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healthpellets
07-13-2010, 06:31 PM
So basically, if the party filing a claim fails to secure alternative income that was available, the claim payment will be reduced by that amount. Logical, to a point I suppose. However, when it comes to cleaning up oil and toxins, and not being allowed to wear a respirator, I think you have to draw the line.

http://rawstory.com/rs/2010/0706/whistleblower-bp-deducts-relief-payments-fishermen-refuse-aid-gulf-cleanup/

Text of story removed to abide by copyright standards and to avoid the assholes at RightHaven, LLC

Saul Good
07-13-2010, 06:37 PM
Honestly, I don't see the problem here. If you bitch because you're out of work, and you bitch because of the spill that put you out of work, how can you bitch when someone offers to compensate you for cleaning up the spill?

healthpellets
07-13-2010, 06:43 PM
Honestly, I don't see the problem here. If you bitch because you're out of work, and you bitch because of the spill that put you out of work, how can you bitch when someone offers to compensate you for cleaning up the spill?

If the oil and dispersants are toxic and causing health problems, contrary to what BP says, i am of the opinion that one should not be compelled to work in that environment.

Saul Good
07-13-2010, 06:44 PM
If the oil and dispersants are toxic and causing health problems, contrary to what BP says, i am of the opinion that one should not be compelled to work in that environment.

If that's the case, I agree. I haven't seen anything to convince me of that, though.

vailpass
07-13-2010, 06:45 PM
Makes sense to me. Same principle as not having to pay an ex-employee's unemployment claim if you can prove they turned down work.

healthpellets
07-13-2010, 06:45 PM
If that's the case, I agree. I haven't seen anything to convince me of that, though.

i hope it doesn't turn out to be an issue like Ground Zero. that'd be horribly sad.

Brock
07-13-2010, 06:49 PM
Clearly, it's hazardous waste. It requires expertise and training. It's BP's mess, they were negligent, they need to pay and stop trying to weasel out of it.

Saul Good
07-13-2010, 06:59 PM
Clearly, it's hazardous waste. It requires expertise and training. It's BP's mess, they were negligent, they need to pay and stop trying to weasel out of it.

They are paying. What are the damages, though. If the people are out of work because of BP, BP should compensate them until they can find other work.

Of course some of the positions involved with cleaning up the oil spill require expertise and training, but not all of them do. It takes immense talent to play in the NBA, but any idiot can be a sweat mopper.

WoodDraw
07-13-2010, 07:11 PM
Work doing what? If someone blows up my building, and then says they'll compensate me as long as I show up every day to pick up rubble, they can fuck off.

Saul Good
07-13-2010, 07:14 PM
So it's just a paid vacation for anyone who claims that they lost income because of the accident?

Taco John
07-13-2010, 07:19 PM
I wouldn't work for the people that destroyed my business. Eff that. Pay me my compensation for destroying my livelihood and don't expect that I'm in a hurry to change my occupation to cleaning up your shit. I don't owe you my employ.

WoodDraw
07-13-2010, 07:21 PM
So it's just a paid vacation for anyone who claims that they lost income because of the accident?

Eh, I don't know. Seems pretty scummy that you burn down the house and then expect the occupants to rebuild it. If I'm a fisher and I can't fish because you contaminated the water, why aren't you liable for all my lost wages?

I honestly don't know. Serious question...

Saul Good
07-13-2010, 07:33 PM
Eh, I don't know. Seems pretty scummy that you burn down the house and then expect the occupants to rebuild it. If I'm a fisher and I can't fish because you contaminated the water, why aren't you liable for all my lost wages?

I honestly don't know. Serious question...

I would by liable to indemnify you. You were gainfully employed before earning $X, and this would be gainful employment earning the same amount of pay. Unless the jobs are proven to be hazardous, those doing the complaining don't have a leg to stand on.

As an aside, it's not like these people had white collar, office jobs to begin with.

HonestChieffan
07-13-2010, 07:45 PM
People are scum. Start there. Watch the freeloaders go after the money. Obamas boy is passin out 20 bil for BP. BP has every right to put the rules in place and weed out the handout queens and sue happy assholes who always show up at the free food trough.

Bet the path is worn smooth from the FEMA trailers to the BP Handout station

jiveturkey
07-13-2010, 07:45 PM
As an aside, it's not like these people had white collar, office jobs to begin with.Why would that even matter?

Saul Good
07-13-2010, 08:20 PM
Why would that even matter?

Because it's a similar line of work. You aren't asking a bunch of blue-collar workers to go rot in a cubicle, and you aren't asking a bunch of desk jockeys to run a jack-hammer.

You are asking blue collar workers to do blue collar work, so it's an equivalent job.

Brock
07-13-2010, 09:04 PM
I would by liable to indemnify you. You were gainfully employed before earning $X, and this would be gainful employment earning the same amount of pay. Unless the jobs are proven to be hazardous, those doing the complaining don't have a leg to stand on.

As an aside, it's not like these people had white collar, office jobs to begin with.

I can't believe you don't know whether a mixture of crude oil and chemical dispersants aren't hazardous to human health. There's no way being a fisherman is equivalent to handling hazardous chemicals. If people are willing to do it, BP should hire them on contract on top of paying them for lost wages.

Saul Good
07-13-2010, 09:30 PM
I can't believe you don't know whether a mixture of crude oil and chemical dispersants aren't hazardous to human health. There's no way being a fisherman is equivalent to handling hazardous chemicals. If people are willing to do it, BP should hire them on contract on top of paying them for lost wages.

I should inherently know that it's dangerous? Where is OSHA saying that it's hazardous? I think BP sucks as much as the next guy, but the work isn't hazardous because someone who would rather stay home says so.

