PDA

View Full Version : Chiefs Under-Appreciated Chiefs


gblowfish
07-14-2010, 12:29 PM
Since we're still a couple weeks from training camp and haven't had much to talk about with Chiefs, I thought I'd see which players in Chiefs history you think may not have been fully appreciated while they played here. Here's three that come to mind for me. Who comes to mind for you, and make a case:

Nomination #1:
Jim Kearney: Safety. From Prairie View A&M Texas.
Played twelve seasons in the National Football League and the American Football League from 1965-1976. He started in Super Bowl IV for the Kansas City Chiefs. In 1972 he tied an NFL record by returning four interceptions for touchdowns. He wore jersey number 46 while with the Chiefs. Played strong safety for the Chiefs for Nine Seasons (1967-1975). 23 career interceptions, 5 for TDs. Had 8 career fumble recoveries. Was originally an 11th round pick by the Detroit Lions in 1965.

I think Jim Kearney was over-shadowed by Emmit Thomas (in the HOF) and Johnny Robinson (who SHOULD be in the HOF) while playing for KC. On another team, he would have been a stand alone star in the secondary.

Nomination #2:
JT Smith: Wide receiver and returner from North Texas Univ. Played for KC from 1978-1984. Was All Pro for KC in 1980. Returned two punts for TDs in 1979 and 1980. Also made All Pro with the Phoenix Cardinals their first year in Phoenix (1988). Had 10,287 all purpose yards in his career.

Smith was arguably KC's greatest all time kick returner (close contest with Noland Smith) until Vanover came along. Now he'd probably be third behind Dante Hall and Vanover. He was an excellent returner during a time when Arrowhead had artificial turf, and very crappy teams.

Nominaton #3:
Kevin Ross: Cornerback. Nicknamed "Rock", From Temple University. KC's 7th round pick in 1984 draft. Started as a rookie. Had 38 career interceptions and scored 2 TDs. Played for KC from 1984-1993. Made the Pro Bowl in 1989 and 1990. Played at 5-9" 185 lbs.

This guy hit like a mack truck. He was so short, teams would try to throw in front of Ross, until the receivers were so beaten up they quit curling up in front of him. His very first regular season game he got owned by the Pittsburgh Steelers, but he quickly recovered to become a great bump and run defender. He was overshadowed for fame by Deron Cherry and Albert Lewis, but was a critical part of the Chiefs pass defense in the 1980s. That secondary was one of the best in the NFL in its prime.

Deberg_1990
07-14-2010, 12:31 PM
Lin Ellio.........oh nevermind....

King_Chief_Fan
07-14-2010, 01:01 PM
LJ was uner appreciated........:doh!:

CoMoChief
07-14-2010, 01:02 PM
Jared Allen

Farzin
07-14-2010, 01:04 PM
Matt Cassel

Rudy lost the toss
07-14-2010, 01:05 PM
Tracy Simien has a cool name

Dayze
07-14-2010, 01:07 PM
Kimble Anders

Gonzo
07-14-2010, 01:09 PM
I have a Percy Snow rookie card. That guy any good? Should I go ahead and plan my retirement?


:D
Posted via Mobile Device

Gonzo
07-14-2010, 01:10 PM
Kimble Anders

He was a beast.

I'd put Tony Richardson in that area as well. Best FB I've ever seen.
Posted via Mobile Device

Rain Man
07-14-2010, 01:10 PM
There are lots who are underappreciated now, particularly the old-timers like Abner Haynes and his generation, but I'll follow your rules about people who were underappreciated while they were playing for us.


Bill Kenney

Robert Holmes

Larry Johnson (yes, I said it)

Kimble Anders

Willie Davis

Chris Burford

Tony Gonzalez (yes, I said it. We took him for granted.)

Wade Smith (for one year)

Mark Adickes

Jeff Criswell

Anthony Davis

Tracy Simien

Art Still (because anything short of worship was underrating him)

Gary Green

Zeke
07-14-2010, 01:10 PM
James Hasty. James Hasty. James Hasty.

Rain Man
07-14-2010, 01:11 PM
Jared Allen

Oh, yeah. That's a good one.

rockymtnchief
07-14-2010, 01:16 PM
Jim Lynch.

Bell and Lanier kind of left him in the shadows to anyone outside KC.

Rain Man
07-14-2010, 01:19 PM
James Hasty. James Hasty. James Hasty.

Don't get me wrong. I love James Hasty. But I sure didn't think he was underappreciated. If anything, I thought he got more credit than Dale Carter, who was in my opinion the better CB of the two.

I recognize that Hasty was a big locker room leader, and that he may have kept Dale on the straight and narrow, but I felt like he got ample credit for that.

Mr. Flopnuts
07-14-2010, 01:21 PM
I agree with Rain Man. Hasty was beloved here, and Anthony Davis definitely belongs on the list. Now, AD may have benefited from an already stellar defense, but he did his job, and did it well.

TheGuardian
07-14-2010, 01:27 PM
Marvcus Patton. We haven't replaced him since he retired. Guy was solid in the middle.

BossChief
07-14-2010, 01:28 PM
Mike Maslowski

KurtCobain
07-14-2010, 01:35 PM
Eddie Kennison
Posted via Mobile Device

nychief
07-14-2010, 01:40 PM
Todd McNair?

RJ
07-14-2010, 01:48 PM
Jim Lynch.

