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crispystl420
12-25-2010, 04:51 PM
Anyone do it? Any good suggestions for a starter kit? It looks like it's about the same cost you would pay for decent beer from the store is this accurate?

MichaelH
12-25-2010, 05:02 PM
It looks like it's about the same cost you would pay for decent beer from the store is this accurate?

I guess it depends on how many case you're buying.

I don't make my own beer but have two good friends that do. I have asked what it would take and both have said a decent starter kit starts around $120. The payoffs are good though. In the long run it's much cheaper once you get going with it. That is assuming you are able to make decent beer.

otherstar
12-25-2010, 05:09 PM
I've been brewing on and off for about 15 years. I've been able to make better than average beer. I don't know that I save money as much as I get better beer for my money. I cannot make beer for the same as I can get a 12 pack of something like Miller Genuine Draft, but I can make the same amount of beer cheaper than I can get a case of Samuel
Adams (and I think my beer is better than that because it is made to my tastes).

runnercyclist
12-25-2010, 05:30 PM
I make better beer than one can buy, however, nowadays, one can buy very good beer.

Depends on what is important to you.

crispystl420
12-25-2010, 05:33 PM
I want the bang for my buck lol

Dartgod
12-25-2010, 05:39 PM
Who cares if its cheaper or not?

You are making beer!!

I need to get busy, its been a couple of years since I've brewed.

crispystl420
12-25-2010, 05:59 PM
Who cares if its cheaper or not?

You are making beer!!

I need to get busy, its been a couple of years since I've brewed.

Good point.

crispystl420
12-25-2010, 05:59 PM
Who cares if its cheaper or not?

You are making beer!!

I need to get busy, its been a couple of years since I've brewed.

Is it hard to make a decent batch?

Bwana
12-25-2010, 06:19 PM
Who cares if its cheaper or not?

You are making beer!!

I need to get busy, its been a couple of years since I've brewed.

This! I just kicked the WORTHLESS flat top range to the curb and bought a duel fuel range. Gas on top, with an electric oven. I will be brewing again VERY soon.

Dartgod
12-25-2010, 06:54 PM
Is it hard to make a decent batch?
Not at all. The most important thing is to make sure your equipment is properly sanitized.

Fire Me Boy!
12-25-2010, 06:56 PM
Have you brewed before? Honestly, a Mr. Beer is a great way to find out whether or not you wanna continue, and runs about $30. Visit the beer forums and you'll see a ton of people that got interested from the Mr. Beer brew kit. It's certainly nothing to be ashamed of.

Once you make a few batches and get you feel for it and whether or not you will stay interested, you can then upgrade.

Psyko Tek
12-25-2010, 07:00 PM
I have wanted to do this for a while
I do like beer
I really have no choice

my last name is Brewer

Pawnmower
12-25-2010, 08:35 PM
There is a great brew shop in my home town:

http://www.thebeveragepeople.com/ (get their catalog!)

I have dabbled in home brewing for quite some time, and the above people will answer questions and are honest and have great equipment and decent prices. Also they will ship to anywhere.

Here is a good starter kit:

http://www.thebeveragepeople.com/product330.html

They have cheaper kits, and better ones...

Get a couple of books too....check out their books section.

Good luck and happy brewing..If you like to cook and you like beer, youll LOVE to brew.

Peace

Lzen
01-21-2011, 09:53 PM
I have thought about this for awhile now. A friend on another forum told me about this place.

http://brewgadgets.com/

Looks like I can get:
Brew Basic Equipment Kit - $70
Brown Ale (or other beer of your choice, they have lots of good choices - makes 5 gallons) - $28
48 bottles (12oz) - $26
Shipping - $25

Looks like I can get started for around $150. Am I missing anything.

Dartgod
01-21-2011, 10:06 PM
I have thought about this for awhile now. A friend on another forum told me about this place.

http://brewgadgets.com/

Looks like I can get:
Brew Basic Equipment Kit - $70
Brown Ale (or other beer of your choice, they have lots of good choices - makes 5 gallons) - $28
48 bottles (12oz) - $26
Shipping - $25

Looks like I can get started for around $150. Am I missing anything.

Don't forget the bottle caps. I didn't see them listed.

Oh, and if you don't mind spending another $11, I'd recommend an auto siphon.

Lzen
01-21-2011, 10:32 PM
Don't forget the bottle caps. I didn't see them listed.

Oh, and if you don't mind spending another $11, I'd recommend an auto siphon.

The Beer kit comes with bottle caps.

What's an auto siphon?

Lzen
01-21-2011, 10:39 PM
Never mind, I found it. Good idea.

DaFace
01-21-2011, 10:48 PM
It's far more enjoyable to obtain the bottles by drinking beer, but they don't look as pretty.

Lzen
01-21-2011, 10:50 PM
It's far more enjoyable to obtain the bottles by drinking beer, but they don't look as pretty.

Now I'm thinking of how many bottles of beer I drank over the years. If I had just kept them I might have enough to start my own brewery. :D

Stram fan
01-22-2011, 03:55 AM
OMG, do NOT buy a Mr Beer kit.

Start here:

Crap... they won't let me post a link... Google "how to brew.com". That is John Palmer's home brewing site.

Read that condensed version of Palmer's book, which is the ABSOLUTE BIBLE for home brewing. Then, buy the hard copy of it. You will thank me later, for both saving you a bunch of money and being able to make great beer at home.

I have had my own original recipe win an award (Brewer's Award, best in show) and it was brewed in a commercial brewery. This was from brewing with grains, not kits, but Palmer's book is the ONE and ONLY place to start.

You read his book, which you will not outgrow, you will make very good beer that will impress others, you will avoid common mistakes, and save money in the long run.

Don't read this, buy a Mr Beer, and I guarantee your beer will suck. Do what I suggest, I guarantee you will brew a decent beer on the first try. The more you do it, the more you learn, the better the beer.

Do you know the difference between a lager and an ale? Do you know that lagers require several different levels of refridgeration temperatures while it ferments, while ales are happy at just one temperature?

It's all in Palmer's book, and it's a fast easy read. Start with his web site. Then buy the book. Thank me later.

BigVE
01-22-2011, 07:16 AM
I used to home brew...gotten away from it for the past year or so. Always loved the beer. Do a search, there is at least one thread where guys discussed this extensively a while back. Love the home brew....doesn't save any money but it's the idea that your making your own brew. Especially when it turns out GOOD! lol

Dartgod
01-22-2011, 08:02 AM
Do a search, there is at least one thread where guys discussed this extensively a while back.
Here's the one I made when I first got started brewing. Lot of good tips in there.

http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=108459&highlight=brew

Here's couple of more I found.

http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=176045&highlight=brew

http://www.chiefsplanet.com/BB/showthread.php?t=161114&highlight=home+brew

And here are a couple of home brew message boards I frequented when I first got started.

http://forum.northernbrewer.com/

http://www.brewboard.com/

Lzen
01-24-2011, 11:04 AM
OMG, do NOT buy a Mr Beer kit.

Start here:

Crap... they won't let me post a link... Google "how to brew.com". That is John Palmer's home brewing site.

Read that condensed version of Palmer's book, which is the ABSOLUTE BIBLE for home brewing. Then, buy the hard copy of it. You will thank me later, for both saving you a bunch of money and being able to make great beer at home.

I have had my own original recipe win an award (Brewer's Award, best in show) and it was brewed in a commercial brewery. This was from brewing with grains, not kits, but Palmer's book is the ONE and ONLY place to start.

You read his book, which you will not outgrow, you will make very good beer that will impress others, you will avoid common mistakes, and save money in the long run.

Don't read this, buy a Mr Beer, and I guarantee your beer will suck. Do what I suggest, I guarantee you will brew a decent beer on the first try. The more you do it, the more you learn, the better the beer.

Do you know the difference between a lager and an ale? Do you know that lagers require several different levels of refridgeration temperatures while it ferments, while ales are happy at just one temperature?

It's all in Palmer's book, and it's a fast easy read. Start with his web site. Then buy the book. Thank me later.

First, I am not buying a Mr. Beer. Its a kit but that's not what its called. Second, I want this to be fairly simple. I don't want to get started and then find out I need something else. If it is too complicated, I will get frustrated and give up. Last, it would help to find that book if you could give me the title.

Radar Chief
01-24-2011, 11:31 AM
http://morebeer.com/

Handy store site that Iíve bought some gear and brew ingredients from.

1moreTRich
01-24-2011, 11:32 AM
First, I am not buying a Mr. Beer. Its a kit but that's not what its called. Second, I want this to be fairly simple. I don't want to get started and then find out I need something else. If it is too complicated, I will get frustrated and give up. Last, it would help to find that book if you could give me the title.

I believe someone else mentioned Mr. Beer in their post. The book he is referencing is the How to Brew hardcopy of John Palmer's introductory website http://www.howtobrew.com/intro.html There are tons of good books on the topic to help you along, but the howtobrew website is really all you need right now to get you started.

Additionally the kit you picked out will work great, agree on adding the auto siphon. You might check this kit out too http://www.midwestsupplies.com/brewing-basics-equipment-kit.html same kit just $10 cheaper. They have a nice brown ale kit http://www.midwestsupplies.com/big-river-brown-ale.html if that is what you prefer as well.

You will still need to pick up a 5 gallon brewpot. Harbor Freight and other hardware stores usually have cheap stainless steel ones that will get you started. Also if you want bottles, check out a recycling center or your local bar. Usually you can find them, or ask them to set some aside for you. No need to pay $25 plus shipping.

If you need any other tips or have any direct questions just let me know. I am also a award winning brewer and have been brewing for 3 years now.

Lzen
01-24-2011, 12:35 PM
I believe someone else mentioned Mr. Beer in their post. The book he is referencing is the How to Brew hardcopy of John Palmer's introductory website http://www.howtobrew.com/intro.html There are tons of good books on the topic to help you along, but the howtobrew website is really all you need right now to get you started.

Additionally the kit you picked out will work great, agree on adding the auto siphon. You might check this kit out too http://www.midwestsupplies.com/brewing-basics-equipment-kit.html same kit just $10 cheaper. They have a nice brown ale kit http://www.midwestsupplies.com/big-river-brown-ale.html if that is what you prefer as well.

You will still need to pick up a 5 gallon brewpot. Harbor Freight and other hardware stores usually have cheap stainless steel ones that will get you started. Also if you want bottles, check out a recycling center or your local bar. Usually you can find them, or ask them to set some aside for you. No need to pay $25 plus shipping.

If you need any other tips or have any direct questions just let me know. I am also a award winning brewer and have been brewing for 3 years now.

Great info. Thanks.

I do have another question. Can I just save my bottles from what I bought at the liquor store and sanitize them? For instance, I have Sam Adams, Boulevard, and Boulder Beer varieties in my garage mini fridge now.

1moreTRich
01-24-2011, 01:25 PM
Great info. Thanks.

I do have another question. Can I just save my bottles from what I bought at the liquor store and sanitize them? For instance, I have Sam Adams, Boulevard, and Boulder Beer varieties in my garage mini fridge now.

Yes and No. Sam Adams and Boulder Beer are pop tops and can be resealed. Boulevard is a twist top and can't be resealed with the capper that you will get.

