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El Jefe
12-20-2010, 06:59 PM
I am taking online classes at my Juco and man are books continuinally going up in price, or is it just me? I have a Business Law book that is coming in at $225 used, I am going to have just $400+ again for this semester. On top of Christmas my funds are getting stretched, but at least I am investing in myself.

OnTheWarpath58
12-20-2010, 07:02 PM
My books last semester ran just over $600. $550 the semester before.

Wanna know what I got back for them in the buy-back program?

$79.

For both semesters, combined.

Fucking racket.

ReynardMuldrake
12-20-2010, 07:02 PM
Yeah it's pretty ridiculous. When I was at JCCC some of my classes the books were more than the tuition!

You can try to buy used, but they change them up so often you have to be careful not to buy the wrong ones.

DJay23
12-20-2010, 07:04 PM
They probably bought that book from some schmuck last semester for a box of junior mints and a 10% off coupon for any bumper sticker in the store.

I kept all of my books in my major.

pr_capone
12-20-2010, 07:06 PM
My job pays for my books, then when I sell them I can pocket the cash.

w00t!

DJay23
12-20-2010, 07:08 PM
The most I ever paid when I was still in school was about $520 and that was a semester where I had 3 lab courses so I had the big biology text book plus all of the lab manuals and such. I never paid more than $90 for a single textbook. This was almost 10 years ago.

A couple of years ago my wife went back to school and I went book shopping for her while she was at work before school started. I was shocked to see how much books have gone up.

DaKCMan AP
12-20-2010, 07:09 PM
half.com

'Hamas' Jenkins
12-20-2010, 07:11 PM
Contact your profs as soon as you register for classes and buy your books from Half or Textbooks.com.

J Diddy
12-20-2010, 07:11 PM
Mine cost about $500 for all 15 credit hours. Most were used. The most being a college algebra, new for $175. Next semester, I'm gonna sell all my books first and then buy the new ones on ebay.

Valiant
12-20-2010, 07:12 PM
tons of websites that are way cheaper.. Some new ones also rent books..

jbwm89
12-20-2010, 07:13 PM
Sell the damn things on half.com for sure. spent 600 this semester and came away with 120. Mizzou takes pride in raping students by putting convenient tents all over campus to buy books back and then giving them jackshit for them.

Saulbadguy
12-20-2010, 07:14 PM
Option 1. Half.com, ebay, buy.com, etc.
Option 2. Buy an edition older than the current edition. There is usually very little difference, just a few newer statistics and whatnot.
Option 3. Search for a PDF of the book. This usually works pretty well for common classes.
Option 4. Library.
Option 5. Don't buy the book. You'll find out within a couple weeks whether or not you actually need the book.

A combination of these options have usually served me well.

Reaper16
12-20-2010, 07:21 PM
The library works roughly 85% of the time for me. Use inter-library loan; SOME library is bound to have what you're looking for.

Extra Point
12-20-2010, 07:22 PM
****ing racket.

THIS. And the whole secondary educational system.

You can go to votech in HS, continue in juco , then get certification as a pipefitter, electrician, or operating engineer, upon taking the exam. By getting a license to practice in a municipality, you can make more than scale by hanging up your own shingle.

AndChiefs
12-20-2010, 07:26 PM
Keep an eye out for previous editions of the books. They're usually almost completely identical and way cheaper.

Kyle DeLexus
12-20-2010, 07:29 PM
Option 1. Half.com, ebay, buy.com, etc.
Option 2. Buy an edition older than the current edition. There is usually very little difference, just a few newer statistics and whatnot.
Option 3. Search for a PDF of the book. This usually works pretty well for common classes.
Option 4. Library.
Option 5. Don't buy the book. You'll find out within a couple weeks whether or not you actually need the book.

A combination of these options have usually served me well.

These 2 are what I've done. I used to buy all my books before classes at the campus bookstore. Then half of my classes never used the books so I started waiting to see if I actually needed them and then got them on Amazon or half.com.

This semester I only spent $20 on one book that I wouldn't have even needed if I didn't get sick and miss a couple classes (only class this semester that didn't have ppts)

pkane
12-20-2010, 07:30 PM
Contact your profs as soon as you register for classes and buy your books from Half or Textbooks.com.

