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Hog Farmer
01-10-2011, 03:45 PM
your freezer NOW. When the food supply demand trickles down to the consumer it's gonna hurt. This Goddamn ethanol bullshit is the stupidest thing I've ever seen. Go buy a bag of Tostitos right now and you'll be gettin a bargain if it's only 4 bucks. Hog prices are hittin ALL TIME HIGHS AND PRODUCERS ARE LOSING BIG MONEY !



Pork Commentary: Lean Hogs Hit Life of Contract Highs!!
CANADA - This week's North American Pork Commentary from Jim Long.
Jim Long on ThePigSite

Jim Long is President &
CEO of Genesus Genetics.
Last week’s USDA December Hogs and Pigs Report were definitely interpreted as bullish. Life of contract highs was reached in all the summer months in 2011 with all four months in the 90’s. The formula for stronger prices is many.

Our Observations
The USDA December report showed there was about 70,000 fewer sows, and 500,000 fewer pigs than a year ago. Less is not more!


Global meat consumption is expected to increase 2 per cent in 2011


US cattle futures hit record highs this past week when the lead month peaked at 107.475. Texas cash cattle also hit $1.07 per pound – the highest in seven years. Drivers in the cattle market are strong domestic and export beef sales, optimism China will buy beef and expected fewer cattle in 2011. April live cattle futures closed at $112.20 per pound last Friday up over 20 cents per pound from April future lows. That would be $260 per head higher on a 1300 pound steer. Record beef prices are going to do nothing but enhance hog prices and the lean hog future market pushing higher is a reflection of that reality.


This past week a pork powerhouse leader expressed to us his greatest fear for 2011 – it is not pork demand; the fear is feed price acceleration and the large packer margins that packers have enjoyed since last spring. The just of his premise that packer margins that have reached above $30 per head at times are unhealthy for a robust production base. Especially the last three months when producers were losing $20 per head.
Of note: Pork plant margins for last Thursday, on average, were forecast at $3.90 per head down from $16.70 a week ago, this as hog prices surged in the past week. Over the next while we expect to see an interesting dynamic of lower hog numbers and the dilemma of packers to try to hold margins and or market share.

In our opinion, one of the greatest indicators of market psychology is the USDA cash early wean and feeder pig market. Last week cash early weans averaged $56.75(high $65.00), cash 40 pound feeder pigs averaged $67.77(high $73.00). Very strong prices in the face of $6.00 corn. This is a real indication of lack of supply and strong demand.


High corn prices, soybean and feed prices will only push hog prices higher over the coming months. With North American pork producers as least cost as any in the world, high feed prices will result in a greater market share gain as pork production is further limited in grain importing countries. Countries such as South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and Mexico will need to have substantially higher hog prices to cover their cost of production significantly higher than North America. The high domestic prices in these countries will continue to pull pork from North America enhancing prices.


In the next while there will be increased interest in improving feed conversions due to high feed costs. There will be ongoing pressure on Genetic companies to show improvement and results. Some Genetics can, some can’t. We are glad that Genesus spent significant money eight years ago to measure individual feed conversions and growth rates. Currently some boars are 2.1 to 1. We all have to become increasingly more efficient.
Summary
Watching NBC national news last week the increasing cost of food and pork was a news item, a National story. Wait until the Einstein’s that have subsidized the insanity of putting billions of bushels of corn into ethanol production begin to see the economic, social, and political implications of higher feed costs. This will become a bigger story in 2011. We suspect that more land will be coming out of set aside while the battle of continued corn ethanol subsidies will be engaged.

The good news for hog producers in 2011 is pork prices will be strong which will support higher feed prices. We expect hogs will reach $1.00 lean this season.


Author: Jim Long, President & CEO, Genesus Genetics

MOhillbilly
01-10-2011, 03:50 PM
lay pellets are 9.50 per 50# up 3-4 bucks from acouple months ago.

talastan
01-10-2011, 03:50 PM
Careful Hog.....you're treading DC forum waters right now.. ;)

Serioiusly though I agree. This combined with USDA increased regulation is going to bring prices up. Stock up folks. :thumb:

MOhillbilly
01-10-2011, 03:52 PM
hog & chicken feed went up but beef cattle & dog feed remained fairly steady. WTF?

ClevelandBronco
01-10-2011, 03:53 PM
I'm taking your advice and packing my freezer with $4 bags of Tostitos.

Brock
01-10-2011, 03:53 PM
Hog lots are a nuisance anyway.

bevischief
01-10-2011, 03:53 PM
Glad that both freezers are full.

bevischief
01-10-2011, 03:54 PM
I'm taking your advice and packing my freezer with $4 bags of Tostitos.

LMAO

Pawnmower
01-10-2011, 03:55 PM
http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:tuLrbcoSSqjcNM:http://www.scrutinyhooligans.us/wp-content/uploads/2007/06/hogwashmeterred.jpg&t=1

MOhillbilly
01-10-2011, 03:56 PM
you can buy a 200 # hog off of craigs from 1-1.50 per #.

Demonpenz
01-10-2011, 03:57 PM
Time to go to rolla and do some hoggin

Hog Farmer
01-10-2011, 03:58 PM
http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:tuLrbcoSSqjcNM:http://www.scrutinyhooligans.us/wp-content/uploads/2007/06/hogwashmeterred.jpg&t=1

It's all good. I'm prepared. I hope your next tank of ethanol destroys your engine. then maybe you'll understand what our fucked up government is trying to accomplish.

FAX
01-10-2011, 04:00 PM
you can buy a 200 # hog off of craigs from 1-1.50 per #.

Some people think those little pot-bellied pigs are cute until they grow up into giant, man-eating hogs. If you can save your wife and children from being devoured in their sleep by a giant, man-eating hog and make a buck a pound in the bargain, that's a pretty good deal.

FAX

TinyEvel
01-10-2011, 04:01 PM
<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/7EjdC0pjo1A?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/7EjdC0pjo1A?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

BigMeatballDave
01-10-2011, 04:04 PM
I've noticed bacon is getting expensive. Seriously. I used to buy the cheap stuff at Sav-a-lot for a buck. Its over $2.

Hog Farmer
01-10-2011, 04:06 PM
you can buy a 200 # hog off of craigs from 1-1.50 per #.

At 6.00 corn the big boys probably have an average COP(Cost of Production) of around .70/pound produced. I'd sell hogs for 1.00 /pound just as long as I could .

WV
01-10-2011, 04:07 PM
If my only choice is meat from a grocery store then I'll pass on filling my freezer.

Pawnmower
01-10-2011, 04:08 PM
It's all good. I'm prepared. I hope your next tank of ethanol destroys your engine. then maybe you'll understand what our ****ed up government is trying to accomplish.

LOL I don't know crap about the issues, just wanted you to have the hogwash meter

Hog Farmer
01-10-2011, 04:08 PM
If we have a bad crop year/drought in the midwest which we haven't had for a long time this nation is totally fucked! It will be a food crisis of epic proportions.

jd1020
01-10-2011, 04:09 PM
It's all good. I'm prepared. I hope your next tank of ethanol destroys your engine. then maybe you'll understand what our ****ed up government is trying to accomplish.

Honda Ruckus tyvm!

Brock
01-10-2011, 04:09 PM
If we have a bad crop year/drought in the midwest which we haven't had for a long time this nation is totally fucked! It will be a food crisis of epic proportions.

LMAO

Hog Farmer
01-10-2011, 04:10 PM
LOL I don't know crap about the issues, just wanted you to have the hogwash meter

Thanks ! A man can't have too many meters. :thumb:

jd1020
01-10-2011, 04:10 PM
If we have a bad crop year/drought in the midwest which we haven't had for a long time this nation is totally ****ed! It will be a food crisis of epic proportions.

For vegans.

Hog Farmer
01-10-2011, 04:13 PM
For vegans.

That's part of the problem, I guess our politicians don't understand that Cows, Chickens and Hogs eat corn as the main feed ingredient in their rations. A drought will further suppress the amount of protein produced.

Extra Point
01-10-2011, 04:18 PM
Better invest in that hogball massager option on your next hog prick milker. It's not quality, it's cycles per head.

Gonzo
01-10-2011, 04:38 PM
Ethanol kills fuel pumps.
Posted via Mobile Device

Sweet Daddy Hate
01-10-2011, 04:50 PM
<object height="385" width="480">


<embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/7EjdC0pjo1A?fs=1&hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" height="385" width="480"></object>

LMAO Choice.

bevischief
01-10-2011, 04:52 PM
You are not the first one I have heard this from in the last several days for real.

Shogun
01-10-2011, 05:11 PM
Not to thread Hijack or anything, but I've been wanting to get this off of my chest for a while now. Every time I see you post hog farmer, I imagine this being you in this pic

http://img827.imageshack.us/img827/1184/1274769655924.gif

Hog Farmer
01-10-2011, 05:32 PM
Not to thread Hijack or anything, but I've been wanting to get this off of my chest for a while now. Every time I see you post hog farmer, I imagine this being you in this pic

http://img827.imageshack.us/img827/1184/1274769655924.gif


Been there and done that! In fact, by God that looks like me.

googlegoogle
01-10-2011, 05:39 PM
It's all good. I'm prepared. I hope your next tank of ethanol destroys your engine. then maybe you'll understand what our ****ed up government is trying to accomplish.


You're right.

http://www.fuel-testers.com/ethanol_fuel_disadvantages.html.

Completely illegal. Why is there are no lawsuits against E10?

CrazyPhuD
01-10-2011, 05:45 PM
Heh it's what happens when the dollar is worth less than the peso! ;)

But as for ethanol as a fuel replacement it's crap...but I want it to be more available out here....because it can make more power! :D Oxygen in the fuel will do that. But sadly it's not really available near me, but my engine is built for it.

Hog Farmer
01-10-2011, 05:53 PM
ETHANOL NEWS:


Washington DC - Ethanol RFA issues warnings to Boat Owners.
http://www.ethanolrfa.org/objects/documents/848/important_news_for_boat_owners.pdf


FAA Issues Safety Bulletin on Ethanol Use in Airplanes.
http://www.faa.gov/aircraft/safety/alerts/saib/media/CE-07-06.pdf


Most auto and marine engine manufacturers have issued ethanol warnings this year, which state that using over 10% ethanol fuel will damage your engine and invalidate your warranty.


View more resources to learn the facts and warnings on ethanol fuel blends.

Buehler445
01-10-2011, 07:23 PM
Careful Hog.....you're treading DC forum waters right now.. ;)

Serioiusly though I agree. This combined with USDA increased regulation is going to bring prices up. Stock up folks. :thumb:

If we have a bad crop year/drought in the midwest which we haven't had for a long time this nation is totally fucked! It will be a food crisis of epic proportions.

Actually, the corn market is very very unresponsive to fundamentals.

I don't have them, and I'm not willing to look for them, but I'm fairly certain the stocks:use ratio hasn't changed significantly from June when the current rally started.

2 things drive the corn market. Very little else does.

China
US Dollar Index.

Buehler445
01-10-2011, 07:36 PM
I'm not sure what contract you are looking at that made all time highs, but I kind of have to disagree that we are in uncharted territory and the world is about to end.

http://barchart.com/cache/b7e65aae11aa7744eeb21d3ae229c1de.png

Hog Farmer
01-10-2011, 07:48 PM
Dude, the North American Sow herd is getting smaller. The population is increasing. Our dumbass government that historically has kept America a cheap food producer is not paying attention. 4 years ago corn was 2.50/3.00. Now it is double. I don't give a fuck what the charts say now , and I look at them every day but in 6 months the charts are going to tell you meat prices are high. And all you fucking corn farmers that have had the government subsidizing your ass all these years are going to end up in a world of hurt. And the American people will be the main ones to suffer.

Hog Farmer
01-10-2011, 07:52 PM
I'm not sure what contract you are looking at that made all time highs, but I kind of have to disagree that we are in uncharted territory and the world is about to end.

http://barchart.com/cache/b7e65aae11aa7744eeb21d3ae229c1de.png

If you know what you're looking at pay attention to where the Jan lean Hog index is at now. Now look back to last January and compare. Nov/Dec/Jan/Feb are normally the lowest hog prices of the year. 79.60 in Jan means when we hit May you will see the July contract at 1.00 which will be a historical record.

Buehler445
01-10-2011, 08:46 PM
Dude, the North American Sow herd is getting smaller. The population is increasing. Our dumbass government that historically has kept America a cheap food producer is not paying attention.

No argument there. But this is not new. They didn't do anything about the highs in 2008. The big deal is that the dollar. The government is trying to manipulate it and it is going the other way. The government has bigger concerns.


4 years ago corn was 2.50/3.00. Now it is double.


But it is still $1.50 off the top of 2008. This isn't new territory.


I don't give a fuck what the charts say now , and I look at them every day but in 6 months the charts are going to tell you meat prices are high.


So your premise is that prices are going to rise? OK. That's an arguement. But that's pretty speculative. If you're so sure of it, you should definitely buy a couple long contracts and subsidize your operation from the market. I'm not so sure corn will continue to rise. The rally is getting pretty long winded and the stochastics are pretty overbought. That doesn't mean much, but I really wouldn't be surprised by a break here.