When I was bottling, I would just throw a bunch of used bottles in a big tub with water and oxyclean free and let is set for a couple hours, then rinse and they should be good. Just sanitize and fill when ready.

Monty
01-24-2011, 02:55 PM
I'm brewing my next batch this Sunday. This will be my third batch and I'm still using a kit until I get the routine down a little more. I can't add much to what's already been said, but sanitization is the most critical item....the rest is a breeze IMO. It's like chemistry lab, but when you're done, you have beer! :toast:

ReynardMuldrake
01-24-2011, 03:05 PM
I'm brewing my next batch this Sunday. This will be my third batch and I'm still using a kit until I get the routine down a little more. I can't add much to what's already been said, but sanitization is the most critical item....the rest is a breeze IMO. It's like chemistry lab, but when you're done, you have beer! :toast:

Yep, a good sanitizing solution is a must for home brewing. Especially when you reuse bottles.

Also, after you drink them, make sure you rinse out the bottles with water if you plan on reusing them. Otherwise you can get mold growing in the bottom, which is a pain to scrub out.

Dayze
01-24-2011, 03:06 PM
i'm hopeful to get a starter kit/rig sometime before summer.

Chiefs Rool
01-24-2011, 03:07 PM
it would be good to learn. If we are ever in apocalypse mode, the knowledge of how to brew good beer would be extremely good.

Lzen
01-24-2011, 03:16 PM
it would be good to learn. If we are ever in apocalypse mode, the knowledge of how to brew good beer would be extremely good.

ROFL

Do you know why I find this comment amusing?

Its because I thought the exact same thing. :D

1moreTRich
01-24-2011, 03:21 PM
Yep, a good sanitizing solution is a must for home brewing. Especially when you reuse bottles.

Also, after you drink them, make sure you rinse out the bottles with water if you plan on reusing them. Otherwise you can get mold growing in the bottom, which is a pain to scrub out.

Yeah, that's when the Oxyclean really comes in handy. Let it soak in moldy bottles for a bit and it is good to go.

Also, would highly recommend picking up some StarSan. It is a sanitizer that is no rinse and only requires 30 seconds of contact time. I save a gallon in milkjug and reuse it over and over again. One bottle can last a very long time if you reuse. "One step" is serviceable, but StarSan is awesome stuff.

googlegoogle
01-24-2011, 03:48 PM
<iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/rNY3_00p180" frameborder="0" allowFullScreen></iframe>

Chiefs Rool
01-24-2011, 09:29 PM
ROFL

Do you know why I find this comment amusing?

Its because I thought the exact same thing. :D

it doesn't seem worth the trouble otherwise with the wonderful uprising of mico breweries and smallers breweries that are producing fantastic beer and most liquor stores carry them now.

Reerun_KC
01-24-2011, 09:33 PM
I would love to have a still....

Reaper16
01-24-2011, 11:44 PM
it doesn't seem worth the trouble otherwise with the wonderful uprising of mico breweries and smallers breweries that are producing fantastic beer and most liquor stores carry them now.
It's been worth it for me. If you want to really understand beer, understand how and why different styles taste the way they do, then brewing is a great way to gain that knowledge.

1moreTRich
01-25-2011, 09:46 AM
it doesn't seem worth the trouble otherwise with the wonderful uprising of mico breweries and smallers breweries that are producing fantastic beer and most liquor stores carry them now.

It's been worth it for me. If you want to really understand beer, understand how and why different styles taste the way they do, then brewing is a great way to gain that knowledge.

Plus, right now with my setup and bulk grain buys through my brewing club, I can produce a 5 gallon batch for as low as $15 (around 48 12oz bottles). If I want to make a higher gravity brew or IPA with alot of hops it will cost more, but still fairly cheap. I have spent that much on a 6 pack of good quality microbrew. Also, I can imitate a any brew I want and make beers that are particular to my taste preference. Cloning brews that aren't available in my area is also a big plus for me. I have a Bells Two-Hearted Ale recipe that is damn near spot on.

Reaper16
01-25-2011, 10:36 AM
Plus, right now with my setup and bulk grain buys through my brewing club, I can produce a 5 gallon batch for as low as $15 (around 48 12oz bottles). If I want to make a higher gravity brew or IPA with alot of hops it will cost more, but still fairly cheap. I have spent that much on a 6 pack of good quality microbrew. Also, I can imitate a any brew I want and make beers that are particular to my taste preference. Cloning brews that aren't available in my area is also a big plus for me. I have a Bells Two-Hearted Ale recipe that is damn near spot on.
The Bell's Two-Hearted clone recipe is my absolute go-to.

Lzen
01-25-2011, 12:46 PM
I have a Bells Two-Hearted Ale recipe that is damn near spot on.

Oh rly?:hmmm:

1moreTRich
01-25-2011, 01:30 PM
Oh rly?:hmmm:

Its all grain, but I'm sure I could convert it over for you. The only issue I would have is I use Vienna as a part of the grain bill, and I don't know how you would get that flavor with anything but all grain or partial mash. Any suggestions Reaper?

You could still do it, it would just be a little bit different. I just love the flavor that Vienna gives to beer, its probably one of my favorite malts.

All Grain Recipe (note this was modified off of a recipe on Homebrewtalk, so can't take all the credit):

Grain:
10lbs 2 row
2lbs Vienna
8oz Carapils
8oz Crystal 15L
Mash at 152 for 60mins

Hops:
.75oz Centennial 60mins
.25oz Centennial 45mins
1oz Centennial 15mins
1oz Centennial 5mins
1oz Centennial 1min
1oz Centennial Dry Hop - 7 Days

Yeast:
Safale 05


To switch to extract the grain bill would change to something like:

7lbs Golden Light DME

Steeping Grains:
8oz Carapils
8oz Crystal 15L
Step at 155-160 degrees for 30mins

Everything else would stay the same.

Monty
01-25-2011, 01:40 PM
it would be good to learn. If we are ever in apocalypse mode, the knowledge of how to brew good beer would be extremely good.

That reminds me. I need to learn how to grow tobacco so I can roll my own cigars. Another critical skillset needed in the post apocalyptic world IMO.

Reaper16
01-25-2011, 01:47 PM
Its all grain, but I'm sure I could convert it over for you. The only issue I would have is I use Vienna as a part of the grain bill, and I don't know how you would get that flavor with anything but all grain or partial mash. Any suggestions Reaper?

You could still do it, it would just be a little bit different. I just love the flavor that Vienna gives to beer, its probably one of my favorite malts.

All Grain Recipe (note this was modified off of a recipe on Homebrewtalk, so can't take all the credit):

Grain:
10lbs 2 row
2lbs Vienna
8oz Carapils
8oz Crystal 15L
Mash at 152 for 60mins

Hops:
.75oz Centennial 60mins
.25oz Centennial 45mins
1oz Centennial 15mins
1oz Centennial 5mins
1oz Centennial 1min
1oz Centennial Dry Hop - 7 Days

Yeast:
Safale 05


To switch to extract the grain bill would change to something like:

7lbs Golden Light DME

Steeping Grains:
8oz Carapils
8oz Crystal 15L
Step at 155-160 degrees for 30mins

Everything else would stay the same.
I don't have any suggestions for replicating the recipe using extract. I always brew all-grain, and I actually learned using all-grain. I don't have one lick of experience brewing with malt extract.

1moreTRich
01-25-2011, 01:50 PM
I don't have any suggestions for replicating the recipe using extract. I always brew all-grain, and I actually learned using all-grain. I don't have one lick of experience brewing with malt extract.

I did about 5 batches of extract before switching to all grain. I haven't done a conversion in about 2 years. I had to look up what temp to steep at and the grain to extract conversion calculator, lol.

Lzen
01-25-2011, 02:56 PM
What do you guys think about this?

<iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/sAJKWCdaPq4" frameborder="0" allowFullScreen></iframe>

Monty
01-25-2011, 02:58 PM
What do you guys think about this?

<iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/sAJKWCdaPq4" frameborder="0" allowFullScreen></iframe>

It's ok, but I'm not willing to bleach my hair first.

Lzen
01-25-2011, 03:15 PM
It's ok, but I'm not willing to bleach my hair first.

:LOL:

1moreTRich
01-25-2011, 04:33 PM
Well at the end you will have beer, but the quality will not be that great. I have watched these videos in the past, to me, there are just a few things that are simple fixes that he could do to result it a much better tasting beer.

Few notes:
Your equipment needs to be sanitized not sterilized. Sterilized is a much higher threshold than is needed.

That can he uses is the prehopped malt, which I have never used myself, but can only assume is not as fresh tasting as using actual hops. But again, I have never used. I have no idea if it gives you any flavor or aroma at all. I guess I just don't like the idea of not being able to control my hop additions.

Corn sugar as a large part of your fermentables is usually unwanted because it can produce a cidery kind of flavor to your beer. If you just use all malt it will result in a much better tasting beer.

I have no idea what that head adjunct stuff is. Never used it. The carapils is what I have always used to help with head retention.

If I remember right in the second video he lets it ferment at a very high temperature, 80 degrees or so? Bad news, this can throw all sorts of off-flavors. Behind sanitation, controlling fermentation temperatures is one of the most important aspects of brewing.

Again, the end result will be beer, but if you already have a taste for good beer, just doing it at a little higher quality will really make a big difference.

Lzen
01-25-2011, 10:44 PM
Well at the end you will have beer, but the quality will not be that great. I have watched these videos in the past, to me, there are just a few things that are simple fixes that he could do to result it a much better tasting beer.

Few notes:
Your equipment needs to be sanitized not sterilized. Sterilized is a much higher threshold than is needed.

That can he uses is the prehopped malt, which I have never used myself, but can only assume is not as fresh tasting as using actual hops. But again, I have never used. I have no idea if it gives you any flavor or aroma at all. I guess I just don't like the idea of not being able to control my hop additions.

Corn sugar as a large part of your fermentables is usually unwanted because it can produce a cidery kind of flavor to your beer. If you just use all malt it will result in a much better tasting beer.

I have no idea what that head adjunct stuff is. Never used it. The carapils is what I have always used to help with head retention.

If I remember right in the second video he lets it ferment at a very high temperature, 80 degrees or so? Bad news, this can throw all sorts of off-flavors. Behind sanitation, controlling fermentation temperatures is one of the most important aspects of brewing.

Again, the end result will be beer, but if you already have a taste for good beer, just doing it at a little higher quality will really make a big difference.

He said between 70-80 degrees. I think he mentioned being closer to the higher end of that range (78 degrees?). What temp do you think he should have used? I am assuming this also depends on the type of beer. Correct?

1moreTRich
01-26-2011, 09:29 AM
He said between 70-80 degrees. I think he mentioned being closer to the higher end of that range (78 degrees?). What temp do you think he should have used? I am assuming this also depends on the type of beer. Correct?

It does depend on the beer, but for the most part 65-68 degrees is pretty optimal for most ales. If you ferment that high (78 degrees), it will be faster, but depending on the yeast used, the off-flavors that will be thrown is pretty large; fusel alcohols and unwanted esters are the main ones. I have fermented high on accident a few time and know first hand how it changes the flavor.

I also can't remember how soon he bottles after taking it off the yeast, but if he says a week, just know that although the yeast may be done fermenting they still are not done doing there job. Leaving it on the yeast for just an extra week or so lets the yeast clean up after themselves and allows for a much cleaner tasting beer.

