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View Full Version : Football After a bloated Super Bowl in Dallas, it's time to rein in big game


siberian khatru
02-08-2011, 01:41 PM
For discussion:


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/07/AR2011020705610.html

After a bloated Super Bowl in Dallas, it's time to rein in big game

By Sally Jenkins
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, February 8, 2011; 12:06 AM

It's a rough morning-after for the NFL. The Dallas Super Bowl was a bender, but now that the confetti has fallen, it looks like litter. The hangover has hit, a splitting headache and a sour stomach from the $19 margaritas and the $12 wine and the $10 beers and the rest of the fiscal insanity. Is this really what the NFL wants to become? A divorced-from-reality debauch?

I don't know about you, but I don't want to live in Jerry World. In Jerry World, a $1.15 billion stadium looks like the Taj Mahal on the outside, but inside some of the seats violate the fire code. In Jerry World, the state of Texas spends $31 million to host the Super Bowl, even as deficits force public school cuts. In Jerry World, it can cost $900 just to park. In Jerry World, fans pay hundreds of dollars to stand outside the stadium.

Buried somewhere in all of the superbull, the booze, bad concerts and relentless commercial squeeze, there was a good football game between the Green Bay Packers and the Pittsburgh Steelers. But to be honest, it was an ancillary event. The NFL may want to rethink that strategy. It may also want to rethink its tendency to look like the Marie Antoinette of the sports world.

Everything you need to know about the future of the NFL could be seen in the gloriously decadent stadium that hosted this Super Bowl. As NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell pointed out, "Quite frankly, that's our stage." It was the cleanest, safest, nicest stadium anyone has ever visited. It was also the most extravagant and economically stratified. It cost double what Jerry Jones said it would, and taxpayers financed about a quarter of it, yet its innermost marble interiors are totally inaccessible to the average fan.

A tipping point was reached with this Super Bowl, for me. It was the screwed-over anger of those 1,250 people without seats that did it. Those travel-weary, cash-whipped fans paid small fortunes to go to the game, only to discover their stubs were no good, because fire marshals declared some sections unsafe. All of a sudden the whole thing seemed offensive. It was just too much.

For absurdity, how about those four Navy F-18s flying over the stadium - with its retractable roof closed? Everybody inside could only see the planes on the stadium's video screens. It was strictly a two-second beauty shot. Know what it cost taxpayers? I'll tell you: $450,000. (The Navy justifies the expense by saying it's good for recruiting.)

It's not clear what the pain threshold of the average NFL fan is: Thirty-two owners digging relentlessly in our pockets haven't found the bottom yet. But the NFL would be advised to recognize that it's getting close. Those folks who found themselves without seats? Many were among the league's most loyal paying customers, season ticket holders. Yet they were treated like afterthoughts, awarded half-built, jerry-rigged seats, folding chairs on auxiliary platforms. Which begs the question of what the "NFL fan experience" really means anymore. A day later the league did its best to make it up to them with offers of tickets to Super Bowl XLVI in Indianapolis and Goodell called it "obviously a failure on our part."

This Super Bowl was the future, and it set some lousy precedents. Every owner in the league wants a stadium like this one, and they will be pitching - maybe even extorting - their communities to help them build one. They want ever-larger luxury suites and bigger restaurants, and giant scoreboards and TVs, so they can replicate this Super Bowl, and sell standing room space in plazas and blocked views of a big screen for $200.

"Of the 100,000 and change tickets they sold, how many of those people actually had seats, and how many could actually see the field?" asks Neil deMause, a stadium-financing watchdog who co-authored the book, "Field of Schemes." He adds: "That's revolutionary if you can sell tickets to not actually watch the game. That's a whole new ballgame. So obviously everybody is saying, 'Hey, we want to get one of those.' "

It's the shiny new toy in the league. New stadiums are such a priority for owners that it's a critical piece of the labor negotiations taking place with the players' union. A major reason owners resent the 60 percent cut of revenue that goes to players is because it's not easy to finance stadium projects. They want a restructured agreement so "we can make the kinds of investments that grow this game," Goodell says, bemoaning the fact that no new construction has started since 2006.