And all you fucking corn farmers that have had the government subsidizing your ass all these years are going to end up in a world of hurt. And the American people will be the main ones to suffer.

I don't grow a hell of a lot of corn. You're looking at the wrong guy. But the farm programs have been around longer than I've been alive. Ethanol subsidies have been around for a long time too. I think they started in the early 2000's, maybe even the late 90s. In fact, I don't think ethanol production is at an all time high. I could be wrong, but it seemed to me that the 2008 high broke a shitload of ethanol plants that are closed now.

I'm not saying pork isn't expensive. All I'm trying to say is that there is more to the issue than ethanol. I'm not much of a fundementalist.

If you know what you're looking at pay attention to where the Jan lean Hog index is at now. Now look back to last January and compare. Nov/Dec/Jan/Feb are normally the lowest hog prices of the year. 79.60 in Jan means when we hit May you will see the July contract at 1.00 which will be a historical record.

I don't know shit about the hog market. I'll defer to you're expertise.

Either way, I'd still contend that there is more to this than just ethanol.

teedubya
01-11-2011, 06:49 PM
The prices of things AREN'T going up... the value of the dollar is going down.

When Congress passes 2 "bailouts" for 1.6 Trillion and the Federal Reserve on its own accord loans out 3 Trillion in cash and 9 trillion in credits... the dollar is about to go through some severe hardships.

Don't be surprised when the dollars status as World Reserve Currency is taken away in the first 6-9 months of 2011.

Hog Farmer
01-11-2011, 07:08 PM
The prices of things AREN'T going up... the value of the dollar is going down.

When Congress passes 2 "bailouts" for 1.6 Trillion and the Federal Reserve on its own accord loans out 3 Trillion in cash and 9 trillion in credits... the dollar is about to go through some severe hardships.

Don't be surprised when the dollars status as World Reserve Currency is taken away in the first 6-9 months of 2011.

well, when you look at the supply of protein going down you can only expect one thing. And that's the price of meat going up. Reality.

Brianfo
01-11-2011, 07:14 PM
That's part of the problem, I guess our politicians don't understand that Cows, Chickens and Hogs eat corn as the main feed ingredient in their rations. A drought will further suppress the amount of protein produced.

The more that you speak, the more ignorant that you sound. You do realize that once the corn is ground to produce ethanol it produces a by-product that is higher in protein than soybean meal. Most ethanol plants are making more selling the by product than selling ethanol. I suppose you want to keep sending money overseas to the Saudis. Get a clue. Stupid hog farmer.

notorious
01-11-2011, 07:21 PM
Farmers have been getting ****ed for a long time on prices.

My father has farmed his entire life on a small 900 acre area. He had been getting screwed on prices for decades until the corn prices finally started rising.

I understand your anger, Mr. Hogfarmer, but just like anything else there is always a someone who benefits from anothers loss.


The farmer is finally getting his.

Hog Farmer
01-12-2011, 02:28 AM
The more that you speak, the more ignorant that you sound. You do realize that once the corn is ground to produce ethanol it produces a by-product that is higher in protein than soybean meal. Most ethanol plants are making more selling the by product than selling ethanol. I suppose you want to keep sending money overseas to the Saudis. Get a clue. Stupid hog farmer.


This has got to be one of the dumbest posts I've ever read on here! If you had a clue you'd understand that DDG's are not what livestock producers prefer. It is inconsistent at best and causes lots of problems in waste efluent on the farms. America has more ****ing oil underground than all the ME put together but our ****ed up government will not allow us to drill for it until we've used up all the foreign oil. Using livestock feed for gasoline is just like you, DUMB !

Hog Farmer
01-12-2011, 02:35 AM
But it is still $1.50 off the top of 2008. This isn't new territory.

Yes it is. The corn futures are at over $5 /bushel thru the end of 2014. We've never ever ,ever had sustained prices this high for this length of time.

http://futures.tradingcharts.com/marketquotes/C.html

Pioli Zombie
01-12-2011, 03:52 AM
Its officially offseason on CP.

Bugeater
01-12-2011, 05:49 AM
Are we dead yet?

HonestChieffan
01-12-2011, 06:14 AM
The more that you speak, the more ignorant that you sound. You do realize that once the corn is ground to produce ethanol it produces a by-product that is higher in protein than soybean meal. Most ethanol plants are making more selling the by product than selling ethanol. I suppose you want to keep sending money overseas to the Saudis. Get a clue. Stupid hog farmer.


Just as an fyi....Ethanol plants in eastern Iowa are having problems selling this by product. Its not quite as simple as you make it out to be. Its difficult to transport, its not as palatable to the livestock, the protein is higher than unprocessed corn but the energy (calories) are far reduced. When you take out the sugars/starch what you are left with is a different product. It cannot replace or be simply substituted for SB in a ration. All protein is not equal.

That said, this "stupid hog farmer" has actually given some of you who have a freezer and the ability to do so some excellent advice.

Live cattle are high and there seems to be little indication they will drop. When feedlots are paying $1.09-$1.12 a pound for steers at 900 pounds and even more for 500 pounders then feed $6.00 corn, the price at retail will have to rise. Cow herd reduction has been ongoing for over 4 years. Beef will rise.

Corn inventory numbers were again cut this week by the USDA due to strong demand globally and the impact of the lower harvest in US this fall. That will not be good if you want cheaper corn.

You can spin yourself in circles blaming whatever you care to. But HF made an excellent and valid point. The price of chicken, pork and beef will rise.

Donger
01-12-2011, 06:16 AM
I hate Big Pig.

Brianfo
01-12-2011, 06:16 AM
This has got to be one of the dumbest posts I've ever read on here! If you had a clue you'd understand that DDG's are not what livestock producers prefer. It is inconsistent at best and causes lots of problems in waste efluent on the farms. America has more ****ing oil underground than all the ME put together but our ****ed up government will not allow us to drill for it until we've used up all the foreign oil. Using livestock feed for gasoline is just like you, DUMB !

Once again you are ignorant. The cattle industry has gone compeletely to DDGs. Go jerk off another pig.

Hog Farmer
01-12-2011, 07:58 AM
Once again you are ignorant. The cattle industry has gone compeletely to DDGs. Go jerk off another pig.

And it's solely for survival. They would much rather feed corn you dumbass !




FINAL JANUARY 12, CROP REPORT:

CORN
The yield estimate was lowered from 154.3 to 152.8 bushels per acre. The production estimate was 12.447 billion bushels. The ethanol estimate was raised from 4.800 to 4.900 billion bushels. The use estimate was 13.430 billion bushels. The ending stocks estimate was lowered from 832 to 745 million bushels. The average farm price was raised from $4.80-$5.60 to $4.90-$5.70.

Again. Futures will move higher today on this news.

Hog Farmer
01-12-2011, 08:04 AM
Just as an fyi....Ethanol plants in eastern Iowa are having problems selling this by product. Its not quite as simple as you make it out to be. Its difficult to transport, its not as palatable to the livestock, the protein is higher than unprocessed corn but the energy (calories) are far reduced. When you take out the sugars/starch what you are left with is a different product. It cannot replace or be simply substituted for SB in a ration. All protein is not equal.

That said, this "stupid hog farmer" has actually given some of you who have a freezer and the ability to do so some excellent advice.

Live cattle are high and there seems to be little indication they will drop. When feedlots are paying $1.09-$1.12 a pound for steers at 900 pounds and even more for 500 pounders then feed $6.00 corn, the price at retail will have to rise. Cow herd reduction has been ongoing for over 4 years. Beef will rise.

Corn inventory numbers were again cut this week by the USDA due to strong demand globally and the impact of the lower harvest in US this fall. That will not be good if you want cheaper corn.

You can spin yourself in circles blaming whatever you care to. But HF made an excellent and valid point. The price of chicken, pork and beef will rise.

You have more energy than I've got . I hate wasting my time trying to explain things to idiots. They live in a world where food is magically produced at the supermarket.

HonestChieffan
01-12-2011, 08:28 AM
HF dont sweat it. Sometimes its difficult to differentiate when someone posts something valuable and real and when someone is just trying to stir the pot.

Groves
01-12-2011, 08:37 AM
I'll take some of that $1/lb hog.

I know how to buy a lot of things on craigslist without getting the shaft.
cars, machinery, antiques, furniture, material. I'm good there. I know the pitfalls, the likely scenarios to walk away from ,etc.

Buying a hog on craigslist? This is new territory.

What's the quickstart guide for someone new to this?

mesmith31
01-12-2011, 08:50 AM
HF dont sweat it. Sometimes its difficult to differentiate when someone posts something valuable and real and when someone is just trying to stir the pot.

"Don't try to teach a pig to sing, it wastes your time and it annoys the pig."

tate2133
01-12-2011, 08:53 AM
Once again you are ignorant. The cattle industry has gone compeletely to DDGs. Go jerk off another pig.

holy cow, this is the classic example of someone thinking they know something, but have absolutely no clue...I respect the fact that obviously he has tried to get info somewhere, but when the info is false, statements like this happen...Im aware this happens everywhere with all information, but damn, it just pisses you off when its actually something your involved in...DDG's are used, but not even a fraction to the corn..

As far as farmers finally getting theirs, Im not a farmer, brother-in-law is, I run cattle...but, I would be scared to be a farmer, because with the cost of all the inputs now and only going up...If corn doesn't stay this high, they could be in for a world of hurt, so just because the price is high, its not a end all cure all, it has to stay there

bsp4444
01-12-2011, 08:58 AM
Even using DDG's, my feed costs have gone up $50 a ton (or 17.5%) from 12/24/10 to 01/10/10. I gauruntee I'm passing that cost along to my customers. You can expect the same at the grocery store.

HonestChieffan
01-12-2011, 09:24 AM
I know about 6 of us who are each getting a 240-250 pound hog to butcher in February. And we all have cattle and will probably do a butcher beef in May or June.

WV
01-12-2011, 09:32 AM
It's comical to hear some of these uninformed people talk about making money in farming. Unless your a huge operation your lucky to break even. Most of the farmers I know aren't in it for the money and the ones that were aren't farmers anymore.

You can make money dairy farming, but it's a hell of a lot of work and to me unless you have a huge herd beef farming isn't worth it. I get my beef from local farmers because I know where it comes from (growing up we raised our own to slaughter) and I'm extremely happy to be able to get it from them and not the super market. Farming is a tough life and props to those who still do it and screw off to the ones downing it.

Hydrae
01-12-2011, 09:50 AM
I hate Big Pig.

Unless it is rotating over a fire. :)

MOhillbilly
01-12-2011, 09:56 AM
I'll take some of that $1/lb hog.

I know how to buy a lot of things on craigslist without getting the shaft.
cars, machinery, antiques, furniture, material. I'm good there. I know the pitfalls, the likely scenarios to walk away from ,etc.

Buying a hog on craigslist? This is new territory.

What's the quickstart guide for someone new to this?

http://springfield.craigslist.org/grd/2151108378.html

had these as a kid. heritage breed. ^

http://springfield.craigslist.org/grd/2120882812.html

duroc/hamp this is what mine was. ^
http://springfield.craigslist.org/grd/2128893505.html
ready to slaughter for 200$^

http://springfield.craigslist.org/grd/2099510956.html
straight hamp boar^

HonestChieffan
01-12-2011, 09:57 AM
It's comical to hear some of these uninformed people talk about making money in farming. Unless your a huge operation your lucky to break even. Most of the farmers I know aren't in it for the money and the ones that were aren't farmers anymore.

You can make money dairy farming, but it's a hell of a lot of work and to me unless you have a huge herd beef farming isn't worth it. I get my beef from local farmers because I know where it comes from (growing up we raised our own to slaughter) and I'm extremely happy to be able to get it from them and not the super market. Farming is a tough life and props to those who still do it and screw off to the ones downing it.


In about 30 days Ill have some opportunities for someone to help pull calves in a snowdrift or some nice 30 degree mud. Gives one a different perspective on where beef comes from.

MOhillbilly
01-12-2011, 10:08 AM
It's comical to hear some of these uninformed people talk about making money in farming. Unless your a huge operation your lucky to break even. Most of the farmers I know aren't in it for the money and the ones that were aren't farmers anymore.

You can make money dairy farming, but it's a hell of a lot of work and to me unless you have a huge herd beef farming isn't worth it. I get my beef from local farmers because I know where it comes from (growing up we raised our own to slaughter) and I'm extremely happy to be able to get it from them and not the super market. Farming is a tough life and props to those who still do it and screw off to the ones downing it.

rep for that last sentence.

MOhillbilly
01-12-2011, 10:13 AM
In about 30 days Ill have some opportunities for someone to help pull calves in a snowdrift or some nice 30 degree mud. Gives one a different perspective on where beef comes from.

god i helped my dad do this. friggin sucked.