Bell and Lanier kind of left him in the shadows to anyone outside KC.


I'll second that nomination for exactly the same reason. He's always been "the other" linebacker from that era, but he was awfully good.

Fish
07-14-2010, 01:51 PM
Dan Saleaumua. That guy was a consistent hard worker. Very versatile too. Started at NT, moved to DE, then back to more traditional DT. He became a starter halfway through the 89 season, and then started every game except 4 throughout his 8 year career with the Chiefs. For a big sumbitch like him, that's pretty impressive. He even returned a kick-off once. He pretty much did everything, and did it well. Not the most talented guy in the world, but a guy I'd want on my team none the less. Classic old school tough bastard...

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_7C0gSvTcf58/RYaa_jpcEYI/AAAAAAAAAAk/h5nHCdi5qIM/s320/someones-dad-card.jpg

CoMoChief
07-14-2010, 01:54 PM
Dan Saleaumua. That guy was a consistent hard worker. Very versatile too. Started at NT, moved to DE, then back to more traditional DT. He became a starter halfway through the 89 season, and then started every game except 4 throughout his 8 year career with the Chiefs. For a big sumbitch like him, that's pretty impressive. He even returned a kick-off once. He pretty much did everything, and did it well. Not the most talented guy in the world, but a guy I'd want on my team none the less. Classic old school tough bastard...

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_7C0gSvTcf58/RYaa_jpcEYI/AAAAAAAAAAk/h5nHCdi5qIM/s320/someones-dad-card.jpg

Samoan Power

Mojo Jojo
07-14-2010, 01:59 PM
Chris Martin...
100-yard TD Fumble return vs. Dolphins.
Chiefs vs. Raiders Playoff game in '91. DT pulls himself out of the game in the 1st quarter because he didn't feel well. Chris Martin rips a MCL and he stays in the game because the Chiefs needed him to win the game.

Curley Culp...much like Jim Lynch overshadowed by the HOF'ers that played around him.

CupidStunt
07-14-2010, 02:01 PM
Jason Dunn.

Saccopoo
07-14-2010, 02:14 PM
Greg Hill - RB

- Was platooned with Hall of Famer Marcus Allen for his entire Chiefs career, but put up very good numbers and good per carry average. Could also catch the ball well out of the backfield. Hit the free agent market, signed with the Rams, and was leading the NFL in rushing in the first two games, but broke his leg in the third game and was never a factor after that as the Rams drafted Marshall Faulk traded him to Detroit and Hill retired from the NFL the following year.
http://cdn3.sbnation.com/imported_assets/216889/greg_hill.jpg

Mojo Jojo
07-14-2010, 02:17 PM
Bill Jones - FB
The first FB for Marty that made a difference. He was a great blocker, and I remember all the 3rd and 1 or 2 the Chiefs lined up in a power run formation, DeBerg with the play action and Jones was always standing alone for the first down. Averaged 6.9 yards per reception (1 out of every 6 receptions was a TD) and 4.7 yards per rush, and he was the blocking back.

JD10367
07-14-2010, 02:17 PM
Sitting Bull.

Robert Parish.

Sandra Day O'Connor.

MOhillbilly
07-14-2010, 02:30 PM
Greg Hill - RB

- Was platooned with Hall of Famer Marcus Allen for his entire Chiefs career, but put up very good numbers and good per carry average. Could also catch the ball well out of the backfield. Hit the free agent market, signed with the Rams, and was leading the NFL in rushing in the first two games, but broke his leg in the third game and was never a factor after that as the Rams drafted Marshall Faulk traded him to Detroit and Hill retired from the NFL the following year.
http://cdn3.sbnation.com/imported_assets/216889/greg_hill.jpg

greg hill fucking sucked. He was fast but if the D even looked at him hed go down. 1st round bust.

gblowfish
07-14-2010, 02:35 PM
I can make a case for these guys who have been mentioned:
Kimball Anders -great pass protection blocker. Career cut short by injury.
Robert Holmes -"The Tank" was a Brandon Jacobs 30 years prior to Brandon.
Willie Davis - Great hands, ran good routes
Anthony Davis - Good on special teams, versatile, dependable.
Gary Green - Is in Chiefs HOF, so really isn't that under appreciated.
James Hasty - Was All Pro before he came to KC with Jets. Tough, good cover.
Jim Lynch - Played with 2 HOF backers (Lanier & Bell) but was excellent.
Dan Saleaumua - Had a nose for the football, recovered fumbles like crazy.
Curley Culp - Also in Chiefs HOF, so not that much of a stretch.

I think Jared Allen and Gonzalez can't be counted here. Allen left because he didn't want to work for Carl anymore. TG will go into the HOF as a Chief and will have his number 88 retired in KC when he's done.

gblowfish
07-14-2010, 02:38 PM
Bill Jones - FB
The first FB for Marty that made a difference. He was a great blocker, and I remember all the 3rd and 1 or 2 the Chiefs lined up in a power run formation, DeBerg with the play action and Jones was always standing alone for the first down. Averaged 6.9 yards per reception (1 out of every 6 receptions was a TD) and 4.7 yards per rush, and he was the blocking back.

If memory serves, Bill Jones was a hit and run driver, suspected DWI in a KC accident in 1992, and that was the end for him here in KC. Have to check that, but pretty sure that's accurate.

crazycoffey
07-14-2010, 02:42 PM
Samoan Power


met him on the field in 91 or 92, was huge compared to me (senior in high school or right after I graduated) and he looked short compared to all the other players. LOL

good choice for under appreciated Chief.

