthier. Not even close to anywhere else.

NewChief
07-03-2010, 06:43 AM
I could have told you about the fat f*cks in Oklahoma and Arky. These people have NO desire to move at all.

Fuck off. :cuss:


IN all seriousness, my mom and I were just talking about this the other day. Well... sort of. My brother lives in the country, and they tried to grow a garden once, unsuccessfully.

They eat more shitty junk food and fast food and processed food than lots of people I know. It seems to me that the trend has become for many people in rural locations to move away from growing their own food instead living on a predominantly prepackaged, processed diet while the food trend in urban areas tends to be to try to find fresh, local produce and eat "healthy" diets. I know that this is probably just based on faulty sampling from my personal experiences (and the crowds I run with in our "urban" area aren't analagous to the rural people I know), but it seemed like an interesting observation.

NewChief
07-03-2010, 06:48 AM
Rip away. It's not "my" city. I hate Colorado Springs. I'm moving back to KC asap, and likely looking for a place in Olathe. But I certainly wouldn't say Estes is "very much" on the eastern side. That's putting it in the same category as Greeley or Fowler IMO. It's northern and a bit west of Denver. Durango is a very nice area as well, but I'm not sure about Telluride. I don't even recall hearing of it...But I'll take your word for it.

When talking about Colorado, you usually talk about a few different regions:

The eastern plains (everything before the mountains start, which is basically the eastern part of the state). The front range (Denver, Springs, Ft. Collins, etc..). The eastern slope (all the mountain towns east of the continental divide) and the Western Slope (everything on the western side of the continental divide). Also "Southern Colorado" while maybe not technically correct usually refers to the area around Durango, Telluride, Ouray, Wolf Creek, etc... I think it actually is part of a different river drainage system from the eastern/western slopes... so maybe it's not technically wrong after all to label it as distinct.

The confusion comes from the fact that you're talking about looking at things on a map, which is technically correct. However, most people in Colorado (at least the ones that don't live in the eastern plains) don't even really acknowledge the existence of the eastern plains. The state, more or less, starts on the front range. As such, the continental divide divides the state's east side from the west side.

So yeah. On the map, Estes Park is fairly centrally located in the state. To a coloradoan, though, it's very much on the eastern side of the mountains. Heck, it's like a 30 minute drive from Loveland.

KC Jones
07-03-2010, 06:51 AM
This is how I describe one of my business trips back home to KC from Budapest ~12 years ago:

Budapest airport: Hot babes everywhere, maybe 1 person in 40 is overwieght. The most gorgeous woman I've ever seen is throwing a fit because she waited in the wrong line and is trying to get back home to Moscow.

Frankfort layover: Still plenty of hotties, maybe 10 in 40 is overweight.

Atlanta: hotties are hard to spot, maybe 25 of 40 is overweight.

KCI: not a babe in sight, although some register on the doable scale. Seems like 35 of 40 are overweight. Yep I'm back home.

milkman
07-03-2010, 06:55 AM
**** off. :cuss:


IN all seriousness, my mom and I were just talking about this the other day. Well... sort of. My brother lives in the country, and they tried to grow a garden once, unsuccessfully.

They eat more shitty junk food and fast food and processed food than lots of people I know. It seems to me that the trend has become for many people in rural locations to move away from growing their own food instead living on a predominantly prepackaged, processed diet while the food trend in urban areas tends to be to try to find fresh, local produce and eat "healthy" diets. I know that this is probably just based on faulty sampling from my personal experiences (and the crowds I run with in our "urban" area aren't analagous to the rural people I know), but it seemed like an interesting observation.

What's the problem?

I live on "shitty junk food and fast food and processed food".

Hell, I snack on chips most of the day, every day.

I weigh less than 150 lbs.

NewChief
07-03-2010, 06:57 AM
What's the problem?

I live on "shitty junk food and fast food and processed food".

Hell, I snack on chips most of the day, every day.

I weigh less than 150 lbs.

Meth? ;)

I'm not saying it's a problem, really. It's just interesting that a lot of rural people, who used to be the one's connected to the food source (usually out of the necessity of poverty and just because they often made their living from the land) have become disconnected from the food source. Meanwhile urban people (at least trendy ones) are now starting to take a renewed interest in their food sources.