Hog Farmer
01-13-2011, 02:16 PM
JPMorgan: Surging Food Prices Fueling Global Inflation
Monday, 10 Jan 2011 01:07 PM Article Font Size

Rising food prices are stoking global inflation with many agricultural commodity markets driven higher by bad weather in key producing countries, a senior trader at JPMorgan said.

"If you break down the inflation numbers then the impact of food has been extremely significant," Will Shropshire, head of investor trading, product development and agriculturals for JPMorgan said in an interview.

"Increased prices for key agricultural food components (are) undoubtedly going to have an impact on inflation," he added.

High food prices have moved to the top of policymakers' agendas because of worries about the impact on inflation, protectionism and unrest.

The United Nations' food agency, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), said last Wednesday that food prices hit a record high last month, above 2008 levels when riots broke out in countries as far afield as Egypt, Cameroon and Haiti.

Shropshire said the rise in agricultural commodities was largely fueled by supply issues.

"Pretty much all of those were driven by the weather," he said, citing drought in Russia last summer as among a series of adverse weather patterns for grains production.

"I think we are now at a level that reflects the tightness of the balance sheets (of the commodities). I think prices could increase if we hit more supply concerns," Shropshire added.

Shropshire does not believe that investor buying of agricultural commodities as an inflation hedge had been a key factor in price rises.

"It is food that is driving inflation rather than inflationary expectations driving people to invest in food," he said. "I don't think you have got many investors buying corn at these price levels because of broad concerns about global inflation."

Last year, U.S. wheat futures prices rose 47 percent, buoyed by a series of weather events including the drought in Russia and its Black Sea neighbors, corn rose more than 50 percent and soybeans jumped 34 percent.

Alongside bad weather in Australia, Europe, North America and Argentina, rising Asian demand is at the heart of the spike. China, for example, is expected to buy 60 percent of globally traded soybeans in 2011-2012, double its purchase of four years ago.

LAND ASSETS

Catherine Flax, JPMorgan's CEO for Global Commodities EMEA, said in a joint interview that investors and even countries were looking at assets such as agricultural land.

"I do think investors are increasingly looking at physical assets, whether agricultural assets or infrastructure type assets, in part because of the expectations of inflation but also I don't think investors are entirely over the insecurity of the financial crisis," she said.

"I think that is a driver for people and countries buying agricultural land."

Shropshire said he was keeping a close watch on weather in South America. Concerns about dry weather in Argentina helped to drive up soybean prices earlier this month to the highest levels since September 2008.

"If we have any more shocks to supply the impact could get increasingly dramatic. If we have any shortfall in South America, for instance, then the impact because of the tightness could be significant," he said. "The current balance sheets are at quite critical levels and not dissimilar to where they were in 2007/08," he added.

The rise has been broad-based with wheat, corn, soybeans, cotton and sugar among those registering significant gains in recent months.

Shropshire said that could slow the normal positive supply response to rising prices.

"There are many shortages at the moment so the natural balancing act will take a bit longer to pan out than it would if we just, for instance, had a problem with cotton."

Frosty
01-13-2011, 02:19 PM
The rise has been broad-based with wheat, corn, soybeans, cotton and sugar among those registering significant gains in recent months.

Grass fed beef, FTW!

tooge
01-13-2011, 02:48 PM
LMAO Choice.

still cracks me up when EM looks at the camera after old guy says "like you might find in a bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich"

Hog Farmer
01-17-2011, 09:58 AM
Retail Meat Prices In December Climb By Most In Seven Years
01/14/2011 01:56PM

Retail meat prices in December posted the biggest increase in seven years,
with pork jumping the most in 14 years, contributing to accelerating food
inflation that's expected to take a larger chunk out of consumers'
pocketbooks this year.

A meat price index tracked by the Bureau of Labor Statistics rose 7.2
percent last month compared to December 2009, the largest year-over-year
gain for that month since 2003, according to a report released today. Pork
prices last month were up 11.2 percent from year-earlier levels, the largest
increase for December since 1996, while beef rose 6.1 percent.

Rising meat prices reflect smaller cattle and hog herds, which forced meat
processors to bid more aggressively for slaughter-ready animals. Livestock
feeders cut herds starting in 2008 after the recession and a spike in corn
prices above $7 a bushel led to deep losses. In mid-2010, the nation's
cattle herd shrank to a record low.

Prices for some cuts, such as bacon, reached record highs last year, and
many analysts expect beef and pork to become even more expensive this year
as high grain prices discourage adding animals to herds.

"It is still primarily a supply-side issue on the meats," said Daniel
Madison, a researcher at the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute
at the University of Missouri.

"We expect more of the same through 2012, as the economy hopefully improves
and the demand side of the picture becomes more of a factor as well,"
Madison said. Assuming tight supplies continue and demand strengthens,
"prices could continue to move up, and strongly," Madison said.

Pricier beef and pork is a concern for the industry's producers because
chicken production is expanding and unemployment remains high, which may
compel budget-tightening consumers toward cheaper meats, analysts say.
Poultry industry executives have said recently they see opportunities to
exploit the price differences and grab a bigger share at the supermarket
meat case.

Additionally, soaring corn prices, up 67 percent over the past year, are
squeezing beef and pork producer margins, making any significant herd
expansion unlikely, analysts say. Corn futures in Chicago yesterday touched
$6.49 ˝ a bushel, the highest price since July 2008.
"It will be difficult to grow the meat production side too much in the
coming year with the kinds of feed prices we are expecting, and the beef
supply will likely remain tight well into 2012, if not longer," Madison
said.

Retail pork prices are expected to rise 3 percent to 4 percent in 2011 and
beef is expected to rise 2.5 percent to 3.5 percent, according to a U.S.
Department of Agriculture forecast released in November.

"Higher feed costs due to sharply higher corn and soybean prices have pushed
meat prices up over the past six months," Ephraim Leibtag, senior economist
with the USDA's Economic Research Service, said in an e-mail today. "This is
projected to continue during the first half of 2011."
Consumers did get some relief at the grocery store meat case in late 2010 as
prices for many pork and beef cuts fell from highs earlier in the year,
reflecting the a slide in cattle and hog markets.

Compared with November, December beef and pork prices at retail fell 0.6
percent and 2.1 percent, respectively, according to the Bureau of Labor
Statistics' Consumer Price Index report. Still, that wasn't enough to offset
rising prices for most of 2010.

For all of 2010, average U.S. retail beef prices rose 2.9 percent from 2009,
while pork rose 4.7 percent, according to today's report.

Among specific cuts, bacon averaged $4.16 at retail during December, down
from $4.70 in November but up almost 17 percent from $3.57 a year ago. Bacon
hit a record $4.77 in October. Choice-grade, boneless sirloin steak averaged
$6.07 a pound last month, down from $6.14 in November and up from $5.68
during December 2009.

Prices for milk, butter and other dairy products have also increased amid
stronger exports and tighter global butter supplies. A dairy products price
index last month rose 0.4 percent from November and 3.7 percent from
December 2009, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Fresh, whole milk averaged $3.32 a gallon nationwide last month, down 1 cent
from November but up 21 cents, or 6.8 percent, from a year earlier,

For the broader food at home category, retail prices during December rose
0.1 percent from November and 1.7 percent from December 2009, according to
the Labor Department.

Hog Farmer
01-18-2011, 05:49 PM
The Great Food Crisis of 2011*
Lester R. Brown
As the new year begins, the price of wheat is setting an all-time high in the United Kingdom. Food riots are spreading across Algeria. Russia is importing grain to sustain its cattle herds until spring grazing begins. India is wrestling with an 18-percent annual food inflation rate, sparking protests. China is looking abroad for potentially massive quantities of wheat and corn. The Mexican government is buying corn futures to avoid unmanageable tortilla price rises. And on January 5, the U.N. Food and Agricultural organization announced that its food price index for December hit an all-time high.

But whereas in years past, it's been weather that has caused a spike in commodities prices, now it's trends on both sides of the food supply/demand equation that are driving up prices. On the demand side, the culprits are population growth, rising affluence, and the use of grain to fuel cars. On the supply side: soil erosion, aquifer depletion, the loss of cropland to nonfarm uses, the diversion of irrigation water to cities, the plateauing of crop yields in agriculturally advanced countries, and—due to climate change —crop-withering heat waves and melting mountain glaciers and ice sheets. These climate-related trends seem destined to take a far greater toll in the future.

There's at least a glimmer of good news on the demand side: World population growth, which peaked at 2 percent per year around 1970, dropped below 1.2 percent per year in 2010. But because the world population has nearly doubled since 1970, we are still adding 80 million people each year. Tonight, there will be 219,000 additional mouths to feed at the dinner table, and many of them will be greeted with empty plates. Another 219,000 will join us tomorrow night. At some point, this relentless growth begins to tax both the skills of farmers and the limits of the earth's land and water resources.

Beyond population growth, there are now some 3 billion people moving up the food chain, eating greater quantities of grain-intensive livestock and poultry products. The rise in meat, milk, and egg consumption in fast-growing developing countries has no precedent. Total meat consumption in China today is already nearly double that in the United States.

The third major source of demand growth is the use of crops to produce fuel for cars. In the United States, which harvested 416 million tons of grain in 2009, 119 million tons went to ethanol distilleries to produce fuel for cars. That's enough to feed 350 million people for a year. The massive U.S. investment in ethanol distilleries sets the stage for direct competition between cars and people for the world grain harvest. In Europe, where much of the auto fleet runs on diesel fuel, there is growing demand for plant-based diesel oil, principally from rapeseed and palm oil. This demand for oil-bearing crops is not only reducing the land available to produce food crops in Europe, it is also driving the clearing of rainforests in Indonesia and Malaysia for palm oil plantations.

The combined effect of these three growing demands is stunning: a doubling in the annual growth in world grain consumption from an average of 21 million tons per year in 1990-2005 to 41 million tons per year in 2005-2010. Most of this huge jump is attributable to the orgy of investment in ethanol distilleries in the United States in 2006-2008.

While the annual demand growth for grain was doubling, new constraints were emerging on the supply side, even as longstanding ones such as soil erosion intensified. An estimated one third of the world's cropland is losing topsoil faster than new soil is forming through natural processes—and thus is losing its inherent productivity. Two huge dust bowls are forming, one across northwest China, western Mongolia, and central Asia; the other in central Africa. Each of these dwarfs the U.S. dust bowl of the 1930s.

Satellite images show a steady flow of dust storms leaving these regions, each one typically carrying millions of tons of precious topsoil. In North China, some 24,000 rural villages have been abandoned or partly depopulated as grasslands have been destroyed by overgrazing and as croplands have been inundated by migrating sand dunes.

In countries with severe soil erosion, such as Mongolia and Lesotho, grain harvests are shrinking as erosion lowers yields and eventually leads to cropland abandonment. The result is spreading hunger and growing dependence on imports. Haiti and North Korea, two countries with severely eroded soils, are chronically dependent on food aid from abroad.

Meanwhile aquifer depletion is fast shrinking the amount of irrigated area in many parts of the world; this relatively recent phenomenon is driven by the large-scale use of mechanical pumps to exploit underground water. Today, half the world's people live in countries where water tables are falling as overpumping depletes aquifers. Once an aquifer is depleted, pumping is necessarily reduced to the rate of recharge unless it is a fossil (nonreplenishable) aquifer, in which case pumping ends altogether. But sooner or later, falling water tables translate into rising food prices.

Irrigated area is shrinking in the Middle East, notably in Saudi Arabia, Syria, Iraq, and possibly Yemen. In Saudi Arabia, which was totally dependent on a now-depleted fossil aquifer for its wheat self-sufficiency, production is in a freefall. From 2007 to 2010, Saudi wheat production fell by more than two thirds. By 2012, wheat production will likely end entirely, leaving the country totally dependent on imported grain.

The Arab Middle East is the first geographic region where spreading water shortages are shrinking the grain harvest. But the really big water deficits are in India, where the World Bank numbers indicate that 175 million people are being fed with grain that is produced by overpumping. In China, overpumping provides food for some 130 million people. In the United States, the world's other leading grain producer, irrigated area is shrinking in key agricultural states such as California and Texas.

The last decade has witnessed the emergence of yet another constraint on growth in global agricultural productivity: the shrinking backlog of untapped technologies. In some agriculturally advanced countries, farmers are using all available technologies to raise yields. In Japan, the first country to see a sustained rise in grain yield per acre, rice yields have been flat now for 14 years. Rice yields in South Korea and China are now approaching those in Japan. Assuming that farmers in these two countries will face the same constraints as those in Japan, more than a third of the world rice harvest will soon be produced in countries with little potential for further raising rice yields.

A similar situation is emerging with wheat yields in Europe. In France, Germany, and the United Kingdom, wheat yields are no longer rising at all. These three countries together account for roughly one-eighth of the world wheat harvest. Another trend slowing the growth in the world grain harvest is the conversion of cropland to nonfarm uses. Suburban sprawl, industrial construction, and the paving of land for roads, highways, and parking lots are claiming cropland in the Central Valley of California, the Nile River basin in Egypt, and in densely populated countries that are rapidly industrializing, such as China and India. In 2011, new car sales in China are projected to reach 20 million—a record for any country. The U.S. rule of thumb is that for every 5 million cars added to a country's fleet, roughly 1 million acres must be paved to accommodate them. And cropland is often the loser.

