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Otter
08-23-2010, 05:24 PM
An illegal immigrant who has been arrested five times for driving offenses, including a hit-and-run that ultimately left an elderly Dacula man dead, was back in court in Gwinnett County last week.

Celso Campo-Duartes, driver of a car that struck and killed 83-year-old Dacula resident in 2005.

Gwinnett County Sheriff's Office Celso Campo-Duartes, driver of a car that struck and killed 83-year-old Dacula resident in 2005.

The family of Aubrey Sosebee, whom Celso Campo-Duartes was convicted of running over in 2005, wonders why the Mexican plumber is still in the United States.

“He shouldn’t have even been on the road, let alone this country,” said Gary Sosebee, one of the man’s sons.

Sosebee’s family believed Campo-Duartes would be sent back to Mexico after serving time on the hit-and-run charge.

The Sosebees received a letter from the Gwinnett County district attorney’s office informing them that Campo-Duartes was due back in court for a probation violation hearing.

“What’s he still doing in this country?” asked Sosebee, 55. “That’s what we want to know.”

Sosebee said his father, who had gone to retrieve the mail when he was run over, spent his last few months in a hospital bed, being fed by a tube. He was 83 when he died.

Gwinnett County Assistant District Attorney Rich Vandever said he routinely sees illegal immigrants pass through the system and back again.

“We deal with it every day,” Vandever told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “It really shows how the state’s hands are tied.”

Campo-Duartes served a little more than two years in the Gwinnett County Detention Center after he was arrested in October 2005 for serious injury by vehicle, driving without a license, driving without insurance, and having a tag from another vehicle on his car in the Sosebee case. He was not able to afford bond, according to court records, and spent the next 26 months behind bars.

Campo-Duartes initially rejected entering a guilty plea because the judge told him he risked deportation. According to the court transcript, the magistrate judge asked him if he understood the ramifications of pleading guilty, and Campo-Duartes said he did not. The case was set for trial at an undetermined date.

In the meantime, Campo-Duartes wrote Superior Court Judge Timothy Hamill, explaining that he has a wife, three children and a 60-year-old mother for whom he is the primary provider.The letter did not specify if the family was in Georgia or in Mexico. In his absence, he said, the family had lost their house and car and was in dire need of food.

In January 2008, he entered a negotiated plea to a charge of failure to stop at or return to the scene of an accident and was sentenced to two years in prison and three years of probation. Campo-Duartes was released for time served. It wouldn’t be long before he was back in police custody.

One year ago Saturday, he was arrested for driving without a license and released the same day on $760 bond. In October, he was arrested on the same charge. This time, an immigration hold was placed on him, meaning no bond could be issued. Nonetheless, according to jail records, Campo-Duartes was released eight days later.

Those arrests came before the Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Department began participating in the 287(g) program — a partnership with the federal government that trains deputies to identify illegal immigrants in the county jail, then hand them over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)for possible deportation.

Cobb, Gwinnett, Hall and Whitfield counties and the Georgia State Patrol participate in the program.

Before 287(g), “our hands were pretty much tied,” said Gwinnett County Sheriff Butch Conway. He said it is likely someone like Campo-Duartes jailed on a traffic-related offense was not checked.

“This just reinforces the need for that program in Gwinnett County,” Conway said. “I’ve said before that it was a revolving door in the past where an illegal immigrant could be arrested eight or 10 times and released even on bond or after 48 hours. It’s just more work on Gwinnett County government to process people that shouldn’t be here.”

Campo-Duartes was arrested again on May 28, charged with disorderly conduct and unlicensed driving. He would have been eligible for a $1,983 bond, but since the arrest is a violation of his probation, he is being held without bond. His hearing was continued until September because he didn’t have a lawyer yet.

Now that Gwinnett has adopted 287g, Campo-Duartes will be handed over to federal immigration officials once this case is resolved.

In court Thursday, Campo-Duartes claimed he had already been deported, but there’s no record of it. If he was in fact deported and returned to the U.S. illegally, “that action constitutes a crime and the alien can be charged with illegal entry and, if convicted, can be sentenced to up to 20 years in prison,” said Ivan L. Ortiz-Delgado, a spokesman with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. He said he could not speak about Campo-Duartes’ case without the defendant’s permission.

“From what we’ve gleaned, he probably was deported,” Vandever said. “But re-entry is another problem we have. We see people back in the country time and again even after they’ve been deported.”

Conway said he hopes to have definitive answers on Campo-Duartes’ fate by today.

“I want to know how it happened,” the sheriff told the AJC. “That’s just a failure of the system.”

Campos-Duartes is being held in the Gwinnett County Detention Center, and does not have legal representation at this time.

orange
08-23-2010, 07:13 PM
Those arrests came before the Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Department began participating in the 287(g) program — a partnership with the federal government that trains deputies to identify illegal immigrants in the county jail, then hand them over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)for possible deportation.

...

