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MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 10:09 AM
The times gettin close for indoor seeders & planning for early varaties.

tips, tricks, varaties you like. Where to buy. What to buy. Does & donts.

Your personal picks.

All things gardening.


What you got?

Mr. Flopnuts
12-21-2010, 10:11 AM
2011 is going to be shit. I would've just skipped to 2012 too. Remember though, shit needs to harvest before December. The world is ending then. :D

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 10:11 AM
2011 is going to be shit. I would've just skipped to 2012 too. Remember though, shit needs to harvest before December. The world is ending then. :D

:doh!:ROFL

Hydrae
12-21-2010, 10:13 AM
I have already turned the garden over and expanded it by a few feet. Being in central Texas I should have planted a second round but was too lazy in August. I will go back in a couple of months and rototill in some fertilizer and be ready to start dropping seeds by late March.

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 10:14 AM
http://www.burpee.com/vegetables/corn/sweet-corn/normal-sugar-su/corn-early-sunglow-hybrid-prod000664.html

my pick for early sweet corn this year is early sun glow hybrid. 63 days,OP, had some last year. need to plant it on high well drained soil to mu spring rain will stunt growth.

Mr. Flopnuts
12-21-2010, 10:17 AM
http://www.burpee.com/vegetables/corn/sweet-corn/normal-sugar-su/corn-early-sunglow-hybrid-prod000664.html

my pick for early sweet corn this year is early sun glow hybrid. 63 days,OP, had some last year. need to plant it on high well drained soil to mu spring rain will stunt growth.

I really need to come over to your place for dinner sometime. Freshly grown veggies are the shit. Maybe this is the year I get some stuff planted in the ground. If I'm around anyways. Hopefully I'll be on the road, but if not, now that I have the yard, I think I'll go for it.

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 10:18 AM
I have already turned the garden over and expanded it by a few feet. Being in central Texas I should have planted a second round but was too lazy in August. I will go back in a couple of months and rototill in some fertilizer and be ready to start dropping seeds by late March.


im puttin taters & cabbage starts in by st. pattys day.

Guy showed me that if you cut the bottom out of 5 gallon buckets and put the bucket over the cabbage you can just put a lid on it when you have a chance of frost.
excellent trick imo.

wont turn mine over until the early march. Like you im gonna expand mine to take up most of the back half of the yard.

Bill Parcells
12-21-2010, 10:18 AM
The best compost mix I have used was 50% top soil/40%Compost/10%Sand. rototill about 4 inches of that shit into the ground and it makes everything happy. I also use steroids for my Annuals. Growers mix/Terra sorb and slow release fert.

Groves
12-21-2010, 10:20 AM
I need to download MO's gardening brain to my kids somehow. C'mon technology!

Hydrae
12-21-2010, 10:24 AM
I had a hard time with stink bugs all over my tomatoes this year. I am going to try a trick I read about and plant marigolds around that part of the garden. Supposedly they are attracted to the yellow flowers and stay out of the maters.

tooge
12-21-2010, 10:26 AM
coons and deer get most of our corn, so I'm gonna plant much more this year. I've got about a quarter acre of mowed pasture to turn up.

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 10:28 AM
I really need to come over to your place for dinner sometime. Freshly grown veggies are the shit. Maybe this is the year I get some stuff planted in the ground. If I'm around anyways. Hopefully I'll be on the road, but if not, now that I have the yard, I think I'll go for it.

Dude i will have plenty. If you need your ground turned up i have a monster tiller.:drool:
My plan this year is to start all the early stuff in the house.

Im not gonna do alot of lettuce and carrots like last year. For sow in row im gonna stick with pole/bush beans,corn,taters,& tomatos. Might put a row of sweet radish and a hill of black seed lettuce.
Only gonna do the ox heart heirlooms this year.

Gonna try these
http://www.burpee.com/vegetables/tomatoes/slicer/tomato-fourth-of-july-hybrid-prod000988.html
& a yellow variety i cant recall the name of for early tomato & stick with beefsteak and better boy for mid season. I gonna make BBQ sauce & juice by the quart.

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 10:32 AM
I had a hard time with stink bugs all over my tomatoes this year. I am going to try a trick I read about and plant marigolds around that part of the garden. Supposedly they are attracted to the yellow flowers and stay out of the maters.

do some research on chewing & sucking garden pests.

liquid 7,malathion,permethrins, are about all i can find. Hummert int. can sometimes get the old school hardcore pesticides.

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 10:33 AM
coons and deer get most of our corn, so I'm gonna plant much more this year. I've got about a quarter acre of mowed pasture to turn up.

turn a radio on in your corn patch to keep varmits away.:thumb:

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 10:35 AM
The best compost mix I have used was 50% top soil/40%Compost/10%Sand. rototill about 4 inches of that shit into the ground and it makes everything happy. I also use steroids for my Annuals. Growers mix/Terra sorb and slow release fert.

what zone? what kind of annuals?

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 10:36 AM
I need to download MO's gardening brain to my kids somehow. C'mon technology!

you have my number vato:thumb:


come get some hens.

BigOlChiefsfan
12-21-2010, 10:47 AM
Mo, try a couple of "Dona" or "Carmello" tomatoes. Tennis ball sized fruit, but tons of 'em, a really productive plant - a few is all I need for salads. Great flavor - a french breed, grown for flavor rather than size or tough skin or whatever. Tough plants, too. I couldn't find 'em around here last year so I may have to grow my own from seed this time. I also like Russian-style 'black' tomatoes for taste, can't really tout their toughness from my own experience but hey.
Recommend 'french breakfast' radishes, I use them as place holders - they grow in about 30 days. I never liked radishes til I ate these (with some butter - try it). If you have vacant space, sow mustard seed (I just buy it as a spice @ the indian grocery store, it's really cheap). Turn it under in 25 days or so as 'green manure'. Will start ridiculously early.
If you like cabbage, try chinese cabbage/pak choy/bok choy. Easy, quick. I can get it in and eaten before the cabbage butterfly appears most years. And don't forget turnips/turnip greens, if you're a cabbage lover. I have a couple of good turnip recipes, remind me.
Don't put cow manure on your garden 'as is', it's full of weed seeds. Compost it, good and hot to kill those seeds. Horse poop I'll put on 'as is'. Chicken poop needs to be composted (too 'hot', ymmv). I use blood meal/green sand/bone meal w/leaf mold every chance I get. I also try to grow some herbs every year, danged things cost a fortune to buy @ the grocery store. I try to plant salad stuff (snow peas, lettuce, spinach, green onions) once a week instead of mass quantities all at once.
I only really recommend one garden book out of the zillions out there:
Self Sufficient Gardener (http://www.amazon.com/Self-Sufficient-Gardener-Complete-Growing-Preserving/dp/038514671X)
or the easier to get new self sufficient gardener (http://www.amazon.com/New-Self-Sufficient-Gardener-John-Seymour/dp/0756628989/ref=pd_sim_b_1). Don't buy the old one for $170, buy the new version for $13.

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 10:58 AM
How much room for a herb garden? Im thinking of doin this in box planters. ( i am gonna do it in box planters for sunlight considerations)

Explain how the once a week for the salad stuff works.

what variety of chinese head cabbage?

seed purveyor you recommend?

a quick search on burpees came up nada for "Dona" or "Carmello". are they a determinant variety? OP/CP?


whats green sand?

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 11:17 AM
Compost it, good and hot to kill those seeds. Horse poop I'll put on 'as is'. Chicken poop needs to be composted (too 'hot', ymmv). I use blood meal/green sand/bone meal w/leaf mold every chance I get.


i see what youre doin here. Do you use any garden fertilizer mixes in conjunction w/?
3-8,3-13,ect.

Like the idea of green sand to break up clay soil.

i used shredded paper and chicken poop as compost/mulch along with 3-13 last year and damn near burned my tomatoes up.

BigOlChiefsfan
12-21-2010, 11:24 AM
I plant herbs here and there, some work pretty well as 'bug deterrents' - garlic w/tomatoes, but I don't go crazy. I have an herb section for perennials, one big sage plant, a couple of rosemary, a couple thyme, some chives (they get divided every year, give some away and replant the rest). 1 Oregano. I usually sow a few dill seeds (from the spice store) in with the tomatoes and beans.
I like this seed company and whatever chinese cabbage she's got is ok by me Renee's seeds (http://www.reneesgarden.com/seeds/seeds-hm/vegO.htm#pak) Chinese cabbage isn't really a 'head' like we're used to, the leaves are more open. Still tastes great and it grows fast. Try it. Napa cabbage is similar, but the pak choi/bok choy stuff is great for a gardener.
Let's say you're growing in rows - once a week or so, go out and sow 8 feet of lettuce, 2 feet of onions, 8 feet of spinach. Keep doing this all spring. After 35 days or so you're out there harvesting the ripe 8 feet of lettuce - enough for a few days of salad but not so much you have to give a ton away. And repeat until it gets hot. Start doing the same thing in the august, there's a lot of stuff that grows well in autumn if we'll plant it while we're eating tomatoes out the wahoo.
My grandma taught me to grow a few 'salad tomatoes' and a ton of 'canning tomatoes', she liked to can tomato juice as well as plain tomatoes. I don't can stuff, so I just grow the salad tomatoes these days. 6 or so is a lot for me.
The Dona and Carmello are indeterminant, but you can pinch them back if you don't like them tall. I use a 'cage' and a rebar stake, + a sapling that just lets them grow up. The fruit is mostly low.
Go out at night to hunt slugs w/a flashlight. Kids love this, as long as they don't squick out from SLUGS! Teach 'em to use chop sticks if they're squicky. I was raised dropping slugs in a coffee can of coal oil, but you can salt 'em or stomp 'em or eat them if you're so inclined, I suppose.

Green sand is a way to get potassium IIRC (http://www.planetnatural.com/site/greensand-soil-amendment.html) into the ground. I'm not all nutso about organic gardening, but I do think a lot of the organic fertilizers stay in one spot longer than the 'chemical' 20/20/20 that I otherwise use. Organics improve the soil's condition instead of just giving us a quick fix. You want that good black loam that comes from lots of compost/peat. Make it easy for the plant to do well and you wind up looking like you know what you're doing. My ozark granny could grow potatoes on a rock, literally.

Get that book.

ETA: For tomatoes, after fixing the soil early on I just use Miracle Grow for tomatoes (in water). If you've got chicken, cattle or horses, half-fill a bucket w/poop and fill it the rest of the way w/water. Dip that water out and use a little on your best tomato plants a few times each week. That 'compost tea' is good stuff.

BigOlChiefsfan
12-21-2010, 11:35 AM
If you plant in rows, think about converting a few sections over to 'beds' for your perennial veggies/herb garden. I also plant a few hot chile peppers in with my herbs - I buy hot chiles from the thai grocery store and just use their seeds (I'm cheap when it comes to seeds! Plus, I know what those thai chiles taste like). A few plants are plenty for me. Peppers don't set a lot of fruit until night temps are low, so don't despair if the plant doesn't look like it's doing much in july/august around here. They'll do their thing late, be prepared to dry some out for winter.

I also recommend trying 'tokyo white' turnips. Sweeter than your purple top, grows quick.

I can't eat much corn these days, but my folks loved 'butter and cream' and it did really well for them over near Rolla.

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 11:46 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shIBFdGBGfo

compost tea brewer. im gonna build one. I hear nothin but good things about tea.

ive got a trailer im thinkin about doin a 'raised bed' on wheels with. Either the entire thing or with box planters so i can move it around. I like the thought of box planters cause i can bring them in the house in winter.
what do you think?

BigOlChiefsfan
12-21-2010, 11:53 AM
Well...me, I'd just dig in the dirt and put a 'frame' over it instead, use that trailer to haul in more horse poop. I said I only recommend 1 book - until you start talking about winter gardening. Then I add this old boy (http://www.amazon.com/Four-Season-Harvest-Organic-Vegetables-Garden/dp/1890132276/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1292957511&sr=1-1)

ETA: Here's another seed catalog I've had pretty good luck with. Johnny's (http://www.johnnyseeds.com/default.aspx?source=google_johnny_s_selected_seeds&gclid=CK-iq_CC_qUCFaFk7AodCGcFZA) He has more variety - note, he and Renee's (above) sell out pretty early most years.

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 11:58 AM
see i have 2 trucks, 4 trailers, and no horses. thank god. I do have 17 head of chicken and a barn full of pig shit.

and i dont like diggin holes. its more like pickin rocks

BigOlChiefsfan
12-21-2010, 12:10 PM
Run a few bales of wheat straw (not hay!) thru a lawn mower w/a bagger and start mixing that w/pig poop & chicken shit. Add your shredded paper if ya got. Mix that in as you plant next spring, throw some bone meal in if you're planting root crops and you should be in bidness. If you don't like to dig holes...pile enough compost on top of your rocky dirt, the worms will come find the poop and do your digging for you. I've had the best luck w/horse manure, a few friends clean their stables every week or so and I can haul all I'm willing to load. They put sawdust down in the stable, so I don't need to mix much chopped straw or leaves with it.