Stram fan
01-26-2011, 10:28 AM
Sorry, but if you brew the way this guy on you tube did, your beer will be lousy. NEVER, EVER use sugar in the brew pot. It will make the beer cidery and hot tasting. This is an old Charlie Papazion thing, and it just is not done if you want good beer, period! There are times that you can add sugars to the fermenter, like maple syrup, but this guy should have used more extract, not sugar. You use sugar as a primer when you bottle it to get it carbonated, but that's it.

Yeast needs sugar, it "eats" it and produces ethyl alchohol as a by product. Sugar is too simple a molecule for the yeast. The more complex sugars in the extract derived from malted barley is the only way to go. Guy should have used another can of extract instead, and pre-hopped extract is something a strongly recommend against. The oil in hops that adds bitterness to the sweet taste of the wort makes for a balanced beer. These oils are volitile, meaning they can break down and lose their flavor and bittering power.

I didn't see part two, but it sounded like this guy did not cool the wort enough. Did he get it down to 75 or less?

I thought I gave you the info... I said Google "howtobrew". That will get you to Palmer's site. There you can read part of his book. He will steer you away from bogus methods, like adding corn sugar to the brew pot. This guy is a hack as far as I am concerned. He is the classic example of the guy who brags about home brewing and everyone else thinks it sucks except for him.

I can lead you to water, but I can't make you drink. 1moreTrich lnows what he's talking about, but you will never get the info you need to make good decisions here until at the very least you take the intiative of visiting Palmer's web site. If you aren't willing to look into this on your own... don't bother.

The name of Palmer's book is the same as his web site. How to Brew. Just Google it man. I don't have enough posts here to post the link. Most good starter kits include Palmer's book, as I previously told you.

I repeat: If you want to brew good beer, you need a good guide, and that is Palmer's book. If you are as lazy as this guy in the video, your beer will be as lousy as his is, and trust me, it's lousy.

CHENZ A!
01-26-2011, 10:37 AM
Any of you ever make mead?
Posted via Mobile Device

1moreTRich
01-26-2011, 10:40 AM
I can lead you to water, but I can't make you drink. 1moreTrich lnows what he's talking about, but you will never get the info you need to make good decisions here until at the very least you take the intiative of visiting Palmer's web site. If you aren't willing to look into this on your own... don't bother.

she's ;)

Lzen
01-26-2011, 10:54 AM
Sorry, but if you brew the way this guy on you tube did, your beer will be lousy. NEVER, EVER use sugar in the brew pot. It will make the beer cidery and hot tasting. This is an old Charlie Papazion thing, and it just is not done if you want good beer, period! There are times that you can add sugars to the fermenter, like maple syrup, but this guy should have used more extract, not sugar. You use sugar as a primer when you bottle it to get it carbonated, but that's it.

Yeast needs sugar, it "eats" it and produces ethyl alchohol as a by product. Sugar is too simple a molecule for the yeast. The more complex sugars in the extract derived from malted barley is the only way to go. Guy should have used another can of extract instead, and pre-hopped extract is something a strongly recommend against. The oil in hops that adds bitterness to the sweet taste of the wort makes for a balanced beer. These oils are volitile, meaning they can break down and lose their flavor and bittering power.

I didn't see part two, but it sounded like this guy did not cool the wort enough. Did he get it down to 75 or less?

I thought I gave you the info... I said Google "howtobrew". That will get you to Palmer's site. There you can read part of his book. He will steer you away from bogus methods, like adding corn sugar to the brew pot. This guy is a hack as far as I am concerned. He is the classic example of the guy who brags about home brewing and everyone else thinks it sucks except for him.

I can lead you to water, but I can't make you drink. 1moreTrich lnows what he's talking about, but you will never get the info you need to make good decisions here until at the very least you take the intiative of visiting Palmer's web site. If you aren't willing to look into this on your own... don't bother.

The name of Palmer's book is the same as his web site. How to Brew. Just Google it man. I don't have enough posts here to post the link. Most good starter kits include Palmer's book, as I previously told you.

I repeat: If you want to brew good beer, you need a good guide, and that is Palmer's book. If you are as lazy as this guy in the video, your beer will be as lousy as his is, and trust me, it's lousy.

Oh, I plan to check out that website. Just haven't had a chance. Most of my posts on this have been from when I'm at work (heh, slow time of year). And I don't think our monitoring software won't allow me to go on a site like that. I simply haven't had a chance to look at it at home. But I will for sure.

Lzen
01-26-2011, 10:54 AM
she's ;)

Holy crap! A chic that can home brew. :thumb:'

Edit: Perhaps you should not have given that info. Now you will have a ton of CP males bugging you. :p

Stram fan
01-26-2011, 10:57 AM
she's ;)

Um... married? :D:hmmm:;)

Lzen
01-26-2011, 11:00 AM
Um... married? :D:hmmm:;)

ROFL


See what I mean, 1moreTRich?

1moreTRich
01-26-2011, 11:01 AM
ROFL


See what I mean, 1moreTRich?

It's cool, I already said it in one of the other many threads I posted in, lol

And yes, I am married.

Stram fan
01-26-2011, 11:05 AM
:crybaby::sulk::BLVD::harumph:

MOhillbilly
01-26-2011, 11:14 AM
idk why a fella couldnt just get a 55 gal. drum that seals and a burner if he wanted to make enough to last.

Radar Chief
01-26-2011, 11:36 AM
idk why a fella couldnt just get a 55 gal. drum that seals and a burner if he wanted to make enough to last.

It needs to be food grade stainless that has never been used for anything else.
Thing about brewing is if you take, say, a drum that once held pickles all the beer brewed in it would take on the taste of pickles.
All my brew gear is dedicated to nothing but brewing beer for that very reason.

Dayze
01-26-2011, 11:52 AM
she's ;)

TTIWWP

:D

ReynardMuldrake
01-26-2011, 11:58 AM
idk why a fella couldnt just get a 55 gal. drum that seals and a burner if he wanted to make enough to last.

But how would you carb it?

Lzen
01-26-2011, 01:42 PM
But how would you carb it?

Lots of dextrose? Or malt or whatever?

MOhillbilly
01-26-2011, 01:47 PM
It needs to be food grade stainless that has never been used for anything else.
Thing about brewing is if you take, say, a drum that once held pickles all the beer brewed in it would take on the taste of pickles.
All my brew gear is dedicated to nothing but brewing beer for that very reason.

idk my dad used to make wine and malt for his whiskey in 55 gal. drums dont remember a complaint.

Detoxing
01-26-2011, 02:05 PM
she's ;)

OMG! Like, a real girl? I've only seen those outside my window.

Radar Chief
01-26-2011, 02:08 PM
idk my dad used to make wine and malt for his whiskey in 55 gal. drums dont remember a complaint.

What did the drums hold before being used for brewing?

MOhillbilly
01-26-2011, 02:09 PM
What did the drums hold before being used for brewing?

idk he bought them from the farm and home place. I dont think they had held anything before hand.

Radar Chief
01-26-2011, 02:15 PM
idk he bought them from the farm and home place. I dont think they had held anything before hand.

Ah, good. What part of the process was he using them for, boiling or just fermenting?
If he was just fermenting itís probably not such a big deal that it be food grade stainless. I know besides stainless people ferment in plastic, glass and copper.

MOhillbilly
01-26-2011, 02:16 PM
Ah, good. What part of the process was he using them for, boiling or just fermenting?
If he was just fermenting itís probably not such a big deal that it be food grade stainless. I know besides stainless people ferment in plastic, glass and copper.

fermenting the mash and wine.

i didnt ever see them make the actual whiskey. It stank and was dangerous.

Groves
01-26-2011, 04:25 PM
Any of you ever make mead?
Posted via Mobile Device

I'm a year or so away from making mead.

We got our first hive last year, and we'll see how the little buggers do. Flying good today.

Any of you Springfielders see a swarm of bees, lemme know. I'll gladly take em safely away.

Stram fan
01-26-2011, 05:40 PM
I spoke with a guy who used steel drums for his mash tuns and boil pot. I think he used one for fermenting too, but I can't recall. I also don't remember what they were originally used for either. The problem is finding a burner that can deliver the BTU's to get that much wort to boil. Then you would have to have a fairly complicated wort cooling system, a high temp march pump, high temp food grade tubing, counter flow chiller, etc.

When you get into batches that big, those are small brewery batches and generally requires regular commercial brewing equipment.

It is also illegal to brew more than 100 gallons per person in the household with a limit of 200 gallons per year. Not that anyone cares..

CHENZ A!
01-26-2011, 07:53 PM
I'm a year or so away from making mead.

We got our first hive last year, and we'll see how the little buggers do. Flying good today.

Any of you Springfielders see a swarm of bees, lemme know. I'll gladly take em safely away.

that's badass. I think I'm going to give it a try. Probably get some good honey from Whole foods or something to use.

J Diddy
01-26-2011, 09:02 PM
this is an awesome thread. I've been thinking about giving this a whirl for awhile and admittedly will probably start with a mr brew kit---just to see if it hits my fancy. I'd rather do that than drop $175 on garage filler.

Stram fan
01-29-2011, 07:40 PM
Brew with a MR Beer and you will never want to brew again.

Bwana
01-29-2011, 07:44 PM
Any of you ever make mead?
Posted via Mobile Device

Yes, I knocked out a couple of batches of blueberry. Very, very good.

Lzen
02-02-2011, 09:39 PM
I've been doing a little reading on howtobrew.com. I have a decent idea of what I need to get started. But I'm trying to figure out something. The kits I'm looking at have one with a carboy and one without. The one with the carboy (has a few other things, as well) is about 30% more expensive. What is the benefit of a carboy?

marcvanrossen
02-02-2011, 09:47 PM
oh trust me, i am an expert in the home brews. i make a cup like you wont believe. just ask me mate

Lzen
02-03-2011, 11:02 AM
I've been doing a little reading on howtobrew.com. I have a decent idea of what I need to get started. But I'm trying to figure out something. The kits I'm looking at have one with a carboy and one without. The one with the carboy (has a few other things, as well) is about 30% more expensive. What is the benefit of a carboy?

bump

CHENZ A!
02-03-2011, 11:05 AM
Yes, I knocked out a couple of batches of blueberry. Very, very good.

That sounds real good. Could you post your recipe, and any tips if you get time?
Posted via Mobile Device

Radar Chief
02-03-2011, 11:07 AM
bump

The glass carboy will last forever with repeated scrubbing and cleansing.
The other kit must be using some kind of plastic bucket for a fermenter, right? Thatís fine short term but the plastic will scratch with repeated cleaning and scratches can hide wild yeasts and bacteria that can spoil your beer.

Radar Chief
02-03-2011, 11:11 AM
Brew with a MR Beer and you will never want to brew again.

:LOL: Theyíre not quite that bad. I started with a small Mr. Beer kit and made some acceptable tasting beers with it but IMO youíre not going to make beer that you will proudly hand a friend to taste until you grow beyond what Mr. Beer will do.