Mojo Jojo
07-14-2010, 02:53 PM
If memory serves, Bill Jones was a hit and run driver, suspected DWI in a KC accident in 1992, and that was the end for him here in KC. Have to check that, but pretty sure that's accurate.

That sounds right. However he was one hell of a FB. Can you imagine taking on a linebacker with Okoye or Word running up your ass...that is taking one for the team.

gblowfish
07-14-2010, 03:02 PM
Word and Okoye running behind John Alt was pretty awesome. True Marty Ball...

Mojo Jojo
07-14-2010, 03:18 PM
How about Dave Lutz played both guard and tackle for the Chiefs. Was overshadowed by John Alt, but he was a stud.

RockChalk
07-14-2010, 03:24 PM
Dan Saleaumua. That guy was a consistent hard worker. Very versatile too. Started at NT, moved to DE, then back to more traditional DT. He became a starter halfway through the 89 season, and then started every game except 4 throughout his 8 year career with the Chiefs. For a big sumbitch like him, that's pretty impressive. He even returned a kick-off once. He pretty much did everything, and did it well. Not the most talented guy in the world, but a guy I'd want on my team none the less. Classic old school tough bastard...

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_7C0gSvTcf58/RYaa_jpcEYI/AAAAAAAAAAk/h5nHCdi5qIM/s320/someones-dad-card.jpg

Really nice guy as well.

Saw him at Garozzos once when I was a kid. Not joking, he literally had 3 entrees put down in front of him.

KCinNY
07-14-2010, 03:29 PM
Willie Davis.

Too skinny and incredibly unpolished when he came in as an UDFA. The one thing he had was speed. And man...did he have speed. He also worked his tail off to make himself into a nice NFL WR.

Made two of the finest and most important catches in Chiefs history: Incredible one handed TD grab against the Oilers in '93 playoffs (with Chris Dishman blanketing him with perfect coverage). And of course, the winning TD against Elway and the Donks in the '94 MNF classic.

Deberg_1990
07-14-2010, 04:01 PM
JJ Birden
Todd Mcnair
Stephon Paige for sure. Dude had a 300 yard receiving game once
Posted via Mobile Device

Mojo Jojo
07-14-2010, 04:08 PM
JJ Birden
Todd Mcnair
Stephon Paige for sure. Dude had a 300 yard receiving game once
Posted via Mobile Device

Except for the dog fighting thing...Todd McNair was a key part to the Chiefs success in the early '90's. Remember his catch and run in San Diego on third down from the goal line to set up the game winning FG and clinch a playoff spot? I think that play went for about 70 yards.

BossChief
07-14-2010, 04:12 PM
Dan Saleaumua. That guy was a consistent hard worker. Very versatile too. Started at NT, moved to DE, then back to more traditional DT. He became a starter halfway through the 89 season, and then started every game except 4 throughout his 8 year career with the Chiefs. For a big sumbitch like him, that's pretty impressive. He even returned a kick-off once. He pretty much did everything, and did it well. Not the most talented guy in the world, but a guy I'd want on my team none the less. Classic old school tough bastard...

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_7C0gSvTcf58/RYaa_jpcEYI/AAAAAAAAAAk/h5nHCdi5qIM/s320/someones-dad-card.jpg

I remember Junior Siaviis first practice of TC and after it I asked him if he was gonna be our new Dan Saleaumua and he had this dumbfuck look on his face and was like :shrug: like he didnt even know what the hell I was talking about...I knew that moment that he was gonna be garbage.

Dan was the man.

milkman
07-14-2010, 04:19 PM
I think Aaron Brown was/is underappreciated.

Deberg_1990
07-14-2010, 04:20 PM
I remember Junior Siaviis first practice of TC and after it I asked him if he was gonna be our new Dan Saleaumua and he had this dumb**** look on his face and was like :shrug: like he didnt even know what the hell I was talking about...I knew that moment that he was gonna be garbage.

Dan was the man.

heh, you cant expect a rookie to know a teams history right off the bat. Its not like Saleamuea was a well known hall of famer like Jerry Rice.

chefsos
07-14-2010, 04:25 PM
Aaron Brown. As I recall (admittedly by reading about it a few years later) he took out Daryle Lamonica and Joe Kapp in consecutive weeks in the championship run. QB killa.

EDIT: Damnit. Beaten by a milkman.

BossChief
07-14-2010, 04:46 PM
heh, you cant expect a rookie to know a teams history right off the bat. Its not like Saleamuea was a well known hall of famer like Jerry Rice.

it wasnt all that he didnt know the player, it was his reaction to the question that told the tale.

He was like a 13 year old in a huge body

I think that is why they called him "junior"

ChiefsCountry
07-14-2010, 04:46 PM
Except for the dog fighting thing...Todd McNair was a key part to the Chiefs success in the early '90's. Remember his catch and run in San Diego on third down from the goal line to set up the game winning FG and clinch a playoff spot? I think that play went for about 70 yards.

His fumble when he played for Houston also led to the Chiefs win in 1995.

Rausch
07-14-2010, 04:57 PM
Word and Okoye running behind John Alt was pretty awesome. True Marty Ball...

I'd say Kimble Anders as well.

Good runner, great pass catcher, solid blocker.

