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Dave Lane
11-05-2010, 10:35 AM
With my new interest in astronomy and getting a new camera yesterday for my new telescope I present this fun quick little video. I might bump this thread when I start getting some images from deep space objects.

Check the end of the thread for Newest Space Photos! Thanks for looking!



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Dave Lane
11-05-2010, 10:37 AM
Oh and kill the Raiders!!

MOhillbilly
11-05-2010, 10:43 AM
IF THE EARTH STOPS WE FLY OFF!!!!! THE STUFF OF NIGHTMARES!

Hog Farmer
11-05-2010, 10:55 AM
Astronomy is fascinating. Dave, let us know when you see Planet Nibiru getting close, it should be viewable in the beginning of 2012 I expect. I just need a few days to hide my gold before the Annunaki arrive. Thanks in advance!

MOhillbilly
11-05-2010, 11:11 AM
Dave do you do any astronomy club stuff in KC?

Dave Lane
11-05-2010, 03:00 PM
Dave do you do any astronomy club stuff in KC?

I've been to one star party and it was pretty cool. Hoping to get to more before too long.

MOhillbilly
11-05-2010, 03:11 PM
when i was a kid my dad was into telescopes and my uncle was into photography. Spent many a night lookin through an eye piece.

Bump what you have when you have it.


My cousin(photography uncles boy) has a super slick set up. tracks by itself, takes pics, ect.

Count Zarth
11-05-2010, 03:17 PM
http://astro.wsu.edu/worthey/astro/html/im-ufo/im-aliens/aliens9.jpg

Baby Lee
11-05-2010, 03:25 PM
I can look up at the universe and say "Dude, I am you."


- Kind of puts that Stewart Obama exchange in perspective. ;)

chasedude
11-05-2010, 03:44 PM
Cool, I'd be interested in what you can capture.

Dave Lane
11-05-2010, 03:59 PM
when i was a kid my dad was into telescopes and my uncle was into photography. Spent many a night lookin through an eye piece.

Bump what you have when you have it.


My cousin(photography uncles boy) has a super slick set up. tracks by itself, takes pics, ect.

I'm getting there. I have an autoguider for the scope and a wedge to do photography with. Just bought a cheapy $350 camera to get started with. Make sure I like it before dropping big bucks on a good one.

Dave Lane
11-05-2010, 04:07 PM
Astronomy is fascinating. Dave, let us know when you see Planet Nibiru getting close, it should be viewable in the beginning of 2012 I expect. I just need a few days to hide my gold before the Annunaki arrive. Thanks in advance!

I'll keep you updated so you know when to stop jerkin. :)

I gotta admit you are growing on me as a poster...

Baby Lee
11-05-2010, 04:14 PM
I'll keep you updated so you know when to stop jerkin. :)

I gotta admit you are growing on me as a poster...

Watch out, you keep up the pillow talk, and next thing you know Fed-Ex is delivering buckets of boar goo 'so you can ballast your tripod with it.'

Is there anything boar goo CAN'T do?

Dave Lane
11-05-2010, 04:19 PM
Watch out, you keep up the pillow talk, and next thing you know Fed-Ex is delivering buckets of boar goo 'so you can ballast your tripod with it.'

Is there anything boar goo CAN'T do?

A very deep question Mr. Lee and much like the wise owl and the tootsie pop one the world may never know.

Dave Lane
01-06-2011, 04:43 PM
First pic. Of Orion M43 from last night...

Art Vader
01-06-2011, 04:57 PM
dunno if you saw this photo but it pretty much blew my mind.. the eclipse that just happened with the international space station in the shot

http://mblogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2011/01/04/insanely-awesome-solar-eclipse-picture/

Extra Point
01-06-2011, 05:00 PM
Don't get elliptical on me, and shit!

mlyonsd
01-06-2011, 05:10 PM
First pic. Of Orion M43 from last night...That's awesome. Did you take it outside of city lights?

My nearest neighbors are a mile away and we have very little ground lighting. I have a cheaper telescope and usually just look at the moon with it but that has gotten boring.

My goal for the year is to see the rings of Saturn.

AirForceChief
01-06-2011, 05:20 PM
I have a cheaper telescope and usually just look at the moon with it but that has gotten boring.

What scope do you have? I just got my daughter and me an introductory scope (i.e., cheaper): Orion StarSeeker 80. It has the programable tracking device on it, as well.

Also, what camera are you using?

Gonzo
01-06-2011, 05:39 PM
First pic. Of Orion M43 from last night...

That's one hell of a pic man. Really impressive stuff. I think that's something I could get into with my boy when he gets a little older.
Posted via Mobile Device

Discuss Thrower
01-06-2011, 05:46 PM
I'm getting there. I have an autoguider for the scope and a wedge to do photography with. Just bought a cheapy $350 camera to get started with. Make sure I like it before dropping big bucks on a good one.

That rig is only useful when it's snapping candids of some fit coeds.

Dave Lane
01-06-2011, 06:47 PM
That's awesome. Did you take it outside of city lights?

My nearest neighbors are a mile away and we have very little ground lighting. I have a cheaper telescope and usually just look at the moon with it but that has gotten boring.

My goal for the year is to see the rings of Saturn.

No just took it in my back yard in Leawood. Saturn should be up to see late feb early march

OnTheWarpath58
01-06-2011, 06:52 PM
Awesome.

I took an Astronomy class and lab a few years ago and really enjoyed it. Want to buy a scope at some point, but we get too much light pollution where we live.

Dave Lane
01-06-2011, 07:02 PM
What scope do you have? I just got my daughter and me an introductory scope (i.e., cheaper): Orion StarSeeker 80. It has the programable tracking device on it, as well.

Also, what camera are you using?

I've got a Takahashi FS-102 refractor on a Losmandy G11 mount and a SBIG 8300 CCD camera. Its not a beginner rig but its lighter than my beast and easier to set up. Orion makes good stuff for the most part i have a Orion auto guider and scope on the Takahashi.

JD10367
01-06-2011, 08:41 PM
when i was a kid my dad was into telescopes and my uncle was into photography. Spent many a night lookin through an eye piece.

When I was a kid my brother had a telescope. I also spent many a night looking through an eyepiece. But it was because we lived in the city, and I had it trained on the windows of other apartment buildings. :evil:

baitism
01-06-2011, 08:43 PM
Almost changed my major after I took astronomy in college. But, then I remembered there aren't many jobs in it.

mohammedhali
01-06-2011, 08:50 PM
Who's narrating this video? Before I watched it I thought it was going to be a Carl Sagan video.

J Diddy
01-06-2011, 08:55 PM
First pic. Of Orion M43 from last night...


Awesome.

Fish
01-06-2011, 09:42 PM
:thumb:

googlegoogle
01-06-2011, 09:49 PM
I've got a Takahashi FS-102 refractor on a Losmandy G11 mount and a SBIG 8300 CCD camera. Its not a beginner rig but its lighter than my beast and easier to set up. Orion makes good stuff for the most part i have a Orion auto guider and scope on the Takahashi.

Pretty cool. I thought reflectors caught more light. Lots of websites for handmade reflectors.

Dave Lane
01-07-2011, 12:01 AM
I have a big 14" Celestron and Meade SCT scopes, but the little Takahashi takes good shots and is a easy setup.

Got some great shots tonight taking a pic of the Horsehead nebula right now.

Earthling
01-07-2011, 12:57 AM
Astronomy is mind-blowing. Great pic you took! :thumb:
Its cool being able to see into the past.

Inspector
01-07-2011, 07:08 AM
I think I just saw June Lockhart and Angela Cartwright in one of those pics. Cool.

I hope they find their way home. I've been worried about them for years.

MOhillbilly
01-07-2011, 07:25 AM
uh, thats pretty slick you can do that in your backyard dave.

drool.

