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KcMizzou
02-23-2011, 10:03 PM
So, I've got a 14 yr old who acts like he hates me 80% of the time. When I get serious and call him on it... he acts like I'm crazy, and he has no idea what I'm talking about.

It's all sullen mumbled bullshit and dirty looks... until I get pissed off... and then suddenly it's the incredulous, "What are you talking about?? Everything's fine."

Is this normal?

Meanwhile the other boy (17 months younger) has none of these issues..... yet.

Buehler445
02-23-2011, 10:05 PM
I think it is for a lot of kids.

Baconeater
02-23-2011, 10:05 PM
Yes, perfectly normal. In fact, you can expect that behavior to continue all through high school.

KcMizzou
02-23-2011, 10:09 PM
It's really just his general demeanor. I think.. and tell him, "Man, you've got it pretty good... what's the deal?" He never has an answer... I think it's part of growing up... but man, it sucks.

luv
02-23-2011, 10:10 PM
Of course he mumbles. He hasn't got a face! :p

LiveSteam
02-23-2011, 10:12 PM
I sneered at my dad once. He called me on it. I then says to him at 16. You think you can handle me old man? I found out in 10 seconds what bark on the pin oak tree out front tasted like.
all part of growing up

pr_capone
02-23-2011, 10:12 PM
Of course he mumbles. He hasn't got a face! :p

:spock:

Baconeater
02-23-2011, 10:12 PM
It's really just his general demeanor. I think.. and tell him, "Man, you've got it pretty good... what's the deal?" He never has an answer... I think it's part of growing up... but man, it sucks.
Of course it sucks. But it's not your job to be his friend at this point in his life, your job is to make him into a man.

pr_capone
02-23-2011, 10:13 PM
I sneered at my dad once. He called me on it. I then says to him at 16. You think you can handle me old man? I found out in 10 seconds what bark on the pin oak tree tasted like.

ROFL

luv
02-23-2011, 10:13 PM
:spock:

It's a facebook thing.

KurtCobain
02-23-2011, 10:14 PM
My four year old daughter acts like she hates me 95% percent of the time. When I call her on it, he yells "bleh" and runs away.

Baconeater
02-23-2011, 10:15 PM
My four year old daughter acts like she hates me 95% percent of the time. When I call her on it, he yells "bleh" and runs away.
Well yeah, because you're a boy and they have cooties.

luv
02-23-2011, 10:15 PM
Well yeah, because you're a boy and they have cooties.

Yes. Yes, they do.

pr_capone
02-23-2011, 10:15 PM
My four year old daughter acts like she hates me 95% percent of the time. When I call her on it, he yells "bleh" and runs away.

Is this your daughter?

http://i53.tinypic.com/15d42yt.gif

Count Zarth
02-23-2011, 10:15 PM
Check him for nose maggots.

Shogun
02-23-2011, 10:18 PM
I'm only 20, and I don't have kids. But I grew up respecting my parents and knew that if I didn't I would get the everliving shit out of me.

Dad would - Beat my ass with anything

Mom - Wooden Spoon

Fuck that, Wooden spoons hurt.

Good luck with your kid, he will grow out of it, he just wants to be left the fuck alone

luv
02-23-2011, 10:19 PM
Remember all of the things you did at 14? They're coming back to haunt you!

KcMizzou
02-23-2011, 10:20 PM
My teenage years were pretty rough when it came to my relationship with my parents. Now I consider them two of my best friends. I guess I was hoping to skip that rough part with my own kids. Blah...

Buehler445
02-23-2011, 10:20 PM
It's really just his general demeanor. I think.. and tell him, "Man, you've got it pretty good... what's the deal?" He never has an answer... I think it's part of growing up... but man, it sucks.

You're right. But keep fighting the good fight. Ask him if he were an employer and one of his employees was acting like that, what would he do?

It may make an impression eventually.

Phobia
02-23-2011, 10:23 PM
You're gonna have opportunities to practice tough love on him soon. Take them. Please don't buy him video games so he'll pretend to like you for a weekend. Treat him like a n00b sometimes. Otherwise he's gonna turn into Clayton.

Count Zarth
02-23-2011, 10:27 PM
Otherwise he's gonna turn into Clayton.

