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View Full Version : Football NCAA spins fairy-tale fodder


luv
12-02-2010, 10:17 AM
Didn't see this. Sorry if repost.

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/columns/story?columnist=wojciechowski_gene&id=5872192&sportCat=ncf

NCAA spins fairy-tale fodder

By Gene Wojciechowski
ESPN.com

Huh? Did the NCAA do what I think it did? Did it basically rule that a father and a third party can actively, brazenly and with impunity shop a player around for hundreds of thousands of dollars -- and the worst thing that happens is the father has to lie low and the third party has to disassociate himself from the programs in question?

Did it just get embarrassed by a rules loophole the size of Jordan-Hare Stadium, the gist of it being: Your old man and another guy can put you on the open market, but as long as you don't know about it, you're good to strap it up for the next big game?

The answers: yes and yes.

"In determining how a violation impacts a student-athlete's eligibility, we must consider the young person's responsibility," said Kevin Lennon, NCAA vice president for academic and membership affairs, in announcing the ruling Wednesday that Auburn quarterback Cameron Newton is eligible. "Based on the information available to the reinstatement staff at this time, we do not have sufficient evidence that Cam Newton or anyone from Auburn was aware of this activity, which led to his reinstatement."

Amazing. The NCAA just made it possible for anyone with a blue-chip prospect to shop that player without fear of real punishment. Football player hoops player -- doesn't matter. All you have to do is say the kid didn't have a clue about the sales price and it's like nothing happened. Plausible deniability.

The Rev. Cecil Newton should thank the heavens that the NCAA carries guns loaded with blanks. Newton's penalty for peddling his son: His access to Auburn athletics is "limited." That's it -- "limited," whatever that means.

This isn't a slap on the wrist; it's a wet kiss on the ring finger. Someone who tried to sell his own son as if he were a football commodity essentially beat the rap.

You think the reverend cares whether he has limited access? Please. In all likelihood, his son has two games left in his Auburn career. And then Cam is off to the NFL, where the auction is sanctioned and done publicly. Amen, to that.

As expected, everyone involved issued the appropriate statements. The NCAA made its molar-less ruling. Auburn said it was pleased with that ruling. And SEC commissioner Mike Slive said, "The conduct of Cam Newton's father and the involved individual is unacceptable and has no place in the SEC or in intercollegiate athletics."

Duh. Of course it's unacceptable. But nothing the NCAA or the SEC did Wednesday is going to make this go away in the future. If anything, Cecil Newton provided a detailed road map for those parents or others looking to make a buck (or nearly $200,000) off their sons. Now everyone with their hands out knows the NCAA is powerless to do anything -- just as long as the kid has that plausible deniability.

And maybe it's just me, but the NCAA's phrase, "Based on the information available to the reinstatement staff at this time" caught my attention. Does that mean investigators are still digging? Or does it mean they've run out of shovels?

And if they are still digging, what happens if they find something after the Heisman vote? Or after the national championship game? Then what?

So Cam Newton is eligible -- for Saturday night's game against South Carolina, for the Heisman and for the BCS National Championship Game, should No. 1-ranked Auburn win the SEC title. But something still doesn't feel right.

The NCAA, for all its countless, mind-boggling rules, is apparently useless when it comes to a father trying to sell his son. Think about that for a minute. It's like a bad fairy tale:

Once upon a time, in the land of the SEC, the quarterback's scheming father and the evil scouting service owner decided they were going to auction off the quarterback to the highest bidder. Best of all, the quarterback would never, ever know.

Then one day, they were ratted out.

The handsome quarterback was ruled ineligible but then instantly reinstated by the NCAA, played for the SEC championship and remained the favorite to win the Heisman Trophy, and everyone lived happily ever after.

Meanwhile, Cecil Newton is laughing all the way to his big, bad limited access. He got his happy ending. And, as it turns out, so did his son.

But here's the thing: This isn't the end; it's the beginning. Of loophole chaos.

Earthling
12-02-2010, 10:19 AM
Good read and agree.

