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View Full Version : Football How NFL Players Memorize Playbooks:


ReynardMuldrake
02-24-2011, 02:53 PM
Dilfer said it's a three-year process to own a particular playbook. Owning a play is different from memorizing it, Dilfer explained. "Owning it to me goes from knowing it to understanding it to it becoming instinctive," Dilfer said.

How does one own the plays? "If you're not spending an hour every day in your playbook, you're cheating your teammates," Dilfer said. He stated quarterbacks should study three hours per day, given their extra responsibilities in commanding an offense.

It can take a while just to lock down a playbook's language. "A lot of coaches use numbering systems," Dilfer added. He said odd numbers are typically used for plays to the right, even numbers for plays to the left. Many offenses use T and D words for formations: T for Trips, where three receivers are lined up on one side, and D for double sets, such as double tight ends.

Dilfer cited an example of one play with a different meaning in two systems. "Red Right 22 Texas is a West Coast play," Dilfer explained. "In another system, it's Split Right Scat Right 639 F Angle. What some players will do when they go to a new team, is when it's Split Right Scat Right, they go, 'Oh, that's 22 Texas.' They hear one thing and they put old language on it; you have to learn the new language." Leinart admitted as much in his transition from the Cardinals to the Texans.

Running back Derrick Ward, who also joined the Texans in early September after he was released by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, said his learning curve was much shorter. "It took me a week to understand everything in Houston's offense," Ward said. That was partly a byproduct of the language similarities shared by the Buccaneers and Texans.

Ward claimed to have a photographic memory, which lets him immediately remember plays he goes over in meetings. "This is my seventh year. Once you get the hang of what the offense does, you can differentiate one play from another and it becomes repetitive," he said. The ability to differentiate is pivotal in a playbook that he noted has up to 300 plays. And many of the plays contain pass routes which can have numerous variations depending on what the defense shows, creating a subset of plays within a play.

Dhani Jones, a middle linebacker for the Cincinnati Bengals, said memorizing plays isn't as difficult as understanding their philosophy. "I don't drop the language (from previous systems)," said Jones, who's also been on the Giants and Philadelphia Eagles during his 10-year career. "It's just different words that are used. Quarters coverage is the same as Cloud coverage is the same as strong-side rotated coverage. They're just named differently."


[full article]

http://nfl.fanhouse.com/2011/02/24/method-men-how-nfl-players-memorize-dizzying-playbooks/

loochy
02-24-2011, 02:55 PM
I always wondered how some of these borderline retards were able to understand and memorize this stuff.

CoMoChief
02-24-2011, 03:00 PM
Dilfer was a horrible QB. That guy was lucky enough to play on one of the best defenses ever. Kind of funny how ESPN allows people like Dilfer, Herm, Millen to do NFL Live segments etc. In recent history, you have one of the worst QB's, HC's, and GM's (esp Millen) of our time, all working for ESPN.

loochy
02-24-2011, 03:13 PM
Dilfer was a horrible QB. That guy was lucky enough to play on one of the best defenses ever. Kind of funny how ESPN allows people like Dilfer, Herm, Millen to do NFL Live segments etc. In recent history, you have one of the worst QB's, HC's, and GM's (esp Millen) of our time, all working for ESPN.

Meh. I think it's better than having someone with NO experience do it.

Reerun_KC
02-24-2011, 03:19 PM
Meh. I think it's better than having someone with NO experience do it.

Barely.....

Brock
02-24-2011, 03:25 PM
Dilfer was a horrible QB. That guy was lucky enough to play on one of the best defenses ever. Kind of funny how ESPN allows people like Dilfer, Herm, Millen to do NFL Live segments etc. In recent history, you have one of the worst QB's, HC's, and GM's (esp Millen) of our time, all working for ESPN.

You seem to be confusing playing ability with experience and understanding of the game and the ability to communicate on television. Joe Montana was a commentator for a while and he sucked at it, badly.

-King-
02-24-2011, 03:34 PM
You seem to be confusing playing ability with experience and understanding of the game and the ability to communicate on television. Joe Montana was a commentator for a while and he sucked at it, badly.

So does steve young.
Posted via Mobile Device

CoMoChief
02-24-2011, 03:39 PM
Meh. I think it's better than having someone with NO experience do it.

OR.....hire someone that has better credibility due to their success in the NFL.

With (esp) Herm and Millen....they're working for ESPN strictly because no other NFL franchise will touch them. Dilfer retired so it's a little different...but Trent Green is a great color commentator and was a good QB. I know he works for NFL network at times..but there are many others I'm sure that are MUCH better than the 3 stooges ESPN has now in Millen, Dilfer and Herm.

CoMoChief
02-24-2011, 03:40 PM
You seem to be confusing playing ability with experience and understanding of the game and the ability to communicate on television. Joe Montana was a commentator for a while and he sucked at it, badly.

Herm barely speaks English.

Like I said....there are others. IMO Keyshawn Johnson is great on TV. He's a natural....when he first did the draft a few yrs ago I was shocked (because I think he was still playing at the time, this is when CAR selected Dwayne Jarrett and KJ was w/ CAR) because he was actually very good.

MOhillbilly
02-24-2011, 03:42 PM
my uncle uses color schemes for individual assignments and then relies on high football iq guys to call the audibles.

MoreLemonPledge
02-24-2011, 03:56 PM
Herm barely speaks English.

Like I said....there are others. IMO Keyshawn Johnson is great on TV. He's a natural....when he first did the draft a few yrs ago I was shocked (because I think he was still playing at the time, this is when CAR selected Dwayne Jarrett and KJ was w/ CAR) because he was actually very good.

Haha, I remember that. He was pretty pissed, and showed his displeasure, if I remember correctly.

edit: I remembered incorrectly. He talked about how he was going to teach him so much and then they released Keyshawn the next day, or very shortly thereafter.

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Otter
02-24-2011, 04:25 PM
I always wondered how some of these borderline retards were able to understand and memorize this stuff.

Snoop Minnis?

Coach: "ok, we give up, just run out 10 yards, turn around and if you see the ball coming catch it and run...in the same direction you started to run"

Snoop: "an jump in the air when the ball gets there so I have to catch it in my stomach...gotcha coach"

Coach: "no, no, no...aw **** it, jump, sure why not"