Everything you'd want in a FB...

Demonpenz
07-14-2010, 04:58 PM
Joe Horn

Deberg_1990
07-14-2010, 05:18 PM
Chester McGlockton. The anchor of our 16-0 team. Free Brandsmart TV's for everyone!
Posted via Mobile Device

KC Tattoo
07-14-2010, 05:34 PM
Mike Maslowski

I agree with this we were 9 & 0 untill he went down, then ended with 13 &3 record couldn't stop peyton FN Manning. Stop him one drive would have won us a play off game and think if Maslowski was playing he would have made the differance. JMHCFO

PunkinDrublic
07-14-2010, 05:42 PM
Bennie Thompson- The heart and soul of our special teams at one time. Nicknamed Bennie and the Chiefs.

Pete Stoyanavich- My favorite Chiefs kicker of all time. That overtime win against Denver in 97 was awesome. The look on Bronco Neils face as the ball barely cleared the crossbar was priceless.

KC Tattoo
07-14-2010, 05:43 PM
Steve Deburg / Stephone Paige. Play action pass were incredible! Stephone Paige is still my favorite WR for chiefs he was amaizing.

Mojo Jojo
07-14-2010, 06:31 PM
Bennie Thompson- The heart and soul of our special teams at one time. Nicknamed Bennie and the Chiefs.

Pete Stoyanavich- My favorite Chiefs kicker of all time. That overtime win against Denver in 97 was awesome. The look on Bronco Neils face as the ball barely cleared the crossbar was priceless.

That game DIDN'T go to overtime. Styo made the kick on the last play of regulation...Final score 24-22. If it was such a big thing for you I would think you would remember the details.

Count Zarth
07-14-2010, 06:50 PM
Herm Edwards. Truly, he was the catalyst for getting rid of Carl Peterson.

BillSelfsTrophycase
07-14-2010, 07:18 PM
Steve DeBerg, anyone who shatters a finger, gets it taped up and comes back into the game deserves some props.

Then he played out the rest of the year with a pin in the finger.

Tough sonuvabitch

Count Zarth
07-14-2010, 07:19 PM
Damon Huard. A key part of the plan that got Carl fired.

milkman
07-14-2010, 07:26 PM
Steve DeBerg, anyone who shatters a finger, gets it taped up and comes back into the game deserves some props.

Then he played out the rest of the year with a pin in the finger.

Tough sonuvabitch

I doubt that he is underappreciated.

I have a high regard for DeBerg because of that, and felt he was the best fit for Marty's offense before he switched to a west coast offense.

I hated that we replaced him with Dave Kreig, who I felt was one of the most overrated QBs of that era.

But the fact is, DeBerg is probably overappreciated, if anything.

gblowfish
07-14-2010, 07:42 PM
DeBerg had it rough.
He was in San Fran, they got Montana.
He was in Tampa, they got Testaverde.
He was in Denver, they got Horseface.

Then he comes to KC.

Where he played some really good ball.

Count Zarth
07-14-2010, 07:48 PM
DeBerg had it rough.
He was in San Fran, they got Montana.
He was in Tampa, they got Testaverde.
He was in Denver, they got Horseface.

Then he comes to KC.

Where he played some really good ball.

There's a good magazine article about that.

Joe's first game as a Chief in Tampa, the opposing quarterback was Steve DeBerg.

He stole Joe's cleats before the game and replaced them with his own, and a note.

"Stop following in my footsteps."

milkman
07-14-2010, 07:49 PM
DeBerg had it rough.
He was in San Fran, they got Montana.
He was in Tampa, they got Testaverde.
He was in Denver, they got Horseface.

Then he comes to KC.

Where he played some really good ball.

DeBerg was just a tough, gritty SOB who, as I said earlier, was a good fit to Marty's offense, or more specifically, Joe Pendry's.

nychief
07-14-2010, 08:00 PM
Bennie Thompson- The heart and soul of our special teams at one time. Nicknamed Bennie and the Chiefs.


Thompson's wife and child where murdered years later.... he was initially a suspect, but was later cleared.

Kerberos
07-14-2010, 08:19 PM
Percy Snow gawdammit.

No one was a prankster like Percy. Very much underappreciated.

ChiefsCountry
07-14-2010, 08:26 PM
DeBerg was just a tough, gritty SOB who, as I said earlier, was a good fit to Marty's offense, or more specifically, Joe Pendry's.

Its shame you couldn't put DeBerg's leadership and toughness with Grbac's talent.

Mecca
07-14-2010, 09:06 PM
Mark Collins.

Rudy lost the toss
07-14-2010, 09:11 PM
Eric Hicks. That dude had 40 sacks

:D

LaChapelle
07-14-2010, 09:21 PM
Eric Warfield, Eric Hicks both players over achieved but were hated/ 7th and undrafted
because they were both put in starting postions they shouldn't have been
and PBJ FIRST DOWN SAMIE PBJ because I have to

BossChief
07-14-2010, 09:32 PM
Sammy Knight

our pass defense was pretty good during his time here and he just got shit on bbs

CHENZ A!
07-14-2010, 09:36 PM
His fumble when he played for Houston also led to the Chiefs win in 1995.

He also picked up the blocked punt against the steelers in the playoff win, and had a decent return to shorten the field.

Mojo Jojo
07-14-2010, 09:46 PM
He also picked up the blocked punt against the steelers in the playoff win, and had a decent return to shorten the field.