Interestingly, I completely skipped this phase. I always had a very good relationship with my parents and we got along fine. Probably because they tanned my hide like there was no tomorrow when I was little.

Maybe it would have been different if I had been interested in girls and partying instead of computers, football and Star Trek.

bowener
02-23-2011, 10:29 PM
Beat him. Mercilessly.

luv
02-23-2011, 10:30 PM
Beat him. Mercilessly.

Shouldn't that have come when he was younger?

KurtCobain
02-23-2011, 10:32 PM
Fuck that, Wooden spoons hurt.


Fuck yeah.

Shogun
02-23-2011, 10:34 PM
Is your son in any sports?

J Diddy
02-23-2011, 11:01 PM
My four year old daughter acts like she hates me 95% percent of the time. When I call her on it, he yells "bleh" and runs away.

your 4 year old daughter is a he?

-King-
02-23-2011, 11:07 PM
Its a part of life. The more he grows up, the more distant he's going to want to be from his parents. It's natural instinct to want to be independent.

As long as he's not being an asshole and he's not doing of anything you don't approve of...its fine.

-King-
02-23-2011, 11:09 PM
I'm only 20, and I don't have kids. But I grew up respecting my parents and knew that if I didn't I would get the everliving shit out of me.

Dad would - Beat my ass with anything

Mom - Wooden Spoon

Fuck that, Wooden spoons hurt.

Good luck with your kid, he will grow out of it, he just wants to be left the fuck alone

Give me a wooden spoon any day over a belt buckle. Holy fuck. Yard sticks weren't uncommon either.

KC Tattoo
02-23-2011, 11:18 PM
I think it is for a lot of kids.

It is & my daughter is the same. It is a natual development for them to rebell from there parents and become there own person. It's hard to deal with as a parent because we give them so much of our love and tollerance. What I have learned from taking parenting classes on teens is that you have to keep a ballenced relationship, fair and hold them responsible yet not be too strict. It's like walking a tight rope in a circus act. Teenage years are when they start to take ownership of there own lives. It's scary as a parent & there are so much distractions and influences like tv, internet, and other delinquents that they have contact with.

Gonzo
02-23-2011, 11:25 PM
Next time you call him on it and he laughs it off, stay on him about it until you get an answer. Don't let him shrug it off like you're the crazy one. Then call him a "little bitch" ( paraphrasing there) for not sticking to his guns.
He'll think twice about being a prick.
If that doesn't do it, make him eat asphalt.
Posted via Mobile Device

Chiefshrink
02-23-2011, 11:29 PM
So, I've got a 14 yr old who acts like he hates me 80% of the time. When I get serious and call him on it... he acts like I'm crazy, and he has no idea what I'm talking about.

It's all sullen mumbled bullshit and dirty looks... until I get pissed off... and then suddenly it's the incredulous, "What are you talking about?? Everything's fine."

Is this normal?

Meanwhile the other boy (17 months younger) has none of these issues..... yet.

He is "screaming" for your love and approval. Every son wants their Father's blessing along the way to becoming a man and especially for a 1st born son.

For whatever reason it sounds like your son feels he does not measure up and he feels like he is disappointing you. Thus hides his emotional pain behind the dirty looks and mumbllings in hopes to get your attention. Obviously, this is the wrong way to get your attention but he doesn't trust you enough with his heart to be honest in his feelings and doesn't know any other way.

The teen yrs are the height of narcissistic development (me,me,me,drama,drama,drama) you know the routine as many have said in this thread and I am not immune to this either.

I'm sure you have tried many things to reach out to him and without knowing the "contextual relational specifics"(family dynamics,schoool grades,girls,friends,etc..) it is hard to get the most accurate read on this but whatever you do "never stop pursuing him" regardless of what he does to you.

Do you ever have very real sober moments with him? If so ask him, "son do you feel you have let me down as a son? Do you feel you can't do anything right and feel like a failure in my eyes? Do you feel like I favor your brother more than you because we get along better?

Timing is everything when asking these questions so be sure you have developed enough of a sober trusting moment so that he feels safe to be honest with you. If these questions are asked to soon he will just deny. But the way to start these questions off is first talk about your feelings of inadequacy you had as a teen which will hopefully create a place of identification for him and he will see that "hey, Dad struggled with these feelings as well" and maybe he will open up to you. You may not believe this but "YOU" are his No.1 HERO, PERIOD! And there is nothing more than he wants than your love and approval. The blessing.