Fast-growing cities are also competing with farmers for irrigation water. In areas where all water is being spoken for, such as most countries in the Middle East, northern China, the southwestern United States, and most of India, diverting water to cities means less irrigation water available for food production. California has lost perhaps a million acres of irrigated land in recent years as farmers have sold huge amounts of water to the thirsty millions in Los Angeles and San Diego.

The rising temperature is also making it more difficult to expand the world grain harvest fast enough to keep up with the record pace of demand. Crop ecologists have their own rule of thumb: For each 1 degree Celsius rise in temperature above the optimum during the growing season, we can expect a 10 percent decline in grain yields. This temperature effect on yields was all too visible in western Russia during the summer of 2010 as the harvest was decimated when temperatures soared far above the norm.

Another emerging trend that threatens food security is the melting of mountain glaciers. This is of particular concern in the Himalayas and on the Tibetan plateau, where the ice melt from glaciers helps sustain not only the major rivers of Asia during the dry season, such as the Indus, Ganges, Mekong, Yangtze, and Yellow rivers, but also the irrigation systems dependent on these rivers. Without this ice melt, the grain harvest would drop precipitously and prices would rise accordingly.

And finally, over the longer term, melting ice sheets in Greenland and West Antarctica, combined with thermal expansion of the oceans, threaten to raise the sea level by up to six feet during this century. Even a three-foot rise would inundate half of the riceland in Bangladesh. It would also put under water much of the Mekong Delta that produces half the rice in Vietnam, the world's number two rice exporter. Altogether there are some 19 other rice-growing river deltas in Asia where harvests would be substantially reduced by a rising sea level.

The current surge in world grain and soybean prices, and in food prices more broadly, is not a temporary phenomenon. We can no longer expect that things will soon return to normal, because in a world with a rapidly changing climate system there is no norm to return to.

The unrest of these past few weeks is just the beginning. It is no longer conflict between heavily armed superpowers, but rather spreading food shortages and rising food prices—and the political turmoil this would lead to—that threatens our global future. Unless governments quickly redefine security and shift expenditures from military uses to investing in climate change mitigation, water efficiency, soil conservation, and population stabilization, the world will in all likelihood be facing a future with both more climate instability and food price volatility. If business as usual continues, food prices will only trend upward.


Lester R. Brown is the president of the Earth Policy Institute and author of World on the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental

Brock
01-18-2011, 05:49 PM
HF endorses global warming

Chiefs Rool
01-18-2011, 05:50 PM
a good time to become a vegan?

boogblaster
01-18-2011, 06:20 PM
They'll be comin' for your wife and kids next .. prepare .......

alnorth
01-25-2011, 10:51 AM
Another "pigs are getting expensive" story.

Commodities Prices Are Hitting Your Wallet (http://finance.yahoo.com/banking-budgeting/article/111906/commodities-prices-are-hitting-your-wallet;_ylt=Av42kO5SV7K2qjaxvwdAcuS7YWsA;_ylu=X3oDMTFhMWM5amRoBHBvcwMyBHNlYwNzcGVjaWFsRmVhdHVyZXMEc2 xrA2NvbW1vZGl0aWVzcA--?mod=bb-budgeting&sec=topStories&pos=4&asset=&ccode=)

"we're using $6 corn to feed hogs right now," up from about $4 last year, says Michael Swanson, an agricultural economist at Wells Fargo in Minneapolis. "Either the hog guy is going to go out of business or you're going to pay more for pork." So if you "want barbecue ribs," he adds, "you're going to have an extra $10 attached to it."

Mr. Kotter
01-25-2011, 11:08 AM
Ethanol is a complete fraud. And a joke. It's farm welfare, rationalized. Period.

Hog Farmer
01-26-2011, 08:16 PM
May Corn closed today at 6.70 This is Extremely High!
May Lean Hogs closed at 98.05 . This is the highest EVER !


U.S. · Australia & New Zealand .Grain, Soybeans Rise as Food Riots Spur Demand for U.S. Exports

By Jeff Wilson and Whitney McFerron - Jan 26, 2011 2:51 PM CT
Wheat rose, heading for the longest rally since November 2009. Photographer: Carla Gottgens/Bloomberg
Wheat rose, capping the longest rally since November 2009, while corn and soybeans climbed as countries increase purchases from the U.S., the world’s biggest exporter, to cut food inflation and quell civil unrest.

Food-exporting countries are “strongly advised” not to restrict shipments to prevent “more uncertainty and disruption” in world markets, the United Nations said. Governments in Egypt, Algeria, Morocco and Yemen have faced protests amid rising costs and high unemployment, and a revolt toppled Tunisia’s leader.

“Sovereign nations are beginning to stockpile food to prevent unrest, and that will help to boost demand for U.S. grains,” said Jim Gerlach, the president of A/C Trading Inc. in Fowler, Indiana. “You artificially stimulate much higher demand when nations start to increase stockpiles.”

Wheat futures for March delivery rose 18.25 cents, or 2.2 percent, to close at $8.565 a bushel at 1:15 p.m. on the Chicago Board of Trade, capping a seven-day advance of 11 percent. Earlier, the price reached $8.6125, the highest for a most- active contract since Aug. 6. The grain has jumped 73 percent in the past 12 months.

Corn futures for March delivery climbed 13.75 cents, or 2.1 percent, to $6.5775 a bushel, the first gain in three sessions. The price has surged 82 percent in the past 12 months.

Soybean futures for March delivery advanced 11 cents, or 0.8 percent, to $13.855 a bushel. The oilseed has gained 46 percent in the past year.

Topple Governments

The commodities climbed in 2010 after drought slashed crops in Russia, Ukraine and other parts of Europe, and adverse weather reduced harvests in the U.S., Canada and Australia. Governments from Beijing to Belgrade are increasing imports, limiting exports or releasing supply from state stockpiles to curb food inflation.

A surge in food and energy costs is stoking inflation in emerging markets and causing riots that may topple governments, Nouriel Roubini, the New York University economist who predicted the financial crisis, said today in an interview in Davos, Switzerland, with Tom Keene on Bloomberg Television’s “The Pulse.”

“When you look at what’s happened in the former Soviet Union and Australia, wheat supplies are tight,” said Dan Kuechenmeister, the manager of the commodities department at RBC Dain Rauscher in Minneapolis, Minnesota. “You hear about the food riots in parts of the Middle East. There’s just all sorts of things out there that have people a little bit on edge.”

Algeria agreed to buy 800,000 metric tons of wheat today and ordered the state-run grain agency to speed up imports, Reuters reported.

China Outlook

Demand may increase in China, the leading soybean importer and the second-biggest corn consumer, said Dan Cekander, the director of grain research for Newedge USA LLC in Chicago.

Today, U.S. exporters reported sales of 227,000 tons of soybeans to China, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said. Yesterday, the agency announced a record one-day sale of 2.74 million tons to the Asian nation.

China may be “virtually out” of corn and might boost imports after demand from livestock producers sent the domestic price of the grain surging close to $8.50, Sterling Liddell, a vice president at Rabo Agrifinance, said today at a conference in Chicago.

In the 12 months that ended Sept. 30, China was a net importer of corn for the first time in 14 years, USDA data show.

“A lot of today’s strength is related to speculation about increased Chinese imports,” Cekander said. “Chinese demand is a wildcard.”

Corn is the largest U.S. crop, valued at $48.6 billion in 2009, followed by soybeans at $31.8 billion, government data show. Wheat was the fourth-biggest at $10.6 billion, behind hay.

KS Smitty
01-26-2011, 08:50 PM
Ethanol is a complete fraud. And a joke. It's farm welfare, rationalized. Period.

I agree and disagree. Ethanol is a joke but the only "farms" getting "welfare" from it are big corporate ones.

Most of the farmers around here are not jumping for joy about corn prices, they're more concerned with the lack of moisture affecting the winter wheat.

Hog Farmer
02-01-2011, 03:59 PM
A smaller beef herd reported in USDA’s January 1 Cattle inventory estimates provided the cattle markets with even more bullish news. Beef cow numbers continue to fall as producers seem to want out of the business. The continued decline is related to multi-year financial discouragement due to high and volatile feed prices, shortages of pastures in some areas last summer, and developing dry conditions in the southeast and the central and southern plains. Beef cow numbers at 30.9 million head are down two percent over the past year and down six percent since 2005.

Regionally, the largest decline in beef cows was in the western Corn Belt where numbers declined by 168,000 head in the past year. This decline was led by Missouri with 103,000 fewer head and Iowa with a 45,000 head reduction. The southern plains had a reduction of 166,000 head, led by Texas with 115,000 fewer head. The southeastern region had the third largest decline with a reduction of 121,000 head. In the eastern Corn Belt, beef cow numbers declined by 35,000, led by a reduction of 37,000 cows in Illinois. Illinois has had a 24 percent decline in beef cow numbers since 2005. The only area of increase was the northern and central plains as cow numbers continue to concentrate somewhat more in the center of the country.

Producers are planning to continue to reduce numbers even further. The number of beef heifers being retained for breeding purposes is down five percent. This means that beef cow numbers should continue to drop at least into the USDA July inventory report. The expected 2011 calf crop should be about 35.3 million head, down one percent as well.

The dairy industry seems to have different views as they have increased both cow numbers and retained heifers by one percent. The dairy industry has failed to reduce numbers sufficiently given high feed costs and is operating at a loss. It is likely the dairy industry will have to trim herds and reduce milk production to get producers back to profits.

Beef producers seem to want to get out of the industry. What will change their attitudes? There are two key factors--a return to profitability and more abundant forage and feed supplies. Since the number of heifers being retained is so low, it will be late in 2011 or early 2012 before any movement toward expansion will occur. It is possible that corn and soybean meal supplies could increase with large 2011 crop production. Unfortunately, given the limited number of acres available, trend yields may do little to increase inventories keeping the 2011/2012 marketing year prices high and volatile. Increasing concerns about dry conditions throughout the southeastern states as well as the central and southern plains will keep producers from expanding until those conditions change. Those three regions account for 55 percent of the beef cows. (See USDA/NOAA “Drought Monitor ”at http://www.drought.unl.edu/dm/monitor.html ).

How high will beef prices rise? Prices have already been record high and seem assured of making new highs throughout 2011. Live cattle futures prices on January 31 are suggesting finished cattle will average about $113 per hundredweight for the year, with quarterly prices of $108, $116, $112, and $115, respectively. These prices are supported by recovering U.S. and world consumer incomes, small beef and pork supplies, and a rapid increase in pork exports.

Oklahoma 600-650 pound calves sold last week at $132 per hundredweight, while 500-550 pound calves were at $146. The strength in calf prices over the past six months means that finished cattle prices have increased enough to cover the much higher corn and soybean meal costs to finish cattle. Unlike the rising feed prices of 2008, the surge in feed prices over the past six months has been met by increases in both live cattle and lean hog futures prices.

Weather in 2011 and 2012 will probably be the deciding factor determining when the beef cattle industry will shift from liquidation to expansion. Favorable weather that provides above-trend corn, soybean, and wheat crops along with abundant forages, could shift the industry into expansion by 2012. Much lower feed prices would provide strong financial incentives to expand brood cow numbers. Trend yields should provide modestly lower feed prices and calf prices will rise proportionally next fall, providing some financial incentives to expand brood cow numbers. However, below-trend yields,and shortages of forages would keep the industry in a state of contraction with even higher finished cattle prices in 2012.

Much is riding on 2011 weather for both crop and livestock producers, and for everyone who enjoys multiple meals a day at moderate

bevischief
02-01-2011, 04:13 PM
I see that a lot of farmers around not having as big as herds compared to the last few years or no herds at all. Doesn't help that Overland Park keeps annexing land for the few years. Figure we are next here in the next a next few years.

Bwana
02-01-2011, 04:49 PM
After talking to my cousin, who is a rancher and raises black angus, I orderd a half a beef last week.

bevischief
02-01-2011, 05:52 PM
Just filled the freezer right before the playoff game and the pantry is full. So is the beer fridge.

Bwana
02-01-2011, 05:54 PM
Just filled the freezer right before the playoff game and the pantry is full. So is the beer fridge.

Priority ONE! :thumb:

bevischief
02-01-2011, 05:57 PM
Priority ONE! :thumb:

I bought 2 30 packs on the way home yesterday just this crap did hit and it did.

Bwana
02-01-2011, 06:20 PM
I bought 2 30 packs on the way home yesterday just this crap did hit and it did.

Perfect! You are hunkered in for the long haul. :thumb:

bevischief
02-01-2011, 06:23 PM
Perfect! You are hunkered in for the long haul. :thumb:

Cooked a few pork loins and some potatoes this weekend so I would have something to eat this week. Chili was last week.

Bwana
02-01-2011, 06:25 PM
Cooked a few pork loins and some potatoes this weekend so I would have something to eat this week. Chili was last week.