Probably more an issue of economics than anything. People who live in the country now, often face long commutes and work in a different area than where they live. This means they don't have the time to invest in raising their own food.

Ebolapox
07-03-2010, 07:11 AM
And now we celebrate.

Sorry, no cake for the rest of you.

wait, you're in cleveland. I don't see ohio being a blue state.

Dave Lane
07-03-2010, 08:20 AM
Weirdly, there seems to be a correlation between obesity rates and voting preferences but only barely.

There is a direct correlation between education and obesity. Also between education level and religion. And if you drive through southern Illinois and southern Indiana like I did last week you can see this fact as plain as day on both counts.

Lzen
07-03-2010, 10:06 AM
The only thing about these statistics that I question is what they consider obese. Seems they are pretty stringent on that these days. But yeah, kids are fatter than they used to be. Duh. And I do believe that Colorado is the lowest. I was just vacationing near Colorado Springs and they have bike paths everywhere. Wish our local leaders would do something like that.

DaFace
07-03-2010, 10:11 AM
I see plenty of obese people in Colorado every day. I don't care what the stats say, I don't really believe them. I think most people think that because Colorado has more outdoor, physical activities to do that the people must be skinny. Sure some are...Maybe on the west side. But Co Springs is not a healthy city at all...Well at least when compared to what people make it out to be. I mean, what do these people do? Go around weighing every person in every state? Obviously not, because I haven't been weighed once since I moved to Colorado.

You don't have to weigh everyone to be able to answer a question like this. That's the whole idea behind the field of statistics.

DaFace
07-03-2010, 10:15 AM
The only thing about these statistics that I question is what they consider obese. Seems they are pretty stringent on that these days. But yeah, kids are fatter than they used to be. Duh. And I do believe that Colorado is the lowest. I was just vacationing near Colorado Springs and they have bike paths everywhere. Wish our local leaders would do something like that.

I can't tell what specific methodology they're using here, but a BMI of 30 or more is often considered to be "obese."

Pitt Gorilla
07-03-2010, 10:19 AM
**** off. :cuss:


IN all seriousness, my mom and I were just talking about this the other day. Well... sort of. My brother lives in the country, and they tried to grow a garden once, unsuccessfully.

They eat more shitty junk food and fast food and processed food than lots of people I know. It seems to me that the trend has become for many people in rural locations to move away from growing their own food instead living on a predominantly prepackaged, processed diet while the food trend in urban areas tends to be to try to find fresh, local produce and eat "healthy" diets. I know that this is probably just based on faulty sampling from my personal experiences (and the crowds I run with in our "urban" area aren't analagous to the rural people I know), but it seemed like an interesting observation.My sister and her family live in Oklahoma and are some of the only thin people in their area. I honestly don't know what the root of the problem is.

Brock
07-03-2010, 10:26 AM
There is a direct correlation between education and obesity.

No, there isn't.

CosmicPal
07-03-2010, 10:35 AM
Yeah I wondered what criteria they are using as well, and who knows where they get the information. Health records I guess.

They do these reports every year and Colorado consistently comes out on top. I may be wrong, but I heard they take the weights from whatever you put on your driver's license. Of course, many people lie about their weights.

But they also add in several factors per capita such as: outdoor activities, number of parks, number of bike paths, recreational facilities, etc.

I can say from experience that Colorado isn't a particularly thin state- it's not a fat state by any means, but I can say that a lot of people I used to work with were obese.

Coloradoans were no different than the many people I've known growing up in the KC area: we all exercised, played sports, went skiing, biking, golfing, hiking, etc. I actually skied more when I lived in KC than I ever did when I lived in Colorado. Of course, when I lived in Colorado, I did a LOT of hiking and loved it. It didn't make me lose weight though.

I do know one thing about Colorado: People drink there! There is a bar and/or brewery on every corner. I've known more people with drinking problems in Colorado than anywhere else. And these people are not thin.

I've heard that Florida is a fat state, but I don't see any difference in the size of the people here when compared to Colorado. Of course, I stay away from the bars now and hit the beach more often. So, my statistics are misrepresented by the number of chicks I see in bikinis. :D

Baconeater
07-03-2010, 11:30 AM
No, there isn't.
From what I see in my day-to-day life, I'd agree with you. I see obese people in all socioeconomic levels.

