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Amnorix
09-24-2010, 11:25 AM
A discussion with someone who is going to visit her brother at the base of Mount Fuji, in Japan, next month, got us talking about hiking, etc.

What is the highest elevation you have WALKED to starting from at or about sea level? For me it's confirmed at 4,100, which is the elevation of Cannon Mountain in the White Mountains, but probably a fair bit higher since we got pretty far up on Mount Lafayette which is about 5,200 feet. If I had to guess we got up to 4,500'ish feet up.

Which, I realize, is pretty paltry. Not even half of Mount Fuji, or a third of McKinley in Alaska, Rainier in Washington, or any of the really bad boys in Asia.

jiveturkey
09-24-2010, 11:31 AM
There's a bitchin' amusement park at the base of Mt. Fuji.

Hydrae
09-24-2010, 11:32 AM
I have hiked the Grand Canyon, does that count? Top to bottom and back up in one day. Sore for days afterwards!

Also used to hike up a small mountain in Flagstaff. It was about 3000 feet or so from bottom to top but you start at almost 7000 feet so obviously nowhere near sea level.

God, I miss mountains living here in Texas.

DrRyan
09-24-2010, 11:36 AM
Tough question to answer as most mountain trailheads do not start at sea level. My highest elevation was the top of Long's Peak 14,259 feet.

DrRyan
09-24-2010, 11:38 AM
I have hiked the Grand Canyon, does that count? Top to bottom and back up in one day. Sore for days afterwards!

Also used to hike up a small mountain in Flagstaff. It was about 3000 feet or so from bottom to top but you start at almost 7000 feet so obviously nowhere near sea level.

God, I miss mountains living here in Texas.

Mt. Humphreys is a good day hike north of Flag as well. Not a small mountain though. 12,633 to the peak of that one, but a pretty easy hike above 12k.

Stewie
09-24-2010, 11:39 AM
I climbed Long's Peak in Colorado. It's ~14,255 ft. with the trail head around 8,000 ft. Until you get above 10,000 ft. things aren't too bad. Once you get above 10K you notice the lack of oxygen and get winded pretty easily... especially if you're having to do rigorous climbing.

Rain Man
09-24-2010, 11:42 AM
I just did the Pike's Peak Ascent race last month. Started at 6,000 feet and ended at 14,119 feet in a little under six hours.

At sea level, I ran the Buffalo Run on Catalina Island that started more or less on the shore and topped out at about 1,600 feet about 8 miles in, then came back down.

Third Eye
09-24-2010, 11:42 AM
Tough question to answer as most mountain trailheads do not start at sea level. My highest elevation was the top of Long's Peak 14,259 feet.

Ditto. I've peaked a few 14s, but the jumping off points are considerably higher than sea level.

Hydrae
09-24-2010, 11:49 AM
Mt. Humphreys is a good day hike north of Flag as well. Not a small mountain though. 12,633 to the peak of that one, but a pretty easy hike above 12k.

Yeah, Mt Elden was across the highway from my trailer there. Had all kinds of fun going up there with my small kids (probably 7 and 4 the first time we went up). Had to carry the 4 year old most of the way back down.

Amnorix
09-24-2010, 11:51 AM
Tough question to answer as most mountain trailheads do not start at sea level. My highest elevation was the top of Long's Peak 14,259 feet.

Yeah, I really should say from trailhead. What I was trying to avoid was someone discussing sex at 40,000 feet in an airplane, or how they drove up Mount Washington.

Peak elevation BY WALKING is all I really care about. I have no idea what elevaton the trailhead I was coming from was at. Certainly wasn't sea level though.

loochy
09-24-2010, 11:52 AM
In New Mexico I hiked Wheeler Peak, which is 13,161 feet. I think the trailhead starts at about 9,000 feet. Also, I've backpacked in the Weminuche Wilderness of Colorado (starting elevation about 8'000 and maximum elevation about 14,000). The difference in the air is huge...you breathe and breathe and huff and puff and you still don't get your breath back. Also, the altitude makes me have really bad gas (not kidding). After coming back down I had the worst headache ever.

Bearcat
09-24-2010, 11:57 AM
Hiked my first mountain a few weeks ago... Pyramid Mountain in Olympic National Park... it starts at 600' and the peak is at 3125'. I'm completely out of shape, and not in the "I was all-everything in high school and scored 4 TDs in a single game once, but now only run 2 miles a day" kind of out of shape some people talk about, so was a bit harder than it should have been.... but we made the round trip in the "casual time" I saw in a few places online. Going down felt really good.