King_Chief_Fan
12-02-2010, 10:20 AM
wasn't his father therefore acting as his agent from a legal perspective?

Molitoth
12-02-2010, 10:21 AM
This could be solved by allowing all major universities to provide the SAME base salary amount no matter what school they go to. When you have poor athletes that get money waved in thier face, they are going to take it. The schools are making more than enough money off of the talent they bring into the school. See Reggie Bush's argument about the situation.

Earthling
12-02-2010, 10:25 AM
wasn't his father therefore acting as his agent from a legal perspective?

Supposedly without his knowledge so I'm not sure.

Mr. Laz
12-02-2010, 10:53 AM
complete bullshit

when it comes to recruiting etc the student athlete and immediate family have to be consider 1 entity. If not then from now on it will just be some twisted game of cat and mouse with plausible deniability.

parents go to student athelete "we will decide which college you go to, you just play" then they go out and basically sell their kid to the highest biding college. If anything ask the kid anything he can legitimately say "i don't know anything about that".

Doesn't work

Reaper16
12-02-2010, 11:00 AM
The NCAA is the most hypocritical organization. Jesus. You all KNOW that if Auburn weren't in the championship game picture they'd get raked over the coals for this, along with Cam. But no, the NCAA wants to spare themselves the embarrassment, so they set this DANGEROUS precedent.

Fuck the NCAA. What a joke.

Brock
12-02-2010, 11:01 AM
They made the right call in this case.

Reaper16
12-02-2010, 11:04 AM
They made the right call in this case.
I didn't know you worked for the NCAA.

kepp
12-02-2010, 11:05 AM
They made the right call in this case.

I tend to agree. If (and its a BIG IF) he really didn't know about it, then he shouldn't be punished. The obvious problem is how do you prove someone did or didn't know what their parents were doing?

Chiefnj2
12-02-2010, 11:06 AM
"Hey dad, What's with the new Suburban and Mercedes in the driveway? Oh my god, is that a new 70" flatscreen being installed? What happened?"

"Nothing, just sign the letter of intent on the new kitchen table, you'll be playing for Auburn net year."

vailpass
12-02-2010, 11:06 AM
IMHO the NCAA has to address this in the offseason and make a rule change or this will blow up in their faces soon. Every baby daddy with a blue-chip son will be asking to get paid "but don't tell my boy, he don't know".

kepp
12-02-2010, 11:06 AM
complete bullshit

when it comes to recruiting etc the student athlete and immediate family have to be consider 1 entity. If not then from now on it will just be some twisted game of cat and mouse with plausible deniability.

He was over 18 at the time and, legally, his own entity. How could you count he and his father/parents as one entity when, in all other legal instances, they aren't?

siberian khatru
12-02-2010, 11:06 AM
So, now that we've got that all cleared up, any chance we could get a fucking decision, ONE WAY OR THE OTHER, on Tony Mitchell?

Earthling
12-02-2010, 11:07 AM
I tend to agree. If (and its a BIG IF) he really didn't know about it, then he shouldn't be punished. The obvious problem is how do you prove someone did or didn't know what their parents were doing?

Exactly. Even a lie detector test isn't 100% reliable.

Chiefnj2
12-02-2010, 11:07 AM
In other words the NCAA doesn't want TCU in the championship game.

Dave Lane
12-02-2010, 11:12 AM
I tend to agree. If (and its a BIG IF) he really didn't know about it, then he shouldn't be punished. The obvious problem is how do you prove someone did or didn't know what their parents were doing?

So all parents of top 50 recruit children should just take out Craigslist ads and not tell their kids?

Oh and if you believe he didn't know I have some swamp land I'd like to sell you. Newt hold on before we commit to Auburn I have one more call to Florida to make then we are good.

Earthling
12-02-2010, 11:14 AM
So all parents of top 50 recruit children should just take out Craigslist ads and not tell their kids?