If he does then total unconditionality must be given by you to build the trust. As this occurs he must also realize that "dirty looks" and mumblings" must stop and real communication must happen instead of "passive aggressive" behavior. You must show him what "real communication" looks like.

If you don't have those intimate sober moments with him you must create them whether it's playing video games, going fishing, playing ball, etc.....

You get the gest.

Good luck!:thumb:

Count Zarth
02-23-2011, 11:29 PM
Make him do chores every time he gets snotty.

Guru
02-23-2011, 11:30 PM
It's normal dude. I'm having the same issue with my 14 year old son. Drives me up the wall.

Phobia
02-23-2011, 11:38 PM
Here's something else to think about, Brandon. Does he have a maternal figure in his life? Grandma? Teacher? Counselor? Neighbor? Sometimes the softer sex can really add amazing balance. I think you bust your ass to be a great dad but you're a man. You can't provide that maternal stuff.

rad
02-23-2011, 11:40 PM
He is "screaming" for your love and approval. Every son wants their Father's blessing along the way to becoming a man and especially for a 1st born son.

For whatever reason it sounds like your son feels he does not measure up and he feels like he is disappointing you. Thus hides his emotional pain behind the dirty looks and mumbllings in hopes to get your attention. Obviously, this is the wrong way to get your attention but he doesn't trust you enough with his heart to be honest in his feelings and doesn't know any other way.

The teen yrs are the height of narcissistic development (me,me,me,drama,drama,drama) you know the routine as many have said in this thread and I am not immune to this either.

I'm sure you have tried many things to reach out to him and without knowing the "contextual relational specifics"(family dynamics,schoool grades,girls,friends,etc..) it is hard to get the most accurate read on this but whatever you do "never stop pursuing him" regardless of what he does to you.

Do you ever have very real sober moments with him? If so ask him, "son do you feel you have let me down as a son? Do you feel you can't do anything right and feel like a failure in my eyes? Do you feel like I favor your brother more than you because we get along better?

Timing is everything when asking these questions so be sure you have developed enough of a sober trusting moment so that he feels safe to be honest with you. If these questions are asked to soon he will just deny. But the way to start these questions off is first talk about your feelings of inadequacy you had as a teen which will hopefully create a place of identification for him and he will see that "hey, Dad struggled with these feelings as well" and maybe he will open up to you. You may not believe this but "YOU" are his No.1 HERO, PERIOD! And there is nothing more than he wants than your love and approval. The blessing.

If he does then total unconditionality must be given by you to build the trust. As this occurs he must also realize that "dirty looks" and mumblings" must stop and real communication must happen instead of "passive aggressive" behavior. You must show him what "real communication" looks like.

If you don't have those intimate sober moments with him you must create them whether it's playing video games, going fishing, playing ball, etc.....

You get the gest.

Good luck!:thumb:

Holy fuck...

"Oops...hour's up. That'll be 75 bucks.....see ya next Wednesday."

Psyko Tek
02-23-2011, 11:41 PM
Yes, perfectly normal. In fact, you can expect that behavior to continue all through high school.

this

Mr. Flopnuts
02-24-2011, 01:02 AM
He is "screaming" for your love and approval. Every son wants their Father's blessing along the way to becoming a man and especially for a 1st born son.

For whatever reason it sounds like your son feels he does not measure up and he feels like he is disappointing you. Thus hides his emotional pain behind the dirty looks and mumbllings in hopes to get your attention. Obviously, this is the wrong way to get your attention but he doesn't trust you enough with his heart to be honest in his feelings and doesn't know any other way.

The teen yrs are the height of narcissistic development (me,me,me,drama,drama,drama) you know the routine as many have said in this thread and I am not immune to this either.

I'm sure you have tried many things to reach out to him and without knowing the "contextual relational specifics"(family dynamics,schoool grades,girls,friends,etc..) it is hard to get the most accurate read on this but whatever you do "never stop pursuing him" regardless of what he does to you.

Do you ever have very real sober moments with him? If so ask him, "son do you feel you have let me down as a son? Do you feel you can't do anything right and feel like a failure in my eyes? Do you feel like I favor your brother more than you because we get along better?