There you have it, living the life of Riley.

alnorth
02-01-2011, 06:34 PM
Perfect! You are hunkered in for the long haul. :thumb:

I don't drink beer, but I did make sure to have 3 bottles of wine available just in case I couldn't get out after snowpocalypse.

DeezNutz
02-01-2011, 06:38 PM
I don't drink beer, but I did make sure to have 3 bottles of wine available just in case I couldn't get out after snowpocalypse.

As a Royals fan, I hope you always have something more potent on hand than wine. Wine is nice, but not down 11-1 in the 7th nice.

Bwana
02-01-2011, 06:39 PM
I don't drink beer, but I did make sure to have 3 bottles of wine available just in case I couldn't get out after snowpocalypse.

It sounds like you are covered as well. BRING IT Mother Nature, you old skank!

http://images.elfwood.com/art/c/a/casus/nature8.jpg

alnorth
02-01-2011, 06:42 PM
As a Royals fan, I hope you always have something more potent on hand than wine. Wine is nice, but not down 11-1 in the 7th nice.

In the case of a dire emergency, I have a bottle of Jeremiah Weed Vodka available.

Bwana
02-01-2011, 06:46 PM
In the case of a dire emergency, I have a bottle of Jeremiah Weed Vodka available.

Saaaaaaaaay!

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/forkintheroad/jeremiah_weed.gif

bevischief
02-01-2011, 06:49 PM
It sounds like you are covered as well. BRING IT Mother Nature, you old skank!

http://images.elfwood.com/art/c/a/casus/nature8.jpg

I have a liquor store within walking distance just in case.

Bwana
02-01-2011, 06:51 PM
I have a liquor store within walking distance just in case.

Heh, you are covered as well. As long as the owner can get to the store.

bevischief
02-01-2011, 07:12 PM
Heh, you are covered as well. As long as the owner can get to the store.

He likes money too much not to have someone there.

jspchief
02-01-2011, 07:49 PM
Making food more expensive so we can have cheaper gas. The ethanol PR machine in Iowa is ridiculous.

Hog Farmer
02-09-2011, 08:56 AM
THE FEBRUARY SUPPLY/DEMAND REPORT:

CORN:
The ethanol estimate was raised 50 million bushel to 4.950 billion bushels. The use total estimate was raised 70 million bushels to 13.500 billion bushels. The ending stocks estimate was lowered from 745 to 675 million bushels. The average farm price estimate was changed to $5.05 to $5.75 per bushel

Hog Farmer
02-10-2011, 09:57 AM
And now the fuckin results. Record territory.

http://www.juhlfeed.com/?&t=1300035260078

King_Chief_Fan
02-10-2011, 10:12 AM
The answer is better yielding corn hybrids.

Buy yours at Monsanto.

boogblaster
02-10-2011, 10:17 AM
Dont they still make feed out of the remaing corn product after the oil is removed for fuel .. I know they did at a plant here in central kansas .. I worked on the building and maintence of the plant .. they dried the product and sold the grain to a local cattle feed yard .....

Hog Farmer
02-10-2011, 11:21 AM
Dont they still make feed out of the remaing corn product after the oil is removed for fuel .. I know they did at a plant here in central kansas .. I worked on the building and maintence of the plant .. they dried the product and sold the grain to a local cattle feed yard .....

Yes and it does the feedyard so much good that they're going bankrupt.

HonestChieffan
02-10-2011, 11:26 AM
The answer is better yielding corn hybrids.

Buy yours at Monsanto.

The answer is like all ag shortages, they are fixed 6-12 months later...By September we will be afloat in corn

Saulbadguy
02-10-2011, 11:29 AM
And now the fuckin results. Record territory.

http://www.juhlfeed.com/?&t=1300035260078

No one knows what any of this means and no on really cares.

Hog Farmer
02-10-2011, 06:33 PM
No one knows what any of this means and no on really cares.


That must be because your stupid!

Mr. Laz
02-10-2011, 06:37 PM
The answer is better yielding corn hybrids.

Buy yours at Monsanto.
the answer is to do away with the ethanol crap

bevischief
02-10-2011, 06:44 PM
this can't be good.

http://worldvisionportal.org/wordpress/

LiveSteam
02-10-2011, 06:53 PM
No one knows what any of this means and no on really cares.

Only a fool would not care or pay attention. When the Ogallala aquifer runs dry from center pivot irrigation. you will care

Hog Farmer
02-13-2011, 08:38 AM
Food Inflation


AMARILLO,TEXAS -- The U.S. cattle herd dropped to its lowest level since 1958, down to 92 million head of cattle, down 1.6 percent from a year ago. That would be the smallest herd in 53 years.
James Hunt, spokesperson for the Texas Cattle Feeders Association says, "The decline in the national cattle herd has been ongoing since the mid-1970s. There are many factors involved in this contraction. Availability of affordable land is an issue. Prolonged droughts in various regions of the country have been a problem. High prices for calves and feeder cattle have given cow-calf operators an incentive to not hold back heifers for breeding purposes. And bad government policies, such as excessive estate taxes and burdensome environmental regulations that are not founded on sound science, have helped to drive some cattlemen and cattlewomen out of the business."

U.S. beef production is expected to be roughly 26 billion pounds, according to Jim Robb, the director of the Livestock Marketing Information Center who also said the projects total next year is expected to drop to
25.2 billion pounds. While the U.S. Department of Agriculture forecasts a slightly lower number at 25.66 billion pounds this year.

They also show retail prices for ground beef were 8.8 percent more expensive in December than a year ago and they predict the cost of meat this year will rise faster than total food inflation, the USDA projects.

Hunt says that, "It is important to note that even though overall cattle numbers have contracted, total beef production has increased every year. The increased production has been made possible by genetic
improvement, larger carcass weights, and technological advances in cattle health and nutrition."

For KVII viewers, stronger beef prices translate into a healthier condition for a vital contributor to their local economy. Within a 150-mile radius of Amarillo, approximately 3,500 people are directly employed in the
cattle feeding business. And the cattle feeding industry delivers an annual beneficial economic impact of $15 billion to the Amarillo area economy.

After enduring staggering losses in recent years, it is good to see local cattle feeders enjoy the opportunity to turn a profit while producing high quality beef in a wide variety of affordably-priced products."

Pioli Zombie
02-13-2011, 08:45 AM
If becomes too expensive,no problem,I'll just go to Applebees.

Bugeater
02-13-2011, 08:56 AM
http://www.newfunnypictures.net/data/media/1/Eat%20more%20chicken.jpg

HonestChieffan
02-13-2011, 09:28 AM
http://www.newfunnypictures.net/data/media/1/Eat%20more%20chicken.jpg



Not another Chick-Fil-A thread

Buehler445
02-13-2011, 11:03 AM
The answer is better yielding corn hybrids.

Buy yours at Monsanto.

LOL Do you work for Monsanto?

I don't know if you're being serious or not, but Monsanto has actually come out and said that they WILL (not intend to) double corn yields in the next 20 years. The seed dealers I know that work for them say that they don't announce shit unless they can do it.

Dont they still make feed out of the remaing corn product after the oil is removed for fuel .. I know they did at a plant here in central kansas .. I worked on the building and maintence of the plant .. they dried the product and sold the grain to a local cattle feed yard .....

Yeah, but they do it for the protein, not the starch (I believe, I'm no cow man). They still feed corn when they use DDGs as a supplement.

No one knows what any of this means and no on really cares.

I do. And I do.

Hog Farmer
02-14-2011, 07:35 PM
Korea
We have further information on the foot and mouth disease in South Korea.

South Korea before the FMD outbreak had about 900,000 sows. There has been at least 250,000 sows exterminated but in all likelihood the number is over 300,000 sows.


FMD vaccination has been undertaken nationwide but there are reports of FMD breaks still occurring in herds that have been vaccinated.


A few days ago some market hogs were sold in South Korea for almost $1,000 each! Since then prices are dropping as pork imports began arriving. Now that South Korea is vaccinating for FMD that means pork can be imported from other Asian countries that vaccinate. i.e.: Philippines.


Approximately 20 – 25 per cent of all the cattle in South Korea have been exterminated. The FMD vaccine is reported to be working for cattle with very few further breaks.


We were told South Korean producers are receiving an average of $300 per pig compensation from their Government. The South Korean Government’s compensation for 3 million pigs exterminated at that rate is $900 million dollars. That’s a budget buster.






Un believable! $1000 /mkt Hog

HonestChieffan
02-14-2011, 08:14 PM
LOL Do you work for Monsanto?

I don't know if you're being serious or not, but Monsanto has actually come out and said that they WILL (not intend to) double corn yields in the next 20 years. The seed dealers I know that work for them say that they don't announce shit unless they can do it.



Yeah, but they do it for the protein, not the starch (I believe, I'm no cow man). They still feed corn when they use DDGs as a supplement.



I do. And I do.

Dow and Monsanto, regardless of the ultra anti ag and anti corporation sentiment will in all likelihood do just what they say. 2x yields.

Buehler445
02-23-2011, 07:07 AM
Corn gave up it's February gains.....In one day and in the overnight

Saulbadguy
02-23-2011, 07:22 AM
I do. And I do.

Haha. Dumb hick.

Hog Farmer
02-23-2011, 07:25 AM
Corn gave up it's February gains.....In one day and in the overnight

Thanks to a production report from Brazil.

Was at a meeting and they are predicting a dry year in the midwest. Normally a wet year in the carolinas is followed by dry in the corn belt. Corn may hit $10 to $12 bushel by July.

Buehler445
02-23-2011, 08:50 AM
Haha. Dumb hick.

I'm a dumb hick because I know how to read a commodity chart? WTF Dude? I hope you're not being serious.

Buehler445
02-23-2011, 08:54 AM
Thanks to a production report from Brazil.

Was at a meeting and they are predicting a dry year in the midwest. Normally a wet year in the carolinas is followed by dry in the corn belt. Corn may hit $10 to $12 bushel by July.

Everybody has been predicting a dry year in the corn belt for the last 3. It's pretty commonly known that the cornbelt doesn't go more than 20 years without a drought and this will be 19 (I think, either way probability says that they will be right sooner or later).

But that gave back a hell of a lot of gains and it is still down this morning some.

What did the hogs do yesterday?

Hog Farmer
02-23-2011, 09:14 AM
Everybody has been predicting a dry year in the corn belt for the last 3. It's pretty commonly known that the cornbelt doesn't go more than 20 years without a drought and this will be 19 (I think, either way probability says that they will be right sooner or later).

But that gave back a hell of a lot of gains and it is still down this morning some.

What did the hogs do yesterday?


Didn't see yesterday but today they're down a buck and a half.

http://www.juhlfeed.com/

Chief Henry
02-23-2011, 09:34 AM
Prepare for $4.00 and possibly $5.00 gas before end of the year.

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 09:36 AM
9$ PER 50 FOR LAY PELLET. That shit is insane!!! payed half that 4-5 years ago.

50# blue bonnet gamecock is almost 20 . insane!!!

LiveSteam
02-23-2011, 09:41 AM
Prepare for $4.00 and possibly $5.00 gas before end of the year.

Last night,I heard 7 to $10.00 if civil unrest hits Saudi Arabia. I see bad bad days ahead

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 09:42 AM
Last night,I heard 7 to $10.00 if civil unrest hits Saudi Arabia. I see bad bad days ahead

bout time.

LiveSteam
02-23-2011, 10:03 AM
bout time.

why do you say that? untapped oil reserves in the US ?

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 10:26 AM
why do you say that? untapped oil reserves in the US ?

fed up on all fronts.

Buehler445
02-23-2011, 10:36 AM
9$ PER 50 FOR LAY PELLET. That shit is insane!!! payed half that 4-5 years ago.

50# blue bonnet gamecock is almost 20 . insane!!!

Ouch. How many chickens do you have?

MOhillbilly
02-23-2011, 10:39 AM
Ouch. How many chickens do you have?

not very many, but im gonna have a shit load in march. gonna buy 50-100 baby chicks.

Valiant
02-23-2011, 10:48 AM
Last night,I heard 7 to $10.00 if civil unrest hits Saudi Arabia. I see bad bad days ahead


Yeah the big powers just need to go to the ME and kill every single man, woman and child there. Then ship most of our welfare cases there to produce oil.

Bugeater
02-25-2011, 05:46 PM
Gah! My favorite Ozark smoked bacon is up to $5.99/lb!

But it is sooo worth it... :drool:

teedubya
02-25-2011, 05:50 PM
Everyone should care about this... this shit is about to effect all of us in a big, big way.