That was Fred Jones that picked up the blocked punt not Todd McNair.:doh!:

KCinNY
07-14-2010, 09:48 PM
That was Fred Jones that picked up the blocked punt not Todd McNair.:doh!:

Keith Cash blocked it and Freddy Jones ran it back.

KCrockaholic
07-15-2010, 12:25 AM
Donnie Edwards in his prime.

Tribal Warfare
07-15-2010, 01:21 AM
Tony Richardson and Greg Manuski

CHENZ A!
07-15-2010, 07:18 AM
That was Fred Jones that picked up the blocked punt not Todd McNair.:doh!:

Fred jones is underappreciate
Posted via Mobile Device

Count Zarth
07-15-2010, 08:35 AM
Sammy Knight

our pass defense was pretty good during his time here and he just got shit on bbs

Sammy Knight > Bernard Pollard

LOCOChief
07-15-2010, 08:37 AM
Collins, Hasty

HemiEd
07-15-2010, 08:42 AM
I totally agree with Kevin Ross, and would add


Joe Phillips
Mike Webster
James Hadnot
and Mike Bell

beach tribe
07-15-2010, 10:49 AM
Dan Saleaumua. That guy was a consistent hard worker. Very versatile too. Started at NT, moved to DE, then back to more traditional DT. He became a starter halfway through the 89 season, and then started every game except 4 throughout his 8 year career with the Chiefs. For a big sumbitch like him, that's pretty impressive. He even returned a kick-off once. He pretty much did everything, and did it well. Not the most talented guy in the world, but a guy I'd want on my team none the less. Classic old school tough bastard...

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_7C0gSvTcf58/RYaa_jpcEYI/AAAAAAAAAAk/h5nHCdi5qIM/s320/someones-dad-card.jpg

Good One.

beach tribe
07-15-2010, 10:54 AM
Dave Szott

Iowanian
07-15-2010, 10:55 AM
Dino Hackett.

He played on shitty teams, but I always liked him.

beach tribe
07-15-2010, 11:02 AM
Willie Davis.

Too skinny and incredibly unpolished when he came in as an UDFA. The one thing he had was speed. And man...did he have speed. He also worked his tail off to make himself into a nice NFL WR.

Made two of the finest and most important catches in Chiefs history: Incredible one handed TD grab against the Oilers in '93 playoffs (with Chris Dishman blanketing him with perfect coverage). And of course, the winning TD against Elway and the Donks in the '94 MNF classic.

I met Willie Davis in the small town of Mckenzie TN. in 96.
The step son of the Winnipeg Blue Bombers GM, was one of my best friends in HS, and we played HS football together. Why he lived there, when he was the GM of CFL team, I will never know, I guess. I went to his house one day, and WD and his cousin were sitting on the couch. He was trying to get his cousin a spot on the Blue Bombers roster. I acted like a star struck idiot when they told me who he was. They had to shoo me away, because I wouldn't stop asking him ???s. He signed a $1 bill for me.
Only Chief I've ever met. It was the coolest thing ever at the time.

HemiEd
07-15-2010, 11:27 AM
Dino Hackett.

He played on shitty teams, but I always liked him.

I almost listed him, good choice.

Joe Phillips always stood out to me for some reason, the guy always gave it all.

MOhillbilly
07-15-2010, 11:35 AM
I almost listed him, good choice.

Joe Phillips always stood out to me for some reason, the guy always gave it all.

i liked joe phillips.

gblowfish
07-15-2010, 11:53 AM
There was a lot of weird and conflicting stories about Joe Phillips after he left the NFL. That he was homeless, a wife beater, totally f-ed up, etc.
Here's a story from 2006:
http://fredericksburg.com/News/FLS/2006/072006/07252006/208765/index_html

Then in 2008, this show up on Arrowhead Addict:
http://arrowheadaddict.com/2008/05/14/joe-phillips-speaks-the-other-side-of-the-story/

Joe has a blogspot, but it hasn't been updated since 2008:
http://joephillipsfootball.blogspot.com/

Not sure what he's up to currently. Would like to find out though...

We've had a thread about him on the CP before:
http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/printthread.php?t=179154

HemiEd
07-15-2010, 12:21 PM
i liked joe phillips.

I often wonder, if some of his post football problems, might stem from injuries. He was badly mugged that one time, near death IIRC, but the details are a little foggy for me now.

gblowfish
07-15-2010, 12:32 PM
I often wonder, if some of his post football problems, might stem from injuries. He was badly mugged that one time, near death IIRC, but the details are a little foggy for me now.

When he was in San Diego, he was assaulted. Somebody hit him in the head with a steel pipe. All the speculation was he might be suffering from brain damage from multiple concussions, kind of like how Mike Webster downward spiral'ed after he got out of football.

Otter
07-15-2010, 01:19 PM
Jesse "James" Haynes

The secret weapon. So secret he wasn't allowed to play.

HemiEd
07-15-2010, 01:30 PM
When he was in San Diego, he was assaulted. Somebody hit him in the head with a steel pipe. All the speculation was he might be suffering from brain damage from multiple concussions, kind of like how Mike Webster downward spiral'ed after he got out of football.

Thanks for the information, very much supports my suspicions. I don't remember ever seeing him take a play off, he was always "all in."

Sweet Daddy Hate
07-15-2010, 01:51 PM
That Gonzales kid. He never got any love.