Timing is everything when asking these questions so be sure you have developed enough of a sober trusting moment so that he feels safe to be honest with you. If these questions are asked to soon he will just deny. But the way to start these questions off is first talk about your feelings of inadequacy you had as a teen which will hopefully create a place of identification for him and he will see that "hey, Dad struggled with these feelings as well" and maybe he will open up to you. You may not believe this but "YOU" are his No.1 HERO, PERIOD! And there is nothing more than he wants than your love and approval. The blessing.

If he does then total unconditionality must be given by you to build the trust. As this occurs he must also realize that "dirty looks" and mumblings" must stop and real communication must happen instead of "passive aggressive" behavior. You must show him what "real communication" looks like.

If you don't have those intimate sober moments with him you must create them whether it's playing video games, going fishing, playing ball, etc.....

You get the gest.

Good luck!:thumb:

And when he turns 16 and tells you he likes boys, remember that you actually had THIS conversation with him.

Seriously, it's a prerequisite for teenagers to be self centered, egotistical, assholes that think the entire world revolves around them. He'll grow out of it. He's got a good Dad, and you can't take it personal otherwise you will start smothering him. Which is a natural instinct, but you have to control your emotions since it's impossible for him to right now with all of the hormonal changes going on. He'll be fine, and so will you. In fact, I'll bet he looks at you as his best friend 10 years from now.

Joe Seahawk
02-24-2011, 01:14 AM
Thank You for that post SS, I have a 17 and 18 year old sons, we get along fine, but i really need to have a good heart to heart with each of them seperately and make sure they realize how proud i am of them.. :thumb:


He is "screaming" for your love and approval. Every son wants their Father's blessing along the way to becoming a man and especially for a 1st born son.

For whatever reason it sounds like your son feels he does not measure up and he feels like he is disappointing you. Thus hides his emotional pain behind the dirty looks and mumbllings in hopes to get your attention. Obviously, this is the wrong way to get your attention but he doesn't trust you enough with his heart to be honest in his feelings and doesn't know any other way.

The teen yrs are the height of narcissistic development (me,me,me,drama,drama,drama) you know the routine as many have said in this thread and I am not immune to this either.

I'm sure you have tried many things to reach out to him and without knowing the "contextual relational specifics"(family dynamics,schoool grades,girls,friends,etc..) it is hard to get the most accurate read on this but whatever you do "never stop pursuing him" regardless of what he does to you.

Do you ever have very real sober moments with him? If so ask him, "son do you feel you have let me down as a son? Do you feel you can't do anything right and feel like a failure in my eyes? Do you feel like I favor your brother more than you because we get along better?

Timing is everything when asking these questions so be sure you have developed enough of a sober trusting moment so that he feels safe to be honest with you. If these questions are asked to soon he will just deny. But the way to start these questions off is first talk about your feelings of inadequacy you had as a teen which will hopefully create a place of identification for him and he will see that "hey, Dad struggled with these feelings as well" and maybe he will open up to you. You may not believe this but "YOU" are his No.1 HERO, PERIOD! And there is nothing more than he wants than your love and approval. The blessing.

If he does then total unconditionality must be given by you to build the trust. As this occurs he must also realize that "dirty looks" and mumblings" must stop and real communication must happen instead of "passive aggressive" behavior. You must show him what "real communication" looks like.

If you don't have those intimate sober moments with him you must create them whether it's playing video games, going fishing, playing ball, etc.....

You get the gest.

Good luck!:thumb:

NewChief
02-24-2011, 04:52 AM
Make him read Oedipus Rex then say, "Now son. Is that really what you want out of life?"

In all seriousness, it's normal for a lot of teenage boys. I don't look forward to it with my boys, but it's normal.

NewChief
02-24-2011, 04:55 AM
Give me a wooden spoon any day over a belt buckle. Holy ****. Yard sticks weren't uncommon either.

Hot wheels track.

Guru
02-24-2011, 05:25 AM
Hot wheels track.Leather belt

King_Chief_Fan
02-24-2011, 05:53 AM
wow, are there a lot of Dr. Phil's on this board.
There are a few who are giviing pretty good advise from their experience.

If you and your dad had a great relationship, recall what made it great and duplicate it.

burt
02-24-2011, 06:16 AM
My 15 year old son acts like Axel from "In the Middle". It is making me crazy!

bevischief
02-24-2011, 06:29 AM
Check him for nose maggots.

