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Simply Red
02-27-2011, 10:23 AM
I have been craving one last winter comfort meal. I like lentils a lot and they sound good, so.


Please share your lentil-bean recipes


Thanks guys, for any ideas

Simply Red
02-27-2011, 10:29 AM
they sell these:


http://i53.tinypic.com/2iropc3.jpg

they're fantastic too + healthy!

J Diddy
02-27-2011, 10:32 AM
If I get a craving for something I generally do a search at allrecipes. Never failed me.

RJ
02-27-2011, 10:36 AM
I saute diced onion, garlic, carrot and celery in olive oil, then add my lentils and some chicken broth. Season with s&p, cumin and curry powder and cook until tender.

That's it.

I keep lentils pretty simple but I gets wild with the black beans.

cdcox
02-27-2011, 10:37 AM
That sounds good, but I don't have a recipe. When I find myself in this situation, I try to think about what flavors I'm looking for in the dish, and then build up from there. I made some very delicious beef bourguignon a couple weeks ago. I think the lentils would go well with that rich beefiness. Maybe lentils and short ribs? So I found this recipe:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/the-best-of/slowly-cooked-short-ribs-with-french-lentils-speck-and-portobello-mushrooms-recipe/index.html

I guarantee that would be really good.

Fritz88
02-27-2011, 10:43 AM
If I get a craving for something I generally do a search at allrecipes. Never failed me.

Ths.
Posted via Mobile Device

Simply Red
02-27-2011, 10:44 AM
I saute diced onion, garlic, carrot and celery in olive oil, then add my lentils and some chicken broth. Season with s&p, cumin and curry powder and cook until tender.

That's it.

I keep lentils pretty simple but I gets wild with the black beans.

you had me yumming till the curry - course there are a tons of varieties OF curry. Yellow is actually tolerable for me - Red Curry = not so much.

RJ
02-27-2011, 10:47 AM
you had me yumming till the curry - course there are a tons of varieties OF curry. Yellow is actually tolerable for me - Red Curry = not so much.
I keep lentils pretty simple but I gets wild with the black beans



I meant curry powder, actually. Depending on who you're cooking for, you might and just a bit of cayenne.

I guess I like mine with a middle eastern flavor but lentils are versatile enough for any type of flavor.

Simply Red
02-27-2011, 10:54 AM
That sounds good, but I don't have a recipe. When I find myself in this situation, I try to think about what flavors I'm looking for in the dish, and then build up from there. I made some very delicious beef bourguignon a couple weeks ago. I think the lentils would go well with that rich beefiness. Maybe lentils and short ribs? So I found this recipe:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/the-best-of/slowly-cooked-short-ribs-with-french-lentils-speck-and-portobello-mushrooms-recipe/index.html

I guarantee that would be really good.

I told you about that girl I'm dating. Well, I just forwarded that linky to her ;)

She's virtually Executive Chef material, I don't even really cook around her, I'm normally not intimidated in the kitchen, but her standards are so high - i just stay away, and I'm not a terrible cook, either. I cooked for 10+ yrs. lol

Simply Red
02-27-2011, 11:00 AM
I meant curry powder, actually. Depending on who you're cooking for, you might and just a bit of cayenne.

I guess I like mine with a middle eastern flavor but lentils are versatile enough for any type of flavor.

I feel the need to mention this, though it has nothing to do w/ the OP - Next time you grill shrimp, try dusting heavily w/ cayenne - let it grill onto the surface of the fish, naturally you'll want to salt them as well, then proceed to brush w/ OO or butter, but it's odd, SOMETHING seems to happen when you grill or flame that particular seasoning (cayenne)

It may be a chemical reaction, whatever it is, but it's loses it's 'hotness' factor and turns into a WONDERFUL little flavor addition to the finished grilled shrimp.

My point is cayenne works awesomly on grilled shrimp, just a fast fact while we're discussing food yet again. ;)

Simply Red
02-27-2011, 11:07 AM
FWIW - those tasty bites lentils - you can find at OTHER places aside from Costco - I just found two at Kroger, they were on special - but they'd be in the Ethnic foods aisle - If you hunt for that label, you'll be able to find them, yes even in Kansas ;)

NewChief
02-27-2011, 11:20 AM
We eat lentils a lot. This is one if our favorite recipes.

http://www.projectfoodie.com/spotlights/cookbooks/how-to-cook-everything-vegetarian.html

Simply Red
02-27-2011, 01:20 PM
was hoping for some insight from BigOlChiefsFan - he's so colorful, love the dude, would totally date him if her were a 'she'

Donger
02-27-2011, 01:26 PM
<iframe title="YouTube video player" width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/gwXMt60tfXM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Simply Red
02-27-2011, 01:36 PM
grrrrrrrrrr. buffering still.