Otter
07-15-2010, 01:55 PM
Thanks for the information, very much supports my suspicions. I don't remember ever seeing him take a play off, he was always "all in."

KANSAS CITY, Mo.--When he played for the Kansas City Chiefs, Joe Phillips appeared to be setting up his family and himself for life.

He was making good money in the NFL as a defensive tackle. In his spare time, he worked for a local law firm, participated in community causes and even was co-host of a radio show with his wife, Cynthia. They had beautiful, blond children.

It was an idyllic life Phillips thought he'd never touch.

"If you talked about preparing for life after football," said Lamonte Winston, the Chiefs' director of player development, "Joe had it lined up."

But today Joe Phillips is a wanted man.

Phillips' smiling visage, the one that flashed across Kansas City television screens in the 1990s, has morphed into a police mug shot--his once-reddish goatee turned to scraggly gray stubble. His face has been posted on a law enforcement Web site under the heading "Have you seen this individual?"

Phillips, 43, is a fugitive from justice in Oregon. He has been arrested twice on charges of driving under the influence during the past two years and once for an outstanding bench warrant for failure to comply with the terms of probation stemming from the first DUI in January 2005 in Clackamas County, Ore.

He was on the lam--or "on abscond"--from November 2005 until May 2006, when he was arrested in Portland, Ore. He was transferred from a jail in Portland to Clackamas County, but was set free because of jail overcrowding. Two days before his June 20 arraignment, police picked up Phillips on another DUI charge while driving a motorcycle in Lincoln City, Ore.

Phillips was released pending a hearing and was to appear in court June 30 in Clackamas County. He never showed. And he's been missing ever since.

But how does a man who stands 6 feet 5 inches and weighs 315 pounds disappear? He has no known job, permanent address or phone number.

A fresh start in Kansas City

Joe Phillips joined the Chiefs as a free agent in 1992 after playing the previous five seasons with the Chargers. It was a fresh start, for he had found trouble in San Diego, where he joined the club as a replacement player during the 1987 strike.

A Sept. 26, 1990 fight with three men outside a Mission Beach, Calif., restaurant and bar nearly ended his life.

He suffered a skull fracture, a broken nose, three broken ribs and a broken facial bone near an eye. A police officer testified Phillips had a blood alcohol level of about 0.23--nearly three times the legal limit of .08 for drivers in California at the time.

Phillips entered the Betty Ford Center and completed a 28-day treatment plan for alcohol dependency. In December 1990, Phillips told reporters he had the "possible existence of a genetic predisposition to alcohol dependency."

The Chiefs were aware of Phillips' history with alcohol when they signed him, but because of his stay at Betty Ford, he was subject to random testing. The Chiefs and Cynthia Phillips said he remained clean during his six years in Kansas City.

"I've never seen Joe take a drink," said former Chiefs center and teammate Tim Grunhard. "I had him over at the house for family parties, and he seemed like he was always under control."

During the mid-1990s, Joe and Cynthia were as visible as any husband and wife in Kansas City.

He was on the board of directors of The Don Bosco Centers, honorary chairman for Court Appointed Special Advocates and with Children's Mercy Hospital's Hands & Hearts. Cynthia was on the board of directors for CASA of Jackson County, Mo, and Hope House, a shelter for victims of domestic violence in the Kansas City area. Cynthia, a former aspiring actress, was a co-host of a television pregame show and a radio talk show with her husband. Both had law degrees.

Joe Phillips, who also had a stockbroker's license, worked in the legal department at Sprint and later for McDowell, Rice, Smith & Buchanan, a Kansas City law firm.

"During the offseason, he would work out early in the morning and then put on a suit and tie and go to work at the law firm," said Chiefs president Carl Peterson. "It looked like this was a very stable, fine, outstanding citizen who also happened to play football. And he was a very good player who helped us win a lot of games."

Indeed, the Chiefs went to the playoffs in five of the six years Phillips started at defensive tackle. He and fellow tackle Dan Saleaumua did the dirty work of taking on double-team blocks that freed outside pass rushers Derrick Thomas and Neil Smith to get to the quarterback.

Phillips set an example in the Chiefs' locker room for how to plan for life after football. He helped Winston develop programs to help families cope with life in the NFL and encourage young players to find offseason internships that would lead to post-football careers. He appeared in the first video for the league's player development program.

A downward spiral

Joe Phillips played his last game with the Chiefs on Jan. 4, 1998, a bitter 14-10 loss to the Denver Broncos in an AFC playoff game at Arrowhead Stadium. Phillips was so distraught that he drove home in full pads and uniform.

He spent 1998 with the St. Louis Rams and 1999 with the Minnesota Vikings before calling it a career. And then, despite all the years of preparation, Phillips' life plan began to change.

He wanted to move somewhere warm, and he took the family to Vero Beach, Fla., even though his wife and children preferred settling in Kansas City.

"We bought a house on the beach, we had saved all our money and I thought we were pretty set," Cynthia said. "The only mistake we made was going there without a purpose. Now what do we do? It totally fell apart from the day we moved in. Something inside of him snapped."

The couple had talked about doing broadcast work, but instead he wandered aimlessly, leaving the house for days at a time. She suggested they open a law practice, but she said her husband didn't want to do anything.

Adjusting to life after football--without its glamour and game day excitement--only added to the pressure cooker.