Dartgod
02-03-2011, 11:37 AM
I've been doing a little reading on howtobrew.com. I have a decent idea of what I need to get started. But I'm trying to figure out something. The kits I'm looking at have one with a carboy and one without. The one with the carboy (has a few other things, as well) is about 30% more expensive. What is the benefit of a carboy?
I assume then that the ones without a carboy just have a single fermenting bucket?

The carboy is for the secondary fermentation stage. You will siphon off the primary into the carboy, leaving all the crap (dead yeast, etc. called trub) that has settled to the bottom behind. There will still be live yeast, suspended in the wort to continue the fermentation process. Basically it helps you produce a clearer, less hazy beer and helps prevent some off flavors being introduced by sitting on the trub too long.

I would recommend getting the kit with the carboy.

Lzen
02-03-2011, 11:46 AM
Thanks, guys. :thumb:

Lzen
02-03-2011, 11:48 AM
The glass carboy will last forever with repeated scrubbing and cleansing.
The other kit must be using some kind of plastic bucket for a fermenter, right? Thatís fine short term but the plastic will scratch with repeated cleaning and scratches can hide wild yeasts and bacteria that can spoil your beer.

I'm just curious of why would the plastic bucket scratch. Wouldn't you clean it with a dish rag and then sanitize it by rinsing with bleach mixture or sanitizing solution? At what point would it get scratched?

Lzen
02-03-2011, 02:15 PM
Is a P.E.T. carboy okay? Or would you guys recommend glass carboy?

Radar Chief
02-03-2011, 02:19 PM
I'm just curious of why would the plastic bucket scratch. Wouldn't you clean it with a dish rag and then sanitize it by rinsing with bleach mixture or sanitizing solution? At what point would it get scratched?

Plastic is soft, even using a soft rag and being careful you will still eventually scuff the surface.
Glass is much harder, you can use an actual carboy brush to clean it.

Radar Chief
02-03-2011, 02:23 PM
Is a P.E.T. carboy okay? Or would you guys recommend glass carboy?

Glass.
You could get tricky and plunk down the coin for a conical fermenter.
Iíve wanted one of these since I first saw them, just donít brew enough to justify the cost.

http://morebeer.com/search/103794/beerwinecoffee/coffeewinebeer/Conical_Beer_Fermenter

LiveSteam
02-03-2011, 02:29 PM
http://www.marijuana-picture.com/gallery/marijuana_bud_close_ups/images/silver_pearl.jpg

Aint it pretty

DMAC
02-03-2011, 02:32 PM
Is a P.E.T. carboy okay? Or would you guys recommend glass carboy?

I have a plastic one. It's fine. Do you plan on brewing a shit ton or like once every couple months.

One thing to either make or invest 40-50 bucks in is a wort chiller. The difference is taking an hour or so to cool the beer down vs. like 5 minutes. (you need to get your boiling beer down to 70 degrees ASAP)

Lzen
02-03-2011, 03:25 PM
I have a plastic one. It's fine. Do you plan on brewing a shit ton or like once every couple months.

One thing to either make or invest 40-50 bucks in is a wort chiller. The difference is taking an hour or so to cool the beer down vs. like 5 minutes. (you need to get your boiling beer down to 70 degrees ASAP)

That's a nice piece of equipment. But couldn't you just put your boiling pot in a sink full of ice water?

DMAC
02-03-2011, 03:27 PM
That's a nice piece of equipment. But couldn't you just put your boiling pot in a sink full of ice water?

That's what takes an hour or so.

DMAC
02-03-2011, 03:31 PM
And you need a lot of ice and a big sink for a 6 or so gallon pot.

MOhillbilly
02-03-2011, 03:32 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNY3_00p180

Lzen
02-03-2011, 03:42 PM
And you need a lot of ice and a big sink for a 6 or so gallon pot.

I see. I may grab one of those down the road. But for now, I don't want to spend the extra $$.

DMAC
02-03-2011, 03:48 PM
I see. I may grab one of those down the road. But for now, I don't want to spend the extra $$.

OOOOOOkay!

Dartgod
02-03-2011, 03:50 PM
I see. I may grab one of those down the road. But for now, I don't want to spend the extra $$.
I did my first couple of batches using the ice method and they turned out fine. It is much quicker using the chiller, however.
Posted via Mobile Device

Radar Chief
02-03-2011, 06:46 PM
That's a nice piece of equipment. But couldn't you just put your boiling pot in a sink full of ice water?

Your worts most vulnerable time is between when you stop boiling and when the yeast starts fermenting. That's what makes a wort chiller nice is you can shorten the time your wort is exposed before you pitch your yeast to it. But a sink full of ice will do the job if you're careful, like Dartgod I did my first couple of batches that way.

Lzen
02-11-2011, 09:23 AM
Okay, got my kit and I'm ready to brew my first batch this weekend. A couple questions for you guys that know this stuff.

- I will be using the glass carboy for the fermenting stage. Correct?

- Then I will siphon it into the plastic bucket for the bottling process after the fermentation period (1 week? Or was that 2 weeks? - need to go back to John Palmer's site for reference). Do I have this right? The reason I ask is that the plastic bucket also has a hole in the top for the airlock. My understanding is that I should ferment in the carboy and transfer to bucket after this stage in order to get rid of some of the sediment prior to bottling.

- Its okay to pour hot boiled water into the glass carboy?
http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter1-1.html
4. Boil the brew water. In the brewpot, bring 2 gallons of water to a boil. Pour this water into the fermentor and leave it to cool.

DMAC
02-11-2011, 09:33 AM
bucket....then carboy. edit: guess it really doesnt matter, thats just the way i do it.

No, you have to cool the beer down to 70 F then put in it the bucket.

no set amount of time. i keep mine in longer than 2 weeks before even transferring to carboy

1moreTRich
02-11-2011, 10:09 AM
Okay, got my kit and I'm ready to brew my first batch this weekend. A couple questions for you guys that know this stuff.

- I will be using the glass carboy for the fermenting stage. Correct?

- Then I will siphon it into the plastic bucket for the bottling process after the fermentation period (1 week? Or was that 2 weeks? - need to go back to John Palmer's site for reference). Do I have this right? The reason I ask is that the plastic bucket also has a hole in the top for the airlock. My understanding is that I should ferment in the carboy and transfer to bucket after this stage in order to get rid of some of the sediment prior to bottling.

- Its okay to pour hot boiled water into the glass carboy?

Wish I would have caught this thread again a week ago.

I have a glass carboy that I really want to get rid of. For me the plastic Better Bottles are just superior because of saftey factor alone. I have heard horror stories of people dropping and breaking the glass carboys that really makes me nervous when I have to use mine.

What size of glass carboy did you get? If it is the 6.5 Gallon size then you will use it for primary fermentation, if you only got the 5 Gallon carboy then that is more of a secondary fermentation (which is really only necessary when you are making a beer that requires more conditioning time such as a lager or a high gravity beer). From what you are describing, it sounds like you got both a fermenting bucket and a glass carboy, did you get another bucket for bottling?

What type of beer are you making? 2 weeks is a good amount of time for most beers, and pretty much the absolute minimum time I will will ferment for.

You should not pour boiling water into the glass carboy. Temperature shock could cause it to break. What I have done in the past is boiled the top off water, let it cool for a while on the stove, then pour it into a sanitized fementer (bucket or Carboy) and then throw my airlock on and put it in fridge to cool down while I do the rest of my brewing. If you don't have a fridge, just let it hang out with the airlock on while you are brewing, but make sure you check the temperature when combining.

1moreTRich
02-11-2011, 10:19 AM
I assume then that the ones without a carboy just have a single fermenting bucket?

The carboy is for the secondary fermentation stage. You will siphon off the primary into the carboy, leaving all the crap (dead yeast, etc. called trub) that has settled to the bottom behind. There will still be live yeast, suspended in the wort to continue the fermentation process. Basically it helps you produce a clearer, less hazy beer and helps prevent some off flavors being introduced by sitting on the trub too long.

I would recommend getting the kit with the carboy.

Secondary is really just needed for extended periods of conditioning. Autolysis (The main reason you transfer to a secondary) has been proven to take a lot longer than previously thought to occur. I had an experimental batch of a very light Blonde Ale that was in the primary for 2 1/2 months to see if my brewing club could detect any autolysis, it was consensus that they could not detect any. I have read other people's accounts that have said the same thing, as does Mr. Palmer himself.

So I guess in summary, the transfer from the primary to the secondary has more chance of harming your beer than leaving your yeast on the beer for anything less than a few months. I have used secondary once in my brewing life and had no discernible different.

Lzen
02-11-2011, 10:23 AM
bucket....then carboy. edit: guess it really doesnt matter, thats just the way i do it.

No, you have to cool the beer down to 70 F then put in it the bucket.

no set amount of time. i keep mine in longer than 2 weeks before even transferring to carboy

See, this is why I'm confused on this. This shows it fermenting in the carboy.

http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter8-2-2.html

1moreTRich
02-11-2011, 10:23 AM
Plastic is soft, even using a soft rag and being careful you will still eventually scuff the surface.
Glass is much harder, you can use an actual carboy brush to clean it.

Absolutely correct on this point. To clean my plastic I let it soak in oxyclean or PBW overnight, then I dump out all but just a bit of the liquid, stuff a rag in it, and use centrifugal force to clean the inside. Works very well, and no chance of a heavy, wet glass carboy slipping out of my hand. To me that is more benefit than possibly having to replace my carboys 5-10 years down the road.

DMAC
02-11-2011, 10:24 AM
I have a keg, cause bottling sucks major wang....

So does cooling down without a wort chiller...

Before I had a carboy I would transfer the beer to the keg, wash out and sanitize the bucket, then syphon the beer right back into it. But, I ended up ponying up for the carboy cause i like to stare at it like its a saltwater aquarium.

1moreTRich
02-11-2011, 10:24 AM
See, this is why I'm confused on this. This shows it fermenting in the carboy.

http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter8-2-2.html

Link to the kit you bought, please.

DMAC
02-11-2011, 10:25 AM
See, this is why I'm confused on this. This shows it fermenting in the carboy.

http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter8-2-2.html

It's probably a larger carboy. Mine is a 5 gallon carboy, so if i fermented in it, it would blow the top off.

The bucket is 6 gallon, so there is room to breathe while fermenting intensly.

Then transfer to the 5 for conditioning.

Lzen
02-11-2011, 10:26 AM
Wish I would have caught this thread again a week ago.

I have a glass carboy that I really want to get rid of. For me the plastic Better Bottles are just superior because of saftey factor alone. I have heard horror stories of people dropping and breaking the glass carboys that really makes me nervous when I have to use mine.

What size of glass carboy did you get? If it is the 6.5 Gallon size then you will use it for primary fermentation, if you only got the 5 Gallon carboy then that is more of a secondary fermentation (which is really only necessary when you are making a beer that requires more conditioning time such as a lager or a high gravity beer). From what you are describing, it sounds like you got both a fermenting bucket and a glass carboy, did you get another bucket for bottling?

What type of beer are you making? 2 weeks is a good amount of time for most beers, and pretty much the absolute minimum time I will will ferment for.

You should not pour boiling water into the glass carboy. Temperature shock could cause it to break. What I have done in the past is boiled the top off water, let it cool for a while on the stove, then pour it into a sanitized fementer (bucket or Carboy) and then throw my airlock on and put it in fridge to cool down while I do the rest of my brewing. If you don't have a fridge, just let it hang out with the airlock on while you are brewing, but make sure you check the temperature when combining.