Groves
12-21-2010, 12:11 PM
I do have 17 head of chicken and a barn full of pig shit.

I know, hens are on the list, not ready yet.

Did you get your monster all sliced up? How'd the rendering go?

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 12:54 PM
I know, hens are on the list, not ready yet.

Did you get your monster all sliced up? How'd the rendering go?

came home the night she who cannot be named and the kids left and the bulldog prospect got into the barn and killed it.

:(
chewed its face clean off.

hell of a week bro.

had em both in the barn one of em got a latch open.

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 01:05 PM
ETA: Here's another seed catalog I've had pretty good luck with. Johnny's (http://www.johnnyseeds.com/default.aspx?source=google_johnny_s_selected_seeds&gclid=CK-iq_CC_qUCFaFk7AodCGcFZA) He has more variety - note, he and Renee's (above) sell out pretty early most years.

im gonna spend a hundred dollars after the 1st and buy all my seed.

if any of you locals want any let me know.

vailpass
12-21-2010, 01:40 PM
Anybody have experience with box gardening? Here in the Valley of the Sun the soil isn't worth a shit even if you could get a shovel in the hard-as-rock ground.
I'll have to figure out what will grow in this climate but I would very much like to grow a few fresh veggies to show my kids what a garden is.

Groves
12-21-2010, 01:45 PM
the bulldog prospect got into the barn and killed it.

:(
chewed its face clean off.


I've never had hog jowls anyway. I assume it was a total loss, then. Dang.

Was it a mild mannered animal? The ones I've been around would have eaten the pup. Special dog or special hog?

KC_Lee
12-21-2010, 01:51 PM
Already mapped out my garden. Expanding it 10 more feet. Putting in; corn, tomatoes (globe, Roma, yellow pear, and grape), bush beans, squash, cukes (lemon and english), potatoes, brussel sprouts, garlic and peas.

Looking to start a third plot for an herb garden, maybe 10' by 10' for starters.

Each year I rake my leaves to the corner of my fence and let them just rot. Then I till the in to keep on rotting. Good free compost.

Hope to have better luck then last year. After getting everything in and started Nashville got flooded and I have 4 feet of water in my house. Most of the garden was a wash but I was able to get some yellow pear tomatoes out of it.

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 01:51 PM
I've never had hog jowls anyway. I assume it was a total loss, then. Dang.

Was it a mild mannered animal? The ones I've been around would have eaten the pup. Special dog or special hog?

One of them dogs. total loss. called my old timer and he came by to see if we could salvage anything. said not bleedin it or hangin it before rigor sat in spoiled the meat.

****in mess. Gonna have to let her freeze and take the chain saw to her to get it out.

Shot the dog on the spot. mother****er.:grr:
just gonna swallow it down take my loss and move on. already lookin for one to replace it.

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 01:57 PM
Anybody have experience with box gardening? Here in the Valley of the Sun the soil isn't worth a shit even if you could get a shovel in the hard-as-rock ground.
I'll have to figure out what will grow in this climate but I would very much like to grow a few fresh veggies to show my kids what a garden is.

super easy once you get a box built and put you soil in it.

USDA hardiness zones
http://www.usna.usda.gov/Hardzone/ushzmap.html

When you buy plants/seeds most of the time it gives what zones and when to plant.

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 01:58 PM
Already mapped out my garden. Expanding it 10 more feet. Putting in; corn, tomatoes (globe, Roma, yellow pear, and grape), bush beans, squash, cukes (lemon and english), potatoes, brussel sprouts, garlic and peas.

Looking to start a third plot for an herb garden, maybe 10' by 10' for starters.

Each year I rake my leaves to the corner of my fence and let them just rot. Then I till the in to keep on rotting. Good free compost.

Hope to have better luck then last year. After getting everything in and started Nashville got flooded and I have 4 feet of water in my house. Most of the garden was a wash but I was able to get some yellow pear tomatoes out of it.

brightside, floodzones have good soil.

Bill Parcells
12-21-2010, 02:02 PM
what zone? what kind of annuals?

Northeast (New Jersey) Vincas and Begonias. I planted begonias one year and put the steroids in the holes with them and they hardly even grew. have shitty soil in the area, a lot of shale and clay and the bed is sloped on a downward angle. so when I d water the flowers the water would run right down the bed and not go into the soil. the flowers hardly grew all year.

The next year I rototilled my compost mix in and threw the steroids in, and by September the begonias were 2ft high (as big as a smallshrub). the sand was the key for drainage, after I did all that I watered the flowers and the water wouldnt run down the bed anymore. it just sunk in.

tooge
12-21-2010, 02:02 PM
Ok, I got one for ya.
Not as much garddening as , uh, orcharding?
I have some apple trees, some peach trees, some nectarine trees, and some plum trees I planted over three or four years. The youngest are the apples and they are about 3 years since planted. I get tons of blossoms on all the trees most years, but then shit goes haywire. For example, this year, only about 10 blossoms total on peach and nectarine trees, all fell off. A shit load of blossoms on the apple trees, they all turned brown and fell off. I got 1, thats ONE, effin apple. The plums seem to blossom every year, then I get tons of little plums the size of maybe three bbs, then they start to wither up and fall off. What gives?

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 02:09 PM
have you pruned them back?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3o3rX3eMcj0


my plum tree didnt do anything until i had it pruned.

tooge
12-21-2010, 02:11 PM
have you pruned them back?

no. is now a good time to do that? what is the best method?

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 02:16 PM
no. is now a good time to do that? what is the best method?

i had a pro do mine but i remember him saying that he cut out all the underneath stuff that wouldnt get sunlight. It exploded the next year.

could be young trees,blossom rot,bugs, & lack of pollination or fertilizer.

last year we had a leaf blight in missouri from some wasp or something. might have been that.

did any of the trees leaves turn rusty looking?

BigOlChiefsfan
12-21-2010, 02:26 PM
Anybody have experience with box gardening? Here in the Valley of the Sun the soil isn't worth a shit even if you could get a shovel in the hard-as-rock ground.
I'll have to figure out what will grow in this climate but I would very much like to grow a few fresh veggies to show my kids what a garden is.

Yep, I use raised beds. Mine are mostly peat moss and some garden soil (my dirt was not great either) I built the boxes fairly shallow using fence slats and just let the worms come dig the soft dirt under. For a few tomatoes and some peppers, some garden stuff it works fine. My herb garden is in 'regular dirt' but with several bales of peat dug into it. They're doing great. If you have to dig hard dirt, get out the hose & run some water on it tonite and dig it tomorrow or the next day (don't dig 'mud', dig it before it turns back to concrete).

tooge
12-21-2010, 02:28 PM
the leaves were fine, but the blossoms fell off after turning brown. Interestingly, they actually reblossomed in september but I pulled them all off. I'm wondering about blossom rot or something.

tooge
12-21-2010, 02:29 PM
thanks for the info MO. I'm gonna look into the pruning thing

vailpass
12-21-2010, 02:32 PM
super easy once you get a box built and put you soil in it.

USDA hardiness zones
http://www.usna.usda.gov/Hardzone/ushzmap.html

When you buy plants/seeds most of the time it gives what zones and when to plant.

Sweet. Thanks man.
*edit* shit I live in a hot zone.

BigOlChiefsfan
12-21-2010, 02:33 PM
Re: Orchard - prune in Jan/Feb, give 'em some stuff to fight scale (a parasite - ask your local garden center) and try to lure in some bees when the trees are in bloom. Be prepared to lose about half your apple & apricot crops around here due to freeze in bloomtime. I grow Japanese plums & cherries because they seem so hardy. And blackberries.

vailpass
12-21-2010, 02:33 PM
Yep, I use raised beds. Mine are mostly peat moss and some garden soil (my dirt was not great either) I built the boxes fairly shallow using fence slats and just let the worms come dig the soft dirt under. For a few tomatoes and some peppers, some garden stuff it works fine. My herb garden is in 'regular dirt' but with several bales of peat dug into it. They're doing great. If you have to dig hard dirt, get out the hose & run some water on it tonite and dig it tomorrow or the next day (don't dig 'mud', dig it before it turns back to concrete).

Thanks BOC. When you say 'garden soil' do you mean soil you dug yourself or soil you bought in a bag?

BigOlChiefsfan
12-21-2010, 02:36 PM
Either one will work - bagged topsoil + bales of peat moss is probably easiest if you're making 'box gardens' instead of growing raised beds on the ground. The bagged stuff has usually been sterilized to prevent some virus', etc...if you're using raised beds in the ground, just add a lot of peat moss. Then add some more peat moss.

vailpass
12-21-2010, 02:37 PM
Either one will work - bagged topsoil + bales of peat moss is probably easiest if you're making 'box gardens' instead of growing raised beds on the ground. The bagged stuff has usually been sterilized to prevent some virus', etc...if you're using raised beds in the ground, just add a lot of peat moss. Then add some more peat moss.

Pete moss on the bottom then soil on top or mix the two together?

Bill Parcells
12-21-2010, 02:39 PM
Ok, I got one for ya.
Not as much garddening as , uh, orcharding?
I have some apple trees, some peach trees, some nectarine trees, and some plum trees I planted over three or four years. The youngest are the apples and they are about 3 years since planted. I get tons of blossoms on all the trees most years, but then shit goes haywire. For example, this year, only about 10 blossoms total on peach and nectarine trees, all fell off. A shit load of blossoms on the apple trees, they all turned brown and fell off. I got 1, thats ONE, effin apple. The plums seem to blossom every year, then I get tons of little plums the size of maybe three bbs, then they start to wither up and fall off. What gives?

The Apple trees probably have rust (a fungus that is very difficult to treat) you can't spray it because you would have to spray it like 9 times, 3 before bud break, 3 during bud break, and 3 after bud break. and if you miss just one piece all that work is for nothing.

I have had moderate success with trunk injection in March.

BigOlChiefsfan
12-21-2010, 02:44 PM
Mix 'em. What I do is lay a tarp down, cut open a bale of peat and bust it up on the tarp. Shovel out the grass in the bed and stack it (green side down!) for next years mix, then add some of the soil starting about 3-4 inches down to my peat. Get your kids to help with the next part. Lift one corner of the tarp and walk in towards the center until the dirt/peat start to mix. Lay the tarp down, go to the next corner and repeat. You can also add pearlite (which is basicaly baked mica, it's a very light 'expanded' rock that will not weigh much and will hold water well). It's spendy, but if you're growing in boxes or containers it's a good idea, it solves 2 problems you'll be cranky about otherwise.
I plant a large pot intensively. One tomato, several lettuce plants and several onion sets, and a few radishes. As I pull something out, I plant something else in with. Go hit the library, there's a ton of books on container gardening. When I lived on the plaza, I joined the KCMO community garden, that might be a good idea for you to show you kids as well. I grew tons of veggies in that little garden. Grew a few tomatoes on the balcony, too. Bought a big bag of grow mix, cut 2 X's in the top and poked a small hole in the bottom. Put 2 patio-sized tomatoes in the X's and watered carefully. Worked like a charm.

cabletech94
12-21-2010, 02:47 PM
Anybody have experience with box gardening? Here in the Valley of the Sun the soil isn't worth a shit even if you could get a shovel in the hard-as-rock ground.
I'll have to figure out what will grow in this climate but I would very much like to grow a few fresh veggies to show my kids what a garden is.

i tried a new method last year. just completely tried something to see if it'd work.
i'm a huge tomato guy. went to the local nursery where they sell mushroom compost my the truckload. brought 1 scoop to the garden. i tilled 3 rows in the garden, then shoveled the compost on top in 3 rows, leaving 3 large hills. i had more 'maters than i ever had using cow manure.

i also have to keep in mind that this garden has only been used 2 years prior, and was mostly clay. i'm gonna try the mush comp again, and i'm gonna buy 3 times as much.

i also tried plum roma this past spring. that's what's going in the most (huge salsa guy).

HemiEd
12-21-2010, 02:47 PM
Anybody have experience with box gardening? Here in the Valley of the Sun the soil isn't worth a shit even if you could get a shovel in the hard-as-rock ground.
I'll have to figure out what will grow in this climate but I would very much like to grow a few fresh veggies to show my kids what a garden is.

I have a problem as well, so many trees, that I don't have enough consistent sun anywhere in our yard. Front or back.

vailpass
12-21-2010, 02:50 PM
Mix 'em. What I do is lay a tarp down, cut open a bale of peat and bust it up on the tarp. Shovel out the grass in the bed and stack it (green side down!) for next years mix, then add some of the soil starting about 3-4 inches down to my peat. Get your kids to help with the next part. Lift one corner of the tarp and walk in towards the center until the dirt/peat start to mix. Lay the tarp down, go to the next corner and repeat. You can also add pearlite (which is basicaly baked mica, it's a very light 'expanded' rock that will not weigh much and will hold water well). It's spendy, but if you're growing in boxes or containers it's a good idea, it solves 2 problems you'll be cranky about otherwise.
I plant a large pot intensively. One tomato, several lettuce plants and several onion sets, and a few radishes. As I pull something out, I plant something else in with. Go hit the library, there's a ton of books on container gardening. When I lived on the plaza, I joined the KCMO community garden, that might be a good idea for you to show you kids as well. I grew tons of veggies in that little garden. Grew a few tomatoes on the balcony, too. Bought a big bag of grow mix, cut 2 X's in the top and poked a small hole in the bottom. Put 2 patio-sized tomatoes in the X's and watered carefully. Worked like a charm.