I had good luck with Half and Textbooks. Amazon worked well too.

A few times I knew people who took the class the previous semester and they let me use it.

There are definitly better options than the college book store.

Bugeater
12-20-2010, 07:37 PM
Yes, it's a racket, and it's really the only thing that's irritated me about going back to school. The one that really made me mad was my business math book, 150 effing dollars used and the damn thing isn't even hardbound, while my hardbound refrigeration textbook that covers 8 classes was under $100. It wouldn't be so bad if they actually gave you a reasonable amount back for them.

Silock
12-20-2010, 07:45 PM
Paperbackswap.com FTW

Or, Craigslist. There's a ton of ways to get them for cheap, but some of them are unavoidable.

Pablo
12-20-2010, 07:47 PM
If you register for your classes a few weeks before the end of the semester; then find out when those classes are being held that semester. Go in the hallway before and/or after the class. Talk to people. Offer them $20 more than what the bookstore will. Most people are pretty lazy and don't want to list books online and/or hassle with shipping them. They return them to the campus bookstore because it is the easiest option. The same reason they buy them at the campus bookstore.

When somebody goes to return a book they probably pay $200 for; and the very same store offers them $25 for the book 4 months later they're going to be pissed. And hopefully they think of you offering them $45 for the book and contact you. Not a sure-fire bet, but I've had it work before. No guarantee they're going to be honest, but if you talk to a person you can get a feel for them. Hell, even haggle with them if you want to.

I know it's not as easy as clicking on a link on a website or buying online, but it's worth it sometimes.

chiefzilla1501
12-20-2010, 07:47 PM
Option 1. Half.com, ebay, buy.com, etc.
Option 2. Buy an edition older than the current edition. There is usually very little difference, just a few newer statistics and whatnot.
Option 3. Search for a PDF of the book. This usually works pretty well for common classes.
Option 4. Library.
Option 5. Don't buy the book. You'll find out within a couple weeks whether or not you actually need the book.

A combination of these options have usually served me well.

Point 2 can't be stressed enough.

If you're a cheapskate, talk to your professor. Most of them hate that books are overpriced too and feel guilty for forcing you to buy them. Most of the time, they'll know and tell you if a previous edition is missing any material. If not, do a search online for differences. Most of the time, the differences are negligible.

Msmith
12-21-2010, 08:00 AM
You forget about the publishers. Just like the car makers who prefer everyone to buy only new cars, the publishers like everyone to buy only new books. But the market for used cars does exist, so does the used books. This is the scheme that came out the past couple year. A new book will package with a web access code that allows students to do the homework and turn in the homework online. You cannot buy the web access code alone so you must purchase the new book package. The code is time sensitive so once used it will expire within 6 months. Pretty ingenious marketing idea, won't you say? Except for the students...

Old Dog
12-21-2010, 08:15 AM
campusbookrentals.com is another good one. Rented one for the Mrs through them and some idiot (me) rented the wrong book. Returned it and they refunded my fee even though it was my own fault.
You can also generally search for a coupon code for them and save another 10%

loochy
12-21-2010, 08:20 AM
Option 1. Half.com, ebay, buy.com, etc.
Option 2. Buy an edition older than the current edition. There is usually very little difference, just a few newer statistics and whatnot.
Option 3. Search for a PDF of the book. This usually works pretty well for common classes.
Option 4. Library.
Option 5. Don't buy the book. You'll find out within a couple weeks whether or not you actually need the book.

A combination of these options have usually served me well.

This. Saulbadguy knows how it's done.

Remember that when classes are over you should sell your books. However DON'T sell them back to the bookstore. I sell my girlfriend's nursing books on Amazon.com Marketplace. I make way more than I would by selling the books back to the store and I usually have a buyer within 1 day. I use the strategy of undercutting the current lowest price by 1 cent. :D

El Jefe
12-21-2010, 08:22 AM
You forget about the publishers. Just like the car makers who prefer everyone to buy only new cars, the publishers like everyone to buy only new books. But the market for used cars does exist, so does the used books. This is the scheme that came out the past couple year. A new book will package with a web access code that allows students to do the homework and turn in the homework online. You cannot buy the web access code alone so you must purchase the new book package. The code is time sensitive so once used it will expire within 6 months. Pretty ingenious marketing idea, won't you say? Except for the students...