Okie_Apparition
02-25-2011, 06:07 PM
The Conservation Department has turned out to be a wonderful investment. I believe they were created because the last depression wiped out deer and turkey. They may have went to far though. Cougar and wolf sightings are up, but then again they may cook up nice on a spit.

bevischief
02-25-2011, 06:38 PM
With everything that is going on this was forgotten in the news or covered up you decide.
http://www.floridaoilspilllaw.com/

Buehler445
03-16-2011, 12:16 PM
May corn

http://www.barchart.com/cache/b8d9966ee0cfe1fbc61e350d1f676f31.png

Lean Hogs

http://www.barchart.com/cache/3c82ddca75d57b7c8d95ccd17ebcae47.png

Saul Good
03-16-2011, 12:50 PM
Wholesale prices up 1.6 pct. on steep rise in food
Wholesale prices rise 1.6 pct. due to biggest jump in food costs in more than 36 years

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Wholesale prices jumped last month by the most in nearly two years due to higher energy costs and the steepest rise in food prices in 36 years. Excluding those volatile categories, inflation was tame.

The Labor Department said Wednesday that the Producer Price Index rose a seasonally adjusted 1.6 percent in February -- double the 0.8 percent rise in the previous month. Outside of food and energy costs, the core index ticked up 0.2 percent, less than January's 0.5 percent rise.

Food prices soared 3.9 percent last month, the biggest gain since November 1974. Most of that increase was due to a sharp rise in vegetable costs, which increased nearly 50 percent. That was the most in almost a year. Meat and dairy products also rose.

Energy prices rose 3.3 percent last month, led by a 3.7 percent increase in gasoline costs...

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Wholesale-prices-up-16-pct-on-apf-3777454020.html?x=0&.v=1

MOhillbilly
03-16-2011, 01:28 PM
im shootin for 400 pounds of eggs and bird meat this year. thats enough to make some feed money back.
Already have more demand than i have eggs.

bought 70 biddies last night. glad to see corn come down abit.

Buehler445
03-16-2011, 07:54 PM
im shootin for 400 pounds of eggs and bird meat this year. thats enough to make some feed money back.
Already have more demand than i have eggs.

bought 70 biddies last night. glad to see corn come down abit.

It's not a lot but some. I wouldn't buy too much at a time until it starts to tick back up.

HonestChieffan
03-16-2011, 08:30 PM
People do not get it....

hog and cattle futures ...

Cash fat hogs and fat cattle prices...

Food is fixin to get high.

Hog Farmer
04-11-2011, 11:28 AM
Update:

Corn 7.75 bushel
Hogs 1.01 pound
Cattle 1.19 pound

All record territory.

http://www.juhlfeed.com/

MOhillbilly
04-11-2011, 11:34 AM
no lie.

Bwana
04-11-2011, 11:35 AM
Update:

Corn 7.75 bushel
Hogs 1.01 pound
Cattle 1.19 pound

All record territory.

http://www.juhlfeed.com/

Yep, it starts.....

MOhillbilly
04-11-2011, 11:42 AM
Skys the limit.

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 11:43 AM
OHNOES

Bwana
04-11-2011, 11:44 AM
Skys the limit.

I agree, it's going to get ugly.

MOhillbilly
04-11-2011, 11:46 AM
I agree, it's going to get ugly.


Its already ugly. Cookie cutter American society just isn't pissed off about it yet

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 11:48 AM
Its already ugly. Cookie cutter American society just isn't pissed off about it yet

Probably because we don't eat 10lbs of pork ass fat for breakfast every morning, Jeb.

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 11:49 AM
Does this mean my shrimp cocktail I order at Los Portales will only include 3 shrimp from now on instead of the usual 5?

Bwana
04-11-2011, 11:49 AM
Its already ugly. Cookie cutter American society just isn't pissed off about it yet

Ha, just wait.

Pants
04-11-2011, 11:53 AM
This will really only start affecting people with a bunch of kids. You shouldn't breed like that to begin with. If everyone had just 2 kids, the overpopulation wouldn't be as drastic.

If you got 8 little mouths to feed, I can see how increasing food prices might be a little scary.

MOhillbilly
04-11-2011, 11:57 AM
Probably because we don't eat 10lbs of pork ass fat for breakfast every morning, Jeb.

ROFL

Simplex3
04-11-2011, 02:11 PM
This will really only start affecting people with a bunch of kids. You shouldn't breed like that to begin with. If everyone had just 2 kids, the overpopulation wouldn't be as drastic.

If you got 8 little mouths to feed, I can see how increasing food prices might be a little scary.

Technically I think it take 2.3 kids per couple to keep a population constant due to attrition.

tooge
04-11-2011, 02:25 PM
I'm gonna start packin my freezer this evening, but with crappie fillets, not pork.

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 02:30 PM
Technically I think it take 2.3 kids per couple to keep a population constant due to attrition.

We need attrition, badly.

Pants
04-11-2011, 02:58 PM
Technically I think it take 2.3 kids per couple to keep a population constant due to attrition.

LOL

OK, cool, every 3rd couple can have an extra kid just in case.

Simplex3
04-11-2011, 02:59 PM
We need attrition, badly.

I agree completely. And the wrong people are breeding in most cases. The people least capable of raising useful human beings seem to be the ones most likely to drop them like they're shedding skin.

BigRichard
04-11-2011, 03:22 PM
I agree completely. And the wrong people are breeding in most cases. The people least capable of raising useful human beings seem to be the ones most likely to drop them like they're shedding skin.

But those are all the ones that do all the labor. I will need them when I am Supreme Overlord. Breed away trailer trash!

FishingRod
04-11-2011, 03:31 PM
Probably because we don't eat 10lbs of pork ass fat for breakfast every morning, Jeb.


Why not? You some sort of Nancy boy? Real men wrap their ham with bacon. Speaking of Bacon, I got my fix this weekend for grilled Bacon Wrapped Jalapeno poppers. Man those were good.

Simplex3
04-11-2011, 06:09 PM
But those are all the ones that do all the labor. I will need them when I am Supreme Overlord. Breed away trailer trash!

They won't be useful for that either due to their entitlement mentality. Sorry.

Buehler445
06-20-2011, 08:24 PM
Update. Meats fell hard after Hog Farmer's warning, but are starting to rally again.

Piggies are down quite a bit from the high, big ass rally though.
http://www.barchart.com/cache/52a8071e24204e8c621c7b0bff5f8a63.png

Live cattle took a colossal crap. Starting to rally a bit.
http://www.barchart.com/cache/1c9132a642b4a9cc900f2075ee8662bc.png

Corn not behaving either.
http://www.barchart.com/cache/57e8b21fb0fdc687f9b31a50abcc4f66.png

The real shit eater is wheat. Down almost $3 from February. Corn is premium to wheat in Chicago. Eventually they are going to feed wheat instead of corn, that should put some pretty serious pressure on corn.
http://www.barchart.com/cache/4ab4ca2a9da08769f0eea75a2d835524.png

HonestChieffan
06-20-2011, 08:42 PM
Update. Meats fell hard after Hog Farmer's warning, but are starting to rally again.

Piggies are down quite a bit from the high, big ass rally though.
http://www.barchart.com/cache/52a8071e24204e8c621c7b0bff5f8a63.png

Live cattle took a colossal crap. Starting to rally a bit.
http://www.barchart.com/cache/1c9132a642b4a9cc900f2075ee8662bc.png

Corn not behaving either.
http://www.barchart.com/cache/57e8b21fb0fdc687f9b31a50abcc4f66.png

The real shit eater is wheat. Down almost $3 from February. Corn is premium to wheat in Chicago. Eventually they are going to feed wheat instead of corn, that should put some pretty serious pressure on corn.
http://www.barchart.com/cache/4ab4ca2a9da08769f0eea75a2d835524.png

Assuming there is no glitch in production overseas on grains....inventory is low on all but beans. Any hickup will send prices up. Cattle numbers continue to drop so higher beef prices if demand stays constant will follow upward.

Buehler445
06-20-2011, 10:48 PM
The best remedy for high Prices is high prices. Demand will curb eventually.

Hog Farmer
06-21-2011, 03:45 AM
The best remedy for high Prices is high prices. Demand will curb eventually.

We live in a different world now days. High prices are here to stay. Corn is still $7 a bushel and lean hogs at $98. And the worst part is we are just ONE weather event away from $12 corn.

MOhillbilly
06-21-2011, 09:28 AM
Update. Meats fell hard after Hog Farmer's warning, but are starting to rally again.

Piggies are down quite a bit from the high, big ass rally though.
http://www.barchart.com/cache/52a8071e24204e8c621c7b0bff5f8a63.png

Live cattle took a colossal crap. Starting to rally a bit.
http://www.barchart.com/cache/1c9132a642b4a9cc900f2075ee8662bc.png

Corn not behaving either.
http://www.barchart.com/cache/57e8b21fb0fdc687f9b31a50abcc4f66.png

The real shit eater is wheat. Down almost $3 from February. Corn is premium to wheat in Chicago. Eventually they are going to feed wheat instead of corn, that should put some pretty serious pressure on corn.
http://www.barchart.com/cache/4ab4ca2a9da08769f0eea75a2d835524.png

All the cowboys i know sold early spring.

durtyrute
06-21-2011, 12:20 PM
Technically I think it take 2.3 kids per couple to keep a population constant due to attrition.

Who started the whole "overpopulation" myth anyway.

Brock
06-21-2011, 12:21 PM
We live in a different world now days. High prices are here to stay. Corn is still $7 a bushel and lean hogs at $98. And the worst part is we are just ONE weather event away from $12 corn.

Not if we stop funding the ethanol nonsense.

Buehler445
06-21-2011, 12:23 PM
Assuming there is no glitch in production overseas on grains....inventory is low on all but beans. Any hickup will send prices up. Cattle numbers continue to drop so higher beef prices if demand stays constant will follow upward.

The flip side of that is the economy could stub it's toe and domestic demand would fall. The dollar could rise (relative to other currencies) and overseas demand would fall.

On the feed side, the Senate passed a bill to remove the ethanol subsidy. That would send the corn market all over the place until it figures out what to do. If that were to pass, it could potentially fall through the floor.

We live in a different world now days. High prices are here to stay. Corn is still $7 a bushel and lean hogs at $98. And the worst part is we are just ONE weather event away from $12 corn.

Yeah, the stocks situation is scary. But the demand side is still in flux. This isn't the first time stocks are tight. They've been tight before and they calmed down.

It is possible that the prices could stay up here, which I would be happy with, but they were high in the 70s and came back down. They were high in 08 and went to hell sharply. They were talking about new plateaus then. Structurally these moves are dramatically different, but I still have a hard time believing we'll be having $9 wheat and $7 corn. Though I would be overjoyed with those prices :D

The one thing I think we can all agree on is that there is tremendous volatility in the market. It used to be a dime move in the grains was going somewhere. Now, it's just screwing around until it moves $.70.

All the cowboys i know sold early spring.

Feeders or fats?

Buehler445
06-21-2011, 12:26 PM
Not if we stop funding the ethanol nonsense.

You think prices would come down if we stop funding ethanol?

We still MANDATE that ethanol is part of the fuel mix. Stopping the ethanol subsidy will not curb demand. It will just make gasoline more expensive.

EDIT: Oh and add tremendous volatility to commodity markets.

HonestChieffan
06-21-2011, 12:26 PM
Not if we stop funding the ethanol nonsense.

The great surprise to average Joe is that doing away with the "ethanol nonsense" will have little or no impact on the long term price of food. It may have a short term impact on corn prices but not a lasting effect.

Global demand and global supply drive the grain markets. And the demand for red meat is ever growing. HF hit it on the head for today, we are one weather event anywhere in crop producing areas away form grain spikes.

Hog Farmer
06-21-2011, 08:25 PM
THERE IS SOMETHING ON THE DROUGHT INDEX PICTURE NOT SEEN BEFORE:

Notice that the land area colored in white, designating what is considered to be “normal” amounts of moisture, is the lesser of both the wet (green to dark green land surface) and the dry colored (shades of brown) land areas. That fits everything else that is not normal going on the the world. The 19 3/4 cent rise in the December futures today, was attributed to flooded acres intended for corn in China. The flooded acres helped by the fierce storms that hit the Missouri River bottoms last night from South Dakota to Kansas City and beyond, where much of the ground water level was already close to the surface was not mentioned. I guess it takes early flooding in China to get the attention of the trade. And then there is the Canadian too wet to plant wheat thing going on. In the U.S. it is what happens to the green, white and brown land areas July and August and maybe September (late planting in northern areas susceptible to early freeze) that counts.

Buehler445
06-21-2011, 10:21 PM
THERE IS SOMETHING ON THE DROUGHT INDEX PICTURE NOT SEEN BEFORE:

Notice that the land area colored in white, designating what is considered to be “normal” amounts of moisture, is the lesser of both the wet (green to dark green land surface) and the dry colored (shades of brown) land areas. That fits everything else that is not normal going on the the world. The 19 3/4 cent rise in the December futures today, was attributed to flooded acres intended for corn in China. The flooded acres helped by the fierce storms that hit the Missouri River bottoms last night from South Dakota to Kansas City and beyond, where much of the ground water level was already close to the surface was not mentioned. I guess it takes early flooding in China to get the attention of the trade. And then there is the Canadian too wet to plant wheat thing going on. In the U.S. it is what happens to the green, white and brown land areas July and August and maybe September (late planting in northern areas susceptible to early freeze) that counts.