Bwana
01-07-2011, 07:48 AM
Cool stuff Dave, but don't tick off the aliens!

http://roadmonster.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/ufo-gif.gif

Molitoth
01-07-2011, 08:30 AM
Great Video find Dave, truely inspiring. I love the narrators voice as well!

Molitoth
01-07-2011, 09:08 AM
I am now a huge fan of this guy.

philhellenes on youtube. He makes a tons of great videos!
I love this type of stuff, I am in awe.

Dave Lane
01-07-2011, 11:42 AM
Here's a little better shot of the same area I took last night with a little more detail and a longer exposure...

AirForceChief
01-07-2011, 02:43 PM
I stepped out of a super nova...and then my mom yelled, "Be sure to wipe your shoes before you come into the house." I hate that b****!

Dave Lane
01-11-2011, 12:11 AM
New pic same area but a 30 Minutes exposure...

LiveSteam
01-11-2011, 12:17 AM
First pic. Of Orion M43 from last night...

I see the Lord Jesus Christ in your pic.
Can you see it Dave?

Buck
01-11-2011, 12:55 AM
Whoa...awesome!!!

What resolution are your pics? Can't check from my iPod. I might use on as my comp background if it's at least 1920 x 1080.

Dave Lane
01-11-2011, 07:34 AM
I should be able to get that close. The raw image is about 3200 x 2500. I'm using it for my background and it looks pretty cool.

Jenson71
01-11-2011, 08:02 AM
I'm amazed that a personal/private telescope can get those images. That's a great piece of technology.

tooge
01-11-2011, 08:35 AM
do these "star parties" have pizza, beer, chicks, that sort of thing, or are they more for like looking at the sky and stuff?

Dave Lane
01-11-2011, 08:50 AM
I see the Lord Jesus Christ in your pic.
Can you see it Dave?

Actually I have a pic I took of a latte I had that looked like there was jesus in the foam, so there you are :)

Dave Lane
01-11-2011, 09:17 AM
do these "star parties" have pizza, beer, chicks, that sort of thing, or are they more for like looking at the sky and stuff?

Yes they generally do but maybe not the focus of the event :)

Dave Lane
01-12-2011, 04:46 PM
Whoa...awesome!!!

What resolution are your pics? Can't check from my iPod. I might use on as my comp background if it's at least 1920 x 1080.

I tried to post the larger size for your background but its too big PM me your email and I'll send it to you .

chasedude
01-12-2011, 04:56 PM
Cool pics Dave :thumb:

I use Spitzer and Hubble pics for my background and would love to add yours to the cycle.

PM sent

alnorth
01-12-2011, 04:57 PM
One sad reality today is that virtually the entire US is bathed in such a bright nighttime light that most people spend most of their lives never really seeing how cool the night sky can really be. Even if you are in a small town it all gets drowned out in a dull grayish off-black with only the brightest stars visible.

You pretty much have to go to someplace like northern Arizona or rural Utah to see the true beauty of the night sky. That actually will probably play a significant role in deciding where I want to retire someday 25-30ish years from now.

National Geographic (http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/11/light-pollution/klinkenborg-text) wrote a really cool article about light pollution a couple years or so ago. I go outside, and I just simply don't see stuff like this:

http://s.ngm.com/2008/11/light-pollution/img/starry-night-sky-615.jpg

MahiMike
01-12-2011, 05:02 PM
No. No I can't comprehend it.

alnorth
01-12-2011, 08:42 PM
another interesting picture of the same group of stars. If the image on the right looks familiar to you, believe it or not, that image on the left does exist in some places in the western and northern US farther from cities.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2c/Light_pollution_It%27s_not_pretty.jpg/800px-Light_pollution_It%27s_not_pretty.jpg

Dave Lane
01-29-2011, 06:14 PM
M81 and M82 from last night... 3 hour photo. A American-Canadian team determined the distance to M81 to be 12.9 million light-years ± 0.9 million light-years. So the light I recorded last night happened about 13 million years ago.

Explanation: On the left, surrounded by blue spiral arms, is spiral galaxy M81. On the right marked by red gas and dust clouds, is irregular galaxy M82. This stunning vista shows these two mammoth galaxies locked in gravitational combat, as they have been for the past billion years. The gravity from each galaxy dramatically affects the other during each hundred million-year pass. Last go-round, M82's gravity likely raised density waves rippling around M81, resulting in the richness of M81's spiral arms. But M81 left M82 with violent star forming regions and colliding gas clouds so energetic the galaxy glows in X-rays. In a few billion years only one galaxy will remain.

Updated pic...

BigMeatballDave
01-29-2011, 08:05 PM
I LOVE this shit. I really hope we get to experience Betelgeuse going supernova in this lifetime.

jd1020
01-29-2011, 08:28 PM
Time to upgrade to a CGE PRO 1400 HD.

Dave Lane
01-29-2011, 08:32 PM
I used a CGEM mount to take this one...

Dave Lane
01-29-2011, 08:34 PM
I LOVE this shit. I really hope we get to experience Betelgeuse going supernova in this lifetime.

It may have already. If it blew up today we won't see the light for 1400 years. Take your vitamins. :)

BigMeatballDave
01-29-2011, 08:40 PM
It may have already. If it blew up today we won't see the light for 1400 years. Take your vitamins. :):D I wonder if scientists will actually know if it has, until one day its light out at 2am?

ChiefaRoo
01-29-2011, 08:49 PM
First pic. Of Orion M43 from last night...

Cool Dave, I see Uranus.

bowener
01-29-2011, 10:04 PM
It may have already. If it blew up today we won't see the light for 1400 years. Take your vitamins. :)

Well, true... but it may have gone Super Nova 1400 years ago as well...

BigMeatballDave
01-29-2011, 10:14 PM
Well, true... but it may have gone Super Nova 1400 years ago as well...Lets hope it did. :thumb:

chasedude
01-30-2011, 10:30 AM
Cool Pic again Dave, nice!

Crush
01-30-2011, 12:36 PM
1400?

I thought it was only 600 light years away.
Posted via Mobile Device

Easy 6
01-30-2011, 01:18 PM
One sad reality today is that virtually the entire US is bathed in such a bright nighttime light that most people spend most of their lives never really seeing how cool the night sky can really be. Even if you are in a small town it all gets drowned out in a dull grayish off-black with only the brightest stars visible.

You pretty much have to go to someplace like northern Arizona or rural Utah to see the true beauty of the night sky. That actually will probably play a significant role in deciding where I want to retire someday 25-30ish years from now.

National Geographic (http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/11/light-pollution/klinkenborg-text) wrote a really cool article about light pollution a couple years or so ago. I go outside, and I just simply don't see stuff like this:

http://s.ngm.com/2008/11/light-pollution/img/starry-night-sky-615.jpg

Absolutely, theres nothing like being waaay out in the country on a clear night. Back in my service days, i spent untold hours using my night vision goggles to stare at the sky while out in the field, the sky literally explodes with stars when you're wearing those on a clear night out in the boonies.

KC Tattoo
01-30-2011, 01:44 PM
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Dave Lane
02-01-2011, 04:10 PM
1400?

I thought it was only 600 light years away.
Posted via Mobile Device

Sorry the Orion nebula, which is about 1400 light years away, is what I was thinking of. You can go to half douses on your vitamins.

Dave Lane
02-01-2011, 09:54 PM
New start of a pic for today....

Barnard 33. Known to most people as the horse head nebula.

Took me awhile to get a shot of this little guy. Always cloudy when I tried.

BigMeatballDave
02-01-2011, 09:57 PM
New start of a pic for today....

Barnard 33. Know to most people as the horse head nebula.

Took me awhile to get a shot of this little guy. Always cloudy when Itried.Awesome.

Dave Lane
02-01-2011, 10:53 PM
And all from my backyard in town...

chasedude
02-04-2011, 08:28 PM
And all from my backyard in town...