But the map says otherwise...it's no secret that the cluster of states in the southeast contains some of the most backward-ass people anywhere. I can't see how it's a coincidence.

Chief Chief
07-03-2010, 11:43 AM
Evidently the parents we have now were those kids who too often were told to think about "the starving children in India" when they tried to avoid their veggies and other non-desired food items, which has resulted in their becoming over-eaters and encouraging their kids to clean up their plates as well.

BTW, based on the colored key chart, I imagine India would be kelly green.

Baconeater
07-03-2010, 11:44 AM
They do these reports every year and Colorado consistently comes out on top. I may be wrong, but I heard they take the weights from whatever you put on your driver's license. Of course, many people lie about their weights.

But they also add in several factors per capita such as: outdoor activities, number of parks, number of bike paths, recreational facilities, etc.

I can say from experience that Colorado isn't a particularly thin state- it's not a fat state by any means, but I can say that a lot of people I used to work with were obese.

Coloradoans were no different than the many people I've known growing up in the KC area: we all exercised, played sports, went skiing, biking, golfing, hiking, etc. I actually skied more when I lived in KC than I ever did when I lived in Colorado. Of course, when I lived in Colorado, I did a LOT of hiking and loved it. It didn't make me lose weight though.

I do know one thing about Colorado: People drink there! There is a bar and/or brewery on every corner. I've known more people with drinking problems in Colorado than anywhere else. And these people are not thin.

I've heard that Florida is a fat state, but I don't see any difference in the size of the people here when compared to Colorado. Of course, I stay away from the bars now and hit the beach more often. So, my statistics are misrepresented by the number of chicks I see in bikinis. :D
I get CO being #1, but it's the rest of the map that doesn't make any damn sense. If outdoor activities are that much of a factor, common sense would tell you that the northern states would be more heavier simply because of the inactivity resulting from the long winters. And like I mentioned earlier, the two times I visited northern tier states it sure seemed like that was the case with what I saw with my own two eyes. But there's not a single orange state up there...and then there's Montana?

And conversely, the south has better weather for the majority of the year, and yet it contains the highest concentration of obesity in the entire country. There's not even one purple state in the entire southern tier outside of California.

WoodDraw
07-03-2010, 12:54 PM
Eight states have obesity levels over 30%. That's pretty incredible.

I doubt any one factor can be isolated as the cause. Education and poverty likely have some correlation, although how strong I don't know. I'd look towards culture before education and poverty though. Do you cook your own meals, or eat frozen and fast food? What do you feed your kids? What role does food play in your life, really...

Brock
07-03-2010, 01:18 PM
The correlation is to poverty. There are just as many fatasses on college campuses as there are anywhere else.

Pitt Gorilla
07-03-2010, 01:27 PM
The correlation is to poverty. There are just as many fatasses on college campuses as there are anywhere else.I'm not sure that is true. There may be some people, but 30% of the student population will NOT be obese.

WoodDraw
07-03-2010, 01:30 PM
I'm not sure that is true. There may be some people, but 30% of the student population will NOT be obese.

You'd have to compare 18-22 college students to 18-22 non-students. Afterall, how many of those thin college students will go on to become obese?

Or, compare all ages of college graduates to non-graduates.

bowener
07-03-2010, 01:32 PM
Wow. If you follow one of the links (http://www.good.is/post/why-does-a-salad-cost-more-than-a-big-mac) from the site in the OP, you can find some neat information on why a Big Mac costs less than a salad.

Brock
07-03-2010, 01:36 PM
I'm not sure that is true. There may be some people, but 30% of the student population will NOT be obese.

Just as many of the student population will be overweight as non students of the same age. A person being educated doesn't mean they aren't going to inhale pizza and work if off by playing video games.

cdcox
07-03-2010, 01:43 PM
Eight states have obesity levels over 30%. That's pretty incredible.

I doubt any one factor can be isolated as the cause. Education and poverty likely have some correlation, although how strong I don't know. I'd look towards culture before education and poverty though. Do you cook your own meals, or eat frozen and fast food? What do you feed your kids? What role does food play in your life, really...