And there have been record droughts on most of the wheat belt and the wheat price is taking a colossal dump right now.

Pure fundamentals don't always explain market activity. Much of the cornbelt is having problems. I'd be willing to wager, however, that we don't run out of corn.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 12:37 AM
New all time high in several contracts of corn. FWIW.

Dec contract corn.

http://barchart.com/cache/3a1fc9e2eab6d6cc970048665fa09cf3.png

Hog Farmer
07-22-2012, 03:57 AM
Yeah, I'm hearing $10 corn is coming.

Setsuna
07-22-2012, 08:13 AM
Beuhler prepare to be temp banned.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 09:01 AM
Beuhler prepare to be temp banned.

OK. Does the graphic I posted not work?

Setsuna
07-22-2012, 09:01 AM
OK. Does the graphic I posted not work?

I'm not seeing it on my page.

MOhillbilly
07-22-2012, 09:04 AM
Consumers won't notice the cost of meat prices this year but next year yall are gonna cry cry cry.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 09:05 AM
Yeah, I'm hearing $10 corn is coming.

Weather markets are a fickle fickle bitch. It's really hard to tell where it will stop. The last USDA report took out a BILLION bushels of demand. So fundementally it shouldn't but people are crazy and when they get a hair up their ass they always take it too far. When it falls out of bed it will go too far the other way too.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 09:15 AM
Consumers won't notice the cost of meat prices this year but next year yall are gonna cry cry cry.

We'll see the cattle market is taking a shit right now. I haven't watched very closely, but I'm glad I'm not feeding any cattle. That damn cattle market is tough to read. The herd shrunk so damn much last year because of the Texas drought it ought to be sky high too. Bit it got ran up so much it had to back off.

I should get ahold of some cattle fundementals and see what they are doing. I might ought to buy some cows.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 09:17 AM
Damn it. I've got to get ahold of some charts that work.

Bugeater
07-22-2012, 09:20 AM
I see your chart, but I have no idea WTH it means. I assume it's bad.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 09:24 AM
I see your chart, but I have no idea WTH it means. I assume it's bad.

Strictly means the corn price is trending up.

But I don't see the chart. :cuss:

MOhillbilly
07-22-2012, 09:50 AM
We'll see the cattle market is taking a shit right now. I haven't watched very closely, but I'm glad I'm not feeding any cattle. That damn cattle market is tough to read. The herd shrunk so damn much last year because of the Texas drought it ought to be sky high too. Bit it got ran up so much it had to back off.

I should get ahold of some cattle fundementals and see what they are doing. I might ought to buy some cows.

It wasnt just texas. The US beef herd is at 1950s numbers. More corn equals less grass. Corn is going higher, cattle numbers are way down, pasture lands are being turned for beans and corn. Pretty simple to see what's coming. If you have pasture and can rotate acouple head now why prices are low could be a boon in years to come.

MOhillbilly
07-22-2012, 09:59 AM
Weather markets are a fickle fickle bitch. It's really hard to tell where it will stop. The last USDA report took out a BILLION bushels of demand. So fundementally it shouldn't but people are crazy and when they get a hair up their ass they always take it too far. When it falls out of bed it will go too far the other way too.

Rumors od a 90% loss on corn and beans in the Midwest will drive prices to the moon.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 10:21 AM
It wasnt just texas. The US beef herd is at 1950s numbers. More corn equals less grass. Corn is going higher, cattle numbers are way down, pasture lands are being turned for beans and corn. Pretty simple to see what's coming. If you have pasture and can rotate acouple head now why prices are low could be a boon in years to come.

The numbers were down before that awful drought in Texas. But the Texas drought decimated the numbers dramatically. I don't know what they've done this year, but I think it takes 2 years to hold a heifer and get production out of her, right? Then another few months to make the feeder to a fat. So we're stuck with low numbers for a long time.

The other thing to consider is that cow men tell me that the carcass weight is significantly higher than it has been in the past. So even though there are fewer critters coming through, they yield more meat per animal. That helps smooth out some of the production from lack of numbers. The other thing to remember is that this country imports a lot of beef. They also export a lot too. So it isn't a closed system of US supply and demand.

One thing I would warn you about is the fat cattle market over the past year has tried to push up through some significant resistance and has fallen off each time. I've heard it postulated that the consumer won't pay any more than that. True or not that's something to consider. At least at this point in time, pork and chicken are very reasonably priced compared to beef at retail. As a result, there is other protein options for the consumer.

It sure makes sense that beef is going to the moon, but I'm not willing to plow much money into it.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 10:25 AM
Rumors od a 90% loss on corn and beans in the Midwest will drive prices to the moon.

Man, I'd really like to take a trip to the corn belt and walk through some fields. My understanding is Northern IL is decent and gets shitty as it goes south, down to probably nothing. But I'm not hearing much out of Iowa. I've heard things are pretty good in WI and NE. I haven't heard much about the Dakotas. I'm not sure where they all are at, but I think most of the corn around should be on the backside of peak water usage. If they've got it pollinated, they should harvest something.

I guess I have a hard time believing that we will have a 10% corn crop. That's 1.4 Billion bushels compared to 14. That would drive prices to the damn moon. AND curb demand for decades. That isn't good for anybody.

notorious
07-22-2012, 10:30 AM
Man, I'd really like to take a trip to the corn belt and walk through some fields. My understanding is Northern IL is decent and gets shitty as it goes south, down to probably nothing. But I'm not hearing much out of Iowa. I've heard things are pretty good in WI and NE. I haven't heard much about the Dakotas. I'm not sure where they all are at, but I think most of the corn around should be on the backside of peak water usage. If they've got it pollinated, they should harvest something.

I guess I have a hard time believing that we will have a 10% corn crop. That's 1.4 Billion bushels compared to 14. That would drive prices to the damn moon. AND curb demand for decades. That isn't good for anybody.

The crop out here is looking excellent. My brother has sold a TON of equipment (the green stuff) due to high expectations.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 10:36 AM
The crop out here is looking excellent. My brother has sold a TON of equipment (the green stuff) due to high expectations.

Sarcasm? Aren't you down by Liberal or something?

MOhillbilly
07-22-2012, 10:37 AM
Part of the fat cattle market has to be in part due to the fact that cattle men with 400 head or so are gettin out now. Them lean cows will be along soon enough.

notorious
07-22-2012, 10:37 AM
Sarcasm? Aren't you down by Liberal or something?

Mennonite town.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 10:39 AM
Mennonite town.

Heh. Which one?

I thought everything looked like ass down south.

MOhillbilly
07-22-2012, 10:42 AM
Man, I'd really like to take a trip to the corn belt and walk through some fields. My understanding is Northern IL is decent and gets shitty as it goes south, down to probably nothing. But I'm not hearing much out of Iowa. I've heard things are pretty good in WI and NE. I haven't heard much about the Dakotas. I'm not sure where they all are at, but I think most of the corn around should be on the backside of peak water usage. If they've got it pollinated, they should harvest something.

I guess I have a hard time believing that we will have a 10% corn crop. That's 1.4 Billion bushels compared to 14. That would drive prices to the damn moon. AND curb demand for decades. That isn't good for anybody.
I've talked to guys from all over. It's bad.

Mr. Laz
07-22-2012, 10:44 AM
Yeah, I'm hearing $10 corn is coming.

$10 dollar what?

MOhillbilly
07-22-2012, 10:45 AM
Went through part of east Kansas a week or so ago. They was already cutting corn. Mind you the Shit was two foot tall.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 10:47 AM
I've talked to guys from all over. It's bad.

Yeah. No argument from me. But it is pretty hard to believe that it is going to be a 10% crop. I guess if it is limited to the MW it would be better than 1.4 Billion. The south puts in a pretty fair chunk of corn. Either way, that'd be a 20-30 bu average crop in the cornbelt. That would be devastating to several aspects of the economy.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 10:47 AM
$10 dollar what?

$10 for a bushel of corn.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 10:48 AM
Went through part of east Kansas a week or so ago. They was already cutting corn. Mind you the Shit was two foot tall.

Were they chopping it for silage? Mine isn't dead yet, and even then I don't think I'll chop it.

Mr. Laz
07-22-2012, 10:50 AM
$10 for a bushel of corn.
which translates to what for the average consumer?

Bugeater
07-22-2012, 10:50 AM
which translates to what for the average consumer?
Zombie Apocalypse.

MOhillbilly
07-22-2012, 10:52 AM
Were they chopping it for silage? Mine isn't dead yet, and even then I don't think I'll chop it.

I assumed they were.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 10:54 AM
which translates to what for the average consumer?

Pretty hard to tell.

One would think that meats would be higher, which is the most likely, but not necessarily a given. Fuels might increase, but the federal mandate for ethanol is no longer there, so maybe. Raw corn cost doesn't hold a candle to the processing costs, so higher food prices could potentially happen maybe.

In and of itself, not much really.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 10:55 AM
I assumed they were.

Were they combining it or running a silage cutter and throwing it directly in the truck?

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 10:55 AM
Zombie Apocalypse.

Are the zombies hot?

MOhillbilly
07-22-2012, 10:59 AM
[QTE=Buehler445;8759067]Yeah. No argument from me. But it is pretty hard to believe that it is going to be a 10% crop. I guess if it is limited to the MW it would be better than 1.4 Billion. The south puts in a pretty fair chunk of corn. Either way, that'd be a 20-30 bu average crop in the cornbelt. That would be devastating to several aspects of the economy.rumors hoss. That's all it was. Corn around me aint dead yet either. It's damn sure on its way out though. Is be suprised if any of it had full rows of kernels though.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 11:02 AM
rumors hoss. That's all it was. Corn around me aint dead yet either. It's damn sure on its way out though. Is be suprised if any of it had full rows of kernels though.

I hear you. I haven't been out to see if any of mine pollinated yet. I'm kind of shutting my eyes and putting my fingers in my ears singing LALALA for awhile. There isn't anything I can do about it now anyway.

notorious
07-22-2012, 11:13 AM
Heh. Which one?

I thought everything looked like ass down south.

Most crops here are irrigated, but it's not like that can keep up. We have also had a few timely rains.

I have not kept up since we sold all of the land this year. I am just going by what my older brother is telling me. Usually he sales a ton of equipment if the crops are doing well.


Trust me, though, it's not like the Monte area is turning into paradise like North of Ford/Southeast of Spearville.

MOhillbilly
07-22-2012, 11:15 AM
Were they combining it or running a silage cutter and throwing it directly in the truck?

Don't know. Just seen they were cuttin it.

cabletech94
07-22-2012, 11:31 AM
that is almost tragic.

need some rain, and fast.

Bugeater
07-22-2012, 11:38 AM
Are the zombies hot?
Of course they are, it's 105 damn degrees outside today.

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 12:11 PM
Don't know. Just seen they were cuttin it.

I would think it would have to be silage. Or maybe hayed. But I could be wrong. They are always ahead of us and wheat harvest came epic early.

Most crops here are irrigated, but it's not like that can keep up. We have also had a few timely rains.

I have not kept up since we sold all of the land this year. I am just going by what my older brother is telling me. Usually he sales a ton of equipment if the crops are doing well.


Trust me, though, it's not like the Monte area is turning into paradise like North of Ford/Southeast of Spearville.

Heh. Glad some rains went through there. Last year was pretty balls. Unfortunately, it hasn't come my way.

that is almost tragic.

need some rain, and fast.

Probably too late for a lot of the corn. I think some rains could help beans and milo though.

Bob Dole
07-22-2012, 12:45 PM
Yeah. No argument from me. But it is pretty hard to believe that it is going to be a 10% crop. I guess if it is limited to the MW it would be better than 1.4 Billion. The south puts in a pretty fair chunk of corn.
Bob Dole has been noticing a number of places where they have had cotton the past 3-4 years is in corn this year. For whatever that's worth.

LiveSteam
07-22-2012, 06:24 PM
Husker corn fields look like this out around Minden Nebraska.

http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/558187_299349920162748_256443183_n.jpg

Bugeater
07-22-2012, 06:27 PM
I'm surprised it's that tall. What the hell were you doing clear out in Minden?

LiveSteam
07-22-2012, 06:36 PM
I'm surprised it's that tall. What the hell were you doing clear out in Minden?

Friend took that pic. We threshed a lil hay
http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/301769_10151590096250705_172959368_n.jpg

But chopped up corn stalk & made more silage than anything else this weekend.
http://informedfarmers.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Corn-Silage2.jpg

Bugeater
07-22-2012, 06:44 PM
That ginormous belt on that thresher freaks me the hell out. I don't like to be within 100 ft of that thing.

LiveSteam
07-22-2012, 06:51 PM
That ginormous belt on that thresher freaks me the hell out. I don't like to be within 100 ft of that thing.

Its safe. belts by the millions ran through factories back in the day powering everything from sewing machines to milling machines. them belts help build this country

MOhillbilly
07-22-2012, 06:57 PM
Cool stuff. I seen em do this at Steam Orama in Republic.

LiveSteam
07-22-2012, 07:02 PM
Cool stuff. I seen em do this at Steam Orama in Republic.