Another good one Dave! Keep em com'n :thumb:

Dave Lane
03-29-2011, 02:05 PM
Had to put this up, its not mine but its a 60 hour exposure in 4 sections of the Orion nebula, Horsehead nebula and the flame nebula. I know the guy who did it and had to share. I thought it was tits.

Buck
03-29-2011, 02:06 PM
Had to put this up, its not mine but its a 60 hour exposure in 4 sections of the Orion nebula, Horsehead nebula and the flame nebula. I know the guy who did it and had to share. I thought it was tits.

How exactly do you keep a 60 hour exposure without noticing any movement? I mean the Earth is moving, right?

Iowanian
03-29-2011, 02:10 PM
Sounds like you're looking for God.

warrior
03-29-2011, 02:22 PM
New start of a pic for today....

Barnard 33. Known to most people as the horse head nebula.

Took me awhile to get a shot of this little guy. Always cloudy when I tried.

Cool pics as always Dave.

I need some advice on Lenses I bought a Celestron Nexstar-8 it came with a

40mm lens what other size lens should I buy first.

King_Chief_Fan
03-29-2011, 02:27 PM
wow...that is impressive stuff. It leaves little doubt about the creativity God had when he created the universe...Awesome

Saulbadguy
03-29-2011, 02:29 PM
Hey look, Orion is bankrupt.

Dave Lane
03-29-2011, 03:02 PM
Cool pics as always Dave.

I need some advice on Lenses I bought a Celestron Nexstar-8 it came with a

40mm lens what other size lens should I buy first.

A lot depends on what you are looking to see. I'd get something in the 12mm range and then maybe 20mm range too. 40 mm is nice and wide but not very powerful. If you are in town I think I have a 25 mm Plossl I could donate to you, and you would be more than welcome, if you bring your scope over, to use the better lens I have too. I have a pretty good selection you could pick through.

Dave Lane
03-29-2011, 03:04 PM
Sounds like you're looking for God.

Hey if there was one and I found him I'd be pumped. Maybe he is just gone away and thats why there are no miracles anymore.

...and no Insane Clown Posse posts please and thank you :)

Jenson71
03-29-2011, 03:06 PM
I've got a Takahashi FS-102 refractor on a Losmandy G11 mount and a SBIG 8300 CCD camera. Its not a beginner rig but its lighter than my beast and easier to set up. Orion makes good stuff for the most part i have a Orion auto guider and scope on the Takahashi.

How much does a set like that cost?

My understanding was that the shots you are taking could only be seen through some sort of university or research project that would cost tens of thousands of dollars to put together.

Dave Lane
03-29-2011, 03:07 PM
How exactly do you keep a 60 hour exposure without noticing any movement? I mean the Earth is moving, right?

Well his exposures are over 2 months time and yes that is what really tough about doing this. Usually you do 10 minute "subs" at a time then stack them in software to gather all the light from the different frames. If the scope varies by 1/32 of the width of a human hair anytime during the 10 minute subs the shot is ruined and you have to toss it out.

The mounts that guide the scopes for the pictures are insanely complex. And expensive for the really good ones.

Dave Lane
03-29-2011, 03:10 PM
How much does a set like that cost?

My understanding was that the shots you are taking could only be seen through some sort of university or research project that would cost tens of thousands of dollars to put together.

I think used, if you aren't looking for REALLY distant galaxies you could put together a reasonable little setup for $2,000 - $3,000. $5K buys a nice setup. I've seen guys that do the top of the line shots spend $200k easy.

MoreLemonPledge
03-29-2011, 03:10 PM
With my new interest in astronomy and getting a new camera yesterday for my new telescope I present this fun quick little video. I might bump this thread when I start getting some images from deep space objects.


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http://www.fohguild.org/forums/attachments/screenshots/156479d1289547267-funny-strange-random-pics-mind-blown.jpg

Jenson71
03-29-2011, 03:16 PM
I think used, if you aren't looking for REALLY distant galaxies you could put together a reasonable little setup for $2,000 - $3,000. $5K buys a nice setup. I've seen guys that do the top of the line shots spend $200k easy.

That's so much cheaper than I thought.

4th and Long
03-29-2011, 03:18 PM
:thumb:

warrior
03-29-2011, 03:19 PM
A lot depends on what you are looking to see. I'd get something in the 12mm range and then maybe 20mm range too. 40 mm is nice and wide but not very powerful. If you are in town I think I have a 25 mm Plossl I could donate to you, and you would be more than welcome, if you bring your scope over, to use the better lens I have too. I have a pretty good selection you could pick through.


Thanks Dave, Trying to pick up some quality eye pieces on ebay.

I'm in Texas now other wise I'd like to meet you and learn more, maybe a rain

check when I get closer to KC.

4th and Long
03-29-2011, 03:19 PM
:)

warrior
03-29-2011, 03:20 PM
http://www.fohguild.org/forums/attachments/screenshots/156479d1289547267-funny-strange-random-pics-mind-blown.jpg

Nice

Dave Lane
03-29-2011, 03:28 PM
Thanks Dave, Trying to pick up some quality eye pieces on ebay.

I'm in Texas now other wise I'd like to meet you and learn more, maybe a rain

check when I get closer to KC.

Absolutely. I'd try to get a couple Naglers if you can swing them. Also get the 2" versions if you can do not buy the 1 1/4" unless you have to. Buy a 2" diagonal preferably 97% reflectivity and you should get some great views with your scope.

Also Google "SCT collimination" online to see if your scope is got its two mirrors centered and aligned. It makes a huge difference in your views.

Dave Lane
03-29-2011, 03:30 PM
:)

Fantastic shots!

warrior
03-29-2011, 04:04 PM
Absolutely. I'd try to get a couple Naglers if you can swing them. Also get the 2" versions if you can do not buy the 1 1/4" unless you have to. Buy a 2" diagonal preferably 97% reflectivity and you should get some great views with your scope.

Also Google "SCT collimination" online to see if your scope is got its two mirrors centered and aligned. It makes a huge difference in your views.

Thanks Dave :thumb:

Detoxing
03-29-2011, 04:25 PM
That's the one thing I hate about living in San Diego; I can't see the stars. I need to see what Dave sees before I die.

threebag02
03-29-2011, 08:25 PM
http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRDYqHObJv59OIoUvBdqeTf-rSoo3um2Gr0-S4I_4zW7NH_mHBj

THAaaaats DEEeeeep Mannnn

munkey
03-29-2011, 08:56 PM
<iframe title="YouTube video player" width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ZTzA_xesrL8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Great movie...

nose
03-30-2011, 02:20 AM
we dont fly off just get smashed by hurricanes and fall thru the crack's the ultra quakes cause and get burned to a crisp by every volcano on earth going off. Not nearly as bad i think honestly i would rather fly off and die immediately!

nose
03-30-2011, 02:24 AM
By the way Dave i think we are in agreement to say astronomy kicks major arse i need a new scope mine broke and when i had a working one i would use the old school logitech cams mounted on the lens with a real long usb cable to do my astraphotography with so that is a good pointer for those of you with a old school logitech messenger cam or similar and a telescope. U get more magnification as well as save your best viewings on your pc to relive over and over.

Dave Lane
04-08-2011, 10:18 PM
Took this on Monday at a Dark Sky site and though it was only 150 minutes it came out nicely I think.

Object data: M51, the 'Whirlpool Galaxy' in Canes Venatici is famous for its beautiful spiral structure, first noted by Lord Rosse in 1845. It was discovered by Messier in October 1773 and catalogued by him in January 1774.

Its companion galaxy, NGC 5195, (seen to the right of M51 in this image) was discovered in 1781 by Messier's colleague, P. Mechain. The M51 system is a spectacular example of interacting galaxies - in this case NGC 5195 is being "ripped apart" by the huge gravitational disturbance of M51, while M51 has in turn undergone huge structural alteration from the gravitational effects of NGC 5195.