This is the kit.

http://brewgadgets.com/beerequipkits.htm

The True Brew Handbook
7.8 Gallon Primary Fermenting Bucket with Drilled and Grommeted Lid. This bucket also comes with a spigot so that it can be used as a bottling bucket.
5 Gallon Glass Carboy
(Perfect size for making beer because of the limited head space)
5 Gallon Stainless Steel Kettle with Lid
The True Brew Bottle Filler
Fermometer Adhesive Fermentation Thermometer
True Brew Rack & Fill Kit
Hydrometer
Red Emily Double Lever Capper
Bottle Brush
Carboy Brush
24" Food Grade Plastic Spoon
3 Piece Airlock
C-Brite Sanitizer 8-pack
And Your Choice of These True Brew Ingredient Kits which includes all the ingredients and bottling caps

DMAC
02-11-2011, 10:27 AM
This is the kit.

http://brewgadgets.com/beerequipkits.htm

The True Brew Handbook
7.8 Gallon Primary Fermenting Bucket with Drilled and Grommeted Lid. This bucket also comes with a spigot so that it can be used as a bottling bucket.
5 Gallon Glass Carboy
(Perfect size for making beer because of the limited head space)
5 Gallon Stainless Steel Kettle with Lid
The True Brew Bottle Filler
Fermometer Adhesive Fermentation Thermometer
True Brew Rack & Fill Kit
Hydrometer
Red Emily Double Lever Capper
Bottle Brush
Carboy Brush
24" Food Grade Plastic Spoon
3 Piece Airlock
C-Brite Sanitizer 8-pack
And Your Choice of These True Brew Ingredient Kits which includes all the ingredients and bottling caps

You want to ferment in the bucket, partner.

Lzen
02-11-2011, 10:28 AM
Oh, and I got the True Brew Brown Ale kit.

1moreTRich
02-11-2011, 10:33 AM
You want to ferment in the bucket, partner.

Yep, the process they want you to use is primary in the bucket, transfer to the carboy after at least 2 weeks for conditioning, then use the primary bucket as your bottling bucket.

For a brown, 2-3 weeks in the primary would be fine.

DMAC
02-11-2011, 10:37 AM
on a side note, my second batch of winter ale (with crushed up cinnamon, allspice, and ginger) is getting transferred to carboy tonight.

...giggity.

Lzen
02-11-2011, 10:41 AM
Yep, they process they want you to use is primary in the bucket, transfer to the carboy after at least 2 weeks for conditioning, then use the primary bucket as your bottling bucket.

For a brown, 2-3 weeks in the primary would be fine.

Ok, so let me review just to be sure I'm fully understanding.

After the boil and cool down of the wort, I put it into the bucket. 2-3 weeks later, I transfer to the carboy for conditioning? At what point and in which container do I add the priming sugar?

1moreTRich
02-11-2011, 10:42 AM
on a side note, my second batch of winter ale (with crushed up cinnamon, allspice, and ginger) is getting transferred to carboy tonight.

...giggity.

Sounds delish!

I have brewed to capacity for sister's wedding in a week (7 5gal Corny kegs), which means I have no beer on tap for me :(

Lzen
02-11-2011, 10:44 AM
Another question. What if I wanted to brew another batch while this one is ready for the conditioning stage? Can I bottle from the carboy so that I can use the fermentation bucket for a different batch? The kit came with a rack and fill kit.

Lzen
02-11-2011, 10:46 AM
What do you guys do if you ever decide you want to brew a lager? I don't have an extra fridge in which to do that (wishing now that I would have kept my old fridge when we got a new one a couple weeks ago instead of giving it to my niece).

1moreTRich
02-11-2011, 10:47 AM
Ok, so let me review just to be sure I'm fully understanding.

After the boil and cool down of the wort, I put it into the bucket. 2-3 weeks later, I transfer to the carboy for conditioning? At what point and in which container do I add the priming sugar?

Yes to all. Dmac may be more apt to answer you on how long to secondary because I just don't do it.

As far as adding the sugar, after you let it hang out in the secondary for a while, you will boil the 5 oz or so of priming sugar in with a little water, throw that into your sanitized bucket, siphon from the carboy to the bucket. (I would put the hose in a position so that it would gently swirl the beer while transferring, so that it would mix the priming sugar evenly). Then transfer to bottles.

Dartgod
02-11-2011, 10:49 AM
You want to ferment in the bucket, partner.
Yep.

I use the 1-2-3 rule

1 week in the primary, although you want to make sure that the specific gravity is pretty close to the final product and activity in the airlock has almost ceased.

Then I transfer to the carboy (secondary). Make sure all your transfer equipment; siphon, tubing, carboy, etc. is properly sanitized. You won't get every last drop transfered over. Just leave all the dead yeast and other crap in the bucket.

2 weeks in the secondary and then transfer back into the bucket for bottling. Again, make sure everything is sanitized well including your bottles and caps.

3 weeks in the bottle (minimum) before drinking. I prefer to wait 6 weeks myself, but will usually pop one open after 3 just to make sure all is well.

You also want to measure the specific gravity before starting the fermentation. You can compare it to the final gravity measurement and get an accurate idea off the alcohol content.

1moreTRich
02-11-2011, 10:54 AM
Another question. What if I wanted to brew another batch while this one is ready for the conditioning stage? Can I bottle from the carboy so that I can use the fermentation bucket for a different batch? The kit came with a rack and fill kit.

If it was me, I would go get another bucket that is just a bottling bucket. That way you can have two batches going at once, and not have to worry about emptying the primary to have bottling bucket.

Also,theoretically, you could just bottle from the primary or secondary. They have little pellets of priming sugar that you just put into each bottle, then transfer the beer into the bottles. This would probably leave you with a bit more sedimentation in your bottles though. I personally have never used those priming tablets though.

DMAC
02-11-2011, 10:56 AM
Yep.

I use the 1-2-3 rule

1 week in the primary, although you want to make sure that the specific gravity is pretty close to the final product and activity in the airlock has almost ceased.

Then I transfer to the carboy (secondary). Make sure all your transfer equipment; siphon, tubing, carboy, etc. is properly sanitized. You won't get every last drop transfered over. Just leave all the dead yeast and other crap in the bucket.

2 weeks in the secondary and then transfer back into the bucket for bottling. Again, make sure everything is sanitized well including your bottles and caps.

3 weeks in the bottle (minimum) before drinking. I prefer to wait 6 weeks myself, but will usually pop one open after 3 just to make sure all is well.

You also want to measure the specific gravity before starting the fermentation. You can compare it to the final gravity measurement and get an accurate idea off the alcohol content.

I do a 2-1 rule myself.

2 weeks in the primary. 1 week in the secondary. And i dont bottle, so usually a 3-4 days just sitting in the keg carbonatin.

Dartgod
02-11-2011, 10:57 AM
I wouldn't attempt to have more than one batch going until you have 2 or 3 under your belt and understand the process well.

1moreTRich
02-11-2011, 10:59 AM
What do you guys do if you ever decide you want to brew a lager? I don't have an extra fridge in which to do that (wishing now that I would have kept my old fridge when we got a new one a couple weeks ago instead of giving it to my niece).

If you want to lager, you will have to have some sort of way to keep your temperatures down. Now is a perfect time to lager if you don't have a dedicated fridge; cold basement temps or possibly garage? It just about being able to keep it at a fairly consistent 50 degrees or so (depending on your yeast).

There is always the Steam beer alternative, lager yeast at ale temps, as well.

Lzen
02-11-2011, 10:59 AM
I wouldn't attempt to have more than one batch going until you have 2 or 3 under your belt and understand the process well.

Heh heh. That's probably a good idea. I'm just kinda gung ho right now. :D

DMAC
02-11-2011, 10:59 AM
I wouldn't attempt to have more than one batch going until you have 2 or 3 under your belt and understand the process well.

Screw that! Balls to the wall Lzen!

1moreTRich
02-11-2011, 11:00 AM
I do a 2-1 rule myself.

2 weeks in the primary. 1 week in the secondary. And i dont bottle, so usually a 3-4 days just sitting in the keg carbonatin.

I would be more in agreement with this. 1 week in primary is just not enough time to let the yeast do there full job.

Reaper16
02-11-2011, 11:27 AM
bump
No oxidation, easier to keep sanitary. Plastic scratches pretty easily, and those scratches are when bugs and mold and stuff can dig in an live. You're not going to have that problem with a glass carboy.

Radar Chief
02-11-2011, 12:45 PM
Sounds delish!

I have brewed to capacity for sister's wedding in a week (7 5gal Corny kegs), which means I have no beer on tap for me :(

:eek: Tell sis she owes you big time. ;)

Radar Chief
02-11-2011, 04:33 PM
I have to admit I havenít brewed in years, mostly because my free time has been spent on my Jeep, but this topic has inspired me to dust off my brew gear and brew up a batch.
Since Mrs. Radarís English pen pal is coming back this year and he kept raving about ďbittersĒ but we couldnít find a comparable microbrew, Iím going to brew a batch of it. I figure if I get after it now I should be able to have it ready by the time he gets here in June.

DMAC
02-11-2011, 04:35 PM
I have to admit I havenít brewed in years, mostly because my free time has been spent on my Jeep, but this topic has inspired me to dust off my brew gear and brew up a batch.
Since Mrs. Radarís English pen pal is coming back this year and he kept raving about ďbittersĒ but we couldnít find a comparable microbrew, Iím going to brew a batch of it. I figure if I get after it now I should be able to have it ready by the time he gets here in June.

Your Mrs. has a dude in England that she writes letters to?

Radar Chief
02-11-2011, 04:37 PM
Your Mrs. has a dude in England that she writes letters to?

Sure. He came and spent two weeks with us last year. Had a blast too.

DMAC
02-11-2011, 04:39 PM
Sure. He came and spent two weeks with us last year. Had a blast too.

Oh...

Ok then.

:thumb:

http://www.gifsoup.com/view/94500/jer-o.gif

Lzen
02-13-2011, 09:07 AM
First batch is in the fermenting bucket in the basement. Airlock is bubbling and temp. is around 63. In about a month, I should have a brown ale to drink. :)

Radar Chief
02-13-2011, 11:12 AM
Oh...

Ok then.

:thumb:

http://www.gifsoup.com/view/94500/jer-o.gif

I know, I even let her outside unsupervised.

Lzen
02-14-2011, 10:18 AM
Last night, the temp was getting low (around 60F). So I put a couple towels and a strand of Christmas lights around the bucket. Temp this morning was about 68F. :)

1moreTRich
02-14-2011, 12:20 PM
Last night, the temp was getting low (around 60F). So I put a couple towels and a strand of Christmas lights around the bucket. Temp this morning was about 68F. :)

Don't be too scared if it is in the 60-68 range, as long as it is still fermenting then you are good. Just remember that if you do get in that lower range (60 and below), make sure to bring it up to around 68 degrees for a diacetyl rest a few days before racking. Diacetyl causes a slick, butter like quality in the beer and is cause when the yeast ferment to low and are not allowed to consume all the diacetyl present. Believe me, I know, I made a batch and was always told, low temps are good, just avoid high temps at all costs. While good advice, no one made me aware of the issue of diacetyl and it tasted like buttered popcorn (worked really good for some beer battered fish though, lol). Just making sure it hits 68-70 degrees a few days before you rack is all that you need to do.