But how much growth does the league need? It already generates an estimated $8 billion, and owners get the first $1 billion off the top. If you really love the NFL - and I do - you have to wonder if the billionizing of the league is really good for it. The average cost of attending a game for a family of four is $412.64. At Cowboys Stadium, it's a staggering $758.58. That's what the league calls growth.

Don't get me wrong: The Super Bowl can be electrifying for a community, and can be priceless in civic pride. Disclosure: I'm from Fort Worth, and I spent the week down there rooting for it to be a success. Cowboys Stadium is a gorgeous structure with some grand qualities, and Roger Staubach, who lobbied for the game, is a lovely guy.

But in the end, this Super Bowl taught me a lesson: Luxury can actually be debasing. The last great building binge in the NFL was from 1995 through 2003, when 21 stadiums were built or refurbished in order to create more luxury boxes, at cost of $6.4 billion. Know how much of that the public paid for? $4.4 billion. Why are we giving 32 rich guys that kind of money, just to prey on us at the box office and concessions? The Dallas deal should be the last of its kind.

When an owner grows tired of a facility and leaves, guess who picks up the tab? New Jersey still owes $110 million on the old Meadowlands home of the New York Giants and Jets, and when both teams moved to their new $1.6 billion, privately financed stadium, they got a huge tax break. According to the Wall Street Journal under their old agreement they paid $20 million a year in tax revenues; now they will pay only about $6 million a year. Know what New Jersey's deficit is? I'll tell you: $36 billion.

At its best the NFL is a deeply embedded piece of American culture, with an indissoluble bond with fans. But it's grown far removed from the grass-roots recreation it started as, the competitive emblem of mill towns, and their enormous civic resilience. As fans, we share blame for being willing to pay anything for it. We've allowed league owners to cash in on American pride, and hunger for entertainment. We should insist they share American economic problems.

Dicky McElephant
02-08-2011, 01:48 PM
Honestly....I think every stadium should be able to host a Superbowl. I'm sure it's not financially feasable for a lot of cities....but I'm getting fucking tired of seeing the Superbowl in the same 4-5 stadiums.

stevieray
02-08-2011, 01:56 PM
I'll always love the game, but the league continues to leave a bad taste in my mouth..eventually, sooner than later, it's just not gonna be worth the price to keep lining their pockets. they might lose on the field, but they win all the way to the bank.

Phobia
02-08-2011, 01:59 PM
This article gets my blood boiling. Stadium deals are nothing more than welfare for billionares. Why not build Bill Gates a $1,000,000,000 skyscraper?

Brock
02-08-2011, 02:01 PM
We're broke, the players make too much monaaaay


TO PLAY A GAME!!!!111

FAX
02-08-2011, 02:02 PM
The best part is when you get to puke up about 18 ten dollar beers.

FAX

ReynardMuldrake
02-08-2011, 02:09 PM
It costs $900 to park at the Superbowl??

Phobia
02-08-2011, 02:12 PM
It costs $900 to park at the Superbowl??

Regular season parking is $50. Don't know what Superbowl parking was but I'd imagine that was a shot at the people who had $900 seats but weren't let in.

ReynardMuldrake
02-08-2011, 02:13 PM
Regular season parking is $50. Don't know what Superbowl parking was but I'd imagine that was a shot at the people who had $900 seats but weren't let in.

Well, those people got triple their money back. That's a really misleading number.

siberian khatru
02-08-2011, 02:15 PM
This article gets my blood boiling. Stadium deals are nothing more than welfare for billionares. Why not build Bill Gates a $1,000,000,000 skyscraper?

Indeed. This part ...