The distance of M51 is estimated to be about 37 million light years. The diameter is approximately 100,000 light years and the total mass is estimated to be the equivalent of 160 billion suns.

Dave Lane
04-09-2011, 08:08 AM
If you look in the background carefully all the little "fuzzy" objects are other galaxies that are 100's of millions of light years away. It's amazing how studded the sky is with them.

chasedude
04-09-2011, 02:59 PM
More cool stuff, keep it coming Dave!

bevischief
04-09-2011, 04:26 PM
Took this on Monday at a Dark Sky site and though it was only 150 minutes it came out nicely I think.

Object data: M51, the 'Whirlpool Galaxy' in Canes Venatici is famous for its beautiful spiral structure, first noted by Lord Rosse in 1845. It was discovered by Messier in October 1773 and catalogued by him in January 1774.

Its companion galaxy, NGC 5195, (seen to the right of M51 in this image) was discovered in 1781 by Messier's colleague, P. Mechain. The M51 system is a spectacular example of interacting galaxies - in this case NGC 5195 is being "ripped apart" by the huge gravitational disturbance of M51, while M51 has in turn undergone huge structural alteration from the gravitational effects of NGC 5195.

The distance of M51 is estimated to be about 37 million light years. The diameter is approximately 100,000 light years and the total mass is estimated to be the equivalent of 160 billion suns.

What time of night was this taken?

Dave Lane
04-09-2011, 09:13 PM
What time of night was this taken?

About 3AM to 5AM

Gadzooks
04-09-2011, 09:51 PM
That's awesome work Dave.
If I'm up at that hour it's usually because I’m on here telling someone there and idiot.

Dave Lane
04-10-2011, 06:09 PM
This is a Shot of M84, M86 and NGC4402. M84 (lower right) and M86 (lower on the left) are both giant lenticular galaxies at the heart of the Virgo cluster of Galaxies.

Located in Markarian's Chain, M84 was studied by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1997 and was found to contain a massive central object, estimated at 300 million solar masses, located less than 26 light years from the center of the galaxy.

NGC 4402, a spiral galaxy at the top of the photo, appears Almost completely edge on to the Milky Way. There are lots of little "fuzzies" in the background that are other members of the cluster .

Located about 70 million light years away, the Virgo cluster is a gigantic collection of several thousand galaxies that dominate our local part of the universe.

The Virgo Cluster is a cluster of galaxies whose center is 53.8 ± 0.3 Mly (16.5 ± 0.1 Mpc)[2] away in the constellation Virgo. Comprising approximately 1300 (and possibly up to 2000) member galaxies,[3] the cluster forms the heart of the larger Local Supercluster, of which the Local Group is an outlying member. It is estimated that its mass is 1.2×1015 M☉ out to 8 degrees of the cluster's center or a radius of about 2.2 Mpc.[4]

Many of the brighter galaxies in this cluster, including the giant elliptical galaxy Messier 87, were discovered in the late 1770s and early 1780s and subsequently included in Charles Messier's catalogue of non-cometary fuzzy objects. Described by Messier as nebulae without stars, their true nature was not recognized until the 1920s.[5]

The cluster subtends a maximum arc of approximately 8 degrees centered in the constellation Virgo. Many of the member galaxies of the cluster are visible with a small telescope.

The cluster is a fairly heterogeneous mixture of spirals and ellipticals.[6]As of 2004, it is believed that the spirals of the cluster are distributed in an oblong prolate filament, approximately 4 times as long as wide, stretching along the line of sight from the Milky Way.[7] The elliptical galaxies are more centrally concentrated than the spiral galaxies.

The cluster is an aggregrate of at least three separate subclumps centered on the galaxies M87, M86, and M49. Of the three subclumps, the one centered on M87 is the dominant one, with a mass of approximately 1014 solar masses, which is approximately an order of magnitude larger than the other two subclumps.[8]

The large mass of the cluster is indicated by the high peculiar velocities of many of its galaxies, sometimes as high as 1,600 km/s with respect to the cluster's center.

The Virgo cluster lies within the Local Supercluster, and its gravitational effects slow down the nearby galaxies. The large mass of the cluster has the effect of slowing down the recession of the Local Group from the cluster by approximately ten percent.

Dave Lane
04-10-2011, 07:03 PM
About 60 million light years away, in the constellation of Leo, sits this magnificent group of galaxies, number 44 in a catalog of 100 such clusters compiled by astronomer Paul Hickson. This scene is an interesting study in the range of galaxy types. Just below center is NGC 3190, a striking spiral that we see nearly edge on. The dust lane traversing it is characteristic of spiral galaxies. To the lower left is NGC 3193, a good example of an elliptical galaxy. To the upper left is NGC 3187, another spiral, but with a prominent central bar. To the top right is NGC 3185. This is also a barred spiral, but its bar is subtle and much smaller relative to its overall size.

The galaxies in Hickson 44 are close enough that they interact with each other gravitationally. This causes the individual galaxies to become distorted and in some cases even share material. If you look closely, you may notice a faint halo around NGC 3190, and also a very subtle smudge of light between it and NGC 3193, a bridge of stars being shared between the two giants as they embrace in their cosmic dance.

Finally, inspect the background of the field and you will find hundreds of tiny yellowish and reddish objects. These are not stars, but extremely distant galaxies, hundreds of millions of light years away. This awesome backdrop almost makes the galaxies of the main group group seem close by!

sd4chiefs
04-10-2011, 08:29 PM
That's the one thing I hate about living in San Diego; I can't see the stars. I need to see what Dave sees before I die.

I live here in San Diego and I can see the stars. I guess it just depends on what part of town you live in.

Dave Lane
04-10-2011, 08:56 PM
If you went out to a dark sky site way out in the boonies you'd shit yourself

Dave Lane
05-04-2011, 03:18 PM
From last night

Close to the Great Bear (Ursa Major) and surrounded by the stars of the Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici), this celestial nebula was discovered in 1781 by the metric French astronomer Pierre Mechain. Later, it was added to the catalog of his friend and colleague Charles Messier as M106. Modern deep telescopic views reveal it to be an island universe -- a spiral galaxy around 30 thousand light-years across located only about 21 million light-years beyond the stars of the Milky Way. Youthful blue star clusters and reddish stellar nurseries trace the striking spiral arms of M106. Seen so clearly in this beautiful image, the galaxy's bright core is also visible across the spectrum from radio to x-rays, making M106 a nearby example of the Seyfert class of active galaxies. The bright core of a Seyfert galaxy is believed to be powered by matter falling into a massive central black hole.

Pawnmower
05-04-2011, 03:58 PM
Dave,

Fellow astronomer here-

Can you detail your gear (maybe in your OP)

Scope Details
Camera Details
Software details


Thanks.....Fellow astronomer here, but old school....(film) thinking of moving to the digital age.

Dave Lane
05-04-2011, 04:10 PM
Dave,

Fellow astronomer here-

Can you detail your gear (maybe in your OP)

Scope Details
Camera Details
Software details


Thanks.....Fellow astronomer here, but old school....(film) thinking of moving to the digital age.


It varies which scope I use.

This was AstroTech Ritchey Chreiten 12" F8
Mount Losmandy Titan
Camera SBIG ST8300M LRGB filters
CCD Soft for acquisition
CCD Stack to combine images
Photoshop CS5 for processing.

6 hours total exposure.

I'm actually talking to a company in China to have them make some cameras for me. If you are interested in a sample version they will run about $700 for a 6 MP camera which is about half of current cost. I hope to have them make a 16 MP for about $4k which is way cheap.

Dave Lane
06-22-2011, 05:52 PM
The roof for the new observatory is almost ready. One half is opening just fine now. Get the other half finished and tighten everything up and it's show time.

<iframe width="560" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/a785LvrM_hM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Ugly Duck
06-22-2011, 07:14 PM
Can you comprehend it?