ROFL

tooge
02-24-2011, 07:08 AM
you need to bring this issue out. Do you have any maple syrup in the house?

MOhillbilly
02-24-2011, 07:30 AM
he just needs to get laid.

edit-
IDK for sure but id bet on some level he A-doesnt wanna hurt your feelings so he acts like nothings wrong. B- Has respect and love for you but doesnt know how to show it yet at this time in his life.
just a hunch.

get him a hooker asap.

Chiefshrink
02-24-2011, 08:34 AM
My 15 year old son acts like Axel from "In the Middle". It is making me crazy!

Love the show:thumb: My 13 y.o. as well but because I continually "pursue him"(quality relational time spent) and ignore the "Axel crap attitude" he knows to knock it off when he realizes that I am truly loving him at those times. Is it hard to do this with an unconditional loving attitude at all times?

HELL YES! I'm human(I'm not perfect and believe you me I have my moments) and you are human and we all make mistakes as parents. But when you do make a mistake as a parent. The best thing you could ever do to get credibility and respect restored so that he will listen to you in the future is 'apologize'. Men in particular have a real hard time doing this especially with their sons. This will role model to him that no parent is perfect and mistakes will happen and failure is part of life but you will role model to him how to positively deal with failure. This will show unconditional grace from you thus unconditional grace will be given by him when he becomes a parent.

My father to this day has never 'apologized' for some very serious mistakes to our family growing up and it has definitely taken its toll not only on me but my own family as well. The only way I deal with this is let God do his work. All God has ever asked us to do is love unconditionally. It is God's responsibility to 'change'. And all to often we get those 2 aspects backwards.

You do not want that to happen in the long run for your family

Inspector
02-24-2011, 09:49 AM
I have 5 sons. They are all grown men in their 30's and 40's but yeah, I had some of that when they were young. Doesn't last. We're all really tight.

And eventually they will have kids and need help with babysitting and then they really start sucking up to ya!!

KurtCobain
02-24-2011, 10:05 AM
your 4 year old daughter is a he?

I don't ask the details of your home.

SNR
02-24-2011, 10:20 AM
Interestingly, when I went through that phase it was against my mom, not my dad. I think it's because she was overprotective and when I got to my teen years I finally said "enough of this bullshit." That still isn't a good excuse for how I treated her back then, but if you combine teenage anger with trying to break free from your parents that's what happens.

Have you tried playing the victim card to him? Maybe you've already done this, but try asking him, "What the hell did I do?" Approach it like you're not meeting his needs and he needs to tell you how you can "be a better parent." Odds are he won't be honest, or he'll just shrug off and leave. But I think if he does answer the question, it might solve a lot of your questions about him.

KurtCobain
02-24-2011, 10:21 AM
Have you tried relocating to a new place taking him away from all his friends and influences, leaving only you to bond with?

KurtCobain
02-24-2011, 10:22 AM
http://thurstongore.files.wordpress.com/2010/02/homer.gif

Hound333
02-24-2011, 10:48 AM
From working with Highschool kids for many years now I can tell you its pretty normal.

Especially for 14 year olds.

At that age they want and expect all the Rights and Privileges that come with being an adult without that pesky accountability. You will have many arguements over the next several years. It seems to start getting better Senior year (contrary to what most people think Seniors are decently mature) Most likely this is due to the fact that they start to figure out that next year they will either be on their own in college or will have to join the work force.

Rausch
02-24-2011, 11:27 AM
So, I've got a 14 yr old who acts like he hates me 80% of the time. When I get serious and call him on it... he acts like I'm crazy, and he has no idea what I'm talking about.

It's all sullen mumbled bullshit and dirty looks... until I get pissed off... and then suddenly it's the incredulous, "What are you talking about?? Everything's fine."

Is this normal?

Yes.

Now that you're a parent you're the dumbest sum'bidge ever drank some water.