The last great building binge in the NFL was from 1995 through 2003, when 21 stadiums were built or refurbished in order to create more luxury boxes, at cost of $6.4 billion. Know how much of that the public paid for? $4.4 billion. Why are we giving 32 rich guys that kind of money, just to prey on us at the box office and concessions? The Dallas deal should be the last of its kind.

... bothered me the most, and has for years. I don't like tax dollars going to fund stadiums of privately owned teams.

(Although, if you don't want greedy owners to "prey" on you, don't go to the games.)

FAX
02-08-2011, 02:19 PM
... (Although, if you don't want greedy owners to "prey" on you, don't go to the games.)

That's the crux of the situation, right there. Well posted.

Nobody's going to pass a bond for a giant, empty soup bowl.

FAX

siberian khatru
02-08-2011, 02:31 PM
That's the crux of the situation, right there. Well posted.

Nobody's going to pass a bond for a giant, empty soup bowl.

FAX

The Sprint Center in KC? :p

Mile High Mania
02-08-2011, 02:40 PM
It costs $900 to park at the Superbowl??

Ummm, no. There was a company across the street that was charging $900 for people to park in their lot.

DeezNutz
02-08-2011, 02:41 PM
At $450,000 a pop, all fly-overs should stop immediately. If the Navy wants to justify it based on recruiting, they need to present more convincing evidence of its positive effect.

Mile High Mania
02-08-2011, 02:48 PM
The Super Bowl is now a week long event that just happens to end with a 4 hour football game. I worked at the SB this weekend simply because I was given the once in a lifetime opportunity to do so and I knew I would never spend the money to actually attend one.

If it were just about 'the game', it would be great... but, it's not. Don't get me wrong, it was one hell of a show and the week of events (weather be damned) presented a lot of opportunities for people to have a great time.

It costs $25 an adult and $20 per child just to attend the NFL Experience and unfortunately, I decided NOT to wait 2 hours in line just to get my tickets and get into the event. But, people did pay and they did wait.

Those $800 nosebleed seats that were selling for several thousand dollars... well, I wouldn't pay $400, but there were a lot of 'average' fans that were paying the crazy prices.

Point is... it won't stop until people decide not to pay and I just don't see that happening. Concession pricing alone would convince me not to go to the game. :p

As far as tax payer $ goes... they didn't pay for half of the Cowboys' stadium. And, they'll get their money back quickly on it - it happened when they paid for the Ballpark for the Rangers.

I don't know what the final financial numbers will be, but I'm sure the North Texas area made off pretty well because of the SB. Jerry will continue to host every event he can to pay for his portion...

Unfortunately though, the SB is no longer something the average fan can truly enjoy... hell, regular games are too expensive in my opinion.

siberian khatru
02-08-2011, 02:49 PM
Ummm, no. There was a company across the street that was charging $900 for people to park in their lot.

... tha fvck?

Mile High Mania
02-08-2011, 02:51 PM
... tha fvck?

I forget the name, but it was on the news... they were asking $900 for the premium 2 minute walk right to park. And, PEOPLE PAID THE PRICE.

38yrsfan
02-08-2011, 02:56 PM
At $450,000 a pop, all fly-overs should stop immediately. If the Navy wants to justify it based on recruiting, they need to present more convincing evidence of its positive effect.

The don't have recruiting problems with the current economy.

From a Navy press release:

"MILLINGTON, Tenn. (NNS) -- Navy Recruiting Command (NRC) has broken several records for recruiting for fiscal year (FY) 2010 and plans to continue its success into FY 2011.

This year's recruiting efforts saw the breaking of several records achieved in fiscal year 2009, while still adhering to NRCs high quality standard for recruits."

siberian khatru
02-08-2011, 02:57 PM
I forget the name, but it was on the news... they were asking $900 for the premium 2 minute walk right to park. And, PEOPLE PAID THE PRICE.

Well, there ya go. Mr. Supply, meet Ms. Demand.

Edit: And I wish I had the kind of money to blow on $900 parking.

siberian khatru
02-08-2011, 02:58 PM
The don't have recruiting problems with the current economy.