I think so. What does "comprehend" mean?

Dave Lane
06-22-2011, 07:44 PM
com·pre·hend

verb /ˌkämpriˈhend/ 
comprehended, past participle; comprehended, past tense; comprehending, present participle; comprehends, 3rd person singular present

Grasp mentally; understand
- he couldn't comprehend her reasons for marrying Lovat
- I simply couldn't comprehend what had happened

Include, comprise, or encompass
- a divine order comprehending all men

Ace Gunner
06-22-2011, 10:52 PM
I think so. What does "comprehend" mean?

it means 'to comp a prehend'

sometimes just sound it out, is what I do :thumb:



hey dave, nice shot of m106. I was reading some deal a while back where we may have an extra sun appear for a bit this summer - do you know anything about it?


btw- I've been up to the mauna kea observatory many times. it is the most vivid viewing area I've been to. simply amazing at 14000ft I felt as if I could reach out and touch the stars

Dave Lane
08-11-2011, 10:57 AM
The Pelican Nebula (also known as IC5070 and IC5067) is an H II region associated with the North America Nebula in the constellation Cygnus. The nebula resembles a pelican in shape, hence the name. The Pelican Nebula is a large area of emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus (the Swan), close to Deneb, and divided from its brighter, larger neighbor, the North America Nebula, by a molecular cloud filled with dark dust.

The Pelican is much studied because it has a particularly active mix of star formation and evolving gas clouds. The light from young energetic stars is slowly transforming cold gas to hot and causing an ionization front gradually to advance outward. Particularly dense filaments of cold gas are seen to still remain. Millions of years from now this nebula might no longer be known as the Pelican, as the balance and placement of stars and gas will leave something that appears completely different.

This is just a close up picture of the back of the neck of the Pelican Nebula as its huge in the sky.

Dartgod
08-11-2011, 11:06 AM
The Pelican Nebula (also known as IC5070 and IC5067) is an H II region associated with the North America Nebula in the constellation Cygnus. The nebula resembles a pelican in shape, hence the name. The Pelican Nebula is a large area of emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus (the Swan), close to Deneb, and divided from its brighter, larger neighbor, the North America Nebula, by a molecular cloud filled with dark dust.

The Pelican is much studied because it has a particularly active mix of star formation and evolving gas clouds. The light from young energetic stars is slowly transforming cold gas to hot and causing an ionization front gradually to advance outward. Particularly dense filaments of cold gas are seen to still remain. Millions of years from now this nebula might no longer be known as the Pelican, as the balance and placement of stars and gas will leave something that appears completely different.

This is just a close up picture of the back of the neck of the Pelican Nebula as its huge in the sky.
Cool, but I'm not seeing the pelican.

Did you take this picture, Dave?

J Diddy
08-11-2011, 11:07 AM
Cool, but I'm not seeing the pelican.

Did you take this picture, Dave?

"Why can't I see the sailboat?"

Dave Lane
08-11-2011, 11:25 AM
Cool, but I'm not seeing the pelican.

Did you take this picture, Dave?

Yes I took the picture heres a picture that isnt mine but shows the whole pelican and the highlighted area is approximately where my picture was shot. Its turned 90 degrees from my shot but its easier to see the pelican this way.

Rausch
08-11-2011, 11:26 AM
Yes I took the picture heres a picture that isnt mine but shows the whole pelican and the highlighted are is approximately where it was shot.

What makes you look?...

Dave Lane
08-11-2011, 11:30 AM
What makes you look?...

At?

Huffmeister
08-11-2011, 12:44 PM
"Why can't I see the sailboat?"

"It's not a sailboat, it's a schooner."

Rausch
08-11-2011, 12:48 PM
At?

The stars.

Sky.

What's above you?...

Dartgod
08-11-2011, 01:18 PM
Yes I took the picture heres a picture that isnt mine but shows the whole pelican and the highlighted area is approximately where my picture was shot. Its turned 90 degrees from my shot but its easier to see the pelican this way.
OK, cool. I suppose it does look a bit like a pelican.

Sofa King
08-11-2011, 01:25 PM
Watched some history channel shit on "dark matter" today over noon.


What is Dave Lane's assessment of dark matter?

go bowe
08-11-2011, 04:57 PM
frankie's mind?

Dave Lane
08-13-2011, 05:20 PM
The stars.

Sky.

What's above you?...

Partially because its there. Mostly because I am looking into the past. Many of the photos I took show how those objects looked before there where any dinosaurs on earth. And one the light from the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs is just now reaching the galaxy. If you could build a big enough telescope there you could watch the impact unfold.

Also the distances and variety are so vast. I'm seeing things we may never even visit as a species ever. Pretty cool stuff in my opinion, your mileage may vary.

Dave Lane
08-14-2011, 08:40 AM
The North America Nebula (NGC 7000 or Caldwell 20) is an emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus, close to Deneb (the tail of the swan and its brightest star). The remarkable shape of the emission nebula resembles that of the continent of North America, complete with a prominent Gulf of Mexico. It is sometimes incorrectly called the "North American Nebula".

The North America Nebula is large, covering an area of more than four times the size of the full moon; but its surface brightness is low, so normally it cannot be seen with the unaided eye. Binoculars and telescopes with large fields of view (approximately 3°) will show it as a foggy patch of light under sufficiently dark skies. However, using a UHC filter, which filters out some unwanted wavelengths of light, it can be seen by the naked eye under dark skies. Its prominent shape and especially its reddish color (from the hydrogen Hα emission line) show up only in photographs of the area.

Cygnus's Wall is a term for the "Mexico and Central America part" of the North America Nebula. The Cygnus Wall exhibits the most concentrated star formations in the nebula.

The North America Nebula and the nearby Pelican Nebula, (IC 5070) are in fact parts of the same interstellar cloud of ionized hydrogen (H II region). Between the Earth and the nebula complex lies a band of interstellar dust that absorbs the light of stars and nebulae behind it, and thereby determines the shape as we see it. The distance of the nebula complex is not precisely known, nor is the star responsible for ionizing the hydrogen so that it emits light. If the star inducing the ionization is Deneb, as some sources say, the nebula complex would be about 1800 light years distance, and its absolute size (6° apparent diameter on the sky) would be 100 light years.

The nebula was discovered by William Herschel on October 24, 1786, from Slough, England.

Dave Lane
08-14-2011, 08:44 AM
Watched some history channel shit on "dark matter" today over noon.


What is Dave Lane's assessment of dark matter?

I'm not totally sure. I'm tempted to believe a alternative theory I have developed and that is that the gravity pulling apart the universe is from other unseen universes who are so distant we cant see them, but the gravity does reach here.

Just an odd out of the box thought...

Dave Lane
08-14-2011, 08:47 AM
frankie's mind?

I think that would dense matter.

Dave Lane
08-14-2011, 08:50 AM
An improved version of the Back of the Pelican Nebula with added frames in Hydrogen Alpha.

Renegade
08-14-2011, 08:52 AM
Partially because its there. Mostly because I am looking into the past. Many of the photos I took show how those objects looked before there where any dinosaurs on earth. And one the light from the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs is just now reaching the galaxy. If you could build a big enough telescope there you could watch the impact unfold.

Also the distances and variety are so vast. I'm seeing things we may never even visit as a species ever. Pretty cool stuff in my opinion, your mileage may vary.

I hate to tell you, but an asteroid did not wipe out the dinosaurs. I believe the latest theory is our government did it while testing for tsunamis, hurricanes, and tornados.

Dave Lane
08-14-2011, 08:53 AM
Oh and heres a 2 minute video of the observatory roof opening. sorry for the shakiness. Now all I need is my pier to make it usable.

<iframe width="560" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/nJOSavcruPo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

cdcox
08-14-2011, 09:06 AM
Dave, this is cool on so many different levels.