There was a WWII lookout at the top, which was cool, even though I was hoping for an IHOP.

Amnorix
09-24-2010, 11:59 AM
Best part of hiking in the White Mountains -- at their small elevations , it's almost embarrassing to call them mountains -- are the views you can get into the valleys during the fall and the leaves are changing. Completely spectacular.

I'd love to do something higher up, though I'm hardly hardcore. My boys, 9 and 6, did very well on a 5 hour hike two months ago, but it was nearly flat. Long hike for kids that age though.

Rain Man
09-24-2010, 12:12 PM
In New Mexico I hiked Wheeler Peak, which is 13,161 feet. I think the trailhead starts at about 9,000 feet. Also, I've backpacked in the Weminuche Wilderness of Colorado (starting elevation about 8'000 and maximum elevation about 14,000). The difference in the air is huge...you breathe and breathe and huff and puff and you still don't get your breath back. Also, the altitude makes me have really bad gas (not kidding). After coming back down I had the worst headache ever.


I do okay up to about 12,000 feet in terms of breathing, but above 12,000 it's amazing how fast I get out of breath. It makes me want to visit some of those Bolivian cities at 17,000 feet just to see if everyone there sits around huffing and puffing all day.

loochy
09-24-2010, 12:20 PM
I do okay up to about 12,000 feet in terms of breathing, but above 12,000 it's amazing how fast I get out of breath. It makes me want to visit some of those Bolivian cities at 17,000 feet just to see if everyone there sits around huffing and puffing all day.

Yeah, it's really weird how you can actually feel the thinness of the air as you breathe in. I can't imagine what it's like on a tall tall tall mountain like Everest or something.

DrRyan
09-24-2010, 12:37 PM
Yeah, it's really weird how you can actually feel the thinness of the air as you breathe in. I can't imagine what it's like on a tall tall tall mountain like Everest or something.

I have been a hiker/mountain climber for quite some time(10+ years) and I used to think that I wanted to train up, climb some bigger peaks 18-20k range and then do Everest. After some more serious thought, research and reading Into Thin Air I think I will settle for K2 and Kilimanjaro instead at some point. I would like to get to Everest base camp at 20k feet though.

Stewie
09-24-2010, 12:50 PM
I have been a hiker/mountain climber for quite some time(10+ years) and I used to think that I wanted to train up, climb some bigger peaks 18-20k range and then do Everest. After some more serious thought, research and reading Into Thin Air I think I will settle for K2 and Kilimanjaro instead at some point. I would like to get to Everest base camp at 20k feet though.

I'd love to be the base camp guy for a crew going up Everest.

I've heard K2 is a tougher climb than Everest. I've also heard that Denali (Mt. McKinley) is a brutal climb. You actually climb 18,000 ft. from base camp as opposed to about 12,000 ft. on Everest.

johnny961
09-24-2010, 12:57 PM
I haven't started hiking at sea level, but have traveled from 1000 feet to 9000 feet in about a 9 hour period. Altitude kinda jacks with you a little at first when your used to living at the level in the KC area and go up there with no time to acclimate. And at somewhere around 9000-10000 feet the oxygen level does become an issue and you get winded pretty quickly.

Donger
09-24-2010, 12:58 PM
Every time I go to Portland or Seattle, I'm stunned by Rainier and Hood. Sure, seeing a 14,000 foot mountain is commonplace in Colorado, but seeing a 12,000 foot mountain from sea level is something else.

DrRyan
09-24-2010, 01:03 PM
I'd love to be the base camp guy for a crew going up Everest.

I've heard K2 is a tougher climb than Everest. I've also heard that Denali (Mt. McKinley) is a brutal climb.

Conversely, Kilimanjaro is supposed to be a very easy(relatively) climb to get to nearly 20k feet.

Stewie
09-24-2010, 01:28 PM
Conversely, Kilimanjaro is supposed to be a very easy(relatively) climb to get to nearly 20k feet.

I've heard that. It's like a 3-day stroll up the hill with no real rigorous climbing. I bet the view from the top is awesome.