From a Navy press release:

"MILLINGTON, Tenn. (NNS) -- Navy Recruiting Command (NRC) has broken several records for recruiting for fiscal year (FY) 2010 and plans to continue its success into FY 2011.

This year's recruiting efforts saw the breaking of several records achieved in fiscal year 2009, while still adhering to NRCs high quality standard for recruits."

I think that was probably due more to the Blu-Ray edition of "Top Gun" than $450,000 stadium flyovers.

DeezNutz
02-08-2011, 03:04 PM
The don't have recruiting problems with the current economy.

From a Navy press release:

"MILLINGTON, Tenn. (NNS) -- Navy Recruiting Command (NRC) has broken several records for recruiting for fiscal year (FY) 2010 and plans to continue its success into FY 2011.

This year's recruiting efforts saw the breaking of several records achieved in fiscal year 2009, while still adhering to NRCs high quality standard for recruits."

Perfect. Then we should immediately stop wasting 1/2 million of taxpayer dollars for each professional sporting event. If the owners want to finance it, great.

Guru
02-08-2011, 03:07 PM
Well, at least we know by the time the Chiefs get there we will be watching from home.

Short Leash Hootie
02-08-2011, 03:12 PM
it's a pipe dream for me to ever make it to a Super Bowl

that's for sure

It's a shame season ticket holders for the team's playing don't get first crack at the tickets...or at least a large share of them...

it doesn't work that way, does it??

Mile High Mania
02-08-2011, 03:14 PM
it's a pipe dream for me to ever make it to a Super Bowl

that's for sure

It's a shame season ticket holders for the team's playing don't get first crack at the tickets...or at least a large share of them...

it doesn't work that way, does it??

No idea. My suggestion is this - if you live in the town where the game is hosted, find a way to "volunteer" or to work on the staff for the event. They hire thousands of people for game day and the week of events. I know a lot of people that were paid to be at the SB on Sunday, and it was pretty easy work.

DaFace
02-08-2011, 03:15 PM
it's a pipe dream for me to ever make it to a Super Bowl

that's for sure

It's a shame season ticket holders for the team's playing don't get first crack at the tickets...or at least a large share of them...

it doesn't work that way, does it??

IIRC, the two teams that make it to the SB each get a chunk of tickets that they get to sell to their season ticket holders at face value. For some reason, the number 20% of total tickets rings a bell, but I could be completely off on that.

EDIT: Here ya go.

25.2 percent of all Super Bowl tickets are controlled by the NFL and distributed among companies, sponsors, media and networks
74.8 percent of tickets are split among the NFL teams:

5 percent to the host city's team
17.5 percent to the AFC champion
17.5 percent to the NFC champion
34.8 percent are distributed among the remaining teams (1.2 percent per team)


That info is a few years old, but is probably in the right ballpark.

Deberg_1990
02-08-2011, 03:15 PM
This article gets my blood boiling. Stadium deals are nothing more than welfare for billionares. Why not build Bill Gates a $1,000,000,000 skyscraper?

Basically they have fans by the balls and they know it...Nobody wants their team moving to another city. Their sport is like crack and we fans soak it all up at any price.

Short Leash Hootie
02-08-2011, 03:18 PM
IIRC, the two teams that make it to the SB each get a chunk of tickets that they get to sell to their season ticket holders at face value. For some reason, the number 20% of total tickets rings a bell, but I could be completely off on that.

every season ticket holder should be able to buy a Super Bowl ticket a face value IMO

I don't know if that is possible...but for crying out loud...$30,000 for a Super Bowl week is just outrageous.

gblowfish
02-08-2011, 03:18 PM
Eat the Rich.