Food Inc. does a great job of making the connection between poverty and obesity. For many families, it is cheaper to go through the drive through at McDonald's than it is to cook a nutritious meal at home. I think you could eat at home cheaper, but you'd have to work at it and the kids wouldn't like it nearly as well (not that you should let the kids dictate what you eat).

Sweet Daddy Hate
07-03-2010, 02:15 PM
Quit serving antifreeze kool-aid to your kids, Colorado!

Pitt Gorilla
07-03-2010, 04:14 PM
Just as many of the student population will be overweight as non students of the same age. A person being educated doesn't mean they aren't going to inhale pizza and work if off by playing video games.That could be true. Your statement appeared to imply that the obesity level on a college campus would equal that of "anywhere else." If you restrict the age ranges, I could see the percentages being closer. College students do tend to have more opportunities for exercise, organized or otherwise.

Brock
07-03-2010, 04:32 PM
That could be true. Your statement appeared to imply that the obesity level on a college campus would equal that of "anywhere else." If you restrict the age ranges, I could see the percentages being closer. College students do tend to have more opportunities for exercise, organized or otherwise.

Turns out I was right. There are as many fatasses on college campuses as anywhere else.

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/254536/are_college_students_fat_and_obese.html?cat=51

Mr. Flopnuts
07-03-2010, 04:58 PM
Wow. If you follow one of the links (http://www.good.is/post/why-does-a-salad-cost-more-than-a-big-mac) from the site in the OP, you can find some neat information on why a Big Mac costs less than a salad.

That's fucking disgusting and I encourage you guys to click the link and take a look at the info.

WoodDraw
07-03-2010, 04:59 PM
Wow. If you follow one of the links (http://www.good.is/post/why-does-a-salad-cost-more-than-a-big-mac) from the site in the OP, you can find some neat information on why a Big Mac costs less than a salad.

The Omnivores Dilemma discusses the role that cheap, subsidized corn and soy has had on our diet. Worthy read.

eazyb81
07-03-2010, 06:16 PM
There is a strong correlation between poverty and obesity, but PC or not, states with a larger contingent of African Americans (see below) also appear to have the highest obesity rates.

Does this tie back into poverty, or is it a cultural issue?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Belt_(U.S._region)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/d0/New_2000_black_percent.gif/776px-New_2000_black_percent.gif (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d0/New_2000_black_percent.gif)

CosmicPal
07-03-2010, 07:49 PM
There is a strong correlation between poverty and obesity, but PC or not, states with a larger contingent of African Americans (see below) also appear to have the highest obesity rates.

Does this tie back into poverty, or is it a cultural issue?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Belt_(U.S._region)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/d0/New_2000_black_percent.gif/776px-New_2000_black_percent.gif (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d0/New_2000_black_percent.gif)

According to that map, of the 8 states in the north central and northwestern part of the country, not including Seattle/Tacoma area, there seems to be an influx of blacks living in Helena, Montana. One of them happens to be on the state's tourist page: http://visitmt.com/

:D

BWillie
07-03-2010, 09:06 PM
Food Inc. does a great job of making the connection between poverty and obesity. For many families, it is cheaper to go through the drive through at McDonald's than it is to cook a nutritious meal at home. I think you could eat at home cheaper, but you'd have to work at it and the kids wouldn't like it nearly as well (not that you should let the kids dictate what you eat).

While you may be correct, it's probably just because people are retarded. I don't know, when I was a poor college student it was hard for me to gain weight because food cost money, especially food I wanted.

Now that I have enough money I eat way too much bad shit. I go out to eat alot for steak, chinese buffets, hamburgers and all sorts of bad shit. For me, being more wealthy causes me to eat bad. It hasn't really affected me at, but I'm still in my mid 20's. I'm sure it's coming. Then I'll have to actually do cardio instead of just lifting. Argh. I shutter at the thought.

Pitt Gorilla
07-03-2010, 11:18 PM
Turns out I was right. There are as many fatasses on college campuses as anywhere else.

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/254536/are_college_students_fat_and_obese.html?cat=51That would represent a significant difference from/change since this cited study.

http://heldref-publications.metapress.com/app/home/contribution.asp?referrer=parent&backto=issue,4,6;journal,41,78;linkingpublicationresults,1:119928,1