THIS. You can't buy these books used, and if you do, you have to pay for anew web access code which you might as well just buy a new book and save the hassle.

El Jefe
12-21-2010, 08:23 AM
This. Saulbadguy knows how it's done.

Remember that when classes are over you should sell your books. However DON'T sell them back to the bookstore. I sell my girlfriend's nursing books on Amazon.com Marketplace. I make way more than I would by selling the books back to the store and I usually have a buyer within 1 day. I use the strategy of undercutting the current lowest price by 1 cent. :D

You old arab LOL!

ReynardMuldrake
12-21-2010, 09:05 AM
Keep an eye out for previous editions of the books. They're usually almost completely identical and way cheaper.

Yeah, except the page numbers are different.

"Turn to page 225 in your textbooks..."

$#@&!@!!

Bill Lundberg
12-21-2010, 11:17 AM
A friend of mine just finished 12 hours at JCCC and bought books for each class. He was pissed, because he didn't open any of them. Apparently all of his teachers handed out study guides and notes for each unit. The books weren't even necessary.

I would check with your prof's to see if they teach from the book or prepare their own materials.

vailpass
12-21-2010, 12:09 PM
http://www.amazon.com/gp/student/signup/info

WebGem
12-21-2010, 12:10 PM
$225 used is definitely not normal

vailpass
12-21-2010, 12:11 PM
Point 2 can't be stressed enough.

If you're a cheapskate, talk to your professor. Most of them hate that books are overpriced too and feel guilty for forcing you to buy them. Most of the time, they'll know and tell you if a previous edition is missing any material. If not, do a search online for differences. Most of the time, the differences are negligible.

Except that you can't usually sell the older edition back.

Saulbadguy
12-21-2010, 12:24 PM
$225 used is definitely not normal

I've been fairly close - $180 used.

Saulbadguy
12-21-2010, 12:25 PM
Except that you can't usually sell the older edition back.

This is true, but the older edition is usually highly discounted. I've seen a current edition go for around $80-100, where the older edition is around $15-30

vailpass
12-21-2010, 12:33 PM
This is true, but the older edition is usually highly discounted. I've seen a current edition go for around $80-100, where the older edition is around $15-30

That much of a discount is certainly significant.

Short Leash Hootie
12-21-2010, 12:42 PM
My books last semester ran just over $600. $550 the semester before.

Wanna know what I got back for them in the buy-back program?

$79.

For both semesters, combined.

****ing racket.

you should be buying and selling on Amazon

vailpass
12-21-2010, 12:44 PM
you should be buying and selling on Amazon

So easy. Just enter your ISBN number and the book you want to buy comes up.
To sell any books to Amazon just enter the ISBN and they will tell you what they will pay for it then give you a free shipping lable to print out and send in your book.
I buy so much shit off of Amazon, they are efficient, almost always have the lowest price and the inventory is ungodly.

Spott
12-21-2010, 03:22 PM
Keep an eye out for previous editions of the books. They're usually almost completely identical and way cheaper.


Exactly. I went back to school a couple of years ago and bought every single one of my books that way. I found out what edition the school wanted you to get, then I went and bought the previous version of the book on Ebay for 5-10 bucks and then turned around and sold it at the end of the semester for the same amount. The books are word for word the same and most classes required you to take notes in class and use the book as reference material, so any book on the subject would likely work. Colleges really screw the students over with that BS of making everyone think they need the newest edition of the book and making you pay an arm and a leg for it.

OnTheWarpath58
12-21-2010, 03:45 PM
you should be buying and selling on Amazon

I've tried to buy on Amazon the past two semesters, but hey haven't had the books I needed, or weren't any cheaper, surprisingly.

I have a box of books I'd like to ship them via their book buy-back, but I've read that they are a bit shady when it comes to determining condition, etc.

If anyone has used the trade-in/but-back service through Amazon, I'd love to hear your feedback.

Fritz88
12-21-2010, 03:56 PM
I've tried to buy on Amazon the past two semesters, but hey haven't had the books I needed, or weren't any cheaper, surprisingly.