Short Leash Hootie
02-08-2011, 03:19 PM
that's not too bad...

so I assume they give the season ticket holders who spend the most money the first crack on tickets...

and then all of those assholes broker those tickets for sick profit

DaFace
02-08-2011, 03:22 PM
every season ticket holder should be able to buy a Super Bowl ticket a face value IMO

I don't know if that is possible...but for crying out loud...$30,000 for a Super Bowl week is just outrageous.

Well, that wouldn't work. You've got two teams that both have their own season ticket holders both trying to fit into one stadium. Even if all of the tickets were sold that way, there's no way that every STH would have a chance.

notorious
02-08-2011, 03:24 PM
Not a single thing is going happen until we see empty seats.

DTLB58
02-08-2011, 03:28 PM
Jeez, Kinda reminds me of x-mas for some people. Glad I stayed home and watched it on TV and don't have to worry about looking at the credit card statement next month and worry about paying all year long to pay off the trip. :grr:

Cash is King baby!

I hope Jerry Jones dies a slow painful death.

notorious
02-08-2011, 03:29 PM
I hope Jerry Jones dies a slow painful death.


That fuck probably drinks his hot cup of stem cells while he reads the Wall Street Journal every morning.

He is going to live to be 130.

tooge
02-08-2011, 03:30 PM
Yeah, its total BS, plain and simple. Owner says, hey, you pump in a few hundred million or I'm heading to LA where they will build me a new stadium. Taxpayers buck up even though they have to sit and watch thier childrens schools cut programs. Owner then plays the same game again 20 years later. NFL shouldn't allow anyone to purchase a team without a no move clause, It would force owners to try to win to appease thier fan base, and thus make more money.

Short Leash Hootie
02-08-2011, 03:30 PM
Well, that wouldn't work. You've got two teams that both have their own season ticket holders both trying to fit into one stadium. Even if all of the tickets were sold that way, there's no way that every STH would have a chance.

how many season ticket holders does a typical NFL team have?

alpha_omega
02-08-2011, 03:30 PM
Honestly....I think every stadium should be able to host a Superbowl. I'm sure it's not financially feasible for a lot of cities....but I'm getting fucking tired of seeing the Superbowl in the same 4-5 stadiums.

I agree with that, but would also suggest that the same location each year would be a good idea too. Have the SB at the Rose Bowl/LA Colosseum/New Meadowlands/wherever every year and leave it at that.

gblowfish
02-08-2011, 03:30 PM
Well, that wouldn't work. You've got two teams that both have their own season ticket holders both trying to fit into one stadium. Even if all of the tickets were sold that way, there's no way that every STH would have a chance.

In 1993 when the Chiefs made the AFC Championship game in Buffalo, I got a letter from King Carl. They had a "lottery" for a limited number of Superbowl tickets alloted to the Chiefs, if, the team were to win and represent the AFC (didn't happen as we all know). The "Chiefs Lottery" was weighted in a fashion where the more season tickets you owned, and the more years you had owned them, allegedly gave you better odds. This was in 1993. My family has had 3 season tickets since 1967, and did not get selected. And, the letter was really nasty. "Our awards are FINAL. Do NOT call the Chiefs offices, we WILL NOT have tickets available, etc." It was typical King Carl Front Office Speak.

If the Chiefs ever do make it to the SB, not many KC fans will get to attend, unless they get a second mortgage.

googlegoogle
02-08-2011, 03:32 PM
Public financing of stadiums which only benefits a few should be banned.

DaFace
02-08-2011, 03:33 PM
how many season ticket holders does a typical NFL team have?

Eh, I dunno. I think the Chiefs sell up to around 70k of them, though obviously that number's much lower right now.

Short Leash Hootie
02-08-2011, 03:36 PM
Eh, I dunno. I think the Chiefs sell up to around 70k of them, though obviously that number's much lower right now.

oh shit lol

there goes that theory

Short Leash Hootie
02-08-2011, 03:36 PM
I guess it wouldn't matter...

if they did sell more to the fan bases they'd all turn around and make 10X (or more) profit and watch it at home...

lose lose

Bob Dole
02-08-2011, 03:39 PM
I agree with that, but would also suggest that the same location each year would be a good idea too. Have the SB at the Rose Bowl/LA Colosseum/New Meadowlands/wherever every year and leave it at that.

