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View Full Version : Home and Auto Where Ceramic Tile Meets Hardwood


Dinny Blues
02-02-2011, 06:39 PM
If some average schmo was gonna take up the linoleum and carpet to be replaced with 3/4" hardwood and 12"x12" ceramic tile, what size/type of underlay would he use for the tile to match the height of the hardwood well enough to keep the lady of the house from mentioning it frequently?

TIA.

PM Fax if repost.

Dinny

Bacon Cheeseburger
02-02-2011, 06:41 PM
Hardiebacker.

Dinny Blues
02-02-2011, 06:43 PM
Hardiebacker.

Nobody even knows what that is.

Dinny

Phobia
02-02-2011, 06:44 PM
He would use 1/4" underlayment. I like hardibacker but there are 3 or 4 other brands that work well too.

KC Jones
02-02-2011, 06:45 PM
Nobody even knows what that is.

Dinny

It's clearly a code word for a jihadist plot. We need to contact homeland security.

NewChief
02-02-2011, 06:45 PM
Nobody even knows what that is.

Dinny

Find a different store.

notorious
02-02-2011, 06:49 PM
For function and aesthetics, the best way to install is to build the the wood right up against the tile. Having a small border with a nice design where the tile transitions to wood is a big bonus.

But, if you want to be like the normal Joe, leave a 1/2" to 3/4" gap between the tile and wood and fill in with a T-Molding.

Over-Head
02-02-2011, 06:53 PM
For function and aesthetics, the best way to install is to build the the wood right up against the tile. Having a small border with a nice design where the tile transitions to wood is a big bonus.

But, if you want to be like the normal Joe, leave a 1/2" to 3/4" gap between the tile and wood and fill in with a T-Molding.

Not hard to tell you do both Subdivision AND custom work :thumb:

Kerberos
02-02-2011, 07:01 PM
No laughing at me Phil as I am NOT a contractor. But I did pull up some carpet in the house I sold in KS to find hard wood underneath. Tile was layed on the floor some years ago and I didn't want to clean up the mess and risk a F***ed up floor underneath so I did what I had to to make it presentable for sale.

Results are as follows:

Dinny Blues
02-02-2011, 07:06 PM
He would use 1/4" underlayment. I like hardibacker but there are 3 or 4 other brands that work well too.

So, is there anything that goes between the subfloor and hardibacker? Does he use regular thinset on top for the tile?

Dinny

Kerberos
02-02-2011, 07:21 PM
Mike Holmes always used the orange mat under tile. (can't remember the name) but he got it from HomeDepot.

Edit: It's called Ditra

mikeyis4dcats.
02-02-2011, 07:32 PM
you don't have to use Hardi brand, but you need a tile underlayment, NOT a wood underlayment like luan.

Dinny Blues
02-02-2011, 07:41 PM
you don't have to use Hardi brand, but you need a tile underlayment, NOT a wood underlayment like luan.

I like you, Mikey, but this ain't even as good as an amen from the cheap seats. Get on up here with the restuvus.

Seriously.

Dinny

mikeyis4dcats.
02-02-2011, 07:43 PM
I like you, Mikey, but this ain't even as good as an amen from the cheap seats. Get on up here with the restuvus.

Seriously.

Dinny

are you speaking jive? seriously, maybe I'm sleep deprived, but I have no idea what you just said...

Phobia
02-02-2011, 07:51 PM
Mike Holmes always used the orange mat under tile. (can't remember the name) but he got it from HomeDepot.

Edit: It's called Ditra

I've seen that used well and I've seen it used badly. I'm a little scared of it, especially for n00bs.

Phobia
02-02-2011, 07:53 PM
So, is there anything that goes between the subfloor and hardibacker? Does he use regular thinset on top for the tile?

Dinny

Technically, you're supposed to use thinset between the subfloor and the backer and between the backer and tile. I'll often use construction adhesive between the backer and subfloor in small areas.

mikeyis4dcats.
02-02-2011, 07:58 PM
Ditra is primarily for moisture control, and a bond breaker membrane. It's probably not necessary unless you think you will get lateral floor movement....it provides no protection against deflection.

Kerberos
02-03-2011, 06:02 AM
Ditra is primarily for moisture control, and a bond breaker membrane. It's probably not necessary unless you think you will get lateral floor movement....it provides no protection against deflection.

Better for bathrooms and kitchens then with tile floors?

I'm not a contractor so forgive the ignorance.... but what do you mean by "deflection"?

If that is the case this is good information to know.

mikeyis4dcats.
02-03-2011, 07:37 AM
Better for bathrooms and kitchens then with tile floors?

I'm not a contractor so forgive the ignorance.... but what do you mean by "deflection"?

If that is the case this is good information to know.

if you're putting tile over a concrete slab, it can prevent moisture wicking up from below. It also prevent moisture from going the other way, like in a shower.

Deflection is the bending of the structure. Picture taking a 2x4 and putting the ends on concrete block, then stepping on the middle of the board, the way it bends is called deflection.

FRCDFED
02-03-2011, 07:41 AM
When I put down tile in my last house I did some research. It was recommended to have between 1 1/4" and 1 1/2" of solid flooring under the tile to prevent vibration that would result in cracking of the grout and tile. Therefore, if your subflooring is 3/4" plywood you would need 1/2" to 3/4" hardibacker or other concrete panels. These take a lot of screws to hold in place but it is worth it to take the time and do it right if you want a solid floor.

They make custom transition strips (usually matching the hardwood you select) that are used to transition between hardwood and tile. These are usually sold by the same company that makes the hardwood. They make them for all sorts of transitions (ie tile to carpet; tile to vinyl; hardwood to tile; hardwood to carpet; etc.).

Good luck. Just be sure you put the necessary time in to make your sub-floor solid. It is annoying but well worth it in the end.

mikeyis4dcats.
02-03-2011, 07:43 AM
When I put down tile in my last house I did some research. It was recommended to have between 1 1/4" and 1 1/2" of solid flooring under the tile to prevent vibration that would result in cracking of the grout and tile. Therefore, if your subflooring is 3/4" plywood you would need 1/2" to 3/4" hardibacker or other concrete panels. These take a lot of screws to hold in place but it is worth it to take the time and do it right if you want a solid floor.

They make custom transition strips (usually matching the hardwood you select) that are used to transition between hardwood and tile. These are usually sold by the same company that makes the hardwood. They make them for all sorts of transitions (ie tile to carpet; tile to vinyl; hardwood to tile; hardwood to carpet; etc.).

Good luck. Just be sure you put the necessary time in to make your sub-floor solid. It is annoying but well worth it in the end.

glue it and screw it. The glue will help a lot.

Over-Head
02-03-2011, 10:20 AM
glue it and screw it. The glue will help a lot. THIS!!!
I laugh my fool head off at builders nailing down the sub floor.
Had one builder look at me and say "ain't no damn difference, not one damn bit, the weight of everything in the house will keep it from popping, and what doesnt will be held down by walking traffic. Now go paint something!!"

Even the relistate developer laughed at that one

notorious
02-03-2011, 10:24 AM
THIS!!!
I laugh my fool head off at builders nailing down the sub floor.
Had one builder look at me and say "ain't no damn difference, not one damn bit, the weight of everything in the house will keep it from popping, and what doesnt will be held down by walking traffic. Now go paint something!!"

Even the relistate developer laughed at that one

No shit. Anyone that has done tearout on ANYTHING can tell you that screws have a hell of a lot more holding power then nails.


Now if we can just outlaw flathead screws ...........