Dave Lane
08-14-2011, 09:08 AM
I hate to tell you, but an asteroid did not wipe out the dinosaurs. I believe the latest theory is our government did it while testing for tsunamis, hurricanes, and tornados.

You forgot to add the /teedubya

Oh and of course the earth is only 6,000 years years old /religion

Dave Lane
08-14-2011, 09:21 AM
Here's where this second shot was taken the North America Nebula next to the Pelican

The highlighted area is roughly where the shot was taken.

Dave Lane
08-31-2011, 01:20 PM
One of my favorite things in the sky.

Unspeakable beauty and unimaginable bedlam can be found together in the Trifid Nebula. Also known as M20, this photogenic nebula is visible with good binoculars towards the constellation of Sagittarius. The energetic processes of star formation create not only the colors but the chaos. The red-glowing gas results from high-energy starlight striking interstellar hydrogen gas. The dark dust filaments that lace M20 were created in the atmospheres of cool giant stars and in the debris from supernovae explosions.

Which bright young stars light up the blue reflection nebula on the right is still being investigated. The light from M20 we see today left perhaps 3,000 years ago, although the exact distance remains unknown. Light takes about 50 years to cross M20.

sd4chiefs
08-31-2011, 01:46 PM
I'm not totally sure. I'm tempted to believe a alternative theory I have developed and that is that the gravity pulling apart the universe is from other unseen universes who are so distant we cant see them, but the gravity does reach here.

Just an odd out of the box thought...

They talked about this idea on this show.

http://throughthewormhole.net/season-2/episode-2-is-there-an-edge-to-the-universe/

Dave Lane
08-31-2011, 03:50 PM
They talked about this idea on this show.

http://throughthewormhole.net/season-2/episode-2-is-there-an-edge-to-the-universe/

I'll have to watch that. It seemed like such a no brainer idea wasn't sure why no one had thought of it but maybe they have.

Dave Lane
09-03-2011, 12:36 PM
It's Coming Right for Us!! At 100 miles a Second!

Taken near Butler MO on August 23, 24 and 25th.

Explanation: The most distant object easily visible to the eye is M31, the great Andromeda Galaxy some two and a half million light-years away. But without a telescope, even this immense spiral galaxy - spanning over 200,000 light years - appears as a faint, nebulous cloud in the constellation Andromeda.

In contrast, details of a bright yellow nucleus and dark winding dust lanes, are revealed in this digital telescopic image. Narrow band image data recording emission from hydrogen atoms, shows off the reddish star-forming regions dotting gorgeous blue spiral arms and young star clusters.

While even casual skygazers are now inspired by the knowledge that there are many distant galaxies like M31, astronomers seriously debated this fundamental concept in the 20th century. Were these "spiral nebulae" simply outlying components of our own Milky Way Galaxy or were they instead "island universes" -- distant systems of stars comparable to the Milky Way itself? This question was central to the famous Shapley-Curtis debate of 1920, which was later resolved by observations of M31 in favor of Andromeda, island universe.

Dave Lane
09-14-2011, 10:25 AM
<iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/11386048?portrait=0&amp;color=ffffff" width="400" height="225" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen allowFullScreen></iframe><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/11386048">5.6k Saturn Cassini Photographic Animation</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/sv2studios">stephen v2</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

Dave Lane
09-14-2011, 10:27 AM
Final version of M20 until I can add Hydrogen Alpha next year.

Dave Lane
11-02-2011, 09:17 PM
The Pelican Nebula (also known as IC5070 and IC5067) is an H II region associated with the North America Nebula in the constellation Cygnus. The nebula resembles a pelican in shape, hence the name. The Pelican Nebula is a large area of emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus (the Swan), close to Deneb, and divided from its brighter, larger neighbor, the North America Nebula, by a molecular cloud filled with dark dust.

The Pelican is much studied because it has a particularly active mix of star formation and evolving gas clouds. The light from young energetic stars is slowly transforming cold gas to hot and causing an ionization front gradually to advance outward. Particularly dense filaments of cold gas are seen to still remain. Millions of years from now this nebula might no longer be known as the Pelican, as the balance and placement of stars and gas will leave something that appears completely different.

Finally got a good set of shots of the Pelican Nebula... I kinda like this pic.

4th and Long
11-02-2011, 09:48 PM
That is a beautiful picture. I envy you.

Rep!

Dave Lane
11-04-2011, 01:33 PM
New pic of same object I started with last year. I think my sklls are increasing. :)

First pic. Of Orion M43 from last night...

New Orion Picture from this year...

The Orion Nebula (also known as Messier 42, M42, or NGC 1976) is a diffuse nebula situated south[b] of Orion's Belt. It is one of the brightest nebulae, and is visible to the naked eye in the night sky. M42 is located at a distance of 1,344 ± 20 light years and is the closest region of massive star formation to Earth. The M42 nebula is estimated to be 24 light years across. Older texts frequently referred to the Orion Nebula as the Great Nebula in Orion or the Great Orion Nebula.

The Orion Nebula is one of the most scrutinized and photographed objects in the night sky, and is among the most intensely studied celestial features. The nebula has revealed much about the process of how stars and planetary systems are formed from collapsing clouds of gas and dust. Astronomers have directly observed protoplanetary disks, brown dwarfs, intense and turbulent motions of the gas, and the photo-ionizing effects of massive nearby stars in the nebula. There are also supersonic "bullets" of gas piercing the dense hydrogen clouds of the Orion Nebula. Each bullet is ten times the diameter of Pluto's orbit and tipped with iron atoms glowing bright blue. They were probably formed one thousand years ago from an unknown violent event.

chasedude
11-04-2011, 01:58 PM
There's a big difference in the clarity between the two. Nice work Dave! :thumb:

Dave Lane
11-04-2011, 02:10 PM
There's a big difference in the clarity between the two. Nice work Dave! :thumb:

Thanks I went a little color crazy, you almost need sunglasses, but I think its kinda cool that way. and it tones down easy if I want to do that, its way harder getting it balanced and bright.

4th and Long
11-04-2011, 02:16 PM
New pic of same object I started with last year. I think my sklls are increasing. :)



New Orion Picture from this year...

The Orion Nebula (also known as Messier 42, M42, or NGC 1976) is a diffuse nebula situated south[b] of Orion's Belt. It is one of the brightest nebulae, and is visible to the naked eye in the night sky. M42 is located at a distance of 1,344 ± 20 light years and is the closest region of massive star formation to Earth. The M42 nebula is estimated to be 24 light years across. Older texts frequently referred to the Orion Nebula as the Great Nebula in Orion or the Great Orion Nebula.

The Orion Nebula is one of the most scrutinized and photographed objects in the night sky, and is among the most intensely studied celestial features. The nebula has revealed much about the process of how stars and planetary systems are formed from collapsing clouds of gas and dust. Astronomers have directly observed protoplanetary disks, brown dwarfs, intense and turbulent motions of the gas, and the photo-ionizing effects of massive nearby stars in the nebula. There are also supersonic "bullets" of gas piercing the dense hydrogen clouds of the Orion Nebula. Each bullet is ten times the diameter of Pluto's orbit and tipped with iron atoms glowing bright blue. They were probably formed one thousand years ago from an unknown violent event.

http://blog.signalnoise.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/i_awesome6.jpg

Huffmeister
11-04-2011, 02:47 PM
So is it even remotely possible that star systems could have already formed in this cloud? Or is it still in a violent stage that planet formation is unlikely?

I just had a weird thought of being part of an alien species that evolved on a planet somewhere within this cloud, and what it would look like from within. Or, being on a planet close by (but way outside the nebula) so that the nebula would rise and set in the sky as a HUGE constellation. That would be awesome.

Dave Lane
11-04-2011, 05:12 PM
I'm sure the are 100's of planetary systems in the frame. In the very core where hot new stars are igniting its probably too radioactive for life as we know it to exist. Not to say some other form might not exist but conditions would be extreme in the nebula itself.

