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View Full Version : U.S. Issues The Backlash Begins


BIG_DADDY
08-26-2010, 12:26 PM
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republican U.S. Senator Lisa Murkowski is in jeopardy of becoming the seventh member of Congress voted out of office this year amid the anti-incumbent fervor fanned largely by the weak U.S. economy and conservative Tea Party movement.

Murkowski is fighting for survival in a Republican primary in her home state of Alaska likely to be decided once absentee ballots are counted in coming days. The two-term senator is challenged by a Tea Party-backed candidate who carries the endorsement of former Alaska Governor and potential 2012 presidential contender Sarah Palin.

Here is a list of the six incumbent U.S. lawmakers, three Republicans and three Democrats, who lost their bids this year for re-election in state primaries or a state convention.

-- Three-term Senator Robert Bennett of Utah. Like many Republicans challenged by members of their own party, Bennett was denounced as not conservative enough. His bid for another term ended in May at a state party convention. "The political atmosphere obviously has been toxic," he said afterward.

-- Five-term Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania. A moderate, he bolted from the Republican Party last year and became a Democrat. Despite support from the Obama White House, Specter lost his new party's primary in May.

-- Six-term Republican Representative Bob Inglis of South Carolina. A critic of Tea Party favorite Palin and what he described as right-wing fear-mongering, he lost his party's primary in June.

-- Fourteen-term Democratic Representative Alan Mollohan of West Virginia. Damaged by ethics allegations, he was defeated in his party's primary in May by a challenger who lambasted him for backing President Barack Obama's plan to overhaul U.S. healthcare.

-- Seven-term Democratic Representative Carolyn Kilpatrick of Michigan; she lost her state's primary in August, hurt by her dogged defense of her son, former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, who was indicted on political corruption charges.

-- First-term Representative Parker Griffith of Alabama; a conservative, he bolted the Democratic Party in December, saying he fit more comfortably with Republicans; six months later, Republicans rejected him in their state primary.

Dozens of incumbents, primarily Democrats, are in danger of being defeated in the November 2 congressional election. Among those in trouble are Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada, who is opposed by a Tea Party-backed candidate.

Amnorix
08-26-2010, 12:39 PM
The pendulum always swings back. Democrats had overwhelming victories in the last two election cycles, taking control of both houses of Congress and the WH. A swing back to Republicans was inevitable.

Doubly so given the lackluster economy and prevailing and seemingly intractable unemployment.

The question, in the long term, is whether the Tea Party candidates or any other third party (or its supporters) win enough votes as a result of the current discontent of the electorate to significantly affect the dynamics in Washington.

Otter
08-26-2010, 12:49 PM
Unfortunately McCain won Arizona.

The big one is going to be Reid in Nevada, that's the stool sample we need taken out.

Alaska is shaping up to be close race too. Another important one.

BIG_DADDY
08-26-2010, 12:52 PM
The pendulum always swings back. Democrats had overwhelming victories in the last two election cycles, taking control of both houses of Congress and the WH. A swing back to Republicans was inevitable.

Doubly so given the lackluster economy and prevailing and seemingly intractable unemployment.

The question, in the long term, is whether the Tea Party candidates or any other third party (or its supporters) win enough votes as a result of the current discontent of the electorate to significantly affect the dynamics in Washington.

We can only HOPE.......... :D

The Mad Crapper
08-31-2010, 08:23 AM
WASHINGTON Americans with the strongest opinions about the country's most divisive issues are largely unhappy with how President Barack Obama is handling them, an ominous sign for Democrats hoping to retain control of Congress in the fall elections.

In nine of 15 issues examined in an Associated Press-GfK Poll this month, more Americans who expressed intense interest in a problem voiced strong opposition to Obama's work on it, including the economy, unemployment, federal deficits and terrorism. They were about evenly split over the president's efforts on five issues and strongly approved of his direction on just one: U.S. relationships with other countries.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100831/ap_on_el_ge/us_ap_poll_election_issues

Chief Henry
08-31-2010, 09:54 AM
The pendulum always swings back. Democrats had overwhelming victories in the last two election cycles, taking control of both houses of Congress and the WH. A swing back to Republicans was inevitable.

Doubly so given the lackluster economy and prevailing and seemingly intractable unemployment.

The question, in the long term, is whether the Tea Party candidates or any other third party (or its supporters) win enough votes as a result of the current discontent of the electorate to significantly affect the dynamics in Washington.

I think the question in the long term will be if the Republican Senators and Republican Congressman after wrestling the control away from the Democrats will have the balls to over turn the policies of OBAMA, starting with the dam national health care cluster _uck. Then wil the republicans have the balls to
pull back spending in a meaning full way.

This country neads conservative leadership desperately. Lets see how it all unfolds.

ChiefaRoo
08-31-2010, 10:20 AM
Unfortunately McCain won Arizona.

The big one is going to be Reid in Nevada, that's the stool sample we need taken out.

Alaska is shaping up to be close race too. Another important one.

McCain has had an 11th hour conversion towards immigration which I don't know if I trust. That being said J.D. Hayworth is a blowhard and is more used car saleman than statesman. I think McCain is a good man and there should be room in the Republican party for a Moderate.

HerculesRockefell
08-31-2010, 12:25 PM
The pendulum always swings back. Democrats had overwhelming victories in the last two election cycles, taking control of both houses of Congress and the WH. A swing back to Republicans was inevitable.


I realize that this is the Dem meme now, but in January '09, the same people were asking how many seats would they pick up in the Senate and would they lose any House seats?

vailpass
08-31-2010, 01:31 PM
McCain has had an 11th hour conversion towards immigration which I don't know if I trust. That being said J.D. Hayworth is a blowhard and is more used car saleman than statesman. I think McCain is a good man and there should be room in the Republican party for a Moderate.

Weathervane McCain owns AZ.

The Mad Crapper
08-31-2010, 03:28 PM
McCain has had an 11th hour conversion towards immigration which I don't know if I trust.

Always go with your gut feeling.