I have a box of books I'd like to ship them via their book buy-back, but I've read that they are a bit shady when it comes to determining condition, etc.

If anyone has used the trade-in/but-back service through Amazon, I'd love to hear your feedback.

I sold my books via Amazon for at least 70% the original pricen
Posted via Mobile Device

OnTheWarpath58
12-21-2010, 03:59 PM
I sold my books via Amazon for at least 70% the original pricen
Posted via Mobile Device

Did you use the trade-in system, or the marketplace?

KCUnited
12-21-2010, 04:31 PM
I have a 100% reimbursement from my employee so I buy brand new, newest addition and sell them for considerably less on Amazon simply because its a 100% profit for me.

Whoever is buying my books is getting a deal.

lazepoo
12-21-2010, 05:11 PM
As someone that works at a bookstore, I can't echo the sentiments above enough. You'll never get more than 25-30% of the original price at most resellers, and you won't use most of your books, especially as an undergrad. Beg, borrow, and steal to get the books, but don't buy them unless you're really out of options.

Chief Chief
12-21-2010, 05:19 PM
I am taking online classes at my Juco and man are books continuinally going up in price, or is it just me?


It's just you...bitchin'!

Saulbadguy
01-26-2011, 08:43 AM
Another tip:

Search Barnes and Noble's "Nookstudy" application for the textbook you require.

Download the "7 day free trial"

Hax0r away.

Simply Red
01-26-2011, 09:24 AM
I've got, 'ahem' some Hustlers for sale. Missing a few pages - 'AS IS' - PM me for further details.

Thanks.

Bearcat
01-26-2011, 09:29 AM
Option 1. Half.com, ebay, buy.com, etc.
Option 2. Buy an edition older than the current edition. There is usually very little difference, just a few newer statistics and whatnot.
Option 3. Search for a PDF of the book. This usually works pretty well for common classes.
Option 4. Library.
Option 5. Don't buy the book. You'll find out within a couple weeks whether or not you actually need the book.

A combination of these options have usually served me well.

Yeah, as if the price wasn't bad enough, you end up paying more for a few edits that you'll probably never notice.

Fortunately, my school let us rent books for the semester, so as long as we turned them back in, we weren't charged anything (well, I'm sure part of it was built into tuition, but it was still a really good deal).

El Jefe
01-26-2011, 09:35 AM
Yeah, as if the price wasn't bad enough, you end up paying more for a few edits that you'll probably never notice.

Fortunately, my school let us rent books for the semester, so as long as we turned them back in, we weren't charged anything (well, I'm sure part of it was built into tuition, but it was still a really good deal).

That's legit, I actually cashed in on one of my books, my fiances school has a massive library and she found one of my books and was able to rent it, saved me a bundle on that book, it was a $200+ dollar book.

RedNFeisty
01-26-2011, 09:37 AM
Books are outrageous. I had two classes last semester, book costs were around five hundred dollars, more then the two classes cost me.

oldandslow
01-26-2011, 09:49 AM
I have been a prof for nearly 30 years and have quit using textbooks during the last decade or so. I find 20/30 research articles from academic journals that the library carries for each class. I then assign several each week. I believe that my students get more from primary research sources than secondary textbook sources anyway.

As an aside I am co-auther on a couple of books - Our royalty is less than $1.50 for each book sold. One retailed for $80.00. The other for $65.00.

teedubya
01-26-2011, 09:49 AM
Option 1. Half.com, ebay, buy.com, etc.
Option 2. Buy an edition older than the current edition. There is usually very little difference, just a few newer statistics and whatnot.
Option 3. Search for a PDF of the book. This usually works pretty well for common classes.
Option 4. Library.
Option 5. Don't buy the book. You'll find out within a couple weeks whether or not you actually need the book.

A combination of these options have usually served me well.

Wise man. In fact, I would petition for you to become the 4th wise man. Let me know, I know people who know people.

teedubya
01-26-2011, 09:52 AM
Or you can just MUG someone that is in your class and take their books, bully-style.

Saulbadguy
01-26-2011, 10:24 AM
Wise man. In fact, I would petition for you to become the 4th wise man. Let me know, I know people who know people.

DM them on Twitter.