Right. Because the west and east coast are most important.

gblowfish
02-08-2011, 03:40 PM
The Super Bowl is really not a game meant for the team's fans, as weird as that sounds. It's more like a big party for millionaires. There's much schmoozing and non-football business weaseling going on, and the game is really just a sideshow.

Lots of times the divisional playoff games and championship games are much better to watch, and those games are still played at the home field of the participants. For most KC fans, getting to see an AFC Championship game at Arrowhead will probably be as good as it ever gets. Super Bowl tickets are just not meant for Joe Lunchbucket.

They're meant for Jennifer Anniston.

Deberg_1990
02-08-2011, 03:43 PM
The Super Bowl is really not a game meant for the team's fans, as weird as that sounds. It's more like a big party for millionaires. There's much schmoozing and non-football business weaseling going on, and the game is really just a sideshow.

Lots of times the divisional playoff games and championship games are much better to watch, and those games are still played at the home field of the participants. For most KC fans, getting to see an AFC Championship game at Arrowhead will probably be as good as it ever gets. Super Bowl tickets are just not meant for Joe Lunchbucket.

They're meant for Jennifer Anniston.

Nail on head......The Superbowl "Event" has grown larger than the NFL itself.

alpha_omega
02-08-2011, 03:45 PM
Right. Because the west and east coast are most important.

Well, i just picked the first ones that came to mind. Soldier Field then. Just one location.

Detoxing
02-08-2011, 03:48 PM
Nail on head......The Superbowl "Event" has grown larger than the NFL itself.

i was just thinking that last night.

The Super Bowl has grown too big for itself. I didn't enjoy this game like i have with other SBs.

It's become so big that it doesn't feel like it's for the fans anymore. The game just couldn't hold my interest because the event was about everything BUT the game.

Coach
02-08-2011, 03:49 PM
Eh, I know that I won't ever go to a Super Bowl, mostly due to the $ being involved. I'm more content with going to a local bar or staying at home, watching the game on TV with my own food and drinks.

siberian khatru
02-08-2011, 03:52 PM
i was just thinking that last night.

The Super Bowl has grown too big for itself. I didn't enjoy this game like i have with other SBs.

It's become so big that it doesn't feel like it's for the fans anymore. The game just couldn't hold my interest because the event was about everything BUT the game.

I agree.

The point was made before the conference championship games that THAT is the best weekend of football for fans. It is only about the games, the X's and O's and the players, with none of the "entertainment" and glitz and hype to overshadow it or wear you down.

Over-Head
02-08-2011, 04:00 PM
The pussies outa play the last one in which ever team had the best W-L record going in.
They play the rest of the season in open stadiums, play the freaken Championship in one.
Better yet,
MAKE a SB stadium.
Each of the 32 owners foot the bill as part of owning a team.

2bikemike
02-08-2011, 04:31 PM
Eh, I know that I won't ever go to a Super Bowl, mostly due to the $ being involved. I'm more content with going to a local bar or staying at home, watching the game on TV with my own food and drinks.

Yeah I agree. I would rather watch the Superbowl from the comforts of my own reclined. I don't really prefer watching games at home. I just hate being raped financially for the experience. However having the superbowl in your home town is pretty cool. There are hundreds of things you can take part in without going to the game. A lot of it is free or very affordable.

Buehler445
02-08-2011, 05:25 PM
This is a really good article IMO. Very on point. Unfortunately, the NFL will eventually choke the golden goose and it will be over. Just like the MLB.

It may be as early as this upcoming season.
Posted via Mobile Device

Deberg_1990
02-08-2011, 05:30 PM
i was just thinking that last night.

The Super Bowl has grown too big for itself. I didn't enjoy this game like i have with other SBs.