Christmas lights, brilliant!

1moreTRich
02-14-2011, 12:22 PM
First batch is in the fermenting bucket in the basement. Airlock is bubbling and temp. is around 63. In about a month, I should have a brown ale to drink. :)

So how did the process go? Any issues?

DMAC
02-14-2011, 01:20 PM
Yeah, did ya boil over??

Lzen
02-14-2011, 02:13 PM
Yeah, did ya boil over??

No boil over. Process went pretty well. Only issue was cool down took a while. Didn't occur to me at first that I should have been using a sink full of ice water instead of just ice. ;)

Lzen
02-14-2011, 02:14 PM
Don't be too scared if it is in the 60-68 range, as long as it is still fermenting then you are good. Just remember that if you do get in that lower range (60 and below), make sure to bring it up to around 68 degrees for a diacetyl rest a few days before racking. Diacetyl causes a slick, butter like quality in the beer and is cause when the yeast ferment to low and are not allowed to consume all the diacetyl present. Believe me, I know, I made a batch and was always told, low temps are good, just avoid high temps at all costs. While good advice, no one made me aware of the issue of diacetyl and it tasted like buttered popcorn (worked really good for some beer battered fish though, lol). Just making sure it hits 68-70 degrees a few days before you rack is all that you need to do.

Christmas lights, brilliant!

Wish I could take credit for the Christmas lights idea. I saw that somewhere else (youtube?).

DMAC
02-14-2011, 02:28 PM
No boil over. Process went pretty well. Only issue was cool down took a while. Didn't occur to me at first that I should have been using a sink full of ice water instead of just ice. ;)

ahem....

WORT CHILLER

1moreTRich
02-14-2011, 02:50 PM
ahem....

WORT CHILLER

LOL

Ah come on, you got to do it in a ice bath a couple time before you can truly appreciate a wort chiller. :)

Lzen
02-14-2011, 03:15 PM
ahem....

WORT CHILLER

Lol. I hear ya. I told you I would probably eventually grab one. I just didn't want to spend any more than I already have at this point. ;)

Lzen
03-15-2011, 01:08 PM
Popped open one of my first batch of home brew (brown ale) on Sunday. It was only a week after bottling, but it actually tasted pretty good. By this Sunday I think the carbonation should be at full strength and it will be even better. Thanks again to everyone for the great advice on getting me started. :thumb:

Radar Chief
03-15-2011, 01:14 PM
Popped open one of my first batch of home brew (brown ale) on Sunday. It was only a week after bottling, but it actually tasted pretty good. By this Sunday I think the carbonation should be at full strength and it will be even better. Thanks again to everyone for the great advice on getting me started. :thumb:

Congrats on a successful brew. :clap: After youíre positive theyíve had enough carbonating time throw a few in the fridge for a couple of weeks. Youíll be amazed how much they mellow and blend with some time in the fridge.

DMAC
03-15-2011, 01:28 PM
Sweet dude!

The only other tip I will give you is go easy on the sharing. I know you want people to taste what you have created, but trust me, it goes FAST.

So if you do drink a lot or share a lot, just know when to start the other one so you dont have to wait as long.

shirtsleeve
04-03-2011, 02:50 PM
Canadian Ale.

Grains:
.5# cara pils
.5# Canadian 2 row barley (or any suitable 2 row substitute)

Extract:
4# light malt liquid extract(or 1 3.3# can if your supplier does not bulk extracts)
2# light spray malt

Hops:
2 oz. willamette hops (pellet)

Yeast:
WLP001 California Ale

Steep: 20 mins. Single rinse

Boil:30 mins, first oz hops at boil, 2nd oz at end of boil.

pitch yeast at 70 deg. primary 7-10 days Secondary 2 weeks. (First at ambient, second at 40 deg.) carbonate at 22psi for 7 days. Or prime and bottle. Age 30 days before refrigerating.

You will like it.

edit. If you are still bottling, secondary should be done at ambient (60-72) Its been a while since ive bottled.

shirtsleeve
04-03-2011, 03:13 PM
Lol. I hear ya. I told you I would probably eventually grab one. I just didn't want to spend any more than I already have at this point. ;)

You really wont need a wort chiller as long as you are extract or partial mash brewing. When you go all grain, you will. Oh and if you have a sanitary supply of ice, you can add 5# in the fermentation bucket to cool the 2 or 3 gals of wort you just brewed, then add sanitary water to the 5 gallon line. Thats what I do, but I have fresh spring water to my faucets which I can freeze in plastic bags. I know different areas present different challenges. Still take one gallon of safe water and split it into two gallon sized freezer bags and freeze them. Drop one into each of your next two batches, then pour the hot wort over them.

I am in the middle of two batches right now which will be in primary tonight. One is the Canadian that I posted.

I will brew lagers and pils next because my basement will be up to temp enough to ferment by then.

shirtsleeve
04-03-2011, 05:34 PM
finished. two batches tucked away in our spare room. First brews since just after the holidays. Three weeks I brew a pils and I am pondering the other lager. I get two shots at these then its back to ales.

shirtsleeve
04-04-2011, 05:53 PM
For a completey different beer from almost the same recipe I filed above. Add 1# cara amber to the grains (single rinse still ok, bigger rinse pot needed) and change the yeast to Wyeast British Ale 1135.

The Brew goes from a lighter ale with a nice herbal nose to a maltier and more full bodied brew. Thats without even changing hops or extracts. This is a good excercise to enjoy what a different yeast can do to your beer. The pound of grains will add some body and malt, true, as well as darkening the ale a bit. But the big difference here will be the yeast.

Lzen
06-15-2011, 02:26 PM
Anyone have any good supplier recommendations (looking for recipe kits, mainly)? If not, I'm gonna try out Midwest Supplies (thanks 1moreTRich). I was using Brewgadgets but wanted to find something perhaps a little cheaper.

I have now brewed 3 batches. The first one was a brown ale and it turned out pretty well. Most people that tried it enjoyed it. The one person who said he didn't was a regular Bud Select drinker so I take that opinion with a grain of salt.

The 2nd batch was a porter. I don't know if I messed up during the process somewhere, put some in the fridge too early, or its simply not a great tasting beer. It tasted a bit sweet. I will try it again now that it has had a few weeks fermentation time and see if it has gotten any better.

The most recent one is a pale ale. This turned out well, too. While its not as great a pale as Blvd or Sierra Nevada, it is pretty good and I will definitely be enjoying drinking those. Again, I tried it after about a week to a week and a half of bottling. I know it will get better with a little more aging so I'm happy with the way it turned out. I even loved smelling those extra hops when I was brewing this one. :)

ReynardMuldrake
06-15-2011, 02:31 PM
Anyone have any good supplier recommendations (looking for recipe kits, mainly)? If not, I'm gonna try out Midwest Supplies (thanks 1moreTRich). I was using Brewgadgets but wanted to find something perhaps a little cheaper.

I have now brewed 3 batches. The first one was a brown ale and it turned out pretty well. Most people that tried it enjoyed it. The one person who said he didn't was a regular Bud Select drinker so I take that opinion with a grain of salt.

The 2nd batch was a porter. I don't know if I messed up during the process somewhere, put some in the fridge too early, or its simply not a great tasting beer. It tasted a bit sweet. I will try it again now that it has had a few weeks fermentation time and see if it has gotten any better.

The most recent one is a pale ale. This turned out well, too. While its not as great a pale as Blvd or Sierra Nevada, it is pretty good and I will definitely be enjoying drinking those. Again, I tried it after about a week to a week and a half of bottling. I know it will get better with a little more aging so I'm happy with the way it turned out. I even loved smelling those extra hops when I was brewing this one. :)

I go to Bacchus & Barleycorn in Shawnee. Midwest Supplies is good if you're looking online.

Lzen
06-15-2011, 02:34 PM
I go to Bacchus & Barleycorn in Shawnee. Midwest Supplies is good if you're looking online.

Yeah, the only problem is that I live in Topeka. We have a place called Ale & Vino. I remembered seeing commercials for it years ago. So I went over to check it out and was disappointed. Their selection is lame. Pretty much just a little hole in the wall mom and pop shop in a crappy section of town.

Lzen
06-15-2011, 02:34 PM
Oh, and DMAC I still don't have a wort chiller. :p

Dartgod
06-15-2011, 02:35 PM
Anyone have any good supplier recommendations (looking for recipe kits, mainly)? If not, I'm gonna try out Midwest Supplies (thanks 1moreTRich). I was using Brewgadgets but wanted to find something perhaps a little cheaper.

I have now brewed 3 batches. The first one was a brown ale and it turned out pretty well. Most people that tried it enjoyed it. The one person who said he didn't was a regular Bud Select drinker so I take that opinion with a grain of salt.

The 2nd batch was a porter. I don't know if I messed up during the process somewhere, put some in the fridge too early, or its simply not a great tasting beer. It tasted a bit sweet. I will try it again now that it has had a few weeks fermentation time and see if it has gotten any better.

The most recent one is a pale ale. This turned out well, too. While its not as great a pale as Blvd or Sierra Nevada, it is pretty good and I will definitely be enjoying drinking those. Again, I tried it after about a week to a week and a half of bottling. I know it will get better with a little more aging so I'm happy with the way it turned out. I even loved smelling those extra hops when I was brewing this one. :)
I don't know what the prices are like, but you have a homebrew/wine making shop in Topeka.

http://www.ale-n-vino.com/index.html


EDIT: Just read your last post, so nevermind.

DMAC
06-15-2011, 02:39 PM
Oh, and DMAC I still don't have a wort chiller. :p

:loser:

DMAC
06-15-2011, 02:44 PM
:loser:

Dont worry though...I'm just as much of a :loser:...

I unplugged the kegerator to plug in a shop vac real quick. Then forgot to plug it back in.

Luckily there was no beer in there but there was beef and chicken in the freezer that sat in the heat of the garage for over a week. It stinks bad dude.

1moreTRich
06-15-2011, 02:49 PM
Anyone have any good supplier recommendations (looking for recipe kits, mainly)? If not, I'm gonna try out Midwest Supplies (thanks 1moreTRich). I was using Brewgadgets but wanted to find something perhaps a little cheaper.

I have now brewed 3 batches. The first one was a brown ale and it turned out pretty well. Most people that tried it enjoyed it. The one person who said he didn't was a regular Bud Select drinker so I take that opinion with a grain of salt.

The 2nd batch was a porter. I don't know if I messed up during the process somewhere, put some in the fridge too early, or its simply not a great tasting beer. It tasted a bit sweet. I will try it again now that it has had a few weeks fermentation time and see if it has gotten any better.

The most recent one is a pale ale. This turned out well, too. While its not as great a pale as Blvd or Sierra Nevada, it is pretty good and I will definitely be enjoying drinking those. Again, I tried it after about a week to a week and a half of bottling. I know it will get better with a little more aging so I'm happy with the way it turned out. I even loved smelling those extra hops when I was brewing this one. :)

For any of my extra supplies (my brew club does bulk grain and hop buys) I almost exclusively use http://www.brewmasterswarehouse.com/. Their prices are comparable and they have great customer service. Their brewbuilder is awesome and you can search through other brewer's recipes for ideas. You get a 10% discount when you use the brewbuilder to buy ingredients with code BBBYO.