Dave Lane
11-07-2011, 12:42 PM
M33: Triangulum Galaxy

Explanation: The small, northern constellation Triangulum harbors this magnificent face-on spiral galaxy, M33. Its popular names include the Pinwheel Galaxy or just the Triangulum Galaxy. M33 is over 50,000 light-years in diameter, third largest in the Local Group of galaxies after the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), and our own Milky Way. About 3 million light-years from the Milky Way, M33 is itself thought to be a satellite of the Andromeda Galaxy and astronomers in these two galaxies would likely have spectacular views of each other's grand spiral star systems. As for the view from planet Earth, this image nicely shows off M33's blue star clusters and pinkish star forming regions that trace the galaxy's loosely wound spiral arms. In fact, the cavernous NGC 604 is the brightest star forming region, seen here at about the 1 o'clock position from the galaxy center. Like M31, M33's population of well-measured variable stars have helped make this nearby spiral a cosmic yardstick for establishing the distance scale of the Universe.

4th and Long
11-07-2011, 02:14 PM
Purdee!!!

Dave Lane
12-04-2011, 08:33 AM
Last years shot

This years shot...

The Horsehead Nebula (also known as Barnard 33 in emission nebula IC 434) is a dark nebula in the constellation Orion. The nebula is located just to the south of the star Alnitak, which is farthest east on Orion's Belt, and is part of the much larger Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. The Horsehead Nebula is approximately 1500 light years from Earth. It is one of the most identifiable nebulae because of the shape of its swirling cloud of dark dust and gases, which is similar to that of a horse's head when viewed from Earth. The shape was first noticed in 1888 by Williamina Fleming on photographic plate B2312 taken at the Harvard College Observatory.

The red glow originates from hydrogen gas predominantly behind the nebula, ionized by the nearby bright star Sigma Orionis. The darkness of the Horsehead is caused mostly by thick dust, although the lower part of the Horsehead's neck casts a shadow to the left. Streams of gas leaving the nebula are funneled by a strong magnetic field. Bright spots in the Horsehead Nebula's base are young stars just in the process of forming.

Bwana
12-04-2011, 08:34 AM
This years shot...

The Horsehead Nebula (also known as Barnard 33 in emission nebula IC 434) is a dark nebula in the constellation Orion. The nebula is located just to the south of the star Alnitak, which is farthest east on Orion's Belt, and is part of the much larger Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. The Horsehead Nebula is approximately 1500 light years from Earth. It is one of the most identifiable nebulae because of the shape of its swirling cloud of dark dust and gases, which is similar to that of a horse's head when viewed from Earth. The shape was first noticed in 1888 by Williamina Fleming on photographic plate B2312 taken at the Harvard College Observatory.

The red glow originates from hydrogen gas predominantly behind the nebula, ionized by the nearby bright star Sigma Orionis. The darkness of the Horsehead is caused mostly by thick dust, although the lower part of the Horsehead's neck casts a shadow to the left. Streams of gas leaving the nebula are funneled by a strong magnetic field. Bright spots in the Horsehead Nebula's base are young stars just in the process of forming.

Nice work Dave, very cool.

Dave Lane
12-04-2011, 05:34 PM
Thanks dude! I think Montana would be an awesome place to shoot the sky in the summer.

Dave Lane
12-27-2011, 01:00 PM
The Rosette Nebula is a large emission nebula located 3000 light-years away. The great abundance of hydrogen gas gives NGC 2237 its red color in most photographs. The wind from the open cluster of stars known as NGC 2244 has cleared a hole in the nebula's center.

The Rosette Nebula (also known as Caldwell 49) is a large, circular H II region located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy. The open cluster NGC 2244 (Caldwell 50) is closely associated with the nebulosity, the stars of the cluster having been formed from the nebula's matter.

The complex has the following NGC designations:

NGC 2237 – Part of the nebulous region (Also used to denote whole nebula)
NGC 2238 – Part of the nebulous region
NGC 2239 – Part of the nebulous region (Discovered by John Herschel)
NGC 2244 – The open cluster within the nebula (Discovered by John Flamsteed in 1690)
NGC 2246 – Part of the nebulous region

The cluster and nebula lie at a distance of some 5,200 light-years from Earth (although estimates of the distance vary considerably, down to 4,900 light-years.[3]) and measure roughly 130 light years in diameter. The radiation from the young stars excite the atoms in the nebula, causing them to emit radiation themselves producing the emission nebula we see. The mass of the nebula is estimated to be around 10,000 solar masses.

It is believed that stellar winds from a group of O and B stars are exerting pressure on interstellar clouds to cause compression, followed by star formation in the nebula. This star formation is currently still ongoing.

A survey of the nebula with the Chandra X-ray Observatory in 2001 has revealed the presence of very hot, young stars at the core of the Rosette Nebula. These stars have heated the surrounding gas to a temperature in the order of 6 million kelvins causing them to emit copious amounts of X-rays.

Dave Lane
02-20-2012, 10:13 AM
OK got a couple new shots to add today. First up M81 and M82, two awesome galaxies...

Explanation: In this stunning cosmic vista, galaxy M81 is on the left surrounded by blue spiral arms. On the right marked by massive gas and dust clouds, is M82. These two mammoth galaxies have been locked in gravitational combat for the past billion years. The gravity from each galaxy dramatically affects the other during each hundred million-year pass. Last go-round, M82's gravity likely raised density waves rippling around M81, resulting in the richness of M81's spiral arms. But M81 left M82 with violent star forming regions and colliding gas clouds so energetic the galaxy glows in X-rays. In a few billion years only one galaxy will remain.

Dave Lane
02-20-2012, 10:16 AM
Last years pic

M81 and M82 from last night... 3 hour photo. A American-Canadian team determined the distance to M81 to be 12.9 million light-years ± 0.9 million light-years. So the light I recorded happened about 13 million years ago.

Dave Lane
02-20-2012, 12:03 PM
The Pacman Nebula or NGC281:

Explanation: NGC 281 is a busy workshop of star formation. Prominent features include a small open cluster of stars, a diffuse red-glowing emission nebula, large lanes of obscuring gas and dust, and dense knots of dust and gas in which stars may still be forming. The open cluster of stars IC 1590 visible around the center has formed only in the last few million years. The brightest member of this cluster is actually a multiple-star system shining light that helps ionize the nebula's gas, causing the red glow visible throughout. The lanes of dust visible left of center are likely homes of future star formation. Particularly striking in the above photograph are the dark Bok globules visible against the bright nebula. The NGC 281 system, dubbed the Pacman nebula for its overall shape, lies about 10 thousand light years distant.

Dave Lane
07-29-2012, 10:50 AM
Newest image I finished today. This is a Narrowband "Hubble Palette" image of M8 the Lagoon Nebula. I'll redo it for a bit better resolution but for my first ever Narrowband image it looks OK.

The Lagoon Nebula (catalogued as Messier 8 or M8, and as NGC 6523) is a giant interstellar cloud in the constellation Sagittarius. It is classified as an emission nebula and as an H II region.
The Lagoon Nebula was discovered by Guillaume Le Gentil in 1747 and is one of only two star-forming nebulae faintly visible to the naked eye from mid-northern latitudes. Seen with binoculars, it appears as a distinct oval cloudlike patch with a definite core. A fragile star cluster appears superimposed on it.