It's become so big that it doesn't feel like it's for the fans anymore. The game just couldn't hold my interest because the event was about everything BUT the game.

I agree.

The point was made before the conference championship games that THAT is the best weekend of football for fans. It is only about the games, the X's and O's and the players, with none of the "entertainment" and glitz and hype to overshadow it or wear you down.

It does sort of annoy me when you get people from the E Network to the Food Network giving their football takes when you know damn well they have watched maybe one game a year.

This also applies to any Super Bowl Party you have ever been to. Random GF or wife of random friend all the sudden thinks they are a football expert while watching the game.

Mile High Mania
02-09-2011, 06:18 AM
The pussies outa play the last one in which ever team had the best W-L record going in.
They play the rest of the season in open stadiums, play the freaken Championship in one.
Better yet,
MAKE a SB stadium.
Each of the 32 owners foot the bill as part of owning a team.

A SB Stadium? That's crazy...

Somehow, they need to just tap the brake on the over-exposure and focus primarily on the game. I don't mind all the glitz and other BS, I don't watch it... so I don't care, I just watch the game. But, after being a part of it this week, they definitely need to step back and evaluate how much they want the normal NFL fan to be a part of the SB. Right now, it's very hard and extremely expensive.

It's ok if they want the A-List stars and all the hoopla, but focus on the real fans and provide affordable options for them to attend. That's key and it could realistically happen.

Bane
02-09-2011, 06:31 AM
Real fans?Normal fans?Yeah good luck with that.Those people are of no importance to the modern day/Goodells NFL.
Posted via Mobile Device

Mile High Mania
02-09-2011, 06:33 AM
Real fans?Normal fans?Yeah good luck with that.Those people are of no importance to the modern day/Goodells NFL.
Posted via Mobile Device

I don't know that I would say that... I do think the SB has grown to a size though that they're not quite sure how to contain/control. Maybe the seat fiasco that happened will open their eyes up a bit - the bulk of those people were the real fans.

HMc
02-09-2011, 06:43 AM
i think it's bullshit that it's in miami and new orleans every other year. spread that shit around

Kerberos
02-09-2011, 07:02 AM
At $450,000 a pop, all fly-overs should stop immediately. If the Navy wants to justify it based on recruiting, they need to present more convincing evidence of its positive effect.

In theory that is a number this writer got somewhere that says the "average cost of flying" an F18 is this much per hour. She then multiplied that by 4 or 5 (however many F18's flew over).

Did it cost $450K for the flyover ? NO

The average costs per hour to fly ANY aircraft are calculated by the number of THAT type of aircraft and how much it costs for maintenance and up-keep of EACH type for a year and then formulated to give a cost per hour to fly.

It really is a numbers game and JUST like stats on a football team they can be skewed ANY way you want them.

:shake:

But you are correct in any event. All fly overs need to cease. There is no reason for it.

Mile High Mania
02-09-2011, 07:02 AM
i think it's bullshit that it's in miami and new orleans every other year. spread that shit around

Since 2000 (and the next 2 locations)... I'm surprised it hasn't been in CA since 2003. That's 13 different venues in 15 years...

2014 East Rutherford, NJ
2013 New Orleans
2012 Indianapolis, IN
2011 Arlington, TX
2010 Miami, FL
2009 Tampa, FL
2008 Glendale, AZ
2007 Miami, FL
2006 Detroit, MI
2005 Jacksonville, FL
2004 Houston, TX
2003 San Diego, CA
2002 New Orleans, LA
2001 Tampa, FL
2000 Atlanta, GA

Baconeater
02-09-2011, 07:08 AM
Eat the Rich.
Out of the palace, and into the ditch!

MahiMike
02-09-2011, 07:41 AM
The NFL is the next big bubble. Eventually fans will start going to high school and college games instead of deal with this. I know I already have.

Baby Lee
02-09-2011, 07:59 AM
So, this is how socialism works? ROFL ROFL