As for the porter, usually when it turns out on the sweet side, it got racked before the yeast were done or you had a stuck fermentation. How long did you let it sit in the primary? Did you take a gravity reading when you bottled it?

Just a tip, if you love the hoppy aroma of pales and ipa, try dry hopping (add some hops in the carboy around 3-7 days before you rack it to bottles). It gives it such an extra dimension. I don't make a pale or IPA without dry hopping.

DMAC
06-15-2011, 02:52 PM
Just a tip, if you love the hoppy aroma of pales and ipa, try dry hopping (add some hops in the carboy around 3-7 days before you rack it to bottles). It gives it such an extra dimension. I don't make a pale or IPA without dry hopping.

Oh the aroma is so flowery. Makka me hoppy happy.

1moreTRich
06-15-2011, 02:57 PM
Oh the aroma is so flowery. Makka me hoppy happy.

:drool:

Lzen
06-15-2011, 03:03 PM
For any of my extra supplies (my brew club does bulk grain and hop buys) I almost exclusively use http://www.brewmasterswarehouse.com/. Their prices are comparable and they have great customer service. Their brewbuilder is awesome and you can search through other brewer's recipes for ideas. You get a 10% discount when you use the brewbuilder to buy ingredients with code BBBYO.

As for the porter, usually when it turns out on the sweet side, it got racked before the yeast were done or you had a stuck fermentation. How long did you let it sit in the primary? Did you take a gravity reading when you bottled it?

Just a tip, if you love the hoppy aroma of pales and ipa, try dry hopping (add some hops in the carboy around 3-7 days before you rack it to bottles). It gives it such an extra dimension. I don't make a pale or IPA without dry hopping.

Thanks for the tips. I will definitely try dry hopping next time.

Shag
06-15-2011, 03:09 PM
<a href="http://www.northernbrewer.com" target="_blank">Northern Brewer</a> and <a href="http://www.midwestsupplies.com" target="_blank">Midwest Supplies</a> are both great retailers. I'm fortunate enough to live close to both, and use both, depending on which is more convenient at the time. Never mail ordered from either, but I've heard great things about both of them in that respect - I believe Midwest may be a little cheaper.

I know they give at 10% discount to AHA members in the stores. Not sure if it applies to online orders or not, but might be worth checking, if you're a member.

DMAC
10-10-2011, 04:49 PM
Just a tip, if you love the hoppy aroma of pales and ipa, try dry hopping (add some hops in the carboy around 3-7 days before you rack it to bottles). It gives it such an extra dimension. I don't make a pale or IPA without dry hopping.

What variety would you suggest for an APA? Cascade?

crispystl420
11-12-2011, 05:42 PM
Ok just put my first wort in the fermenter. We'll see how it turns out.

crispystl420
11-12-2011, 05:44 PM
I used a blonde ale malt extract and some honey along with the half the booster. Just using a MR Beer kit for now until I get a little practice. The shit actually smelled great though.

rageeumr
11-12-2011, 05:50 PM
Ok just put my first wort in the fermenter. We'll see how it turns out.

I hope it's tasty. I'll do this one day. No time for another hobby right now, though.

Pawnmower
11-12-2011, 05:56 PM
Ok just put my first wort in the fermenter. We'll see how it turns out.

conrats and rep

crispystl420
11-12-2011, 06:00 PM
Thanks

I just have one question... the only way i have to keep the temp stable is to ferment it in the house I have it in one of those soft coolers zipped up almost all the way. Could this be risking a huge mess?I'm going out of town for a week and I don't want that shit to explode all over my house lol.

Pawnmower
11-12-2011, 06:03 PM
Thanks

I just have one question... the only way i have to keep the temp stable is to ferment it in the house I have it in one of those soft coolers zipped up almost all the way. Could this be risking a huge mess?I'm going out of town for a week and I don't want that shit to explode all over my house lol.

Well, the fermetation (primary) is pretty violent, and can blow pretty good....

I once left for a few days and it blew just hard enough to blow all the water out of my air water -lock, and ruined a batch...i dont think you could make too much of a mess tho besides a little spilled brew

If you are past the violent stage, you SHOULD be ok....maybe just leave your heater at like 61 ?

When are you leaving??

Pawnmower
11-12-2011, 06:08 PM
Also you could build a bigger fermentaion lock thats more fail proof:

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-your-own-Fermentation-Lock-Not-a-ball/

crispystl420
11-12-2011, 06:10 PM
Well, the fermetation (primary) is pretty violent, and can blow pretty good....

I once left for a few days and it blew just hard enough to blow all the water out of my air water -lock, and ruined a batch...i dont think you could make too much of a mess tho besides a little spilled brew

If you are past the violent stage, you SHOULD be ok....maybe just leave your heater at like 61 ?

When are you leaving??

I'll be leaving Friday afternoon. I think having it zipped in the soft cooler should prevent any major explosions. Hopefully if anything happens it will be contained in the cooler.

Pawnmower
11-12-2011, 10:18 PM
I'll be leaving Friday afternoon. I think having it zipped in the soft cooler should prevent any major explosions. Hopefully if anything happens it will be contained in the cooler.

you should be good by then, especially if you build/use a larger water lock like the one above

crispystl420
11-13-2011, 10:26 AM
you should be good by then, especially if you build/use a larger water lock like the one above

Cool thanks man

DMAC
01-31-2012, 02:23 PM
Poured my first glass of dry hopped California Common/ Steam beer.

It is a hopped up version of Anchor Steam. I kept my house at 65 degrees for 3 weeks for this beer to ferment properly. Now I can finally reap the rewards (and turn up the thermostat).

I highly recommend dry hopping if you love that flowery aroma.

Lzen
01-31-2012, 03:35 PM
Poured my first glass of dry hopped California Common/ Steam beer.

It is a hopped up version of Anchor Steam. I kept my house at 65 degrees for 3 weeks for this beer to ferment properly. Now I can finally reap the rewards (and turn up the thermostat).

I highly recommend dry hopping if you love that flowery aroma.

Sounds great. I need to order a brew kit. Haven't brewed in a few months. Last one I did was an amber ale. I wasn't as fond of it. I think I'll order another brown ale. That one seemed to go over pretty well.

DMAC
01-31-2012, 03:44 PM
Sounds great. I need to order a brew kit. Haven't brewed in a few months. Last one I did was an amber ale. I wasn't as fond of it. I think I'll order another brown ale. That one seemed to go over pretty well.

Where do you order from?

KC Dan
01-31-2012, 03:44 PM
My son just keg'ed his latest beer (Irish Stout) and when I return from this businees trip, I am looking forward to drinking it. Especially out of my christmas gift to him (kegging gear) :thumb:

Lzen
01-31-2012, 03:52 PM
Where do you order from?

I can't remember the name of the place I first ordered from, but I've been using Midwest Supplies the last few brews.

DMAC
01-31-2012, 04:01 PM
I can't remember the name of the place I first ordered from, but I've been using Midwest Supplies the last few brews.

I made this Honey Brown Ale once from The Home Brewery. It was VERY good.

http://www.homebrewery.com/beer/beer-kits-ales.shtml (5th one down)

Bwana
01-31-2012, 04:02 PM
Man, I need to knock out a few batches. My carboys are out there collecting dust.

Dartgod
01-31-2012, 05:21 PM
Man, I need to knock out a few batches. My carboys are out there collecting dust.

Me too. Been about 3 years since I've brewed.

shirtsleeve
02-02-2012, 08:28 PM
I'm due too. I wanna try a lower alcohol/calorie beer (@4%abv, like a domestic "lite") with a nice hoppy kick and balanced malt taste. I have some research to do, but will run a small amount of biscuit, and maybe some amber grains to enhance flavor without hitting it too hard with malt sugars. I'm thinking of hopping it like a good western IPA. lots of citrus notes.

MOhillbilly
10-17-2012, 02:12 PM
Have a batch of hard cider goin. Stinks like death.

DMAC
10-17-2012, 02:16 PM
Never tried that. The smell makes it through the air lock?

R8RFAN
10-17-2012, 03:44 PM
Never tried that. The smell makes it through the air lock?

When the yeast is eating it produces co2 the air lock will release that co2 a few times an hour...


The air lock is basically an upside down cap that is under water that lets air escape but won't let air in.


I used to make beer 15 or so years ago... I may get back into it.

DMAC
10-17-2012, 04:08 PM
When the yeast is eating it produces co2 the air lock will release that co2 a few times an hour...


The air lock is basically an upside down cap that is under water that lets air escape but won't let air in.


I used to make beer 15 or so years ago... I may get back into it.

When I brew my beer, the gas bubbles out, but it never stinks at all.

Chiefs=Good
10-17-2012, 04:10 PM
NO TIME FOR THIS GUYS! SCOTT PIOLI! MATT CASSHOLE! CANDY RAPPER! TO ARMS!!!!

DMAC
10-17-2012, 04:19 PM
NO TIME FOR THIS GUYS! SCOTT PIOLI! MATT CASSHOLE! CANDY RAPPER! TO ARMS!!!!

Exactly. We need to drink.

1moreTRich
10-17-2012, 04:34 PM
Have a batch of hard cider goin. Stinks like death.

During the beginning parts of the fermentation, depending on the yeast, you can throw off a lot of sulphur. A lot of cider yeast does this. Won't effect the end product and nothing to worry about. Stinks like rotten eggs, though.

R8RFAN
10-17-2012, 04:47 PM
When I brew my beer, the gas bubbles out, but it never stinks at all.

I never thought mine did either, I guess different combos of the organic stuff the yeast is eating gives off different smells .. I know I could never drink something that stinks..

Groves
10-17-2012, 05:19 PM
Did you add yeast or go with whatever yeasts were in there already? I'm jealous.

MOhillbilly
10-17-2012, 05:20 PM
My stepsons room is in the basement and he is super pissed.

MOhillbilly
10-17-2012, 05:24 PM
Did you add yeast or go with whatever yeasts were in there already? I'm jealous.

I added yeast. Some Shit to make it super dry. Gonna make a batch of peary after we turn 640# of tomatoes into goodness.

R8RFAN
10-17-2012, 05:44 PM
Homebrewing should be a helluva lot easier that it was for me in the early 90's .... Look at all the places you can get recipes and stuff... Also there are alot nicer kits available now...

MOhillbilly
10-17-2012, 06:05 PM
Bought from e.c.kraus direct.

DMAC
01-10-2013, 11:48 AM
I just can't seem to get that flowery/citrusy hoppy flavor in my IPA style beers.

I'm putting around 3 oz during the boil for flavor, then another 2-3 oz dry hop for aroma.

Aroma seems to be there, but the taste is lacking.

More hops in the boil? Any recommendations? I bought some Nelson Sauvin hops I am excited to use.

1moreTRich
01-10-2013, 12:35 PM
I just can't seem to get that flowery/citrusy hoppy flavor in my IPA style beers.

I'm putting around 3 oz during the boil for flavor, then another 2-3 oz dry hop for aroma.