The Mad Crapper
07-13-2010, 09:41 PM
Idled Gulf Rigs Head For Africa

Commerce: What does it say about America’s investment climate when the Republic of Congo now attract oil rigs that once drilled the Gulf of Mexico? That’s the effect of the Obamaadministration’s nonstop bid to halt production here.

As millions were enjoying the World Cup last weekend, powerful engines began churning the waters of the Gulf of Mexico as Diamond Offshore Drilling began pulling its huge floating rig on a 60-day trip to the Republic of Congo.

Congo is hardly the place that springs to mind for the quality of its investment environment. But because of the Obama administration's nonstop efforts to halt offshore drilling through one executive order after another, that is now the reality.

On May 27, in the wake of the BP oil spill that began three weeks earlier, the Department of the Interior issued a blanket ban on all drilling deeper than 500 feet. When a federal judge threw that out as unjustified, the administration came right back with a new diktat that amounts to the exact same ban.

For rig companies, such pigheadedness gave the game away: The Obama administration is determined to halt offshore drilling by any means necessary. And for energy companies, the only rational response is to pull out.

"As the uncertainty about continued deep-water drilling in the (Gulf of Mexico) persists, we must consider alternatives that allow our deep-water assets to remain employed," Diamond Offshore's CEO, Larry Dickerson, explained in a press release.

Diamond Offshore had already moved one of its big floating rigs to the Nile River delta of Egypt a few days earlier, and now another is heading to the Congo. These facilities rent for $510,000 a day — a lot of money to lose as rigs await the Obama administration's "six-month pause" to run its course.

Industry analysts estimate that another five of the 33 rigs that have been directly idled will be leaving the Gulf for places with better business climates.

Amazingly, one of these places is the Republic of Congo, a country in the middle of a war with Ugandan rebels and busy dealing with 200,000 refugees. The country ranks 169th out of 179 in the Heritage Foundation/Wall Street Journal's 2010 Index of Economic Freedom. That's low even by African standards, with major deficits in property rights, freedom from corruption and even investment freedom.

Still, it outranks the U.S., where there is no drilling at all. So, in two months' time, Diamond's Ocean Confidence rig, moving across the turbulent Atlantic, will arrive there for high-tech offshore work as far as 35,000 feet below sea level.

http://www.investors.com/NewsAndAnalysis/Article/540265/201007131904/Idled-Gulf-Rigs-Head-For-Africa.aspx

Boy, that boot on neck thing is really working out like a charm!

healthpellets
07-13-2010, 09:42 PM
scary stuff.



Warning To Gulf Volunteers: Almost Every Cleanup Worker From The 1989 Exxon Valdez Disaster Is Now Dead

Are you sure that you want to help clean up the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico? In a previous article we documented a number of the health dangers from this oil spill that many scientists are warning us of, and now it has been reported on CNN that the vast majority of those who worked to clean up the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska are now dead. Yes, you read that correctly. Almost all of them are dead.

In fact, the expert that CNN had on said that the life expectancy for those who worked to clean up the Exxon Valdez oil spill is only about 51 years. Considering the fact that the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is now many times worse than the Exxon Valdez disaster, are you sure you want to volunteer to be on a cleanup crew down there? After all, the American Dream is not to make big bucks for a few months helping BP clean up their mess and then drop dead 20 or 30 years early.

This news clip from CNN is absolutely stunning. If this is even close to true, then why would anyone want to be involved in helping to clean up this oil?....

The truth is that what we have out in the Gulf of Mexico is a "toxic soup" of oil, methane, benzene, hydrogen sulfide, other toxic gases and very poisonous chemical dispersants such as Corexit 9500.

Breathing all of this stuff is not good for your health, but the reality is that the true health toll of this oil spill is not going to be known for decades.
However, the early reports are not encouraging....

*Already, a large number of workers cleaning up the BP oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico report that they are suffering from flu-like symptoms.

*According to another new report, exposure to the oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico has resulted in 162 cases of illnesses reported to the Louisiana state health department.

*In addition, according to one local Pensacola news source, "400 people have sought medical care for upper or lower respiratory problems, headaches, nausea, and eye irritation after trips to Escambia County beaches."
This is going to be something that we all want to keep a very close eye on.
But it is not just oil spill cleanup workers and people who have gone to the beach who are reporting health issues. The following is a report from a reader named Dee....

My 2 friends and I have been sick with headaches and vomiting, also it feels like heartburn, just feeling lousy. We have not been to the Gulf but there is an inlet at the end of our street. We live on the West side of Pensacola FL. near the Bayou. At first I thought it was just me. My 2 friends are having the same symptoms, all at the same time. Right now I have a dull headache, and my stomach is queasy. I have been thinking maybe the chemicals from the oil cleanup or the oil itself is causing us to be ill. It has been raining all day off and on. I started feeling ill late last night. I was wondering if anyone else in Pensacola have the same symptoms.

So what can we conclude from all this?
Well, it is still very early, but when this crisis is all said and done the biggest tragedy of all might be the health devastation that this oil spill has caused.
If the Exxon Valdez oil spill is any indication, a lot of pe0ple are going to end up dying early deaths.

So once again, do you really want to go down there and clean up this oil?
Of course all of this oil is not just going to clean itself up.
But if we all refuse to participate, who will clean it up?

Perhaps BP CEO Tony Heyward and other high ranking BP executives could roll up their sleeves and go down there and start cleaning up all of that toxic sludge.

It's their mess, so let them clean it.

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Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/warning-to-gulf-cleanup-workers-almost-every-crew-member-from-the-1989-exxon-valdez-disaster-is-now-dead-2010-6#ixzz0tcXBWHmR