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Dinny Blues
11-09-2010, 06:39 PM
Recently found some cherry wood at the price cutter and smoked a turkey breast with it. Still not sure if I like it better than apple.

Mesquite is my "go to" for pork, and I like it on beef.

Apple has grown on me for everything but pork.

Does cherry work well by itself on anything, in your opinion, or should I mix it with something else for the best flavor?

Hickory seems pretty harsh to me, and I don't use it on anything but pork.

Mind is open, have much to learn.

Dinny

Groves
11-09-2010, 06:45 PM
What we really want to know is how them St. George's Donuts were?

GloryDayz
11-09-2010, 06:46 PM
I love cherry, and my neighbors agree... I find that a wet heavy cherry smoke for the first two hours provides a sweet ring, and a nice flavor. Most cant tell it from apple though. Skroo them!!! But I like to go hot for 45 minutes of wet heavy smoke, then cooler for the next hour and a quarter. After that, the wood is done (rather expensive), but the flavor is there to stay, and I go with a cool, wet, pure cowboy charcoal for the remainder of the burn. But I'm growing more fond of cherry.

Have you tried sassafras? Another weekend project if you have not...

KCUnited
11-09-2010, 06:46 PM
Arrowood.

jojomontana
11-09-2010, 06:50 PM
Hickory is my favorite...on all meats. Followed by apple.
To me, cherry gives the meat a flavor too close to soured milk. Maybe it was just a bad bag o' wood chunks, but I wasn't a fan.

Gadzooks
11-09-2010, 06:50 PM
Acacia is similar to mesquite but not as strong. This wood burns very hot and should be used in small amounts or for limited amounts of time.

Alder has a light flavor that works well with fish and poultry. Indigenous to the northwestern United States, it is the traditional wood for smoking Salmon.

Almond give a nutty, sweet flavor that is good with all meats. Almond is similar to Pecan.

Apple is very mild in flavor and gives food a sweetness. This is good with poultry and pork. Apple will discolor chicken skin (turns in dark brown).

Apricot is great for poultry and pork. This wood is similar to hickory but is sweeter and milder in flavor.

Ash has a light, unique flavor. This wood burns fast.

Black Walnut has a heavy flavor that should probably be mixed with other wood because of the bitter taste it can impart.

Birch has a similar flavor to maple. This wood is good with pork and poultry.

Cherry has a sweet, mild flavor that goes great with virtually everything. This is one of the most popular woods for smoking.

Chokecherry has a bitter flavor and should only be used in small amounts for short period of times.

Citrus woods like lemon or orange have a moderate smoke that gives a light fruity flavor that is more mild than apple or cherry.

Cottonwood is very mild in flavor and should be used with stronger flavored woods. Avoid green wood.

Crabapple is very similar to apple wood and can be used interchangeably.

Fruit, like apple, apricot or cherry, fruit wood gives off a sweet, mild flavor that is good with poultry or ham.

Grapefruit is a mild wood that produces a good, smoky flavor. A good wood for any meat.

Grapevines make a lot of tart smoke and gives a fruity but sometimes heavy flavor. Use it sparingly with poultry or lamb.

Hickory adds a strong flavor to meats, so be careful not to use to excessively. Itís good with beef and lamb.

Lemon is a mild wood that produces a good, smoky flavor. A good wood for any meat.

Lilac produces a good supply of mild, sweet smoke. A popular wood for smoked cheese, but also good for poultry and pork.

Maple, like fruit wood gives a sweet flavor that is excellent with poultry and ham.

Mesquite has been very popular of late and is good for grilling, but since it burns hot and fast, it's not recommended for long barbecues. Mesquite is probably the strongest flavored wood; hence its popularity with restaurant grills that cook meat for a very short time.

Mulberry is sweet and very similar to apple.

Nectarine is great for poultry and pork. This wood is similar to hickory but is sweeter and milder in flavor.