Demonpenz
02-24-2011, 12:44 PM
I was a doosh at 14. Always throwing my pads around after football practice and things. My dad got pissed, but it was to much to handle sometimes.

seclark
02-24-2011, 01:02 PM
I was a doosh at 14. Always throwing my pads around after football practice and things. My dad got pissed, but it was to much to handle sometimes.

when i was 14, i wanted to become a minister.
no shit.
sec

MOhillbilly
02-24-2011, 01:34 PM
when i was 14, i wanted to become a minister.
no shit.
sec

minister of defense?

burt
02-24-2011, 01:53 PM
So....the other night he was mouthing off to me, with total disrespect. I yelled at him about it.... more disrespect. I grabbed him... more disrespect. I smacked him with an open palm...cautht his mouth with my fingers. I am kind of large.... drew a little blood. He called for mom, who took his side, I am thinking because I drew blood. I walked away. Slept on the couch. The next day, she asked me if I apologized. I said, "No, I am not sorry." No one has remained angry. Thoughts?

MOhillbilly
02-24-2011, 02:11 PM
IDK Burt, my dad killed people-dry grin-. Talked soft and carried a big stick, ya dig.

FAX
02-24-2011, 02:23 PM
So, I've got a 14 yr old who acts like he hates me 80% of the time. When I get serious and call him on it... he acts like I'm crazy, and he has no idea what I'm talking about.

It's all sullen mumbled bullshit and dirty looks... until I get pissed off... and then suddenly it's the incredulous, "What are you talking about?? Everything's fine."

Is this normal?

Meanwhile the other boy (17 months younger) has none of these issues..... yet.

When I was thirteen years old, my father said something to me (I can't recall what it was ... probably nothing) as I was leaving for school and, in return, I smart-mouthed him disrespectfully (I remember that part as though it was this morning).

That was the second-to-last time I ever saw my father. The last time was later that day as he lay dying in a hospital bed with a severe stroke and heart attack. He had literally worked himself to death for his family and didn't last through the night.

I've never fully forgiven myself for that thoughtless moment. Kids, I suppose, think they're smarter than their parents. They always have and they always will. Yet, I would trade everything I've ever owned to have that moment back again. This is what young people don't seem to understand. Life is far shorter than they realize.

Your son, Mr. KcMizzou, is probably very intelligent and consumed with the details and problems of his own life. Society demands far too much from young people, I think, and teenagers certainly don't make life easy on themselves. But, the seemingly insignificant moments can ultimately carve out a personality that lasts a lifetime. That's the one thing that's most often overlooked. I hope things improve for both your sakes.

FAX

MOhillbilly
02-24-2011, 02:27 PM
When I was thirteen years old, my father said something to me (I can't recall what it was ... probably nothing) as I was leaving for school and, in return, I smart-mouthed him disrespectfully (I remember that part as though it was this morning).

That was the second-to-last time I ever saw my father. The last time was later that day as he lay dying in a hospital bed with a severe stroke and heart attack. He had literally worked himself to death for his family and didn't last through the night.

I've never fully forgiven myself for that thoughtless moment. Kids, I suppose, think they're smarter than their parents. They always have and they always will. Yet, I would trade everything I've ever owned to have that moment back again. This is what young people don't seem to understand. Life is far shorter than they realize.

Your son, Mr. KcMizzou, is probably very intelligent and consumed with the details and problems of his own life. Society demands far too much from young people, I think, and teenagers certainly don't make life easy on themselves. But, the seemingly insignificant moments can ultimately carve out a personality that lasts a lifetime. That's the one thing that's most often overlooked. I hope things improve for both your sakes.

FAX
quoted for truth.
drank a beer and read a book while my dads brain bled out.

We all have our crosses to bare.

Chiefshrink
02-24-2011, 02:30 PM
Holy ****...

"Oops...hour's up. That'll be 75 bucks.....see ya next Wednesday."

That was 10yrs ago. It's $95.00 now.:thumb:

seclark
02-24-2011, 02:31 PM
quoted for truth.
drank a beer and read a book while my dads brain bled out.

We all have our crosses to bare.

in.
sec

Chiefshrink
02-24-2011, 02:33 PM
Thank You for that post SS, I have a 17 and 18 year old sons, we get along fine, but i really need to have a good heart to heart with each of them seperately and make sure they realize how proud i am of them.. :thumb:

Anytime Joe!:thumb:

|Zach|
02-24-2011, 03:22 PM
Add him to the miserable users list.

digger
02-24-2011, 08:04 PM
Give me a wooden spoon any day over a belt buckle. Holy fuck. Yard sticks weren't uncommon either.