Great advice, thanks for taking the time. LOL at growing right of out of the grow mix bag.

vailpass
12-21-2010, 02:51 PM
I have a problem as well, so many trees, that I don't have enough consistent sun anywhere in our yard. Front or back.

I'll trade you some sun for some rain.

vailpass
12-21-2010, 02:53 PM
i tried a new method last year. just completely tried something to see if it'd work.
i'm a huge tomato guy. went to the local nursery where they sell mushroom compost my the truckload. brought 1 scoop to the garden. i tilled 3 rows in the garden, then shoveled the compost on top in 3 rows, leaving 3 large hills. i had more 'maters than i ever had using cow manure.

i also have to keep in mind that this garden has only been used 2 years prior, and was mostly clay. i'm gonna try the mush comp again, and i'm gonna buy 3 times as much.

i also tried plum roma this past spring. that's what's going in the most (huge salsa guy).

A salsa garden is one of the things I want to plant. Never heard of mushroom compost. Out here they are pretty garden-challenged since nothing grows unless it has thorns on it but I'll look for it.

HemiEd
12-21-2010, 02:57 PM
I'll trade you some sun for some rain.

Deal! We get plenty of rain and you have plenty of sun.


On the apple tree subject, I have two. One old mature tree that was here when we moved in 12 years ago, and one I planted 6 years ago.

This year, both were loaded with blossoms. Then we had a late frost, and zero apples off of the old tree, zip, none.

The young tree had a lot of apples.
These trees are very close to each other, as the limbs can even touch.
I thought it was pretty strange.

BigOlChiefsfan
12-21-2010, 03:24 PM
One thing about tomatoes/eggplant/peppers/potatoes. They're all members of the 'nightshade' family, and they leave some 'wilt' disease in the ground where they've grown. Never compost their stems or leaves, and I try really hard to rotate crops out of last years 'nightshade' patch into fresh soil every year. Otherwise after a few really great tomato seasons your plants will start turning brown 'for no reason' and you'll feel like a bad gardener. I try to let some of the garden lay fallow (rest) or I grow peas or beans w/innoculant, they fix nitrogen in the soil - or I grow 'green manure' and rototill it under after it's mostly grown - repeat. I plant tomato/pepper/potato crop in that fresh dirt the following year. OR I rotate nightshades w/corn and add nitrogen (corns a hog). Anyway...mushroom compost is good stuff, I don't see it around here often. Be aware that some types of soil amendments are likely to need nitrogen to break down - sawdust or wood chips for instance - so they might steal enough nitrogen from the garden to slow your plants down. Your manure tea or miracle grow will fix that, for the most part. Or if you have time, mix manure or bloodmeal w/your sawdust and let it break down before tilling it in.

I'm going to quit hogging the discussion. Y'all have fun!

MOhillbilly
12-21-2010, 03:54 PM
nightshades are bad news for dogs.


my grandpa would rotate back to the same spot every 3-4 years. like BOCF beans,beans,beans, and compost.

winter rye is a good way to loam your ground and add nitrogen during the winter. its also good to let it go in the spring summer for your fallow plots. Adds cover.
all you have to do is throw it down on tilled soil late fall.

NewChief
12-21-2010, 04:10 PM
We're doing some chickens this year. No garden, though. We travel too much during the summer, and it puts too much pressure on us when we're back in town to have to work work work on it.

KC_Lee
12-21-2010, 05:40 PM
One thing about tomatoes/eggplant/peppers/potatoes. They're all members of the 'nightshade' family, and they leave some 'wilt' disease in the ground where they've grown. Never compost their stems or leaves, and I try really hard to rotate crops out of last years 'nightshade' patch into fresh soil every year. Otherwise after a few really great tomato seasons your plants will start turning brown 'for no reason' and you'll feel like a bad gardener.

Wow I did not think about that. Thanks for the good advice. :thumb:

tmax63
12-21-2010, 06:13 PM
I built momma a 12x16 greenhouse this fall. Spaded the gravel they call dirt out here and added a full 8' pickup bed of compost and tilled it in. Got a coffee can full of fertilizer from the Coop from bags breaking open so it's probably an interesting mix. Not expecting alot this first year but I plan on doing a soil test at some point next year to see where it stands.

BigOlChiefsfan
12-21-2010, 07:18 PM
winter rye is a good way to loam your ground and add nitrogen during the winter. its also good to let it go in the spring summer for your fallow plots. Adds cover. all you have to do is throw it down on tilled soil late fall.

For every 6 inches of rye plant above ground, there's like 800 miles of rye roots under the soil. Not really that extreme, but you get the idea. Don't pay much attention to what your winter rye looks like, it's doing it's job of holding your soil where it belongs, and those roots are the same thing as hauling in that amount of leaves or straw. Good stuff, esp. in our part of the world. I usually kept a good part of my bigger garden growning kale, spinach, chinese veggies, daikon radish, cabbage and other cold-hardy stuff, but what wasn't producing food was growing rye or being 'sheet composted' (where you pile layers of materials and let them rot down in place instead of piling compost and hauling it in later. Materials like crumbled leaves and manure)

KC native
12-21-2010, 07:34 PM
Great advice, thanks for taking the time. LOL at growing right of out of the grow mix bag.

If you're doing boxes just buy Fox Farm bagged soil. It's expensive but has everything you need without making a mess

FoxFarm Original Planting Mix
Don’t Treat Your Soil Like Dirt!®
The very best for your soil! Our premium organic planting mix is designed to be worked into the soil every time you plant. It’s got everything you need to get your garden off to a good start: earthworm castings, bat guano, Norwegian kelp meal, composted forest humus, sphagnum peat moss, and more. We carefully adjust the pH to make sure that your plants can take up the nutrients they need. Our special mix also helps hold moisture in the soil, which keeps plants hydrated and growing.

Garden tip: If you’re digging a new garden, work in a 3-6 inch layer of FoxFarm Original Planting Mix, and for established gardens, top dress with a 3-inch layer. You can even revive your lawn with our Original Planting Mix—just aerate or spike the lawn, spread a thin layer of planting mix and our Peace of Mind® Premium Lawn Fertilizer across the grass, and work in with a rake and water.

http://www.foxfarmfertilizer.com/images/product_PLANTINGMIX.jpg

cdcox
12-21-2010, 07:40 PM
We lost a tree this year and I thought that it finally opened up a sunny place to grow tomatoes. Unfortunately, I read that tomatoes need at least 7 hours of sunlight per day. I still don't have a place that will get that much sun. :sulk:

KS Smitty
12-21-2010, 08:23 PM
There is a lot of good info here. Crop rotation is essential IMO, not composting dead plants, soil amendments, and composting ideas including the tea are also spot on.

Not sure what varieties do well in your area? Check you local extension website. Those of us in NE KS go to http://www.ksre.k-state.edu/DesktopDefault.aspx There is tons of info including recommended varieities tested in this area.

I like to use either newspaper or wheat straw as mulch, drip irrigation (from a soaker hose) to reduce fungus and bacteria and I like to "plant" gallon milk jugs with holes poked in them next to my maters and peppers for easy liquid fertilizer application as well as watering.

My favorite site for pepper seeds is Pepper Joe's http://www.pepperjoe.com . He has the best seeds and many different types of peppers. He has expanded to include more sweet peppers available. Nearly 100% germination from seeds I've got from him. Big Bertha, Bell Boy and King Arthur are good bells, Mucho Nacho are a great jalapeno. Sweet Banana and Garden Salsa are both great varieties to use in salsa. Ghost Pepper is probably the hottest I've tried.

Tomatoes include Jetstar, Christa, Amelia and Florida 91 have been excellent "regular" tomatoes. I like the Supersweet 100's for a cherry and Super Marzano are excellent Romas. Heirlooms (which can be irregular in shape and size and more prone to diseases and blight) include Purple Cherokee, Granny Smith, and Black Krim.

Onions: Candy and Texas 1015 seem to do the best around here.

Taters: Yukon Gold, Lasoda Red, and Superior all seem to do well.

There are "sister" plantings you can do, for example plant corn beans and squash together and they all help each other by providing nutrients the others need. Also you can plant insect deterring plants next to your maters, peppers and other edibles. These include some types of herbs as well as the ever stinky marigold. Some plants will deter critters also but if you have deer, coon or other large varmints just plant extra in addition to other methods.

My favorite place to get plants and supplies is where I work http://www.eastsideandwestsidemarkets.com/ . We have folks from around NE KS come to get their bedding plants, seeds and garden supplies. In addition most of our plants are started and grown locally so they are already hardened off and ready to go. Also we keep our plants outside (covering madly during frosts) so they are ready for your garden.

It sounds like a lot of you guys have it dialed in, for those of you that don't, I seriously recommend your local extension service, they can do soil tests for you as well as tell you what is best for your location.

Happy gardening all!

MOhillbilly
12-22-2010, 07:24 AM
We lost a tree this year and I thought that it finally opened up a sunny place to grow tomatoes. Unfortunately, I read that tomatoes need at least 7 hours of sunlight per day. I still don't have a place that will get that much sun. :sulk:


you can burn em up fast with that much direct sunlight in july & august.

if you have a spot that gets sunshine in the morning put them in the ground.
:thumb:

MOhillbilly
12-22-2010, 07:31 AM
guy showed me last year that he just runs a furrow, sticks his taters in, and covers them.
we always dug a trench, planted, then row hipped. lotta work.

his taters turned out just fine.

Alton deFlat
12-22-2010, 07:39 AM
New house, new yard, new garden this year for me. While it's even a new state, it's only about 30 miles from my old place. I'll probably get started next month starting my slower germinating and growing plants indoors (parsley, eggplant, etc). I'll start tomatoes, peppers, basil, etc about 6-8 weeks before I set them outside. For me, that's about mid April.

I'll plant mostly open pollinated varieties of tomatoes, with a few hybrids scattered in. A mix of OP and hybrid peppers and mostly open pollinated eggplant. Probably no corn, as my space will be somewhat limited. I took down some old gnarly looking overgrown cedar trees to make room for my garden. Hopefully it will work out OK.

MOhillbilly
12-22-2010, 07:44 AM
do you run lights?

Alton deFlat
12-22-2010, 07:56 AM
do you run lights?

Yep, I have several four foot florescent fixtures. I'll have them on a timer to run about 15-16 hours a day.

MOhillbilly
12-22-2010, 07:58 AM
Yep, I have several four foot florescent fixtures. I'll have them on a timer to run about 15-16 hours a day.

i have everything but the bulbs. suggestions?

Alton deFlat
12-22-2010, 08:13 AM
i have everything but the bulbs. suggestions?

If you already have the fixtures, go to your local hardware / Lowe's / Home Depot or even Walmart and get the ones you need. I've read to put one warm white and one cool white bulb in each fixture, but I've never done that. Many places have a display of how bright the bulb is. I usually go with the one that looks brightest. You can generally get them pretty cheap and they last for several years. I set my my timer to come on at 7 am and shut off at 11 pm. You might also check the fixture, to see if you need a T8 or a T12 bulb. It depends on the ballast in the fixture.

excessive
12-22-2010, 08:16 AM
This is the light I use: 400w induction lamp. It's pricey but the pay back is sweet.

http://www.inda-gro.com/images/400.2.png

Alton deFlat
12-22-2010, 08:18 AM
i have everything but the bulbs. suggestions?

Oh, and after the seeds have germinated, keep the light only a few inches above the seedlings. I had my light fixtures on a small chain, and would shorten the chain to raise the fixture as the plants grew. Keeping the seedling close to the light, helps prevent them from getting too leggy.

Alton deFlat
12-22-2010, 08:19 AM
This is the light I use: 400w induction lamp. It's pricey but the pay back is sweet.

http://www.inda-gro.com/images/400.2.png

That's sweet.

excessive
12-22-2010, 08:24 AM
full spectrum, 6500k cfls work well too. Use a brooder fixture w/ a two way socket. A 26w would be okay for the bulb, as seedlings don't need much light.
40w if you want to grow bigger.

penguinz
12-22-2010, 08:26 AM
i have everything but the bulbs. suggestions?I use just regular shop type florescent lights and have always had good luck. No need to get the expensive grow lights.

MOhillbilly
12-22-2010, 09:48 AM
im gonna pull the trigger and get this.
Tomato Growers Seed Special #1064 (Assortment) $17.95
An outstanding assortment of our best early season, mid-season, beefsteak, yellow, cherry, and paste varieties chosen for their excellent flavor and superior performance. Enough seeds to grow bushels and bushels of luscious tomatoes. Includes one packet each of: Early Girl VFF Hybrid, First Prize VFFNT Hybrid, Beefmaster VFN Hybrid, Cherry VFT Hybrid, Sweet Million FNT Hybrid, Viva Italia VFFNA Hybrid.
http://www.tomatogrowers.com/collection.htm

KC_Lee
12-22-2010, 10:33 AM
Ok here's a strange question.