Phillips' peak earnings were between $1 million and $1.24 million during the 1995 and 1996 seasons. The money didn't last long.


"All he did was spend," Cynthia said. "I want to say 90 percent of what we saved was spent. That compulsive behavior goes hand in hand. He bought and wrecked a boat. He was constantly looking for the thrill to replace that high you get from playing. He wasn't finding it in the constructive places."

She said their home became a volatile place.

"Not having to be subjected to drug testing, he relapsed," Cynthia said.

Phillips did check into a treatment center, but in August 2001 he walked out and filed for divorce.

"I was shocked," Cynthia said. "I figured he could beat this thing again. I don't know what his reasons were."

Cynthia and the children--daughters Ashley and Marian, sons Joseph and John--have resettled to Cynthia's hometown of Washington, Pa., outside Pittsburgh. She does some substitute teaching and raises the little ones, with a support group of family and friends.

Cynthia said Joe saw the children for six weeks in 2003 and 2004 and last January during Super Bowl week. The visits, according to 19-year-old daughter Ashley, were "very difficult."

Compounding the strained relationship with his family, Phillips owes $34,000 in back child support, according to court records.

"It was sad to see him go from such a great dad to drinking and letting himself go," Ashley said. "It was difficult for me because I had to fill his role, watching the kids when my mom had to go to the store. It's sad for me to see my youngest brother, John, because he never had a father figure around."

After the divorce, Phillips gravitated to where he grew up--working class and the son of a truck driver--in the Pacific Northwest. His family members blame the breakup for his woes.

"He's being rebellious," said his father, trying to explain the DUI arrests and other issues with the court. "I've never seen him drink to excess."

Phillips has some wherewithal to fund his wandering. In 2004 he received his NFL annuity worth more than $86,000, plus $130,000 in workers' compensation, according to his former wife. He also receives a monthly NFL disability benefit of $3,840, though it is uncertain where the check is sent or how it is cashed. And he has an NFL pension worth about $250,000 due in two years--the last vestige of a perfectly planned post-football life.

Most of the rest is gone: the career, the community causes, the celebrity. All of it outside his reach.

For now, Joe Phillips drifts.

If he is caught, he could face up to one year in jail. The longer he is a fugitive, the more severe a sentence he will face, said his probation officer, David Rice.

HemiEd
07-15-2010, 02:04 PM
Thanks for posting that Otter, I don't recall ever seeing that.

How many players care this much about their team, and it's success?

Joe Phillips played his last game with the Chiefs on Jan. 4, 1998, a bitter 14-10 loss to the Denver Broncos in an AFC playoff game at Arrowhead Stadium. Phillips was so distraught that he drove home in full pads and uniform.

If he had been playing on Shannahan's team, he would have fallen out of the car, due to slippage from the Pam spray.

Count Zarth
07-15-2010, 02:13 PM
Nate Hobgood Shit Dick

gblowfish
07-15-2010, 02:37 PM
KANSAS CITY, Mo.--When he played for the Kansas City Chiefs, Joe Phillips appeared to be setting up his family and himself for life.

He was making good money in the NFL as a defensive tackle. In his spare time, he worked for a local law firm, participated in community causes and even was co-host of a radio show with his wife, Cynthia. They had beautiful, blond children.

It was an idyllic life Phillips thought he'd never touch.

"If you talked about preparing for life after football," said Lamonte Winston, the Chiefs' director of player development, "Joe had it lined up."

But today Joe Phillips is a wanted man.

Phillips' smiling visage, the one that flashed across Kansas City television screens in the 1990s, has morphed into a police mug shot--his once-reddish goatee turned to scraggly gray stubble. His face has been posted on a law enforcement Web site under the heading "Have you seen this individual?"

Phillips, 43, is a fugitive from justice in Oregon. He has been arrested twice on charges of driving under the influence during the past two years and once for an outstanding bench warrant for failure to comply with the terms of probation stemming from the first DUI in January 2005 in Clackamas County, Ore.

He was on the lam--or "on abscond"--from November 2005 until May 2006, when he was arrested in Portland, Ore. He was transferred from a jail in Portland to Clackamas County, but was set free because of jail overcrowding. Two days before his June 20 arraignment, police picked up Phillips on another DUI charge while driving a motorcycle in Lincoln City, Ore.

Phillips was released pending a hearing and was to appear in court June 30 in Clackamas County. He never showed. And he's been missing ever since.

But how does a man who stands 6 feet 5 inches and weighs 315 pounds disappear? He has no known job, permanent address or phone number.

A fresh start in Kansas City

Joe Phillips joined the Chiefs as a free agent in 1992 after playing the previous five seasons with the Chargers. It was a fresh start, for he had found trouble in San Diego, where he joined the club as a replacement player during the 1987 strike.

A Sept. 26, 1990 fight with three men outside a Mission Beach, Calif., restaurant and bar nearly ended his life.

He suffered a skull fracture, a broken nose, three broken ribs and a broken facial bone near an eye. A police officer testified Phillips had a blood alcohol level of about 0.23--nearly three times the legal limit of .08 for drivers in California at the time.

Phillips entered the Betty Ford Center and completed a 28-day treatment plan for alcohol dependency. In December 1990, Phillips told reporters he had the "possible existence of a genetic predisposition to alcohol dependency."

The Chiefs were aware of Phillips' history with alcohol when they signed him, but because of his stay at Betty Ford, he was subject to random testing. The Chiefs and Cynthia Phillips said he remained clean during his six years in Kansas City.