Hot wheels plastic race track, with the hard tabs the connected them. Now that left marks. :shake:

milkman
02-24-2011, 08:13 PM
Leather belt

You, or others, may remember Richard Pryors stand up in which he speaks about having to pick out the switch from the tree that he was going to get his ass whipped with.

I related to that, cause that was exactly how punishment was meted out for me.

Okie_Apparition
02-24-2011, 08:21 PM
Better he go through that stage now. Than in his twenties, when you are replaced by men in dress blues with a badge. That weaved belt on the ass now will feel a hell of a lot better. For you and him. Than cold bars of steel under his palms latter.

teedubya
02-24-2011, 08:34 PM
Do you have a hobby that you enjoy with your child?

My son is 9, so not quite to 14, so I may not know shit... but my son and I collect coins together and use it as a bonding time. Whenever I get a new coin, he comes and looks it up in the Red book or online.

Each week for his allowance, instead of giving him dollars, he earns a pre 1965 silver coin of some sort... at least a quarter which is worth about $6 now.

Having a hobby that you can do together may be something your sons find value in?

RJ
02-24-2011, 08:44 PM
My 7 year old daughter adores me.

I'll enjoy it while it lasts.

My sons when they were teenagers were incredibly difficult. Now 32 and 31, they have become normal human beings. Sort of. Or at least about as normal as their dad was at the same age.

I'll report back on going through it again but with a girl in about 7 years.

Baconeater
02-24-2011, 09:05 PM
Do you have a hobby that you enjoy with your child?

My son is 9, so not quite to 14, so I may not know shit... but my son and I collect coins together and use it as a bonding time. Whenever I get a new coin, he comes and looks it up in the Red book or online.

Each week for his allowance, instead of giving him dollars, he earns a pre 1965 silver coin of some sort... at least a quarter which is worth about $6 now.

Having a hobby that you can do together may be something your sons find value in?
Yeah I used to do all that type of stuff with my son too. Then he turned 13.

stevieray
02-24-2011, 09:08 PM
Normal.

I went from Daddy to an old worthless tennis shoe to my 14 year old daughter.

Guru
02-24-2011, 10:06 PM
You, or others, may remember Richard Pryors stand up in which he speaks about having to pick out the switch from the tree that he was going to get his ass whipped with.

I related to that, cause that was exactly how punishment was meted out for me.Yep, my dad used that tactic on me once. Only once.

JD10367
02-24-2011, 10:31 PM
Hmm. Must be kids nowadays. When I was 14 I got along great with my parents. Of course, I was too busy playing Atari 2600 and :whackit: while thinking about Heather Thomas from "The Fall Guy" and Heather Locklear from "T.J. Hooker".

(Editor's Note: I was not :whackit: while playing Atari. You needed both hands on the joystick.)

REDHOTGTO
02-25-2011, 07:25 AM
well just be glad you don't have 2 teenage biotches for daughters !!! LOL
yes its normal behavior, but that dont make it easy.
remember, god made little kids cute so you'd love to see 'em a lot, then he made teenagers act like dipshits so you'd love to see 'em leave !

Jenson71
02-25-2011, 08:16 AM
You should tell them that Jenson71 thinks you're cool. That would go pretty far.

HoneyBadger
02-25-2011, 11:49 AM
Maybe you should take him out for breast milk ice cream... Might strengthen the relationship.

KurtCobain
02-25-2011, 11:50 AM
You should tell them that Jenson71 thinks you're cool. That would go pretty far.

With your puny post count, I think not.

KcFanInGA
02-25-2011, 12:34 PM
My 7 year old daughter adores me.

I'll enjoy it while it lasts.

My sons when they were teenagers were incredibly difficult. Now 32 and 31, they have become normal human beings. Sort of. Or at least about as normal as their dad was at the same age.

I'll report back on going through it again but with a girl in about 7 years.

I can so relate to this. My two girls, 9 and 4, think I hung the moon. My son is 11 and still loves me, but I am seeing signs of the attitude that lurks beneath. Is the right approach to let him know if he wants to mope around fine, but catch that attitude with me and I WILL pop your ass? Seems to work.

KcFanInGA
02-25-2011, 12:34 PM
Maybe you should take him out for breast milk ice cream... Might strengthen the relationship.

Mmmmm....so hungry now. Do they have that at Brusters?