The Lagoon Nebula is estimated to be between 4,000-6,000 light years from the Earth. In the sky of Earth, it spans 90' by 40', translates to an actual dimension of 110 by 50 light years. Like many nebulas, it appears pink in time-exposure color photos but is gray to the eye peering through binoculars or a telescope, human vision having poor color sensitivity at low light levels. The nebula contains a number of Bok globules (dark, collapsing clouds of protostellar material), the most prominent of which have been catalogued by E. E. Barnard as B88, B89 and B296. It also includes a funnel-like or tornado-like structure caused by a hot O-type star that emanates ultraviolet light, heating and ionizing gases on the surface of the nebula. The Lagoon Nebula also contains at its centre a structure known as the Hourglass Nebula (so named by John Herschel), which should not be confused with the better known Hourglass Nebula in the constellation of Musca. In 2006 the first four Herbig-Haro objects were detected within the Hourglass, also including HH 870. This provides the first direct evidence of active star formation by accretion within it.

Or full sized image here:

http://api.ning.com/files/2KKUOu2hs3pwyjIDJ-EFMNrT2frvO*sUKWB1v52JYocusT5YWuP8k*YzzbSt3kb*F73Cgizr-ujKbkea8toK6SpzvQleuEP1/MedianM8NB22.jpg

Dave Lane
12-06-2012, 07:22 PM
http://re-prop.com/cp/BNF2.jpg

Today's Image I finished.

From APOD:

To the eye, this cosmic composition nicely balances the Bubble Nebula at the lower right with open star cluster M52. The pair would be lopsided on other scales, though. Embedded in a complex of interstellar dust and gas and blown by the winds from a single, massive O-type star, the Bubble Nebula, also known as NGC 7635, is a mere 10 light-years wide. On the other hand, M52 is a rich open cluster of around a thousand stars. The cluster is about 25 light-years across. Seen toward the northern boundary of Cassiopeia, distance estimates for the Bubble Nebula and associated cloud complex are around 11,000 light-years, while star cluster M52 lies nearly 5,000 light-years away. The wide telescopic field of view spans about 1.5 degrees on the sky or three times the apparent size of the Full Moon.

AG Optics 12.5 Newt
Apogee U16
300 Pics about 30 hours of exposure

notorious
12-06-2012, 08:30 PM
Stupid question: Does your telescope invert the image?



BTW, you are fantastic at what you do. I thought I would tell you again for the 11tybillionth time. Do you take photos for any publications?

petegz28
12-06-2012, 08:32 PM
Awesome pics, Dave!

Dave Lane
12-07-2012, 06:47 AM
Stupid question: Does your telescope invert the image?



BTW, you are fantastic at what you do. I thought I would tell you again for the 11tybillionth time. Do you take photos for any publications?

Hey thanks for that! I really like the Bubble photo, I've gotten a few things published and won a few contests. I do think the telescope inverts the images but I choose the final orientation so really it doesn't matter a whole lot.

Since I got the observatory pretty much done I can start getting images done instead of constantly tweaking the observatory.

Now hopefully I can work on getting stuff published.

Fish
12-07-2012, 10:43 AM
This one just completely melts my brain when trying to comprehend.... Plasma jets that are 1 million light years long!

http://img23.imageshack.us/img23/6499/hercavlahst960.jpg

Explanation: Why does this galaxy emit such spectacular jets? No one is sure, but it is likely related to an active supermassive black hole at its center. The galaxy at the image center, Hercules A, appears to be a relatively normal elliptical galaxy in visible light. When imaged in radio waves, however, tremendous plasma jets over one million light years long appear. Detailed analyses indicate that the central galaxy, also known as 3C 348, is actually over 1,000 times more massive than our Milky Way Galaxy, and the central black hole is nearly 1,000 times more massive than the black hole at our Milky Way's center. Pictured above is a visible light image obtained by the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope superposed with a radio image taken by the recently upgraded Very Large Array (VLA) of radio telescopes in New Mexico, USA. The physics that creates the jets remains a topic of research with a likely energy source being infalling matter swirling toward the central black hole.

theelusiveeightrop
12-07-2012, 12:05 PM
How old will you be in September 2036?

whoman69
12-07-2012, 02:02 PM
No pictures of the Mutara Nebula?

crossbow
12-07-2012, 03:51 PM
Wow, the universe looks a lot like a blue hand. Awsome.

Dave Lane
12-07-2012, 09:46 PM
How old will you be in September 2036?

Really old :)

Dave Lane
12-14-2012, 05:35 PM
The Heart Nebula

Explanation: Cosmic clouds seem to form fantastic shapes in the central regions of emission nebula IC 1805. Of course, the clouds are sculpted by stellar winds and radiation from massive hot stars in the nebula's newborn star cluster, Melotte 15. About 1.5 million years young, the cluster stars are near the center in this colorful skyscape, along with dark dust clouds silhouetted against glowing atomic gas. A composite of narrow and broad band telescopic images, the view spans about 40 light-years and includes emission from hydrogen in green, sulfur in red, and oxygen in blue hues. Wider field images reveal that IC 1805's simpler, overall outline suggests its popular name - The Heart Nebula. IC 1805 is located about 7,500 light years away toward the constellation Cassiopeia.

http://re-prop.com/apod/Heart-Nebula.jpg

Fish
12-16-2012, 11:28 AM
Can you imagine seeing this for the first time and wondering how a natural image like this could come to be?

http://img841.imageshack.us/img841/7802/redsquaretuthill1024.jpg

Explanation: What could cause a nebula to appear square? No one is quite sure. The hot star system known as MWC 922, however, appears to be embedded in a nebula with just such a shape. The above image combines infrared exposures from the Hale Telescope on Mt. Palomar in California, and the Keck-2 Telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. A leading progenitor hypothesis for the square nebula is that the central star or stars somehow expelled cones of gas during a late developmental stage. For MWC 922, these cones happen to incorporate nearly right angles and be visible from the sides. Supporting evidence for the cone hypothesis includes radial spokes in the image that might run along the cone walls. Researchers speculate that the cones viewed from another angle would appear similar to the gigantic rings of supernova 1987A, possibly indicating that a star in MWC 922 might one day itself explode in a similar supernova.

GloryDayz
12-16-2012, 12:08 PM
God this is cool... One regret I have is that I should have spent the money on a great telescope. It's just so dam cool!

chasedude
12-18-2012, 07:21 PM
The Heart Nebula

Explanation: Cosmic clouds seem to form fantastic shapes in the central regions of emission nebula IC 1805. Of course, the clouds are sculpted by stellar winds and radiation from massive hot stars in the nebula's newborn star cluster, Melotte 15. About 1.5 million years young, the cluster stars are near the center in this colorful skyscape, along with dark dust clouds silhouetted against glowing atomic gas. A composite of narrow and broad band telescopic images, the view spans about 40 light-years and includes emission from hydrogen in green, sulfur in red, and oxygen in blue hues. Wider field images reveal that IC 1805's simpler, overall outline suggests its popular name - The Heart Nebula. IC 1805 is located about 7,500 light years away toward the constellation Cassiopeia.

http://re-prop.com/cp/heartnebula.jpg

That's some amazing quality Dave. I'm envious of your telescoping skillz!

Dave Lane
01-29-2013, 02:20 PM
Fly around the center of the Nebula for some great views.

Explanation: Look through the cosmic cloud cataloged as NGC 281 and it's almost easy to miss stars of open cluster IC 1590. But, formed within the nebula, that cluster's young, massive stars ultimately power the pervasive nebular glow. The eye-catching shapes looming in this portrait of NGC 281 are sculpted columns and dense dust globules seen in silhouette, eroded by intense, energetic winds and radiation from the hot cluster stars. If they survive long enough, the dusty structures could also be sites of future star formation. Playfully called the Pacman Nebula because of its overall shape, NGC 281 is about 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. This composite image was made through narrow-band filters, but combines emission from the nebula's hydrogen, sulfur, and oxygen atoms in a visible spectrum palette. It spans over 80 light-years at the estimated distance of NGC 281.

http://re-prop.com/apod/Pacman-TM.jpg

Dave Lane
01-29-2013, 02:33 PM
That's some amazing quality Dave. I'm envious of your telescoping skillz!

Hey and thanks for that!