Now that Gwinnett has adopted 287g, Campo-Duartes will be handed over to federal immigration officials once this case is resolved.


Thank goodness that's settled, then.

Saul Good
08-23-2010, 08:21 PM
Thank goodness that's settled, then.

Did that law bring Aubrey back to life?

orange
08-23-2010, 08:30 PM
Did that law bring Aubrey back to life?

No more than it will bring back any of the other victims of drunken drivers - the ones who were not killed by illegal immigrants, hence not warranting any mention at all here.

Why is Aubrey dead? Because of illegal immigration or drunken driving?

Oucho Cinco
08-23-2010, 08:37 PM
No more than it will bring back any of the other victims of drunken drivers - the ones who were not killed by illegal immigrants, hence not warranting any mention at all here.

Why is Aubrey dead? Because of illegal immigration or drunken driving?

Do you argue just for the sake of arguing?

If the illegal hadn't of been here there most likely wouldn't have been a time line for Aubrey to be killed by a drunken driver that was here illegally.

Bring her back? No, but if you round them up and send them home the probability of the same event happening again lessens.

Saul Good
08-23-2010, 08:41 PM
No more than it will bring back any of the other victims of drunken drivers - the ones who were not killed by illegal immigrants, hence not warranting any mention at all here.

Why is Aubrey dead? Because of illegal immigration or drunken driving?

Illegal immigration

Otter
08-23-2010, 11:52 PM
No more than it will bring back any of the other victims of drunken drivers - the ones who were not killed by illegal immigrants, hence not warranting any mention at all here.

Why is Aubrey dead? Because of illegal immigration or drunken driving?

Both

healthpellets
08-24-2010, 12:04 AM
Those arrests came before the Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Department began participating in the 287(g) program — a partnership with the federal government that trains deputies to identify illegal immigrants in the county jail, then hand them over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)for possible deportation.

so local LEOs are SO incompetent that they had to be trained to identify illegal immigrants and then notify ICE? wtf? i don't buy that.

Dylan
08-24-2010, 09:20 PM
San Juan, Texas

Police: San Juan teen randomly kidnapped, found in Reynosa, Mexico

August 23, 2010 4:51 PM
Jared Taylor
The Monitor

SAN JUAN —Police reunited a teenage woman with her family Monday afternoon, nearly 19 hours after she was abducted, blindfolded and dumped in a Reynosa field.

The 18-year-old woman, whose name was not disclosed by police, was walking to a friend’s house about 6:30 p.m. Sunday.

A black van pulled up alongside her and three men hopped out, San Juan Police Chief Juan Gonzalez said. They snatched the girl, blindfolded her and took her to Reynosa.

The kidnappers began calling the woman’s family demanding ransom money.

“The kidnappers somehow missed it that she had a cell phone,” Gonzalez said. “We were able to keep communicating with her.”

The chief said police investigators, FBI agents and Hidalgo County sheriff’s deputies negotiated with the kidnappers. Once the abductors realized their victim’s family would not be able to pay a ransom, they dumped her in a random field.

She had her cell phone, but police still had no idea where she was.

Customs officers and U.S. Border Patrol agents were put on alert to look for the teen and a helicopter surveyed Mexico from this side of the border, but found nothing.

U.S. authorities did not contact their Mexican counterparts because they did not know whether they were corrupted or connected to the girl’s captors, Gonzalez said.

The girl had no idea where she was, Gonzalez said, and because she was in another country, officers could not go there directly to pick her up.

“The only thing that prevented us from going out there and helping her was that river,” the chief said.

For about four hours during the night, authorities could not reach her on her phone, likely due to a poor signal.

“We felt helpless because we couldn’t help her at all,” he said.

It was the cell phone that proved crucial to finding her location and bringing her home, Gonzalez said.

“We were able to keep communicating with her,” he said.

Random people the girl encountered would not help, either.

“People that she came across didn’t want to help,” the chief said. “People are living in fear in Mexico.”

Gonzalez would not specify exactly who went to pick up the girl — only that a “courageous person” crossed and found her covered in dirt, but unharmed.

“The only thing that was on her mind was ‘I want to go home with my mom,” the chief said. “‘I want to be safe.’”

Kidnappings for ransom involving random victims rarely occur in the Rio Grande Valley, law enforcement officials said. But they still do happen.

In November 2009, a McAllen businessman was abducted at gunpoint from a Starbucks Coffee parking lot and taken to Reynosa. The kidnappers demanded $30,000 and two luxury vehicles as ransom. Mexican police found the man bound and beaten at a northeast Reynosa house and returned him to the United States.

__

Jared Taylor covers law enforcement and general assignments for The Monitor. You can reach him at (956) 683-4439.

http://www.themonitor.com/articles/san-42116-juan-teen.html

Saul Good
08-24-2010, 09:32 PM
Give me a break. That could just as easily have happened in Overland Park, KS.

