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View Full Version : Misc How much for your kidney?


Cave Johnson
07-13-2010, 11:59 AM
Apparently the cost of a patient in dialysis (for the 5 year waiting period) is roughly 150K.

http://andrewsullivan.theatlantic.com/the_daily_dish/2010/07/what-is-a-kidney-worth.html

The math is simple. In a country the size of the United States, a payment, either direct (cash, vouchers, or tax credits) or indirect (tuition, charitable donations, etc.) of, say, $20,000 to kidney donors would probably produce enough donated kidneys each year to eliminate or drastically reduce the backlog of approximately 83,000 people waiting for their turn to receive a donated kidney. This financial inducement would cost about $1.7 billion. The federal government currently pays 100 percent of the cost for treating most people with end-stage renal disease. With the average annual cost estimated at about $30,000 to maintain one person on dialysis, the taxpayers are paying about $8 billion a year to dialyze fellow citizens in kidney failure. Furthermore, people usually wait about five years to receive a donated kidney unless they are fortunate enough to have a living donor offer one of their two healthy kidneys. Thus, the actual total cost to the taxpayers of maintaining fellow citizens on dialysis for five years is approximately $40 billion.

rambleonthruthefog
07-13-2010, 12:48 PM
i'd consider selling it for a couple million. but since were overpopulated ill just keep it for myself or an immediate/young relative.

ClevelandBronco
07-13-2010, 03:19 PM
I'd have a sliding scale that would depend on how much the recipient annoys me.

rageeumr
07-13-2010, 03:27 PM
I don't know the answer to this question. I can tell you with absolute certainty, however, that the answer is multiple orders of magnitude higher than their $20,000 number.

DJ's left nut
07-13-2010, 03:30 PM
Depends.

If I move to the top of the list in the event that I need an extra kidney of my own some day - I'd sell mine for about $50K.

At that point, I have the safety net of knowing that I'll be taken care of should I actually desperately need that spare, but I've also, in effect, mortgaged the spare.

"Make your kidney work for you"

RJ
07-13-2010, 03:34 PM
I'm saving mine for that special someone.

Iowanian
07-13-2010, 04:47 PM
I'd give a kidney to a friend, family or person I felt inclined to let have it, but I don't think mine would be for sale.

Detoxing
07-13-2010, 05:15 PM
Mine would have a "For Rent" sign on it. And they better give it back in good shape too. Or they won't be getting that deposit back.

CrazyPhuD
07-13-2010, 05:34 PM
WTH I thought the Doc would give me a pill and I'd regrow my kidney...

Infidel Goat
07-13-2010, 05:56 PM
Depends.

If I move to the top of the list in the event that I need an extra kidney of my own some day - I'd sell mine for ....

At that point, I have the safety net of knowing that I'll be taken care of should I actually desperately need that spare, but I've also, in effect, mortgaged the spare.
"

This answer is correct, I think.

The only ethical qualm I have is that the govt would set the figure at such a low threshhold that only those living in poverty would do so. $50,000 might not be the magic number, but I'd be comfortable if the US govt set a figure that 50% of US citizens would accept (whether it be <$25,000 or >$75,000). It'd be higher than a lot of people would like ("quit spending my money)--but I think it is probably more egalitarian than fleecing the poor. And more importantly, I think it would be good for health care.

bevischief
07-13-2010, 05:59 PM
Show me the money!

I want enough to pay for another one if needed and have fun.

seclark
07-13-2010, 06:24 PM
tree fiddy
40oz
sec

digger
07-13-2010, 07:08 PM
FYI, sullie is so the ghey....