Oh and if you believe he didn't know I have some swamp land I'd like to sell you. Newt hold on before we commit to Auburn I have one more call to Florida to make then we are good.

I'm thinking he did indeed know as well. The problem is proving it.

kepp
12-02-2010, 11:14 AM
So all parents of top 50 recruit children should just take out Craigslist ads and not tell their kids?

Oh and if you believe he didn't know I have some swamp land I'd like to sell you. Newt hold on before we commit to Auburn I have one more call to Florida to make then we are good.

FTR, no, I don't believe he didn't know anything about it. But I wasn't in on the NCAA's investigation. If they determined that he didn't know about it, then the decision they made followed suit.

Brock
12-02-2010, 11:16 AM
Of course he knew. But it appears it can't be proven, so what are you going to do?

DaKCMan AP
12-02-2010, 11:19 AM
In other words the NCAA doesn't want TCU in the championship game.

TCU will get raked over by Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl. Then what will your argument be?

Reaper16
12-02-2010, 11:21 AM
Of course he knew. But it appears it can't be proven, so what are you going to do?
The problem is that you really can't prove it, and you won't be able to prove this sort of thing in future cases. There's no reason for parents not to go to a middleman and get paid now. No reason at all.

Earthling
12-02-2010, 11:21 AM
Of course he knew. But it appears it can't be proven, so what are you going to do?

The only way I can see to handle future abuses of this sort is to either make a ruling that specifies all family members will be considered to be acting for the player themselves, or make a fine so stiff against anyone colaberating with non-agents in the interests of that player that it wouldn't happen.

Stinger
12-02-2010, 11:21 AM
In other words the NCAA doesn't want TCU in the championship game.

Not until next year when they are finally part of "The System"......

Reaper16
12-02-2010, 11:21 AM
TCU will get raked over by Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl. Then what will your argument be?
A TCU loss doesn't affect his argument at all.

DaKCMan AP
12-02-2010, 11:22 AM
Not until next year when they are finally part of "The System"......

They don't join the Big Least until 2012.

DaKCMan AP
12-02-2010, 11:22 AM
A TCU loss doesn't affect his argument at all.

When they get rolled by Wisconsin it will prove they didn't deserve a title shot.

Reaper16
12-02-2010, 11:23 AM
When they get rolled by Wisconsin it will prove they didn't deserve a title shot.
Which is something very different than what chiefnj said.

DaKCMan AP
12-02-2010, 11:23 AM
Oh and if you believe he didn't know I have some swamp land I'd like to sell you. Newt hold on before we commit to Auburn I have one more call to Florida to make then we are good.

Clueless.

Earthling
12-02-2010, 11:24 AM
When they get rolled by Wisconsin it will prove they didn't deserve a title shot.

Its getting there that is at issue...

DaKCMan AP
12-02-2010, 11:24 AM
Which is something very different than what chiefnj said.

His agenda has always been for Boise State or TCU or whatever other mid-major team of the year to get a title shot.

Stinger
12-02-2010, 11:24 AM
TCU will get raked over by Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl. Then what will your argument be?

eh ... people said the same thing twice about Boise State

vailpass
12-02-2010, 11:24 AM
The problem is that you really can't prove it, and you won't be able to prove this sort of thing in future cases. There's no reason for parents not to go to a middleman and get paid now. No reason at all.

I'm not in favor of government involvement in athletics, far from it. In a case like this I wonder if there are any laws against solicitation of funds in return for guiding your unknowing child to perform an action? For some reason this seems more like it should be handled by the legal system than the NCAA.

DaKCMan AP
12-02-2010, 11:25 AM
eh ... people said the same thing twice about Boise State

They said Boise State would get rolled by Wisconsin?

vailpass
12-02-2010, 11:25 AM
eh ... people said the same thing twice about Boise State

Boise who?

beach tribe
12-02-2010, 11:26 AM
NCAA, especially football is all BS anyway.

Earthling
12-02-2010, 11:27 AM
I'm not in favor of government involvement in athletics, far from it. In a case like this I wonder if there are any laws against solicitation of funds in return for guiding your unknowing child to perform an action? For some reason this seems more like it should be handled by the legal system than the NCAA.