"I've never seen Joe take a drink," said former Chiefs center and teammate Tim Grunhard. "I had him over at the house for family parties, and he seemed like he was always under control."

During the mid-1990s, Joe and Cynthia were as visible as any husband and wife in Kansas City.

He was on the board of directors of The Don Bosco Centers, honorary chairman for Court Appointed Special Advocates and with Children's Mercy Hospital's Hands & Hearts. Cynthia was on the board of directors for CASA of Jackson County, Mo, and Hope House, a shelter for victims of domestic violence in the Kansas City area. Cynthia, a former aspiring actress, was a co-host of a television pregame show and a radio talk show with her husband. Both had law degrees.

Joe Phillips, who also had a stockbroker's license, worked in the legal department at Sprint and later for McDowell, Rice, Smith & Buchanan, a Kansas City law firm.

"During the offseason, he would work out early in the morning and then put on a suit and tie and go to work at the law firm," said Chiefs president Carl Peterson. "It looked like this was a very stable, fine, outstanding citizen who also happened to play football. And he was a very good player who helped us win a lot of games."

Indeed, the Chiefs went to the playoffs in five of the six years Phillips started at defensive tackle. He and fellow tackle Dan Saleaumua did the dirty work of taking on double-team blocks that freed outside pass rushers Derrick Thomas and Neil Smith to get to the quarterback.

Phillips set an example in the Chiefs' locker room for how to plan for life after football. He helped Winston develop programs to help families cope with life in the NFL and encourage young players to find offseason internships that would lead to post-football careers. He appeared in the first video for the league's player development program.

A downward spiral

Joe Phillips played his last game with the Chiefs on Jan. 4, 1998, a bitter 14-10 loss to the Denver Broncos in an AFC playoff game at Arrowhead Stadium. Phillips was so distraught that he drove home in full pads and uniform.

He spent 1998 with the St. Louis Rams and 1999 with the Minnesota Vikings before calling it a career. And then, despite all the years of preparation, Phillips' life plan began to change.

He wanted to move somewhere warm, and he took the family to Vero Beach, Fla., even though his wife and children preferred settling in Kansas City.

"We bought a house on the beach, we had saved all our money and I thought we were pretty set," Cynthia said. "The only mistake we made was going there without a purpose. Now what do we do? It totally fell apart from the day we moved in. Something inside of him snapped."

The couple had talked about doing broadcast work, but instead he wandered aimlessly, leaving the house for days at a time. She suggested they open a law practice, but she said her husband didn't want to do anything.

Adjusting to life after football--without its glamour and game day excitement--only added to the pressure cooker.

Phillips' peak earnings were between $1 million and $1.24 million during the 1995 and 1996 seasons. The money didn't last long.


"All he did was spend," Cynthia said. "I want to say 90 percent of what we saved was spent. That compulsive behavior goes hand in hand. He bought and wrecked a boat. He was constantly looking for the thrill to replace that high you get from playing. He wasn't finding it in the constructive places."

She said their home became a volatile place.

"Not having to be subjected to drug testing, he relapsed," Cynthia said.

Phillips did check into a treatment center, but in August 2001 he walked out and filed for divorce.

"I was shocked," Cynthia said. "I figured he could beat this thing again. I don't know what his reasons were."

Cynthia and the children--daughters Ashley and Marian, sons Joseph and John--have resettled to Cynthia's hometown of Washington, Pa., outside Pittsburgh. She does some substitute teaching and raises the little ones, with a support group of family and friends.

Cynthia said Joe saw the children for six weeks in 2003 and 2004 and last January during Super Bowl week. The visits, according to 19-year-old daughter Ashley, were "very difficult."

Compounding the strained relationship with his family, Phillips owes $34,000 in back child support, according to court records.

"It was sad to see him go from such a great dad to drinking and letting himself go," Ashley said. "It was difficult for me because I had to fill his role, watching the kids when my mom had to go to the store. It's sad for me to see my youngest brother, John, because he never had a father figure around."

After the divorce, Phillips gravitated to where he grew up--working class and the son of a truck driver--in the Pacific Northwest. His family members blame the breakup for his woes.

"He's being rebellious," said his father, trying to explain the DUI arrests and other issues with the court. "I've never seen him drink to excess."

Phillips has some wherewithal to fund his wandering. In 2004 he received his NFL annuity worth more than $86,000, plus $130,000 in workers' compensation, according to his former wife. He also receives a monthly NFL disability benefit of $3,840, though it is uncertain where the check is sent or how it is cashed. And he has an NFL pension worth about $250,000 due in two years--the last vestige of a perfectly planned post-football life.

Most of the rest is gone: the career, the community causes, the celebrity. All of it outside his reach.

For now, Joe Phillips drifts.

If he is caught, he could face up to one year in jail. The longer he is a fugitive, the more severe a sentence he will face, said his probation officer, David Rice.

This is the story that Phillips was saying was BS trumped up by his ex wife. I can't find anything about him posted on the net since 2008. Very weird.

What's even weirder?

Today is Joe Phillips Birthday. Born 1963. He's 47 years old today.

Sweet Daddy Hate
07-16-2010, 12:14 PM
Nate Hobgood Shit Dick

wtf...LMAO

boogblaster
07-16-2010, 12:50 PM
Hasty
Bell
Ross