My house was hit by the May floods here in Nashville. Most of my yard was under water for 6 days and my house had 4 inches of water in it.

When I was able to get into my house the floor was covered in, among other things, dead worms. All across my yards we dead worms.

So, should I be concerned about the earthworm population in my ground this year?

Like I said, strange question but one that has been on my mind.

MOhillbilly
12-22-2010, 01:21 PM
http://www.parkseed.com/gardening/PD/96619/

anyone ever use these?

penguinz
12-22-2010, 01:24 PM
http://www.parkseed.com/gardening/PD/96619/

anyone ever use these?I have used the peat pellet version and it worked well. No reason why these would not work.

KS Smitty
12-22-2010, 08:29 PM
http://www.parkseed.com/gardening/PD/96619/

anyone ever use these?

Not those specifically but I have used coir "pods" for starting seeds. They looked like they were bigger than the peat ones after soaking and germination time was maybe a day or 2 faster (compared to the previous years notes anyway) and I never had any mold on top as has occurred with peat. Also once the plants have their first true leaves I put a fan on low and keep it running 24/7, this seems to help with both mold/fungus and plants being leggy.

FWIW I have had good luck making newspaper pots and just plain old potting soil for transplanting. I like to germinate seeds in a damp paper towel in a baggie on top of the fridge and then transplant them into the pots when they have some decent roots.

Groves
12-22-2010, 09:04 PM
This thread will be my new homepage. You guys are awesome.

MOhillbilly
12-23-2010, 07:37 AM
anyone heard from dinny? i figured he would have chimed in by now.

MOhillbilly
12-23-2010, 07:39 AM
MU has extensive resource guides

http://extension.missouri.edu/stclair/Timely%20Tidbits/Vegetable%20Calendar.pdf

BigOlChiefsfan
12-23-2010, 03:50 PM
FWIW I have had good luck making newspaper pots and just plain old potting soil for transplanting. I like to germinate seeds in a damp paper towel in a baggie on top of the fridge and then transplant them into the pots when they have some decent roots.

Newspaper pots 'how-to' V1 (http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/polachic49.html)

'how to' V2 (http://www.raft.net/ideas/Newspaper%20Planting%20Pots.pdf)

(spend any money you save on more bales of peat moss)

cabletech94
12-23-2010, 03:53 PM
Ok here's a strange question.

My house was hit by the May floods here in Nashville. Most of my yard was under water for 6 days and my house had 4 inches of water in it.

When I was able to get into my house the floor was covered in, among other things, dead worms. All across my yards we dead worms.

So, should I be concerned about the earthworm population in my ground this year?

Like I said, strange question but one that has been on my mind.

you'd think if there were alot around your house (in and out), there'd still be a ton left. just thinking out loud here.

BigOlChiefsfan
12-23-2010, 04:42 PM
I don't know enough about worm ratio to really help, but I think they're measured by the ton per acre (there's a lot of hot action goes on in the top 2 feet of soil). It couldn't hurt to add compost/peat to your soil where possible and turn loose a few containers full of local yokel worms in that enriched dirt. Put your coffee grounds/salad trimmings, etc...out in your compost pile (if you don't have one, start one) and you'll soon find worms in there. Let nature do the rest. Oh yeah, stay above water level.

BigOlChiefsfan
12-24-2010, 07:57 AM
I know I keep talking up Sphagnum peat moss (http://www.peatmoss.com/pm-flfaq.php) bales, but short of having a ton of compost or leaf mold, it's the best soil amendment most of us can go buy. One thing for those of you w/bad, hard soil who want to get your kids interested in a garden...build a box of cedar (I use fence slats, cut to 4' and use the cutoff as a 'stake' in each corner) I set it where it'll get good sunshine and where i can water it w/hose or bucket. Fill it w/3 or 4 bales of sphagnum peat most and a couple of bags of builders sand (reserve a coffee can or two of sand), buy as much peat as you need, you want it full. Buy a couple of sweet potatoes now and keep them dark & dry until march or so. Then stick 3 or 4 toothpicks into each sweet potato (SP) and set one end of the SP into a jar of water. You'll start having sweet potato vines grow out of the SP. I break these off the SP and set them into a couple of recycled styrofoam cups 3/4 full of your reserved builders sand. I add water to these and set them near a window or under a 'shop light' and let the vines start putting on roots. They need a lot of water at this stage, transplant into bigger containers if you need to - these are called 'sweet potato slips'. Around here the last frost is about April 15, go plant your sweet potato slips after all danger of frost. I plant my bed in a 'diamond' pattern, about every 10 inches or so apart. No bugs around here will eat sweet potatoes, no critters seem to bother 'em, frost or flood/rot is about the only problems I remember ever having. They're a tropical root, so sun/heat are their friend. Dig them up in the fall before frost, lay them on a tarp spread out on the lawn in the sun. Let your kids 'rotate' them every few hours and 'cure' them (dry the dirt, really). Brush 'em clean if you like, we always peeled ours when I was a kid but there's probably a way to wash them clean - not part of my repertoire.
I store them where air can circulate around 'em. Kids seem to really like growing these from slips, and they're pretty much guaranteed to grow if you keep them from getting cold, flooded. Water when you think about it. The vines are fairly attractive, and I know some people eat the young leaves in salad. Not me.
You won't really 'save money' because the bed costs more than buying SP the week after Thanksgiving for $.20/lb @ walmart, but it's money well spent if your kids want a success. Next year build a new box, use your old one to grow 3 pumpkin seeds, and rotate 'em after that.. When I was a kid we didn't have bales of peat, we went into the woods and found rotten logs or old leaf piles and used 'compost' mixed w/creek sand. Worked pretty well so if you have more time than money, get with it.

MOhillbilly
12-28-2010, 09:57 AM
AHHHHH!! brain overload.....

puttin these here so i remember come ordering time.

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-6536-eight-ball-f1.aspx

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-7659-sunburst-f1.aspx

http://www.parkseed.com/gardening/PD/5527/

http://www.parkseed.com/gardening/PD/5093/

http://www.burpee.com/vegetables/cabbages/chinese-cabbage-orient-express-prod000624.html?catId=2020&trail=

KC_Lee
12-28-2010, 08:10 PM
Anybody grown blueberry bushes? I want to put some in next to my house but I have no idea how much sun or heat they can take.

MOhillbilly
12-29-2010, 08:40 AM
i know they make three varaties. Early,mid,late, so you can harvest from spring to late fall.

Oldtimer my Grandpa taught has some and he uses a hard hose that has little plastic jets to irrigate individual plants.
Seems like his and the pick your own places ive been to had em in full sunlight.
Theres a local here who sells bushes for 10$ a bucket in spring. Craigslist, local pick your own, or CSA farms in your area would be a good place to start.



Blueberry pancakes rule.

MOhillbilly
12-29-2010, 09:27 AM
thoughts about aas winners.

id like to do some flower beds/pots, annuals vs perennials.

nohomo.

Groves
01-12-2011, 10:01 PM
I know people grow all kinds of lettuce. Does it ever work to grow some type of romaine here in Missouri? Tricks? Tips?

MOhillbilly
01-13-2011, 07:48 AM
lettuce is like a weed & grows anywhere. best in the shade. put it in early.

Black seeded simpson is what i like.

Groves
02-07-2011, 11:19 AM
What should I be doing in the next month for a successful garden? I assume things like ordering seeds and planning locations.

MOhillbilly
02-07-2011, 11:23 AM
yes -dry grin- You gonna do taters/cabbage?

Groves
02-07-2011, 11:32 AM
I've never done either. Very interested in taters. Cabbage? Maybe.

MOhillbilly
02-07-2011, 01:33 PM
somo had seeds out but nothing that interested me...yet. When i talked to em they said they should have bulbs & seed taters with in the week.
Ill grab you some and swing em by, show you the deal.

You gotta, gotta, gotta, come out this spring,you can check shit out & ill run ya up to waynes and we can pick a true master gardeners/man of the earths brain.

Groves
02-07-2011, 02:10 PM
You gotta, gotta, gotta, come out this spring,you can check shit out & ill run ya up to waynes and we can pick a true master gardeners/man of the earths brain.

Dude, you just gotta gotta check your messages. I keep askin to come check out the place, but you lacka da responsa.

Need some learnin. Springs almost here. Not that it looks that way outside. I need it to hold off another month anyway for the syrup.

MOhillbilly
02-07-2011, 02:34 PM
Weekend after next. If that doesnt work let me know. Deal.

HonestChieffan
02-07-2011, 04:44 PM
Anybody grown blueberry bushes? I want to put some in next to my house but I have no idea how much sun or heat they can take.

I have 4. They have produced more blueberries than we can eat, we freeze all we need and give away the balance. They sit in a wide open sunny spot and it gets hotter than sin here in summer. We have 3 varieties so only two bushes are ready to pick at one time. If all 4 were it would be a lot of picking.

Bird nets are a must or birds and deer will clean you out.

Got mine from Miller. They have a website.

BigOlChiefsfan
02-07-2011, 05:42 PM
Re: Lettuce. Don't plant it ALL AT ONCE. Plant some today, some next week and more the week after that. Otherwise you wind up w/18 bushels of lettuce one weekend and no danged lettuce to eat the following weekend.

KS Smitty
02-07-2011, 08:22 PM
Blueberries: here in NE KS you really need to amend you soil. Most folks like to use pine needles as an amendment but peat will work also.

MO: Many flowers that are designated annuals can reseed on their own and come back from those seeds year after year. A few that I know from personal experience are petunias, nicotiana, verbena and salvia. Are you wanting a particular color, size, aroma? IMO if you're planting in pots annuals are the way to go since periennials may not survive some winters in pots.

Lettuce: I agree that black seeded simpson is a great leaf lettuce and to space your plantings. Head lettuces may have a hard time reaching full size before the weather gets too hot, plant it early.

It's still pretty early here to start many seeds for transplanting, mid-March is a pretty accurate planting time for taters followed by cole crops (cabbage, brocolli, cauliflower, lettuces, chard). I plan on starting seeds for broc, cabbage and cauliflower here in a week or so.

We have received our 2011 seeds at work including some USDA organic seeds from High Mowing. This is new for us, they have a few varieties of carrots and lettuce that I may try, they are more expensive than non-organic seeds so if I can locate them elsewhere for cheaper I may go that route.

Buehler445
02-07-2011, 08:52 PM
Blueberries: here in NE KS you really need to amend you soil. Most folks like to use pine needles as an amendment but peat will work also.



Do you have Alkali soil?

Boon
02-07-2011, 09:52 PM
I always buy what the local retailers carry as far as tomato plants, onion bulbs, seed taters, etc. I try to get taters, onions, peas, radishes, and spinach in early (St Patty's day). I try to make several plantings of the spinach and radishes to have it come on at different times. When temps rise I put out beans, maters, corn, squash, okra, etc. I like to put this in around first of May. Put on cow manure two years ago and tilled it in (fall). Would like to do that again this fall. I love the fresh veggies and have cabin fever bad!

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 08:30 AM
Oh man, oh man,oh man. who else has got the itch? When the weather got nice last week i damn near sowed seed....

boogblaster
02-23-2011, 09:45 AM
Garden'n might be a littl' more work this year my ole tiller-man just died this week .....

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 09:54 AM
Garden'n might be a littl' more work this year my ole tiller-man just died this week .....

Craigslist is your friend.

kindra68
02-23-2011, 09:59 AM
what i'm startin from seeds
(and they should be in today! yay!)
Tomato, Italian Ice Hybrid
Tomato, Black Pearl Hybrid
Tomato, Yellow Pear
Tomato, Brandywine Pink Organic
Tomato, Honeybunch
Tomato, Sunny Boy Hybrid
Tomato, Mr. Stripey
Tomato, Roma Vf
Squash, Summer Green Tiger Zucchini Hybrid
Squash, Summer, Early Prolific Straightneck
Pepper, Pepperoncini
Onion, Parade

tooge
02-23-2011, 10:14 AM
Three weeks till taters onions and peas. Bout 6 weeks till beets, spinach. That little warm up was a bit of a tease.

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 10:20 AM
Three weeks till taters onions and peas. Bout 6 weeks till beets, spinach. That little warm up was a bit of a tease.

you presoak your beets?

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 10:22 AM
what i'm startin from seeds
(and they should be in today! yay!)
Tomato, Italian Ice Hybrid
Tomato, Black Pearl Hybrid
Tomato, Yellow Pear
Tomato, Brandywine Pink Organic
Tomato, Honeybunch
Tomato, Sunny Boy Hybrid
Tomato, Mr. Stripey
Tomato, Roma Vf
Squash, Summer Green Tiger Zucchini Hybrid
Squash, Summer, Early Prolific Straightneck
Pepper, Pepperoncini
Onion, Parade

nice mix of maters. how many you gonna put out?