Good point.

Stinger
12-02-2010, 11:28 AM
They said Boise State would get rolled by Wisconsin?

No, that the smaller non BCS school would get rolled by the large BCS school.

DaKCMan AP
12-02-2010, 11:30 AM
No, that the smaller non BCS school would get rolled by the large BCS school.

And they said that about Boise State twice? Against Oklahoma and who else?

Baconeater
12-02-2010, 11:38 AM
This could be solved by allowing all major universities to provide the SAME base salary amount no matter what school they go to. When you have poor athletes that get money waved in thier face, they are going to take it. The schools are making more than enough money off of the talent they bring into the school. See Reggie Bush's argument about the situation.
Once again, if they start paying football players, that means they have to pay all the athletes in all the sports. That will NEVER happen.


In other words the NCAA doesn't want TCU in the championship game.
I think there is some truth to this.

Chiefnj2
12-02-2010, 11:45 AM
When they get rolled by Wisconsin it will prove they didn't deserve a title shot.

Don't be dense.

notorious
12-02-2010, 12:03 PM
How much $$$ did Auburn make off of Cam Newton?



Leave it alone. Players are going to get paid, and there won't be a damn thing that anyone can do about within the current fair and LEGAL system.

kstater
10-12-2011, 04:29 PM
NCAA ruled no major violations for this. Opens the door to pay all parents as long as they don't tell their children.

http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/7093495/ncaa-finds-no-major-violations-auburn-regarding-cam-newton

Pants
10-12-2011, 04:35 PM
NCAA ruled no major violations for this. Opens the door to pay all parents as long as they don't tell their children.

http://espn.go.com/college-football/story/_/id/7093495/ncaa-finds-no-major-violations-auburn-regarding-cam-newton

The only thing the article you linked seems to say is that NCAA found no proof of Cam's family getting paid.

kstater
10-12-2011, 04:44 PM
TCU will get raked over by Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl. Then what will your argument be?

Awesome

sedated
10-12-2011, 04:53 PM
TCU will get raked over by Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl. Then what will your argument be?

I guess he should be asking you the same thing.

Brock
10-12-2011, 05:35 PM
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2011/10/the-shame-of-college-sports/8643/

Interesting history of the NCAA and all their brazen hypocrisies.

Reaper16
10-12-2011, 05:40 PM
The Perfect Crime.

whoman69
10-12-2011, 07:46 PM
There are many reasons why athletes can never get paid. As has been pointed out, if you pay one, you have to pay all. That will make it easier for cheaters to pay out more to the athletes.

There are two reasons for college athletics to exist. First is to bring prestige to the university. The second is to make money for the universities. Erase either of those and there is no incentive for universities to have sports. Having to pay athletes are going to boot a bunch of schools out of the process who don't make the millions that Notre Dame, Michigan, Ohio State, Texas or USC can bring in. I would guess a good percentage of Div 1 schools will simply downgrade at that point.

Most writers seem to think they are only in place as a minor league system for football and basketball. They also can't seem to understand that by paying college athletes in many instances makes these athletes now government employees. That's money coming out of taxpayers pockets.

The fact is athletes are paid with a college education. The fact that those who believe they will turn pro don't believe that its worth it for them doesn't make the opportunity any less. They complain some athletes can't afford to live. They get room, board, books, tutors. Tell me what else they need? If they can't afford to live with free food and housing, how did they make it that far?

Clearly the NCAA needs to look at its mounds of rules and relax them to a great extent. Problem is loosening the rules opens the door even further for programs to take advantage of. Let's take outside jobs. If those are allowed then overzealous boosters may put entire squads on their payroll for non-existent jobs. It could also flood the market so that those who do not have a full ride and a name on the back of their jersey won't have any jobs available. They probably actually need the money, unlike these athletes.

Smed1065
10-12-2011, 07:49 PM
Awesome

Nice.