Oak is strong but not overpowering and is a very good wood for beef or lamb. Oak is probably the most versatile of the hard woods.

Orange is a mild wood that produces a good, smoky flavor. A good wood for any meat.

Peach is great for poultry and pork. This wood is similar to hickory but is sweeter and milder in flavor.

Pear is similar to apple and produces a sweet, mild flavor.

Pecan burns cool and provides a delicate flavor. Itís a much subtler version of hickory.

Plum is great for poultry and pork. This wood is similar to hickory but is sweeter and milder in flavor.

Walnut has a heavy, smoky flavor and should be mixed with milder flavored woods.

(this was plagiarized by me from the interwebs in the hopes of helping you Mr. Blues)

jojomontana
11-09-2010, 06:52 PM
Oh, and maple smoked chicken wings with a touch of spicy honey glaze!! Awesome.

Simply Red
11-09-2010, 06:52 PM
Arrowood.

ROFL

Pablo
11-09-2010, 07:01 PM
Read this thread wrong.

*Packs bong*

Dinny Blues
11-09-2010, 07:03 PM
What we really want to know is how them St. George's Donuts were?

If there is a level higher than sainthood, they need to rename the place.

I'm gonna get fat.

Buy stock in Rolaids.

Yum yum yum.

I give 'em 3 yums.

Dinny

Pablo
11-09-2010, 07:07 PM
(this was plagiarized by me from the interwebs in the hopes of helping you Mr. Blues)I was about to be incredibly impressed a Dolt fan knew so much about his smoking woods. Then I started to realize the list was alphabetical, then I remembered you were a Dolt fan. Then I read this last line.

I do bet you make a dope BBQ Fish taco though Gadzooks. Mmmm Mmmm...KC Masterpiece and some chunk albacore on a flour shell. HEAVEN.

Shogun
11-09-2010, 07:12 PM
Read this thread wrong.

*Packs bong*

thought it said that too, im not interested

milkman
11-09-2010, 07:12 PM
Given his last thread (Matt Cassel>>>>>GoChiefs), I thought this was going to be another GoChiefs thread.

RJ
11-09-2010, 07:33 PM
I'm finding my favorites to be oak, apple and hickory. I like oak/hickory with a pork butt, oak/apple with a brisket or ribs. With chicken I like apple or any other fruit wood. I get plum and apricot on occasion. Probably not much different from apple but fun to experiment.

I'd say oak is way underrated. Maybe because it sounds dull. But it does the job, especially with beef.

RJ
11-09-2010, 07:35 PM
Recently found some cherry wood at the price cutter and smoked a turkey breast with it. Still not sure if I like it better than apple.

Mesquite is my "go to" for pork, and I like it on beef.

Apple has grown on me for everything but pork.

Does cherry work well by itself on anything, in your opinion, or should I mix it with something else for the best flavor?

Hickory seems pretty harsh to me, and I don't use it on anything but pork.

Mind is open, have much to learn.

Dinny

I'd suggest mixing it with oak next time you do a brisket.

redhed
11-09-2010, 08:05 PM
Love to use apricot on pork/chix. A real crowd pleaser.
Mesquite tastes weird on anything but beef to me.
Pecan/hickory mix is great with babybacks (depending on the rub, I 'spose).
I like a little cherry/hickory with burgers as well.

Gadzooks
11-09-2010, 08:12 PM
I was about to be incredibly impressed a Dolt fan knew so much about his smoking woods. Then I started to realize the list was alphabetical, then I remembered you were a Dolt fan. Then I read this last line.

I do bet you make a dope BBQ Fish taco though Gadzooks. Mmmm Mmmm...KC Masterpiece and some chunk albacore on a flour shell. HEAVEN.

I pride myself on my BBQ steak, others have raved over my ribs, although, I've never gotten a chance to taste them myself. (My ribs take a long time to cook so I'm usually passed out from binge drinking by the time they're done).