Rain Man
09-24-2010, 01:31 PM
Every time I go to Portland or Seattle, I'm stunned by Rainier and Hood. Sure, seeing a 14,000 foot mountain is commonplace in Colorado, but seeing a 12,000 foot mountain from sea level is something else.

And with no other mountains around it. I saw Rainier for the first time this past summer and it's spectacular.

damaticous
09-24-2010, 01:35 PM
Lake Serene, Goldbar Washington.

elevation gain. 2,100 foot hike
Trailhead - 500 Ft.
Top Elevation - 2,600 ft.
7.4 Miles.

Donger
09-24-2010, 01:47 PM
And with no other mountains around it. I saw Rainier for the first time this past summer and it's spectacular.

Yep. My SiL was giving me a bunch of crap about how majestic Rainier is compared to the Rockies. I looked at her and said, "Well, yeah. It's a f*cking volcano." She just stared at me (she didn't know it was a volcano).

I then sent her a link to lahars.

Bugeater
09-24-2010, 01:49 PM
I got out of the car and walked around a bit at the top of Mt Evans. That was enough for me.

Frazod
09-24-2010, 01:56 PM
Harney Peak in the Black Hills for me. Elevation 7,242, gain of about 1,200 feet. Doesn't sound like much, for a fat pack-a-day smoker from the midwest it felt like fucking Everest.

Otter
09-24-2010, 01:58 PM
We didn't have a GPS system at the time so it's tough to tell exactly elevation but I'll guess between 10,000 and 12,000 while hiking from outside Durango to the top of Rockies.

Psychedelics and the Rockies are like popcorn and butter. Good times.

Donger
09-24-2010, 02:12 PM
Harney Peak in the Black Hills for me. Elevation 7,242, gain of about 1,200 feet. Doesn't sound like much, for a fat pack-a-day smoker from the midwest it felt like ****ing Everest.

My youngest hiked Devil's Head when she was three. Little turd went up that hike faster than me. I forget the exact numbers, but it's about 1.5 miles one way. Starts at 8,500 feet and ends at 9,500 feet.

I guess being born in Colorado helps.

shakesthecat
09-24-2010, 02:18 PM
Buffalo Mountain in Colorado.

Started at 9800+ up to 12,777 at the summit.

Did it when I was 18 and don't recall it being all that difficult. However I don't think I would try it again now.

NewChief
09-24-2010, 02:19 PM
Done some 14ers in Colorado.

Probably one of my toughest was when the wife (girlfriend at the time), and I headed out to the Guadalupe Mountains for Spring Break one year. She had a cold, but she was determined not to let that keep her down. We hiked into the back country with our packs and enough water to stay 3 days in the back country (no water sources up on the mountain). It's about a 3,000' climb that peaks out at around 8,500. It was an awesome few days out in nature but carrying 60lb packs didn't make it easy. It also sucked for her to have a cold and for us to have to ration our water, since you need fluids when you're sick.

KC Dan
09-24-2010, 02:20 PM
A discussion with someone who is going to visit her brother at the base of Mount Fuji, in Japan, next month, got us talking about hiking, etc.
Is she hot? I fly to Tokyo tomorrow morning....I could be pursuaded to stay awhile :D

KingPriest2
09-24-2010, 04:23 PM
I'd love to be the base camp guy for a crew going up Everest.

I've heard K2 is a tougher climb than Everest. I've also heard that Denali (Mt. McKinley) is a brutal climb. You actually climb 18,000 ft. from base camp as opposed to about 12,000 ft. on Everest.

Base camp is actually about 7100 ft so you have to climb 13000 ft From its actual base to the tip is 18000

Rain Man
09-24-2010, 04:26 PM
Is she hot? I fly to Tokyo tomorrow morning....I could be pursuaded to stay awhile :D

I'm pretty sure there are other attractive women in Japan (as long as you like them petite).

DenverDanChiefsFan
09-24-2010, 04:27 PM
I drove to the top of Mt. Evans. Then walked. Then picked up my kid. Then almost passed out. Then set her down.

DaFace
09-24-2010, 04:56 PM
I don't often start at sea level, but I regularly do hikes with 2-3k feet in elevation change. they're a lot harder from 11-14k than at 6-9k though.

rockymtnchief
09-24-2010, 06:12 PM
Longs Peak and Mt. Elbert in Co. (14ners)

Numerous 11-12k peaks in Montana.

But none from sea level.