I love it MO. Its a way of time travailing for me. Plus I love the smell of coal smoke.

Dammit mom! Dad wanted to leave you at home.
http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/300538_10150761349805705_4990979_n.jpg

Bugeater
07-22-2012, 07:05 PM
Yeah, I love those shows. You gain a lot of respect for our forefathers in regards to how much fucking work it was to do pretty much anything back then. It's too bad it had to be this weekend.

LiveSteam
07-22-2012, 07:08 PM
Yeah, I love those shows. You gain a lot of respect for our forefathers in regards to how much fucking work it was to do pretty much anything back then. It's too bad it had to be this weekend.

Yesterday was nice all morning with cloud cover. It didnt get hot & out of hand tell well after 2pm. Today? just hot from start to finish & finished I was at noon.

The 2012 feature tractor was a 1941 Case D1 Military issue

http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/602581_10151930546585705_1609483688_n.jpg

listopencil
07-22-2012, 07:15 PM
Its safe. belts by the millions ran through factories back in the day powering everything from sewing machines to milling machines. them belts help build this country

Yeah...I get that...but still...I'd stay the fuck away from it.

LiveSteam
07-22-2012, 07:20 PM
Yeah...I get that...but still...I'd stay the fuck away from it.

Ya you have to use some common sense around this old equipment thats for sure. The most dangerous aspect of our show is the public. They want to touch everything.

http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc6/224874_10151784123805705_1790749066_n.jpg

1916 Altman Taylor. She will shake the ground when she goes rumbling by

listopencil
07-22-2012, 07:29 PM
Man. Those are great pics. I wish I was able to stop by for a look. With my hands in my pockets.

LiveSteam
07-22-2012, 07:56 PM
Man. Those are great pics. I wish I was able to stop by for a look. With my hands in my pockets.

Thanks. Last pic for tonight

65 hp steam powered air compressor that once was used by Burlington Northern shops at the Havlock yards in Lincoln Nebraska. Shes not quit done yet. Should be under steam for the 2013 show
http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/76108_10150340663905705_7705272_n.jpg

Buehler445
07-22-2012, 09:54 PM
Yeah, I love those shows. You gain a lot of respect for our forefathers in regards to how much fucking work it was to do pretty much anything back then. It's too bad it had to be this weekend.

That ain't no shit. My grandad was tougher than a boot. Grandma too. He'd always put her to work and she wore a dress. Never would wear pants even if she was going to move pipe through mud. Fuckers were crazy.

Husker corn fields look like this out around Minden Nebraska.

http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/558187_299349920162748_256443183_n.jpg

Oofta. What is that green in the background? Is that a soybean field?

LiveSteam
07-22-2012, 10:13 PM
That ain't no shit. My grandad was tougher than a boot. Grandma too. He'd always put her to work and she wore a dress. Never would wear pants even if she was going to move pipe through mud. Fuckers were crazy.



Oofta. What is that green in the background? Is that a soybean field?

That would be my guess. Even the corn around here with center pivot aint that green anymore

LiveSteam
07-23-2012, 10:48 AM
Thresher's row.

http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/528797_10151941017485705_1974571659_n.jpg

http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/560941_10151941017820705_1436045239_n.jpg

LiveSteam
07-23-2012, 10:50 AM
Something must have broke. Its up to the local blacksmith to get it fixed
http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/377599_10151941025135705_363184557_n.jpg

you can see Grandma's old gas powered Maytag washing machine to the far left. The motor sits under the tub. Grandma has her hand on a butter churning attachment that hooks up to the PTO shaft of the old Maytag washer.
http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/524096_10151941028045705_1676710517_n.jpg

LiveSteam
07-23-2012, 10:56 AM
Hand Corn Shelling machine.
http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/482080_10151941014790705_870234902_n.jpg

a old hay baler
http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/382495_10151941015130705_404684736_n.jpg

Fish
07-23-2012, 11:03 AM
Thresher's row.

http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/528797_10151941017485705_1974571659_n.jpg

http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/560941_10151941017820705_1436045239_n.jpg

You ever make it down to the Jewell County Threshing Bee? Pretty big excitement back in my hometown of Mankato, KS. Sounds like it would be right up your alley.

http://www.jewellcountyhistory.com/3736.html

LiveSteam
07-23-2012, 11:39 AM
You ever make it down to the Jewell County Threshing Bee? Pretty big excitement back in my hometown of Mankato, KS. Sounds like it would be right up your alley.

http://www.jewellcountyhistory.com/3736.html

I haven't yet.Our show is the same weekend JULY 21 and 22. I'm gonna check out Mt. Pleasant Iowa this year. Its a week long show. The grounds are 30 to 40 times the size of our show grounds. They have a 3 truck shay geared logging steam-engine they run up there & I hope to get some throttle time on it.

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/0NTZxKk63fw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Buehler445
08-25-2012, 07:58 AM
Pro Farmer Crop tour came back with surprisingly good numbers in some areas. Markets are probably going to take a shit.

Link (http://www.agweb.com/article/maybe_its_not_as_bad_as_we_thought/)

Link has shitload of formatting that didn't come over very well, just read the article.

Buehler445
08-25-2012, 08:00 AM
Link (http://www.agweb.com/article/pro_farmer_2012_corn_soybean_crop_estimates/)for full resutls. Agweb's webiste sucks for copy/paste

Bugeater
08-25-2012, 08:01 AM
Hey Buehler, when I was out riding last Thursday night I noticed some areas of the cornfields that were already down. It's obviously too early for harvest, is this something that the farmers are just knocking down early because they're a complete loss?

LiveSteam
08-25-2012, 08:06 AM
30lbs of chicken quarters
50lbs of bacon
80lbs lbs of hamburger are the newest addition to the freezer.
I head down to Lake of the Ozarks in 2 weeks to pick up 200 crappie fillets. That will pretty much fill the freezer.

Bugeater
08-25-2012, 08:06 AM
Oh, and here's a pic I took a couple weeks ago of some corn near Malvern, IA. I'm no farmer but I didn't think it looked all that bad.

LiveSteam
08-25-2012, 08:07 AM
Hey Buehler, when I was out riding last Thursday night I noticed some areas of the cornfields that were already down. It's obviously too early for harvest, is this something that the farmers are just knocking down early because they're a complete loss?


They probably chopped it up to be turned into Silage for cattle to eat at a latter date
.

Buehler445
08-25-2012, 08:35 AM
Hey Buehler, when I was out riding last Thursday night I noticed some areas of the cornfields that were already down. It's obviously too early for harvest, is this something that the farmers are just knocking down early because they're a complete loss?

What do you mean down? Like the plant fell down or the plant is gone?

If the plant is gone, they chopped it for silage most likely. Although 3 or 4 weeks ago dad said some was picked in eastern kansas somewhere, so it may have come early. If the field is bare, it is silage, if there is a stalk standing and looks like it has been kinked over, it has been harvested for grain.

Oh, and here's a pic I took a couple weeks ago of some corn near Malvern, IA. I'm no farmer but I didn't think it looked all that bad.

Physiologically, the plant looks pretty good, but there is a lot that can go wrong with the ear and the plant can continue to be healthy. The most notable is poor pollination. But yeah, if it has pollenated and not tipped back too far, it should be decent enough.

Bugeater
08-25-2012, 08:38 AM
It just looked like the plants were knocked down, but still there.

Buehler445
08-25-2012, 09:11 AM
It just looked like the plants were knocked down, but still there.

They probably picked it. Harvest is going to at least start early.

Saulbadguy
08-25-2012, 09:28 AM
Just checking in. I haven't starved to death yet. When should I expect widespread famine?

Buehler445
08-25-2012, 09:38 AM
Just checking in. I haven't starved to death yet. When should I expect widespread famine?

Never. They figured out how to grow corn without rain in Iowa.

Bugeater
08-25-2012, 11:23 AM
Never. They figured out how to grow corn without rain in Iowa.
It's really hit and miss all around here, the field I saw that was knocked down looked dry as a bone, no green whatsoever. The corn I took the picture of was about 15 miles down the same trail, but it was near a creek so maybe that's the difference.

whoman69
08-25-2012, 01:20 PM
It's all good. I'm prepared. I hope your next tank of ethanol destroys your engine. then maybe you'll understand what our ****ed up government is trying to accomplish.

Latest move is to use sorghum for ethanol as it needs less water than corn and would free that up for other uses. There is also strides being made converting waste to energy.

Buehler445
11-07-2013, 09:43 PM
https://gallery.mailchimp.com/da73604860fc11a94511a0119/images/1corn.19.png

Welp, corn is going to go under $4.20 tomorrow. We survived $7.00 corn without the world ending.

Strongside
11-07-2013, 09:47 PM
https://gallery.mailchimp.com/da73604860fc11a94511a0119/images/1corn.19.png

Welp, corn is going to go under $4.20 tomorrow. We survived $7.00 corn without the world ending.

Heh...it's never as bad as it seems.

Hog Farmer
11-08-2013, 06:12 AM
https://gallery.mailchimp.com/da73604860fc11a94511a0119/images/1corn.19.png

Welp, corn is going to go under $4.20 tomorrow. We survived $7.00 corn without the world ending.

The world didn't end for you, yet I lost a multimillion dollar business and am now leased by a ****ing megafarm with deep ass pockets. I guess it depends on which end of the stick you lean on !!!!!

And at the same time you're pumping etanol through your engines decreasing you gas mileageand increasing the wear. and quess what, the cost of living increased for EVERYBODY !!!!

Mr. Kotter
11-08-2013, 07:45 AM
The world didn't end for you, yet I lost a multimillion dollar business and am now leased by a ****ing megafarm with deep ass pockets. I guess it depends on which end of the stick you lean on !!!!!

And at the same time you're pumping etanol through your engines decreasing you gas mileageand increasing the wear. and quess what, the cost of living increased for EVERYBODY !!!!

Not to mention the bullshit subsidies that transform taxpayers into benefactors to an ethanol industry that is laughing it's ass off on the way to the bank...and their vacations in the Cayman's (not hyperbole, fact: local families I'm very acquainted with and who whine about "big government" otherwise...at every turn.)

Cochise
11-08-2013, 07:52 AM
The world didn't end for you, yet I lost a multimillion dollar business and am now leased by a ****ing megafarm with deep ass pockets. I guess it depends on which end of the stick you lean on !!!!!

And at the same time you're pumping etanol through your engines decreasing you gas mileageand increasing the wear. and quess what, the cost of living increased for EVERYBODY !!!!

A gas station near my work just opened that has a huge banner out front saying "ethanol-free gasoline". I am going to start buying there whenever I can help it.

At least some states like Iowa label it, in other states there's just a sticker on the pump that says it may contain up to 10% ethanol, but doesn't tell you whether it does or doesn't, or how much.

My car requires premium anyway so it's not like I want to pay for premium and get something that's still watered down

Buehler445
11-08-2013, 08:35 AM
A gas station near my work just opened that has a huge banner out front saying "ethanol-free gasoline". I am going to start buying there whenever I can help it.

At least some states like Iowa label it, in other states there's just a sticker on the pump that says it may contain up to 10% ethanol, but doesn't tell you whether it does or doesn't, or how much.

My car requires premium anyway so it's not like I want to pay for premium and get something that's still watered down

I thought the government wasn't going to allow ethanol free gas. I'll have to talk to my buddy that's in the retail fuel industry.

Mr. Kotter
11-08-2013, 08:49 AM
I thought the government wasn't going to allow ethanol free gas. I'll have to talk to my buddy that's in the retail fuel industry.

Ethanol lobby and cronies have done their best to try to force that...but, fortunately, some states haven't rolled-over for them....

mike_b_284
11-08-2013, 09:57 AM
The only places I know that have ethanol free are around lakes (ozarks/pomme) since you shouldn't put it in jetskis/boats/etc. I just fixed a neighbors brand new powerwasher, needed a carburetor because he left gas in it for 6 months. that shit rots so fast it is ridiculous. You would think together the oil and auto industry would/could out lobby the aggies.

Mr. Kotter
11-08-2013, 10:18 AM
The only places I know that have ethanol free are around lakes (ozarks/pomme) since you shouldn't put it in jetskis/boats/etc. I just fixed a neighbors brand new powerwasher, needed a carburetor because he left gas in it for 6 months. that shit rots so fast it is ridiculous. You would think together the oil and auto industry would/could out lobby the aggies.

An unholy alliance of ag interests and environmentalist whackjobs keeps the spigot flowing.

Rausch
11-08-2013, 10:22 AM
The world didn't end for you, yet I lost a multimillion dollar business and am now leased by a ****ing megafarm with deep ass pockets. I guess it depends on which end of the stick you lean on !!!!!

And at the same time you're pumping etanol through your engines decreasing you gas mileageand increasing the wear. and quess what, the cost of living increased for EVERYBODY !!!!

I guess this would be better than bumping my old thread.

Buying a half hog come tuesday. Price/weight is after skinning.

Looking at somewhere between 150-170 lbs at 34c a lb processing. 40c a LB cured.