Groves
02-23-2011, 10:36 AM
Garden'n might be a littl' more work this year my ole tiller-man just died this week .....

His estate auction is your friend, too.

Buehler445
02-23-2011, 10:38 AM
Oh man, oh man,oh man. who else has got the itch? When the weather got nice last week i damn near sowed seed....

We still have frost in the ground in the mornings.

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 10:42 AM
We still have frost in the ground in the mornings.

was gonna till sunday and decided to turn a spade first. the ground was soupy about 2in down.

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 10:46 AM
His estate auction is your friend, too.

this.

was readin on that corn seed. 85 days,direct sun. said to keep it cool for 48 hours after pickin and its supposed to be 4x sweeter than off the stalk. excellent for freezing.

tooge
02-23-2011, 10:48 AM
you presoak your beets?

I haven't. Am I supposed to? I've grown them in years past and the only trouble I've had is with the rabbits.

Hydrae
02-23-2011, 10:50 AM
One of the fun things about living here in Central Texas, I have a few things in the ground already! We did get a freeze after I put them in and I have yet to see the carrots and onions sprout but the beets and cilantro are out in the open and growing now! These things should be ready to harvest in late March when I want to put everything else in. :thumb:

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 11:01 AM
I haven't. Am I supposed to? I've grown them in years past and the only trouble I've had is with the rabbits.

i hate beets, only doin em cause a lady at work wants some. If you soak em they germinate faster.

pee around the edge of your garden to keep rabbits and deer away.

cabletech94
02-23-2011, 12:00 PM
i hate beets, only doin em cause a lady at work wants some. If you soak em they germinate faster.

pee around the edge of your garden to keep rabbits and deer away.

this just made my day. thanks!!!ROFL

DMAC
02-23-2011, 12:19 PM
Ideas for cheap fencing to keep my dog out?

I'm expanding this year and I have fencing but it was pretty pricey for the small area. Don't really want to buy more of the same shit...

Buehler445
02-23-2011, 12:29 PM
Ideas for cheap fencing to keep my dog out?

I'm expanding this year and I have fencing but it was pretty pricey for the small area. Don't really want to buy more of the same shit...

Hog panels and posts.
Posted via Mobile Device

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 12:56 PM
Ideas for cheap fencing to keep my dog out?

I'm expanding this year and I have fencing but it was pretty pricey for the small area. Don't really want to buy more of the same shit...

how big and or how retarded is said dog?

DeezNutz
02-23-2011, 12:57 PM
T-posts and field fence.

DMAC
02-23-2011, 12:59 PM
how big and or how retarded is said dog?

:LOL:

Probably 60 pounds and is fairly retarded.

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 01:06 PM
if you want it to last and be able to reuse it what the guys listed is a good option. Can get pricey though. Check out SOMO/Race on w. kearney for price....if your not to scared of northenders.

DMAC
02-23-2011, 01:11 PM
if you want it to last and be able to reuse it what the guys listed is a good option. Can get pricey though. Check out SOMO/Race on w. kearney for price....if your not to scared of northenders.

Yeah, that is a pricey option. Especially for good quality.

DMAC
02-23-2011, 01:11 PM
...if your not to scared of northenders.

I'll just stay away from Dennys.

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 01:18 PM
I'll just stay away from Dennys.

they closed it down after the whitepower dudes stabbed that interracial couple.

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 01:20 PM
Yeah, that is a pricey option. Especially for good quality.

chicken wire comes 4ft tall. J-clip it to the posts. roll it up after the seasons over.

or you could just shoot the dog.

BIG_DADDY
02-23-2011, 02:03 PM
If I am going to do it this year I have to get a greenhouse. I don't know shit about value in that area.

DMAC
02-23-2011, 02:06 PM
chicken wire comes 4ft tall. J-clip it to the posts. roll it up after the seasons over.

or you could just shoot the dog.

We dont shoot dogs and sell their fur for crack money here on the south side...

We pet them.

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 02:09 PM
If I am going to do it this year I have to get a greenhouse. I don't know shit about value in that area.

you can build one outta PVC and plastic for about 200$. give me a minute and ill see what i can find.

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 02:10 PM
We dont shoot dogs and sell their fur for crack money here on the south side...

We pet them.

northenders use hammers.

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 02:14 PM
BD guy i bought some flowers off of lastyear had one identical to these plans. Said it ran him right around 200$.
http://www.pvcplans.com/ArchGrnHouse.pdf

http://www.pvcplans.com/pvc-greenhouse.htm

DMAC
02-23-2011, 02:15 PM
you can build one outta PVC and plastic for about 200$. give me a minute and ill see what i can find.

Similar to this?

http://doorgarden.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/hoop-house-const-41.jpg

DMAC
02-23-2011, 02:15 PM
guess so

BIG_DADDY
02-23-2011, 02:16 PM
BD guy i bought some flowers off of lastyear had one identical to these plans. Said it ran him right around 200$.
http://www.pvcplans.com/ArchGrnHouse.pdf

http://www.pvcplans.com/pvc-greenhouse.htm

The big deal is keeping the deer out. I have tons of deer up there.

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 02:20 PM
The big deal is keeping the deer out. I have tons of deer up there.

bait some corn with strychnine. :evil:

hotwire around the garden. your boys big enough now. the fence charger would be the biggest expense and you could probably get one of those for less than $100 easy.

tooge
02-23-2011, 02:24 PM
BD, if you have a tree nearby, I can hang my tree stand there by your garden. You wont see shit for deer.

BIG_DADDY
02-23-2011, 02:31 PM
bait some corn with strychnine. :evil:

hotwire around the garden. your boys big enough now. the fence charger would be the biggest expense and you could probably get one of those for less than $100 easy.

I think I will just wait one more year and get a glass greenhouse. There are so many organic farmers there everything is dirt cheap. I was just going to do it for my boy but he probably still a year out from really getting into it.

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 02:33 PM
I think I will just wait one more year and get a glass greenhouse. There are so many organic farmers there everything is dirt cheap. I was just going to do it for my boy but he probably still a year out from really getting into it.

pheww! big spender.:p

once he figures out its work he will hate it. When he gets older he will have a skill set few have.

BIG_DADDY
02-23-2011, 02:49 PM
pheww! big spender.:p

once he figures out its work he will hate it. When he gets older he will have a skill set few have.

Somebody was selling a really nice one for $600 with the door and fans and all. Maybe I will do a small herb garden this year just to break him in on it and use it in cooking.

Boon
02-23-2011, 06:23 PM
Itching to get in the garden.
15-20 days until early planting.
Checked the ground out over the weekend
and things were wet from 12" snow melt.
Coming real soon though.

MOhillbilly
02-28-2011, 10:49 AM
Whatcha got started? tomatos,cabage,cauliflower, ect?

running up on it now.

Alton deFlat
02-28-2011, 10:52 AM
Indoors I have parsley, eggplant, peppers, and some basil started. The basil is just now starting to germinate.

MOhillbilly
02-28-2011, 10:53 AM
what kinda peppers?

Alton deFlat
03-01-2011, 07:24 AM
what kinda peppers?

I started a couple varieties of sweet peppers. One is an Italian bell type, Quadrato D'Asti Rosso, and the other is another sweet pepper called Jimmy Nardello's. It's an elongated variety.

http://sustainableseedco.com/images/D/JimmyNardello3.jpg

MOhillbilly
03-01-2011, 07:46 AM
Tuned up the equipment lastnight. Have 4 tomato varaties percolatin & some okra so far. Have chinese, red & white cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, 4 types of onions, 2 types of taters, early spinach, lettuce (head and leaf), at the ready.
EDIT- LEFT OUT THE EARLY SUNGLOW CORN.
Goin to buy baby chicks & maybe a few hens this weekend. Eyeballin acouple hogs.

Groves
03-01-2011, 03:12 PM
I've never started a seed in my life. I know what water is, and I'm a good speller. That should help when I'm at the store buying what you gents suggest.

What's the best way to get things going early? I assume starting plants inside and transfer them outside later. What do I need? Grow lights? potting soil? those plastic seedling trays? Please say I need a 56inch television, cause I don't have one of those yet either.

MOhillbilly
03-01-2011, 03:26 PM
wal-mart has jiffy peat pots, 38 hole for around 12$. Seeds from 20c & up. Dont need grow lights a sunny warm spot will get you started. Early varaties. potting soils around 9$, top soils around 1.29$ , peat moss is just under 9 for 2.2 cu ft.





You need to figure out what youre gonna do with your ground.

Groves
03-01-2011, 08:35 PM
You need to figure out what youre gonna do with your ground.

Ain't that the freaking truth.

I think I'm leaning toward building some raised beds and buying ("obtaining") a load of topsoil for them. My crap soil can go jump in a lake.

MOhillbilly
03-02-2011, 07:38 AM
BOCF is the master of raised beds.

Buehler445
03-02-2011, 09:07 AM
Ain't that the freaking truth.

I think I'm leaning toward building some raised beds and buying ("obtaining") a load of topsoil for them. My crap soil can go jump in a lake.

My neighbor in town has those and he brought in some top soil, and puts conditioned manure on it, and does a fantastic job with them, but the fucking bermuda grass from the alley rooted over and is coming up in his beds. Unless you want to put a plastic liner under there (in which case you're going to have to have a fuckload of dirt), You're still going to be using your dirt.

tooge
03-02-2011, 09:47 AM
Ok, got a question. I have 6 4x8 raised beds for all the maters, peppers, and a few other things. I am thinking about turning over a big chunk of a pasture behind the house for potatos, sweet corn, onions, beets, melons, and cucumbers since all these things seem to take up so much space to get lots of them. Its an idle pasture, and has been for at least 7 years. What do I need to do, if anything, before turning the soil?

MOhillbilly
03-02-2011, 09:58 AM
Idle ground can be a god send in the control of fungus. I just turn it. stick a ph meter in. and add from there.

MOhillbilly
03-02-2011, 09:59 AM
My neighbor in town has those and he brought in some top soil, and puts conditioned manure on it, and does a fantastic job with them, but the ****ing bermuda grass from the alley rooted over and is coming up in his beds. Unless you want to put a plastic liner under there (in which case you're going to have to have a ****load of dirt), You're still going to be using your dirt.

as much clay as he has i would think plastic ontop of it would be bad for drainage.

BigOlChiefsfan
03-02-2011, 10:09 AM
Bermuda grass is a beyotch in a raised bed. Keep after it, everybody needs a hobby.

I've used landscape timbers or logs to make large raised beds, lately I'm using cedar picket fence-boards and making a lot of small beds instead of one or two big raised beds w/longer/bigger wood. I've got the space to get away with it and it lets me raise different stuff w/different needs/timetables. I've been sick for a while and I can't do what I used to do, these small beds work better for ME but ymmv. Franky, you don't need to use wood at all if you're broke. Just scalp off the sod (I haul it aside and pile it 'green side down' to rot this year, it'll be part of next years garden.) and pile in some dirt mixed w/amendments. I use these to grow sweet potatoes. They're so tough that they'll cover the top of this mounded bed pretty quick and nothing seems to eat or otherwise bother sweet potatoes.

FYI, I had a stroke in December and my memory isn't what it was. So I may defer to saying 'get this book or that book' because I frankly can't remember stuff that I could recall back in November. I like the Square Foot garden book - or the website. Square foot
(http://www.amazon.com/All-New-Square-Foot-Gardening/dp/1591862027/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1299085141&sr=8-1)

And another out of print garden book I like:
Better Vegetable Gardens the Chinese Way: Peter Chan's Raised-Bed System (http://www.amazon.com/Better-Vegetable-Gardens-Chinese-Way/dp/0882663887/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1299085514&sr=1-1)

Spend some time before you dig looking around at different times of the day. See where the shadows fall at 8 am, noon, 5 pm. See where there are tree roots that'll invade your raised bed. Check if your hose can reach, etc...If you just want one little raised bed for a few tomatoes (all I did last year) that's one thing, but if you're growing to feed yourself...that's a hossflesh of a different color.

Buehler445
03-02-2011, 10:21 AM
Ok, got a question. I have 6 4x8 raised beds for all the maters, peppers, and a few other things. I am thinking about turning over a big chunk of a pasture behind the house for potatos, sweet corn, onions, beets, melons, and cucumbers since all these things seem to take up so much space to get lots of them. Its an idle pasture, and has been for at least 7 years. What do I need to do, if anything, before turning the soil?

Depends on the type of weed pressure there. As soon as it greens up, I'd nuke everything with some glyphosate, 2-4d, and dicamba before I turned it up. The prairie grasses here are a son of a bitch to kill. Yours out east might be easier, but if you dead them before you turn it over, you might have good luck.

If the dirt is hard, your tiller might not go through it. You may have to take a spade and break it loose. It's one hell of a lot of work. And if your ground is hard, it is best to do it in the winter and water the shit out of it because the freezing/thawing will really mellow out the soil.

If you have really tall residue, you might mow it first. I don't think I'd burn it unless it is REALLY thick. The organic matter will do you some good, but it will break down faster and give you what you need if it is in smaller pieces.