Dylan
08-25-2010, 09:13 AM
Clearly, you'd be singing a different tune if she was your 18 year old daughter! Just saying...

Saul Good
08-25-2010, 11:23 AM
Clearly, you'd be singing a different tune if she was your 18 year old daughter! Just saying...

Time for a tune-up to the old sarcasm meter.

chiefsnorth
08-25-2010, 11:25 AM
They are just doing the things Americans don't want to do

orange
08-25-2010, 02:29 PM
Time for a tune-up to the old sarcasm meter.

So it WAS sarcasm! I thought it was too good to be true, that you can see reality.


: KEIGHLEY ALYEA - 18 yo - Overland Park KS
by TomTerrific0420 on Wed Oct 07, 2009 9:12 pm


A Kansas teenager allegedly murdered
by her ex-boyfriend and two others regained consciousness after she was
attacked and kidnapped — but the three suspects chose to "finish
killing her," her uncle told reporters.
Keighley Alyea, 18, was found dead late Monday in a farm field near Harrisonville, Mo., after disappearing a week earlier.
Alyea's former boyfriend Dustin Hilt, 18; his cousin Joseph Mattox, 18; and his
best friend Gerald Calbeck, 18; were charged Tuesday with first-degree
murder, aggravated kidnapping and aggravated robbery.
The teen's uncle, Eddie Frentrop, said police told Alyea's father that she
was initially attacked in her hometown of Overland Park but woke up
after she was abducted.
"Somewhere along the drive out east of Harrisonville, she regained consciousness,"
Frentrop said. "At that time, they had the option to do the right
thing, and they chose to finish killing her."
Alyea's best friend, Jessika Beebe, said she tipped detectives off that Hilt
was behind the teenager's disappearance because of the couple's
violent, on-again-off-again relationship.
"He's abusive. He's so abusive," Beebe told the station. "All she ever talked
about was him beating her. And being scared of him."Alyea vanished about midnight on Sept. 29.
That day, she'd spoken of getting back together with Hilt, her best
friend said. Beebe tried to talk her out of it, but said Hilt had
gotten Alyea addicted to drugs and she wouldn't listen to her.
Court documents show that Alyea was killed Sept. 30, hours after she disappeared.
District Attorney Steve Howe declined to discuss why or how the victim was killed at a Tuesday news conference.
The three suspects appeared in Johnson County Court Tuesday to face the charges; each is being held on $2 million bond.
Frentrop says that a tattoo of Hilt's name will be removed from Alyea's body before she is buried.

http://justice4caylee.forumotion.net/adjudicated-cases-f31/keighley-alyea-18-yo-overland-park-ks-t3515-15.htm

Saul Good
08-25-2010, 07:07 PM
So it WAS sarcasm! I thought it was too good to be true, that you can see reality.


: KEIGHLEY ALYEA - 18 yo - Overland Park KS
by TomTerrific0420 on Wed Oct 07, 2009 9:12 pm


A Kansas teenager allegedly murdered
by her ex-boyfriend and two others regained consciousness after she was
attacked and kidnapped — but the three suspects chose to "finish
killing her," her uncle told reporters.
Keighley Alyea, 18, was found dead late Monday in a farm field near Harrisonville, Mo., after disappearing a week earlier.
Alyea's former boyfriend Dustin Hilt, 18; his cousin Joseph Mattox, 18; and his
best friend Gerald Calbeck, 18; were charged Tuesday with first-degree
murder, aggravated kidnapping and aggravated robbery.
The teen's uncle, Eddie Frentrop, said police told Alyea's father that she
was initially attacked in her hometown of Overland Park but woke up
after she was abducted.
"Somewhere along the drive out east of Harrisonville, she regained consciousness,"
Frentrop said. "At that time, they had the option to do the right
thing, and they chose to finish killing her."
Alyea's best friend, Jessika Beebe, said she tipped detectives off that Hilt
was behind the teenager's disappearance because of the couple's
violent, on-again-off-again relationship.
"He's abusive. He's so abusive," Beebe told the station. "All she ever talked
about was him beating her. And being scared of him."Alyea vanished about midnight on Sept. 29.
That day, she'd spoken of getting back together with Hilt, her best
friend said. Beebe tried to talk her out of it, but said Hilt had
gotten Alyea addicted to drugs and she wouldn't listen to her.
Court documents show that Alyea was killed Sept. 30, hours after she disappeared.
District Attorney Steve Howe declined to discuss why or how the victim was killed at a Tuesday news conference.
The three suspects appeared in Johnson County Court Tuesday to face the charges; each is being held on $2 million bond.
Frentrop says that a tattoo of Hilt's name will be removed from Alyea's body before she is buried.

http://justice4caylee.forumotion.net/adjudicated-cases-f31/keighley-alyea-18-yo-overland-park-ks-t3515-15.htm
Murdered by an angry ex boyfriend does not equalbeing kidnapped and taken to a foreign country where law enforcement can't pursue.