Aroma seems to be there, but the taste is lacking.

More hops in the boil? Any recommendations? I bought some Nelson Sauvin hops I am excited to use.


What hops are you using? Dry hopping usually does the trick for aroma, but you might want to do some 30-15min and flame out additions as well. That should boost the flavor profile.

Haven't used or heard too much about Nelson Sauvin hops. Let us know what you think.

DMAC
01-10-2013, 01:58 PM
What hops are you using? Dry hopping usually does the trick for aroma, but you might want to do some 30-15min and flame out additions as well. That should boost the flavor profile.

Haven't used or heard too much about Nelson Sauvin hops. Let us know what you think.

Centennial. I probably need to boost the % a bit.

Any recommendations?

I have had beer brewed with Nelson hops. EFFING GOOD.

1moreTRich
01-10-2013, 03:38 PM
Centennial. I probably need to boost the % a bit.

Any recommendations?

I have had beer brewed with Nelson hops. EFFING GOOD.

When you say %, do you mean IBUs? amount of hops? Alcohol? Centennial usually runs in the 9-11% AA ranges so I'm guessing you are getting around 100 IBUs which puts you more in the Imperial range. Is that what you are going for? What is your grain bill like?

I've done a nice single IPA with all Centennial (it was a 2 Hearted Ale Clone). Off the top of my head it was something like 5 oz all together; an ounce at 60, 45, 20, flame out, and dry hop. It ends up being around 60 IBUs with a OG around 1.060. Actually won a couple awards with that beer.

Centennial is one of my favorite hops, but if you want to get a wider array of flavors, you might throw in something else as well. If your going for the heavy floral/citrus Pacific NW feel, any of the C hops would be fine (Chinook, Cascade, Challenger). I'm also a big fan of Amarillo.

DMAC
01-10-2013, 04:02 PM
When you say %, do you mean IBUs? amount of hops? Alcohol? Centennial usually runs in the 9-11% AA ranges so I'm guessing you are getting around 100 IBUs which puts you more in the Imperial range. Is that what you are going for? What is your grain bill like?

I've done a nice single IPA with all Centennial (it was a 2 Hearted Ale Clone). Off the top of my head it was something like 5 oz all together; an ounce at 60, 45, 20, flame out, and dry hop. It ends up being around 60 IBUs with a OG around 1.060. Actually won a couple awards with that beer.

Centennial is one of my favorite hops, but if you want to get a wider array of flavors, you might throw in something else as well. If your going for the heavy floral/citrus Pacific NW feel, any of the C hops would be fine (Chinook, Cascade, Challenger). I'm also a big fan of Amarillo.
Thanks, this helps alot.

You had me at Two Hearted Ale Clone.

1moreTRich
01-10-2013, 04:25 PM
Thanks, this helps alot.

You had me at Two Hearted Ale Clone.

Haha, one of my absolute favorites.

I tracked down my recipe if you want to check it out:

10lb 2 Row
2lbs Vienna
8oz Carapils
8oz Crystal 15L

Mash 151 for 60 mins

Hop additions

.75oz Centennial 60mins
.25oz Centennial 45mins
1oz Centennial 20mins
1oz Centennial 5mins
1oz Centennial 1min
1oz Centennial dry hop 7 days

Yeast: Safale US05
Ferment @ 65 degrees for 4 weeks.

DMAC
01-10-2013, 04:33 PM
http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mc3hg5VpQP1qcy0p7o1_500.gif

Phobia
01-10-2013, 06:12 PM
I guess I'll be joining you guys soon. Got a kit for Christmas. Haven't even attempted anything yet.

KC Dan
01-10-2013, 06:13 PM
Me too. Been about 3 years since I've brewed.Funny that it has been about that long since I have come and visited you. Coincidence or not???

kstater
01-10-2013, 07:45 PM
I just can't seem to get that flowery/citrusy hoppy flavor in my IPA style beers.

I'm putting around 3 oz during the boil for flavor, then another 2-3 oz dry hop for aroma.

Aroma seems to be there, but the taste is lacking.

More hops in the boil? Any recommendations? I bought some Nelson Sauvin hops I am excited to use.

Do a lot of late addition.

Radar Chief
02-05-2013, 02:09 PM
Got a Kegerator last night and now I need to get the O2 bottle filled. Any help from the guys with kegging gear is appreciated.
Getting this setup has resparked my interest in brewing. Part of the reason I havenít done it in a while is the hassle of sanitizing 50 some bottles to bottle my brew. If I could syphon it into one keg and let it effervesce there Iíd probably do it more often.

1moreTRich
02-05-2013, 02:27 PM
Got a Kegerator last night and now I need to get the O2 bottle filled. Any help from the guys with kegging gear is appreciated.
Getting this setup has resparked my interest in brewing. Part of the reason I havenít done it in a while is the hassle of sanitizing 50 some bottles to bottle my brew. If I could syphon it into one keg and let it effervesce there Iíd probably do it more often.

You need to fill it with Co2 not O2. I'm in Wichita, but any welding or fire extinguisher place in your area should be able to fill it or exchange it. What else do you need help with? Is it home built or store bought kegerator? Do you have any kegs yet?

Radar Chief
02-05-2013, 02:37 PM
You need to fill it with Co2 not O2. I'm in Wichita, but any welding or fire extinguisher place in your area should be able to fill it or exchange it.

Ok, Co2, I was being lazy but youíre right there is a difference.
The reason I ask is there seems to be conflicting information on the internet as to whether a welding supply shop will have lubricant in the Co2, but thinking about it I canít come up with any useful purpose that would serve to a welder.

What else do you need help with? Is it home built or store bought kegerator? Do you have any kegs yet?

Store bought, donít have any kegs yet, just looking to get it setup and probably buy a keg of commercial beer just to try it out.
When I do get around to home brewing a batch Iíll most likely go with Cornelius Kegs but they have ball locks, one for gas in and one fluid out. How do you adapt that to a typical Sankey keg valve?

Marcellus
02-05-2013, 02:58 PM
Haha, one of my absolute favorites.

I tracked down my recipe if you want to check it out:

10lb 2 Row
2lbs Vienna
8oz Carapils
8oz Crystal 15L

Mash 151 for 60 mins

Hop additions

.75oz Centennial 60mins
.25oz Centennial 45mins
1oz Centennial 20mins
1oz Centennial 5mins
1oz Centennial 1min
1oz Centennial dry hop 7 days

Yeast: Safale US05
Ferment @ 65 degrees for 4 weeks.

Is this a 5gal batch?

1moreTRich
02-05-2013, 03:02 PM
Ok, Co2, I was being lazy but youíre right there is a difference.
The reason I ask is there seems to be conflicting information on the internet as to whether a welding supply shop will have lubricant in the Co2, but thinking about it I canít come up with any useful purpose that would serve to a welder.

Never ran into anything like that, but I have only heard of using welding supply place ancedotally, which I know a lot of people that do. I go to the Kansas Fire & Equipment here and get a 10lb filled for $14

Store bought, donít have any kegs yet, just looking to get it setup and probably buy a keg of commercial beer just to try it out.
When I do get around to home brewing a batch Iíll most likely go with Cornelius Kegs but they have ball locks, one for gas in and one fluid out. How do you adapt that to a typical Sankey keg valve?

You have a couple choices, you can get some corny kegs that have the sanke fittings (called sixth barrels I believe). These are pretty expensive last I checked and I'm not that familiar with the functionality of them (cleaning, dissembling, etc.). I have seen some people convert ball lock kegs to sanke fittings, but am unfamiliar with that process as well. What I would do is take the sanke fitting off your kegerator hoses and put on ball lock disconnects. The only problem being you wouldn't be able to easily serve commercial sanke kegs in the future, as you would have to cut off the ball lock disconnects and reconnected your sanke fitting.

1moreTRich
02-05-2013, 03:06 PM
Is this a 5gal batch?

Yeah, 5 Gallons.

Radar Chief
02-05-2013, 03:15 PM
Never ran into anything like that, but I have only heard of using welding supply place ancedotally, which I know a lot of people that do. I go to the Kansas Fire & Equipment here and get a 10lb filled for $14

Weíve got two or three welding supply shops in town, suppose I should just go and ask.

You have a couple choices, you can get some corny kegs that have the sanke fittings (called sixth barrels I believe). These are pretty expensive last I checked and I'm not that familiar with the functionality of them (cleaning, dissembling, etc.). I have seen some people convert ball lock kegs to sanke fittings, but am unfamiliar with that process as well. What I would do is take the sanke fitting off your kegerator hoses and put on ball lock disconnects. The only problem being you wouldn't be able to easily serve commercial sanke kegs in the future, as you would have to cut off the ball lock disconnects and reconnected your sanke fitting.

I was kind of afraid of that, which I might still do but it would be a whole lot easier to switch from one type of keg to the other if I could build or buy some type of adaptor.
Regardless, thanks for your help. This gets me started. :thumb:

Bearcat
04-16-2014, 08:19 PM
Got a Mr Beer kit as Christmas gift... tried it out, tasted like beer. Upgraded and started a stout this weekend and it's happily fermenting in the basement. The kit came with bourbon soaked oak chips and I'm thinking about adding some bourbon soaked cherries to this batch or a future batch (reading the debate on adding fruit to the primary or secondary).... maybe add some coffee.

Excited to see how it turns out so I can keep experimenting.

Also thinking about what I can do with the grain... tried making some bread with it, but didn't turn out very well... will try again though. Might buy a dehydrator so at least it'll last longer without needing to freeze it.

TambaBerry
04-16-2014, 08:45 PM
I picked up a silly blonde recipe, should be pretty good. Whenever I get some time to brew it.

Unsmooth-Moment
04-17-2014, 05:34 AM
I Have some honey wheat in the primary fermenter right now. Should be ready to bottle Saturday.

Zebedee DuBois
04-17-2014, 06:13 AM
I made the jump to all-grain this year, and will be doing my third batch - a pale ale this weekend. i bottle, and ingredient costs are down to 55 cents a bottle, about half of what my extract recipe costs. I wish I had made the move earlier.

Marcellus
04-17-2014, 07:16 AM
I made the jump to all-grain this year, and will be doing my third batch - a pale ale this weekend. i bottle, and ingredient costs are down to 55 cents a bottle, about half of what my extract recipe costs. I wish I had made the move earlier.

Its cheaper but obviously more time consuming. I have been doing all grain for about a year now. Still improving my efficiencies.

I'm doing 10gal of pale ale this weekend and if I have time since its a 3 day weekend I may do a 5gal Belgian double.

Belgian beers always seem to come out excellent.

I have a really good Pale Ale recipe and and pretty good IPA and a decent hoppy wheat beer I have been working on.

Im getting thirsty.

I recommend Beer Smith brewing software to anyone that does all grain or brews much. Its extremely valuable when working your numbers out.

Bearcat
07-06-2014, 12:15 PM
Started a Young's Double Chocolate Stout clone.... mixed recipes/ideas from here (http://www.buzzfeed.com/rachelysanders/how-to-make-the-best-granola-ever) and here (https://byo.com/stories/item/496-cooking-with-spent-grain) to make granola with the spent grains (in this case, chocolate malt, flaked oats, and crystal 60), and holy crap it's delicious. Best use of spent grains yet, without having to grind it into flour.