Like I said, your soil conditions out there are WAY different than here, so it may not be applicable at all, but that's what we had to do.

as much clay as he has i would think plastic ontop of it would be bad for drainage.

IDK. The point I was trying to make is that raised beds don't automatically solve soil problems.

I bought some range tubs that they put minerals in for cows, cut drainage holes, filled it with soil and grew a cucumber in it. If he just wants some light gardening, that might be a good alternative.

Buehler445
03-02-2011, 10:22 AM
Bermuda grass is a beyotch in a raised bed. Keep after it, everybody needs a hobby.

I've used landscape timbers or logs to make large raised beds, lately I'm using cedar picket fence-boards and making a lot of small beds instead of one or two big raised beds w/longer/bigger wood. I've got the space to get away with it and it lets me raise different stuff w/different needs/timetables. I've been sick for a while and I can't do what I used to do, these small beds work better for ME but ymmv. Franky, you don't need to use wood at all if you're broke. Just scalp off the sod (I haul it aside and pile it 'green side down' to rot this year, it'll be part of next years garden.) and pile in some dirt mixed w/amendments. I use these to grow sweet potatoes. They're so tough that they'll cover the top of this mounded bed pretty quick and nothing seems to eat or otherwise bother sweet potatoes.

FYI, I had a stroke in December and my memory isn't what it was. So I may defer to saying 'get this book or that book' because I frankly can't remember stuff that I could recall back in November. I like the Square Foot garden book - or the website. Square foot
(http://www.amazon.com/All-New-Square-Foot-Gardening/dp/1591862027/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1299085141&sr=8-1)

And another out of print garden book I like:
Better Vegetable Gardens the Chinese Way: Peter Chan's Raised-Bed System (http://www.amazon.com/Better-Vegetable-Gardens-Chinese-Way/dp/0882663887/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1299085514&sr=1-1)

Spend some time before you dig looking around at different times of the day. See where the shadows fall at 8 am, noon, 5 pm. See where there are tree roots that'll invade your raised bed. Check if your hose can reach, etc...If you just want one little raised bed for a few tomatoes (all I did last year) that's one thing, but if you're growing to feed yourself...that's a hossflesh of a different color.

Shit dude. Sorry to hear about your stroke. What do you treat your bermuda with?

BigOlChiefsfan
03-02-2011, 10:30 AM
I just pull it. And chop it and keep after it. The one's that spread by roots/rhizomes are a bitch to get rid of, but persistance pays. There's probably something in the chemical line that'll kill it but I'm not real good at that side of the game. Listen to that radio show on 980 am (kc) early Saturday. That Toby Tobin knows his stuff.

Ruth Stout (http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=sr_tc_2_0?rh=i%3Astripbooks%2Ck%3ARuth+Stout&keywords=Ruth+Stout&ie=UTF8&qid=1299086727&sr=8-2-ent&field-contributor_id=B001IYXF18) wrote a couple of 'classic' no-work garden books that are worth a looksee.

MOhillbilly
03-04-2011, 09:45 AM
im gettin my tractor fixed this month...

Groves
03-04-2011, 10:21 AM
Everyone knows this already, but MO is a top shelf stand up dude. Generosity with animals, seeds, materials and knowledge.

I hope the tractor goes well. Did you find out what it was? cracked piston?

MOhillbilly
03-04-2011, 10:29 AM
Everyone knows this already, but MO is a top shelf stand up dude. Generosity with animals, seeds, materials and knowledge.

I hope the tractor goes well. Did you find out what it was? cracked piston?

new head gasket @ the minumum. gonna take it in around pattys day and get the engine rebuilt top to bottom.

If you wanna haul it from my place i can plow and till you a spot by early/mid april.
Big as you want. youll need to call CU before hand.

PS- you aint such a bad vato loco yourself.

MOhillbilly
03-07-2011, 11:02 AM
Ill have maybe 20 or so first generation tomato plants to give away end of next week. Betterboy,beefsteak,roma, and a few early girl.
cant beat free. I work midtown, if you want em you can pick em up at he shop.

Buehler445
03-07-2011, 11:50 AM
im gettin my tractor fixed this month...

What kind of tractor?

DMAC
03-07-2011, 11:57 AM
Ill have maybe 20 or so first generation tomato plants to give away end of next week. Betterboy,beefsteak,roma, and a few early girl.
cant beat free. I work midtown, if you want em you can pick em up at he shop.

Dude, I'm down.

MOhillbilly
03-07-2011, 11:59 AM
What kind of tractor?

Case IH 245

6ft bushhog, 48in tiller, rock rake, blade, dump bucket, acouple plows, sod buster.

http://www.tradebit.com/usr/infoman/pub/9001/100478736_245.jpg

MOhillbilly
03-07-2011, 11:59 AM
Dude, I'm down.

cool ill post when i bring em in.


for clarity ill start three gen. so if these peter out ill have more.

DMAC
03-07-2011, 12:03 PM
cool ill post when i bring em in.


for clarity ill start three gen. so if these peter out ill have more.

tanks, juss lemee know

boogblaster
03-07-2011, 12:56 PM
My garden spot is still too wet to plow .....

MOhillbilly
03-07-2011, 01:02 PM
My garden spot is still too wet to plow .....

Dont sweat it. round here is still 15-30 days out minumum.

MOhillbilly
03-10-2011, 12:45 PM
7-10 days out.

http://extension.missouri.edu/publications/DisplayPub.aspx?P=G6201-2#Asparagus

BigOlChiefsfan
03-13-2011, 12:48 PM
I may have already mentioned this (memory issues are no fun) but I remembered a freebie 'deal' that might benefit you folks. The spice rack ploy. Check your cabinets for or go buy some dried chile (with seeds) that you like. I get Thai chile from a nearby Thai grocery store, but it works just as well w/chile from New Mexico/California, etc... Pull out a dozen seeds or so, I soak a paper towel and lay the seeds on the wet towel over night, plant 'em in a peat pot or something similar the next day. With luck, you'll have a dozen chile plants popping up. Transplant after all fear of frost - you could start a couple in large pots about midsummer, and keep them indoors over winter. These small hot chile plants are sometimes pretty attractive, you can sneak a few into the flower garden if you like.

Likewise, I've planted Coriander seeds = cilantro eaten fresh, or let it grow and you'll get more coriander seed. When I was doing the square foot garden thing, I'd plant 2 coriander seeds ever few weeks, had a constant, cheap supply of cilantro for cooking and to give away (I just can't eat that much cilantro, but I know folks who can). Dill seed from the spice rack works great, my grandmother had dill growing all thru the garden (it self-sows). Just don't chop it down, thinking it's a weed. Sesame supposedly grows into a really large plant, but I've never had any luck w/it.

FWIW, I have had pretty good luck keeping a cooks-herb garden here. My sage plant is 4 or 5 years old now and gives more sage leaves than I can use. I've got a 3 year old thyme plant that looks like it's made it thru the winter - my rosemary plant looks like she went under. I think I bought one chive plant 20 years ago, have been dividing it (and replanting or giving them away) ever since.

You can go to the grocery store and buy shallots or heads of garlic. I recommend going to an Asian market for the shallots, they seem to be a lot cheaper there. Anyway, break the garlic heads into individual cloves of garlic, plant them in a row. I dig a row, pour in some sand, poke the cloves in, bury w/more sand/soil. Tamp down w/a 2x4 laid down 'flat' so you press the whole row at once just to firm the dirt around the cloves. Water and keep the weeds off. I usually plant this sort of thing a couple of times in short 'blocks' - stagger the harvest a bit. Do the same thing w/your shallots, but leave more room between the plants. FWIW, you'll find shallot-tops make a great addition to salads, soups, etc...cutting the tops will reduce the size of the cloves, so I plant a few extra just for tops. Shallots cost a fortune at the grocery store, grow your own. They're really tasty if you like onions/garlic.

It's time to be planting some onion 'sets' or bulbs. As above, plant a few feet of them, then repeat in a week or so. That way you've got onions coming all spring and summer instead of 3 tons of onions all at once.

About time to plant your spinach, snow peas, radish (try some asian radish (daikon) and asian greens this year, you never know what you'll have luck with til you try. If you like turnip greens - I'd be planting some 'seven top' turnips as well as some japanese 'tokyo white' turnips - they're REALLY good and most people have never eaten 'em.

As stated, I have some memory issues these days, so if a lot of this was a repeat...well, them's the breaks. You didn't pay much for it.

MOhillbilly
03-15-2011, 09:25 AM
next - http://achornfarm.blogspot.com/2009/06/how-to-build-chicken-plucker_30.html

http://www.kent-company.com/fingers.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-pbRxIlpuw

Groves
03-15-2011, 09:26 AM
next - http://achornfarm.blogspot.com/2009/06/how-to-build-chicken-plucker_30.html

http://www.kent-company.com/fingers.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-pbRxIlpuw

Awesome. Especially if you're runnin meat birds, you gotta build a pluckerator.

MOhillbilly
03-15-2011, 09:35 AM
goin to pick up 60 tonight. gotta 5 week window. thanks for plantin the seed.

i think i have everything but the fingers on hand.

gonna compost all the poop, guts, feathers, & see what happens.

tooge
03-15-2011, 09:59 AM
Saturday I got in my beets, yukon gold and some small red potatos, walla walla, texas sweet, and spanish yellow onions, spinich, and redid my strawberry patch. Then it snowed two inches and melted in about 4 hours, perfect! Dirts all turned for the peppers and tomatos in about 6 or 7 weeks. Also planted more garlic, but I still have quite a few sprouts from last year in the ground. Regarding onions, if you put them in panty hose and hang them in the basement, the giant batch you get mid summer will last all year.

MOhillbilly
03-15-2011, 10:11 AM
i got nervous with all the rain forcasted so i just tilled. Maybe sunday if the ground isnt mud.

MOhillbilly
03-15-2011, 10:19 AM
Saturday I got in my beets, yukon gold and some small red potatos, walla walla, texas sweet, and spanish yellow onions, spinich, and redid my strawberry patch. Then it snowed two inches and melted in about 4 hours, perfect! Dirts all turned for the peppers and tomatos in about 6 or 7 weeks. Also planted more garlic, but I still have quite a few sprouts from last year in the ground. Regarding onions, if you put them in panty hose and hang them in the basement, the giant batch you get mid summer will last all year.

YOU GOT THE ITCH BAD:thumb:

Groves
03-15-2011, 11:08 AM
It's a freaking swamp here. Dang clay.

tooge
03-15-2011, 11:23 AM
YOU GOT THE ITCH BAD:thumb:

Yes I do. Everything in will be fine unless we get some crazy assed 23 degree nights that will screw the onions

MOhillbilly
03-15-2011, 11:54 AM
Yes I do. Everything in will be fine unless we get some crazy assed 23 degree nights that will screw the onions

5 gallon buckets w/ lids are your besty.

Take a drill to the bottom(1/2in) then take a saber and cut the bottom out(make sure to keep the sidewall of the bucket intact). Put em right over your plants once they sprout/transplant. Put lids on when it cold/chance of frost.

if you can find junk sprayer tanks (big, hundreds of gallons), cut the bottom off those for your onions,spinach,lettuce, ect.

Beats the shit outta covering with roller paper.

Oldtimer i go to has hundreds of these buskets out for his early spring crops.

MOhillbilly
03-15-2011, 11:55 AM
It's a freaking swamp here. Dang clay.

Dont know how much you got but its pretty wet at my place. If you wanna borrow my PH tester this week swing by the shop. Ill have more hose too.
Dont give up on your dirt just yet vato:thumb:.

DMAC
03-17-2011, 12:33 PM
I'm extending my garden out about 6 feet so I need to kill the grass. Could I just put plastic over the area to kill it then till it up? Or will it grow back.

I really dont want to dig it all out if I dont have to.

MOhillbilly
03-17-2011, 12:47 PM
I'm extending my garden out about 6 feet so I need to kill the grass. Could I just put plastic over the area to kill it then till it up? Or will it grow back.

I really dont want to dig it all out if I dont have to.

No tiller? guy on craigs list will do it for 20$. but ya anything that smothers the plant will work.

Tomato plants will be ready mon-tues of next week.

Bwana
03-17-2011, 12:53 PM
About 5 years ago, I took out all of the garden and threw gravel down. I still have a raised cement 4x15 garden, but the regular one is gone. Now that food prices are through the roof, I'm kind of kicking myself in the ass and may haul back in some soil to redo the garden.

MOhillbilly
03-17-2011, 12:53 PM
or if you wanted to you could throw something organic on it. leaves,mulch,peat,soil, ect.

MOhillbilly
03-17-2011, 12:54 PM
About 5 years ago, I took out all of the gardern and threw gravel down. I still have a raised cement 4x15 garden, but the regular one is gone. Now that food prices are through the roof, I'm kind of kicking myself in the ass and may haul back in some soil to redo the garden.

You can raid mine anytime, Hoss.

Bwana
03-17-2011, 01:00 PM
You can raid mine anytime, Hoss.

