PDA

View Full Version : Life Veteran's Day...now and then.


BigVE
11-11-2010, 11:53 AM
My 'ol man was in 'nam. Never really liked to talk about it much. What he saw and did over there was atrocious. I have gotten some stories out of him here and there over the years. He had many friends die right along side of him. He had cousins die over there and didn't hear about it until long after the funeral. His family business was sold out from under him while he was away. So much sacrifice and suffering and absolute misery. THEN to top it all off, once he finally got to come home he was called a murderer, a baby killer. He had no choice but to go...he was drafted, just like thousands of other young men at the time. Once he was there he made the most of it and moved up in rank quickly. He served his country well, got several medals...but was treated like scum when he came home. He is still amazed at the amount of support the troops get nowadays. He still suffers from the scars he received those few years in the late 60's but I know that helped form him into the man he is/was, my Dad. Always a hero to me Dad. Thanks. Thanks to all who have sacrificed so much.

Renegade
11-11-2010, 12:01 PM
My 'ol man was in 'nam. Never really liked to talk about it much. What he saw and did over there was atrocious. I have gotten some stories out of him here and there over the years. He had many friends die right along side of him. He had cousins die over there and didn't hear about it until long after the funeral. His family business was sold out from under him while he was away. So much sacrifice and suffering and absolute misery. THEN to top it all off, once he finally got to come home he was called a murderer, a baby killer. He had no choice but to go...he was drafted, just like thousands of other young men at the time. Once he was there he made the most of it and moved up in rank quickly. He served his country well, got several medals...but was treated like scum when he came home. He is still amazed at the amount of support the troops get nowadays. He still suffers from the scars he received those few years in the late 60's but I know that helped form him into the man he is/was, my Dad. Always a hero to me Dad. Thanks. Thanks to all who have sacrificed so much.

BigVE I am in the same boat as you, but my Dad still won't talk about the crap he did/saw. He was a Ranger, and I can only guess what he did in his 2 tours in Nam.

This day is almost as special to me than any other throughout the year, which ranks right behind the big 2 religous days.

Thank you to those who have served or are currently serving our country.
:clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap::clap:

gblowfish
11-11-2010, 12:03 PM
My dad got drafted for Korea in 1951. He was in the 24th Infantry, bunch of guys in KC went to the 24th. He was a radio man and field grunt. He fought mostly against Chinese, because most of the North Koreans had been wiped out by then. He said when he got off the boat, they took the brand new Carbine they had given him in basic -the weapon he had trained on-, and gave that weapon to the South Korean MPs. They gave him back an old M-1 that was WWII surplus. It had a broken firing pin. Two days later he was in a firefight with a useless M-1. He had to take a weapon off another GI who was KIA to defend himself. He carried that M-1 the rest of the way in his tour. He was lucky, bunch of guys in his platoon got zapped. He doesn't talk about it much, either. I think guys that went through that kind of terror would rather not bring it up. Doesn't do much good except to stir up nightmares.

BigVE
11-11-2010, 12:06 PM
My dad got drafted for Korea in 1951. He was in the 24th Infantry, bunch of guys in KC went to the 24th. He was a radio man and field grunt. He fought mostly against Chinese, because most of the North Koreans had been wiped out by then. He said when he got off the boat, they took the brand new Carbine they had given him in basic -the weapon he had trained on-, and gave that weapon to the South Korean MPs. They gave him back an old M-1 that was WWII surplus. It had a broken firing pin. Two days later he was in a firefight with a useless M-1. He had to take a weapon off another GI who was KIA to defend himself. He carried that M-1 the rest of the way in his tour. He was lucky, bunch of guys in his platoon got zapped. He doesn't talk about it much, either. I think guys that went through that kind of terror would rather not bring it up. Doesn't do much good except to stir up nightmares.



So true. He still has nightmares and only recently (past 2 years) FINALLY agreed to see a shrink to maybe help him deal with some of that crap. For the most part he has NO signs or lingering affects but mentally it hits once in a while.

istas
11-11-2010, 12:22 PM
I joined the USAF in 1975. I was made to feel like a second class citizen every time I ventured off base. We never wore our uniforms off base because people would glare at us, spit at us, or flip us off.

Today I took my 17 year old son to Applebee's for lunch and we were greeted at the door by an Army SGT, thanked for my service to my country, given a veterans pin, and given a free lunch.

What a difference.

Dayze
11-11-2010, 01:14 PM
I joined the USAF in 1975. I was made to feel like a second class citizen every time I ventured off base. We never wore our uniforms off base because people would glare at us, spit at us, or flip us off.

Today I took my 17 year old son to Applebee's for lunch and we were greeted at the door by an Army SGT, thanked for my service to my country, given a veterans pin, and given a free lunch.

What a difference.

:thumb:

BigVE
11-11-2010, 03:39 PM
I joined the USAF in 1975. I was made to feel like a second class citizen every time I ventured off base. We never wore our uniforms off base because people would glare at us, spit at us, or flip us off.

Today I took my 17 year old son to Applebee's for lunch and we were greeted at the door by an Army SGT, thanked for my service to my country, given a veterans pin, and given a free lunch.

What a difference.

Very cool.

Gonzo
11-11-2010, 04:40 PM
My dad was a helicopter gunner and a radio guy in the 101st during his 1st tour in Nam. He went back 2 years later in the Air Force.
My Grandfather was a glider pilot in WWII, flew troops in on D-day. Then he was a tank commander in Korea.
Posted via Mobile Device

Valiant
11-11-2010, 05:01 PM
Prayers/thanks to any veterans..

Deberg_1990
11-11-2010, 05:04 PM
I joined the USAF in 1975. I was made to feel like a second class citizen every time I ventured off base. We never wore our uniforms off base because people would glare at us, spit at us, or flip us off.

Today I took my 17 year old son to Applebee's for lunch and we were greeted at the door by an Army SGT, thanked for my service to my country, given a veterans pin, and given a free lunch.

What a difference.

Thank you for your service. This is how it should have always been. Damn glad times have changed.

stlchiefs
11-11-2010, 05:14 PM
I joined the USAF in 1975. I was made to feel like a second class citizen every time I ventured off base. We never wore our uniforms off base because people would glare at us, spit at us, or flip us off.

Today I took my 17 year old son to Applebee's for lunch and we were greeted at the door by an Army SGT, thanked for my service to my country, given a veterans pin, and given a free lunch.

What a difference.

That's the way it should be. I'm ashamed of the way our country treated our soldiers during/following some past wars. HUGE thanks to all who have served.

GloryDayz
11-11-2010, 06:24 PM
I come from 4 generations of menwho have served, I was the 5th, and my son has his eye on the Naval Acadamy. I can tell you the conversation we had at a gathering where 4 generations were able to seperate from the groups was mind blowing. We all learned to respect each other even more than we did before. We were lucky to do it then, 17 days later we were down to only 3 generations.

bevischief
11-11-2010, 06:34 PM
My grandpa saw the bombing of Pearl Harbor and was a submarine radar operator for the bombing of Japan. I was in Saudi in February of 1998 most people don't know how close we were from going to war.