I appreciate the offer bro, but that would be one hell of a road trip for a carrot. :D

If it bugs me for too long, I will just dump a bunch of good soil back there again and do some planting. I plant tomatoes, peppers and onions in the raised garden. I do miss some of the other stuff though. The product at the store looks like it's been hung out to dry most of the time.

DMAC
03-17-2011, 01:06 PM
No tiller? guy on craigs list will do it for 20$. but ya anything that smothers the plant will work.

Tomato plants will be ready mon-tues of next week.

No i dont have one. Even if you till it, wont the grass just grow back?

Sweet on the maters...PM me when you get em and I'll swing over.

HonestChieffan
03-17-2011, 01:06 PM
To wet here but made the plunge yesterday and ordered a tiller for the tractor.

MOhillbilly
03-17-2011, 01:25 PM
No i dont have one. Even if you till it, wont the grass just grow back?

Sweet on the maters...PM me when you get em and I'll swing over.

No. it will kill the grass by smothering it with dirt.


Roger roger on the maters.

MOhillbilly
03-17-2011, 01:25 PM
To wet here but made the plunge yesterday and ordered a tiller for the tractor.

:thumb: makes life easy. how big?

Groves
03-18-2011, 08:04 AM
This is my first attempt at starting from seeds. Followed the directions, but the sprouts are going crazy. I've kept them in the dark so far. I've propped the plastic cover open. Is this normal? I'm looking to start my veggie plants, not make a sandwich.

Look at these things. What'd I do wrong?

http://idisk.me.com/mcgroves/public/pics/starts.jpg

DMAC
03-18-2011, 08:07 AM
Must be RADIATION!!

MOhillbilly
03-18-2011, 08:11 AM
not enough direct sunlight. shoulda popped the lid right after most everything sprouted. looks dry.
my advice is pull em(keep the pods) and reseed. keep em wet and warm and as soon as you see germenation crack the lid, once theyre all up(or 90%) pull the lid and place in direct sun light. If they start to lean turn them around.

Ill send pics of mine later.

youre in no danger of not makin a garden. if you reseed in the next week or three youll be fine.

edit- feed them sprouts to your hens.

Groves
03-18-2011, 08:17 AM
I thought you didn't need sunlight until the first adult leaves were on?

MOhillbilly
03-18-2011, 08:24 AM
I thought you didn't need sunlight until the first adult leaves were on?

when they arent up keep them out of the light, just in a warm spot. Once they start to sprout crack the lid.(no direct sunlight)

when 90% sprout pull the lid place in direct sunlight.

( you should have near complete germination in 5-7 days)

keep the pods wet but dont over water. I water mine 2-3 times a week just goin by what the moister content looks like in the pods.
Light brown and youre to dry. Standing water in the trays and your to wet.

If i get some time this weekend i can cruise by and help if you want.

MOhillbilly
03-19-2011, 07:58 AM
Put in 90ft of potatoes last night. Have enough extra seed to put out another 90. If you want some smoke me. red lasoda/yukon gold.

Gonna need a bigger garden.

HonestChieffan
03-19-2011, 08:46 AM
I thought you didn't need sunlight until the first adult leaves were on?

Not true at all...and some seeds need light to germinate....

Bwana
03-19-2011, 08:55 AM
Hey Mo, what kind of tomatoes would you suggest? Every year I plant several different kinds and I want to narrow it down to two. Last year, one of the verities was some kind of mutant, Jack in the bean stock, giant tomato from hell. They grew huge, but lacked flavor. I just want a couple verities that grow to average size, but have decent flavor, ideas?

HonestChieffan
03-19-2011, 09:21 AM
:thumb: makes life easy. how big?

Garden is currently 120 by 100 and for years me and the Troybuilt have worked it. Over time I have let things go to hell...my fault as I have put Turkey hunting ahead of doing the garden and seems like I miss the dry enough days sittin in the woods.

Last fall I borrowed a buddys tractor mounted tiller and was an instant convert.

I had hauled 4 trailer loads of horse manure/bedding in and spread about 4 inches over the main part of the garden and that baby tilled it in great. So I bought a Land Pride reverse direction 63 inch. Ill use it on the farm as well doing food plots and firebreaks for some prairie burns.

Pretty well have my interest back up.

Now if the damn weather will cooperate!

BigOlChiefsfan
03-19-2011, 07:08 PM
A couple of my favorite tomato plants - these are medium fruits, but the plants set plenty of 'em. Really good flavor, both of 'em. So for 'medium reds' I like:
Carmello (http://store.tomatofest.com/Carmello_p/tf-0101.htm) & Dona (http://store.tomatofest.com/Dona_Tomato_Seeds_p/tf-0146.htm)

A really nice black/purple tomato. Good flavor, larger fruit than the one's above. Russian variety.
Paul Robeson (http://store.tomatofest.com/Paul_Robeson_Tomato_Seeds_p/tf-0373.htm)

Bwana
03-19-2011, 07:35 PM
A couple of my favorite tomato plants - these are medium fruits, but the plants set plenty of 'em. Really good flavor, both of 'em. So for 'medium reds' I like:
Carmello (http://store.tomatofest.com/Carmello_p/tf-0101.htm) & Dona (http://store.tomatofest.com/Dona_Tomato_Seeds_p/tf-0146.htm)

A really nice black/purple tomato. Good flavor, larger fruit than the one's above. Russian variety.
Paul Robeson (http://store.tomatofest.com/Paul_Robeson_Tomato_Seeds_p/tf-0373.htm)

Nice, thanks BOCF!

MOhillbilly
03-20-2011, 06:52 AM
Hybrids i like are early girl,beefsteak, & better boy. Science is your friend. disease resistants make them much easier to care for .


For flat out taste, ox hearts are the best imo. Take forever, & you gotta baby hierlooms.

The real question bwana is what do you like? acid,sweet,pulp, ect.

MOhillbilly
03-20-2011, 07:00 AM
Garden is currently 120 by 100 and for years me and the Troybuilt have worked it. Over time I have let things go to hell...my fault as I have put Turkey hunting ahead of doing the garden and seems like I miss the dry enough days sittin in the woods.

Last fall I borrowed a buddys tractor mounted tiller and was an instant convert.

I had hauled 4 trailer loads of horse manure/bedding in and spread about 4 inches over the main part of the garden and that baby tilled it in great. So I bought a Land Pride reverse direction 63 inch. Ill use it on the farm as well doing food plots and firebreaks for some prairie burns.

Pretty well have my interest back up.

Now if the damn weather will cooperate!



May be gettin a TB 60s model that the rod busted on the motor. If it can be had on the cheap(20 or so) its mine.

weathers been nice here. NOAA says the long range forcast is chance of frost end of the week. Gonna put onions in anyway.


still have the potato seed. Ill send it ups to anyone who will use it. no charge.

HonestChieffan
03-20-2011, 07:09 AM
May be gettin a TB 60s model that the rod busted on the motor. If it can be had on the cheap(20 or so) its mine.

weathers been nice here. NOAA says the long range forcast is chance of frost end of the week. Gonna put onions in anyway.


still have the potato seed. Ill send it ups to anyone who will use it. no charge.

The old Troys were built like a tank. Mine is the 8hp Horse with a Koehler. Never fails to start. In the old days TroyBuilt had every part in stock and complete DIY instructions to fix everything. Not sure even where parts are available now days for them. The axel seals were prone to fail, I fixed one years ago and now I need to fix the other.

MOhillbilly
03-20-2011, 07:14 AM
The old Troys were built like a tank. Mine is the 8hp Horse with a Koehler. Never fails to start. In the old days TroyBuilt had every part in stock and complete DIY instructions to fix everything. Not sure even where parts are available now days for them. The axel seals were prone to fail, I fixed one years ago and now I need to fix the other.


Oldtimer told me flat out to keep up with my TB Horse. Said TB sold out and they werent makin parts for the older models anymore. Newones look like chinese sheet metal.

i was told a honda motor could be a good swap for the 7-11horse tecumseh that threw the rod.

HonestChieffan
03-20-2011, 07:41 AM
Oldtimer told me flat out to keep up with my TB Horse. Said TB sold out and they werent makin parts for the older models anymore. Newones look like chinese sheet metal.

i was told a honda motor could be a good swap for the 7-11horse tecumseh that threw the rod.

I think parts are still available. The small engine guy who does my chain saw work says he can get them still but Im not sure where


This looks promising http://www.custompartsinc.com/cat.asp?id=1

Bwana
03-20-2011, 07:59 AM
Hybrids i like are early girl,beefsteak, & better boy. Science is your friend. disease resistants make them much easier to care for .


For flat out taste, ox hearts are the best imo. Take forever, & you gotta baby hierlooms.

The real question bwana is what do you like? acid,sweet,pulp, ect.

I use them to make tomato sauce, (Freeze it) salsa and put a few on salads.

HonestChieffan
03-20-2011, 08:04 AM
I use them to make tomato sauce, (Freeze it) salsa and put a few on salads.


How long is your growing season there...

You may have this already: http://msuextension.org/publications/YardandGarden/MT199217AG.pdf


And I found this as well...

"Some tomato plants I have successfully grown in Montana are: Early Pick Hybrid, Northern Exposure, and Springset varieties. I also like to have a few small fruit varieties in my organic Montana garden as well. My favorite ones are Juliet Hybrid, Pixie Hybrid and Tumbler Hybrid. "

Bwana
03-20-2011, 08:12 AM
How long is your growing season there...

You may have this already: http://msuextension.org/publications/YardandGarden/MT199217AG.pdf


And I found this as well...

"Some tomato plants I have successfully grown in Montana are: Early Pick Hybrid, Northern Exposure, and Springset varieties. I also like to have a few small fruit varieties in my organic Montana garden as well. My favorite ones are Juliet Hybrid, Pixie Hybrid and Tumbler Hybrid. "

In THEORY, and I use that term loosley, the last frost day is May 15th. We get our first freeze in Sept of early Oct. If it get sketchy as far as frost, I can always toss a tarp over them.

cabletech94
03-20-2011, 08:59 AM
May be gettin a TB 60s model that the rod busted on the motor. If it can be had on the cheap(20 or so) its mine.

weathers been nice here. NOAA says the long range forcast is chance of frost end of the week. Gonna put onions in anyway.


still have the potato seed. Ill send it ups to anyone who will use it. no charge.

this may be a A-duh!!! question, BUUUUT: you do mean potato starts, right?
i'd be interested.

MOhillbilly
03-20-2011, 09:05 AM
I use them to make tomato sauce, (Freeze it) salsa and put a few on salads.

super boy hybrid 785, jet star (low acid), since your growing season is short id maybe get acoule early girl.

Bwana
03-20-2011, 09:07 AM
super boy hybrid 785, jet star (low acid), since your growing season is short id maybe get acoule early girl.

:thumb: Thanks buddy, I'll be looking soon.

MOhillbilly
03-20-2011, 09:08 AM
this may be a A-duh!!! question, BUUUUT: you do mean potato starts, right?
i'd be interested.

yes, potato starts/seeds. Smoke me an addy and ill send em out mon.

MOhillbilly
03-20-2011, 09:12 AM
:LOL::thumb: Thanks buddy, I'll be looking soon.

you have lots of time. Id bullshit with your local farm and home guy and see what he says.

cabletech94
03-20-2011, 09:27 AM
I had a hard time with stink bugs all over my tomatoes this year. I am going to try a trick I read about and plant marigolds around that part of the garden. Supposedly they are attracted to the yellow flowers and stay out of the maters.

marigolds go great in repelling all sorts of bugs.
ever watch billy the exterminator. dude'll talk about crystanthimums(sp?) on end. it'll actually get annoying.

actually, start watching your ad flyers and such. Sutherlands here will have plant sales starting in the next few weeks (on the weekends). should be around 80cents for a 4 pack. really not a bad investment for your vegies.
i usually plant one marigold per 4 plants or so. it doesn't really matter. just water, and remove the spent heads and you'll be fine.

cabletech94
03-20-2011, 09:27 AM
yes, potato starts/seeds. Smoke me an addy and ill send em out mon.

PM sent, sir!:thumb:

Bwana
03-20-2011, 09:38 AM
:LOL:

you have lots of time. Id bullshit with your local farm and home guy and see what he says.

Not as long as you may think. :D

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/mg/gardennotes/images/722-8.jpg

HonestChieffan
03-20-2011, 09:43 AM
We need a wall-o-beer for those warm afternoons watchin maters ripen while the wife pulls weeds......(she saw that, said dream on)

Bwana
03-20-2011, 10:33 AM
On a side note. I had a hell of a time last year with the birds getting at my cherry tree. I'm thinking about building some kind of frame (PVC, or something light) around the tree and going with netting around the frame. Anyone out there use anything like this?

HonestChieffan
03-20-2011, 10:51 AM
We have to net Blueberries for same reason. Birds and deer can find a ripe BB faster than you can count 123

Bwana
03-20-2011, 10:58 AM
We have to net Blueberries for same reason. Birds and deer can find a ripe BB faster than you can count 123

Yeah, it's the same thing with a cherry tree with the birds. I was going to pick last year on a Saturday and when I came home that friday night, the birds had been in there and blasted off half my tree. I was so pissed off, I sat there for two hours in a lazy Boy, with my pellet gun and a 12 pack of beer and killed everthing that flew into that tree. It looked like the killing field under that tree, with blackbirds all over the place.

I want to frame it and net it this year so I can get my full crop.

Dinny Blues
03-22-2011, 05:23 PM
It appears I will have some extras from the starts this year.

Heirloom tomatoes;
Oxheart
Pink Brandywine
Missouri Pink Loveapple
Watermelon Beefsteak

Heirloom Squash;
Bon-Bon
Sunshine

I might have more things in a few days, these are what have germinated so far.

Groves and MoHB got first dibs.

Dinny

Dinny Blues
03-22-2011, 05:30 PM
Oh, and I intend to make BBQ sauce to the complete limit this year.

Sweating in the kitchen is much more tolerable when you realize it's a noble and worthwhile thing which you do.

Dinny

BigOlChiefsfan
03-22-2011, 07:17 PM
Bwana - take a look at some of the Russian tomatoes we can get now, they're usually black colored and have a shorter grow-to-harvest time, most were developed in Siberia - which ought to suit your climate. The ones below I've had and they were really tasty.

Paul Robeson (http://store.tomatofest.com/SearchResults.asp?Search=robeson&Search.x=0&Search.y=0)
black plum (http://store.tomatofest.com/Black_Plum_Tomato_Seeds_p/tf-0064.htm)


Oxhearts were my paternal grandmother's favorite tomato. I think she was prouder of some of those 2 and 3 lb tomatoes than she was of her children (and she had some good kids). They've got a lot of flavor, if I was growing a buttload of tomatoes I'd include some.

Netting for your cherry tree + a hoot-owl decoy (you can use it to hunt crows as well, so you get your money's worth)

Bwana
03-22-2011, 08:01 PM
Bwana - take a look at some of the Russian tomatoes we can get now, they're usually black colored and have a shorter grow-to-harvest time, most were developed in Siberia - which ought to suit your climate. The ones below I've had and they were really tasty.

Paul Robeson (http://store.tomatofest.com/SearchResults.asp?Search=robeson&Search.x=0&Search.y=0)
black plum (http://store.tomatofest.com/Black_Plum_Tomato_Seeds_p/tf-0064.htm)


Oxhearts were my paternal grandmother's favorite tomato. I think she was prouder of some of those 2 and 3 lb tomatoes than she was of her children (and she had some good kids). They've got a lot of flavor, if I was growing a buttload of tomatoes I'd include some.

Netting for your cherry tree + a hoot-owl decoy (you can use it to hunt crows as well, so you get your money's worth)

Thanks bud!

Buehler445
03-22-2011, 08:38 PM
I'm extending my garden out about 6 feet so I need to kill the grass. Could I just put plastic over the area to kill it then till it up? Or will it grow back.

I really dont want to dig it all out if I dont have to.

Glyphosate (Roundup) kills the fuck out of grass and has no residual.

To wet here but made the plunge yesterday and ordered a tiller for the tractor.

:rockon: What kind of tractor you sportin?

On a side note. I had a hell of a time last year with the birds getting at my cherry tree. I'm thinking about building some kind of frame (PVC, or something light) around the tree and going with netting around the frame. Anyone out there use anything like this?

PVC will work good. Get some rubber coated chicken wire. Zip tie it to the PVC. I'm afraid netting won't work. You get much wind up there?

HonestChieffan
03-22-2011, 08:42 PM
Glyphosate (Roundup) kills the **** out of grass and has no residual.



:rockon: What kind of tractor you sportin?



PVC will work good. Get some rubber coated chicken wire. Zip tie it to the PVC. I'm afraid netting won't work. You get much wind up there?

Nothing runs like a....... Raised on a JD60, 4020, and up from there My utility tractor is a JD 4410.

Groves
03-22-2011, 09:46 PM
It appears I will have some extras from the starts this year.

Heirloom tomatoes;
Oxheart
Pink Brandywine
Missouri Pink Loveapple
Watermelon Beefsteak

Heirloom Squash;
Bon-Bon
Sunshine

I might have more things in a few days, these are what have germinated so far.

Groves and MoHB got first dibs.

Dinny

Dinny!

I'm raisin sprouts that are offspring of your sprouts from last year.

I are a moran, though, and ruined a bunch. I may take just 1 of your oxhearts and a loveapple or two. I'll swap ya for some syrup.

You around during the day?

Buehler445
03-22-2011, 10:27 PM
Nothing runs like a....... Raised on a JD60, 4020, and up from there My utility tractor is a JD 4410.

:rockon:

That rules.

Bwana
03-23-2011, 06:50 AM
PVC will work good. Get some rubber coated chicken wire. Zip tie it to the PVC. I'm afraid netting won't work. You get much wind up there?

I was thinking either PVC, of electrical conduit. I lile the rubber coated chicken wire idea. I don't think I have ever seen it, or messed with it to be honest. How fine it is, enough to keep sparrows out?

As far as wind, it isn't to bad aroudn here, not like Livingston, or ever Great Falls. I had a net on i ttwo years ago and it worked ok. I just think the frame with "something," will be the ticket. Thanks for the ideas though! :thumb:

DMAC
03-23-2011, 07:04 AM
No tiller? guy on craigs list will do it for 20$. but ya anything that smothers the plant will work.

Tomato plants will be ready mon-tues of next week.

Hey im off work all day if they are ready. Lemme know

MOhillbilly
03-23-2011, 07:12 AM
Bwana rubber coated chicken wire is expensive. You may balk at the tag. Its just like chicken wire but more durable. Its nice, id like to have a roll.

What kinda cherry tree? Do you have other fruit trees youd recommend?(open question for all)

Dinny, outside burners are yo friend. Hit me up when youre makin sauce and ill do likewise.

Groves, put a set of lights a half inch from your sprouts. Keeps em from stress. Ive run mine 3 days in a row and my stuff took off. I think i have an extra 5 footer if you wanna borrow it. Mother plucker is a greenlight for sure!

Buehler, you dont worry about residual from the phosphate on this years crops? It would make me nervous as hell.

MOhillbilly
03-23-2011, 07:14 AM
Hey im off work all day if they are ready. Lemme know

they are ready but i didnt bring em in. ummmmm, tonight im pickin up a tiller and tommorow in huntin for blacks.

maybe fri? or i can meet you somewhere over the weekend?

Bwana
03-23-2011, 07:51 AM
Bwana rubber coated chicken wire is expensive. You may balk at the tag. Its just like chicken wire but more durable. Its nice, id like to have a roll.



Mo: this one is a Montmorency.

http://www.arborday.org/Shopping/Trees/TreeDetail.cfm?id=95

It is a great Pie Cherry tree and always put out a bumper crop. I also have to sweet cherry trees out there (name eludes me right now) that in theory, will grow in this zone. I lost about half the tree(s) to cold last winter, so we'll see what is left this spring. If there is any more dead branchs on those two trees, it's logging chain and super duty time. I'll either plant two more Montmorency trees, of bang two mor eApple trees in the holes. Apples seem to do very well back there, as do plums.

I'll head over to some of the local ag stores this week and look into the wire. Is it fine enough to keep out small birds?

HonestChieffan
03-23-2011, 07:53 AM
Mo: this one is a Montmorency.

http://www.arborday.org/Shopping/Trees/TreeDetail.cfm?id=95

It is a great Pie Cherry tree and always put out a bumper crop. I also have to sweet cherry trees out there (name eludes me right now) that in theory, will grow in this zone. I lost about half the tree(s) to cold last winter, so we'll see what is left this spring. If there is any more dead branchs on those two trees, it's logging chain and super duty time. I'll either plant two more Montmorency trees, of bang two mor eApple trees in the holes. Apples seem to do very well back there, as do plums.

I'll head over to some of the local ag stores this week and look into the wire. Is it fine enough to keep out small birds?

We use the rolls of poly bird netting...cheap, weighs nothing and we get 2-3 years out of it. Sure easier than wire

Bwana
03-23-2011, 07:56 AM
We use the rolls of poly bird netting...cheap, weighs nothing and we get 2-3 years out of it. Sure easier than wire

I haven't seen any around here, link??

Bwana
03-23-2011, 07:58 AM
I haven't seen any around here, link??

Meh, nevermind, I thought it was something else. I have used that in the past, with mixed results.

MOhillbilly
03-23-2011, 07:58 AM
Mo: this one is a Montmorency.

http://www.arborday.org/Shopping/Trees/TreeDetail.cfm?id=95

It is a great Pie Cherry tree and always put out a bumper crop. I also have to sweet cherry trees out there (name eludes me right now) that in theory, will grow in this zone. I lost about half the tree(s) to cold last winter, so we'll see what is left this spring. If there is any more dead branchs on those two trees, it's logging chain and super duty time. I'll either plant two more Montmorency trees, of bang two mor eApple trees in the holes. Apples seem to do very well back there, as do plums.

I'll head over to some of the local ag stores this week and look into the wire. Is it fine enough to keep out small birds?

its maybe 3/4-1 in dia. hole. gonna be a couple hundred for a 50 ft roll. shit is not cheap. Back when i had roosters i had a chance to buy a roll at a dollar a foot & passed. Wish i hadnt.

ill look into the cherry trees. wanna run a small orchard on the back 40. Gettin alittle late i think....dont know for sure. will one be enough?

MOhillbilly
03-23-2011, 08:03 AM
Meh, nevermind, I thought it was something else. I have used that in the past, with mixed results.

like this?
http://www.3tproducts.com/shop/pc/viewcategories.asp?idCategory=2

MOhillbilly
03-23-2011, 08:03 AM
slick idea for raised beds

http://springfield.craigslist.org/grd/2280294373.html

MOhillbilly
03-23-2011, 08:07 AM
bwana-
http://www.riverdale.com/images/sample6BIG.jpg

backtrace this. price isnt near what i thought itd be.

Bwana
03-23-2011, 09:29 AM
ill look into the cherry trees. wanna run a small orchard on the back 40. Gettin alittle late i think....dont know for sure. will one be enough?

Mo: If I could, I would rather grow Bing, Rainer, or queen Ann trees, but the eastern half of the state is just to harsh on them and they die. (You may be able to get away with it in your area) I have tried several time, but no luck. They have a bunch in the Flathead Valley and man are they good to eat right off the tree. With that being said, this pie cherry tree I have, is outstanding and gives me a great yield every year. I may hang two more. I have two Plumbs, six apples and three cherry trees right now. As I mentioned before, the two sweet cherry trees may be winter kill, I will know in another five weeks or so.

Bwana
03-23-2011, 09:34 AM
On a side note, I have also found it to be wise buying local. Some of those mail order tree may have a better price up front, but between he shipping damage and difference in climate acclimation, 90% they die off within the first year. The exception was that damn cherry tree, which I picked up for $9.99 about 5 years ago at Wal-mart, on a wild hair. That son of a gun is bullet proof. Home Depot and Lowes also seem to have some "ok" trees at times. That's where I go my plumb trees and they are also kicking ass.

MOhillbilly
03-23-2011, 09:56 AM
thanks for the info Bwana. i have a plum and dont know what to do with it. Its a nice tree & smells wonderful in bloom, but all the fruit goes to shit.
what do you do with yours?





(plants,trees,shrubs,ect)
walmart is bad, lowes is worse.

Bwana
03-23-2011, 01:08 PM
thanks for the info Bwana. i have a plum and dont know what to do with it. Its a nice tree & smells wonderful in bloom, but all the fruit goes to shit.
what do you do with yours?


Mo: just bought some netting here:

http://www.vineyardbirdnetting.com/priceorder.php#berryfruit1

Decen price and looks like good quality. I called and talked to them in person. Nice folks out of MN.

The two plum trees are Toka plum trees. I just pull them right off and eat them, VERY good. My best apples tree so far are Haralred's. Very good apples for pies and great off the tree if you like your apples a little on the tar tside, which I do, my wife, no so much. ;)

KS Smitty
03-23-2011, 02:51 PM
Buehler our soil is not alkaline, just not acidic enough to keep blueberries happy.

Seed taters are cut and drying, hopefully this weekend I'll get them in the ground. Have a few onion sets for green onions also some Candy plants for big sweet onions. Considering starting an asparagus patch, it's a favorite here.

At work we have gotten our first batch of shrubs in along with early veggie plants, frostproof annuals, herbs and perennials. We even have some 4" pots of tomato and pepper plants for the folks with cold frames or wallowaters. I imagine we'll be covering/bringing in some stuff tonite since it's getting down to 27 or so.

I picked up a "Bloomerang" reblooming lilac. It stays around 4-5' tall and if you prune it after it's first bloom it will rebloom the rest of the summer. I love lilacs and hope this one has the great fragrance the old fashioned ones do. I have a double white that has just started leafing out. My forsythia in the yard is in full bloom as is my Lenten Roses (hellebore).

Ready for the season to kick in!