BigOlChiefsfan
02-27-2011, 01:56 PM
Ain't interested in dating any dudes, but here's what I did last week w/some curry.
I chopped 1 package of chicken breast into 1 inch pieces, season w/salt/pepper/italian seasoning (use pork or beef if you got it instead). Heat on med-hi a few tablespoons of olive oil for a minute add & stirfry chicken pieces and a diced onion in a large pot until the meat firms up (chicken turns white). I added a dozen chopped mushrooms, a tablespoon or so of cumin seed & Mustard seed and 5-6 cloves of chopped garlic. Add more olive oil at this point, if necessary, the mushrooms eat up the oil. Add a couple tablespoons of curry powder and chile to taste - or spill a helluva lot more chile than you planned, it works for me. Lower heat to med-lo and stirfry for 4 or 5 minutes. I added a well rinsed can of chick peas and red beans (throw in half a cup of lentils if you like), 3 cups water + 3 chicken bullion cubes, 2 cans of beef broth, a can of diced tomatoes w/green chile and brought to boil. Reduced to a simmer for 45 minutes or so.
When about ready to serve, I added some chopped green onions (fresh herbs would be great) and a (well shaken) can of coconut milk. You could reserve a few tablespoons of the coconut milk and taste for spices at this stage, if it's too mild heat some olive oil, cook some more chile and curry in the oil for a few minutes, add the reserved coconut milk (I think they call this 'tempering' a curry, I have memory issues...but it makes a good final taste test/fix). I add the tempered spices and I let this sit for 5 minutes or so. I served it over some cous-cous I had, but basmatti rice would be great.

Simply Red
02-27-2011, 02:00 PM
Ain't interested in dating any dudes, but here's what I did last week w/some curry.
I chopped 1 package of chicken breast into 1 inch pieces, season w/salt/pepper/italian seasoning (use pork or beef if you got it instead). Heat on med-hi a few tablespoons of olive oil for a minute add & stirfry chicken pieces and a diced onion in a large pot until the meat firms up (chicken turns white). I added a dozen chopped mushrooms, a tablespoon or so of cumin seed & Mustard seed and 5-6 cloves of chopped garlic. Add more olive oil at this point, if necessary, the mushrooms eat up the oil. Add a couple tablespoons of curry powder and chile to taste - or spill a helluva lot more chile than you planned, it works for me. Lower heat to med-lo and stirfry for 4 or 5 minutes. I added a well rinsed can of chick peas and red beans (throw in half a cup of lentils if you like), 3 cups water + 3 chicken bullion cubes, 2 cans of beef broth, a can of diced tomatoes w/green chile and brought to boil. Reduced to a simmer for 45 minutes or so.
When about ready to serve, I added some chopped green onions (fresh herbs would be great) and a (well shaken) can of coconut milk. You could reserve a few tablespoons of the coconut milk and taste for spices at this stage, if it's too mild heat some olive oil, cook some more chile and curry in the oil for a few minutes, add the reserved coconut milk (I think they call this 'tempering' a curry, I have memory issues...but it makes a good final taste test/fix). I add the tempered spices and I let this sit for 5 minutes or so. I served it over some cous-cous I had, but basmatti rice would be great.

my dating comment was a joke, we do enjoy your food and bev takes though.

That sounds good, it's funny - I just hung up w/ the girl I was telling you about - she is making the soup w/ the kale and sausage and then adding the softened lentils at the end.

She's bringing it over tomorrow. Can't wait!

BigOlChiefsfan
02-27-2011, 02:02 PM
Kale/sausage soup is great. Enjoy this sort of stuff while the cold weather lasts!

Chiefs Rool
02-27-2011, 02:04 PM
try reconstituting the beans in beer overnight :)

Simply Red
02-27-2011, 02:05 PM
Kale/sausage soup is great. Enjoy this sort of stuff while the cold weather lasts!

she's already made it once w/ the northerns - man o man - nothing I like more in the winter. One of the best soups ever created, indeed.

Simply Red
02-27-2011, 02:09 PM
but basmatti rice would be great.

Funny you should mention the Basmatti - I've been seeing just how many ways I can cook up Risotto - I think i like the lemon zest/parm/pancetta and asparagus best - thus far anyway - I'd like to take the credit for that assembly - but Tonya created that one. :/

NewChief
02-27-2011, 03:17 PM
Kale/sausage soup is great. Enjoy this sort of stuff while the cold weather lasts!

I made an African Peanut soup with kale last week. It was outstanding.

Simply Red
02-27-2011, 03:46 PM
I made an African Peanut soup with kale last week. It was outstanding.

sounds good man - pls link me, sometime or message it on over.

NewChief
02-27-2011, 05:39 PM
sounds good man - pls link me, sometime or message it on over.

Mark Bittman's Senegalese Peanut Soup

SERVES 4

* 3/4 cup shelled roasted peanuts
* 2 tablespoons peanut oil
* 1 medium red onion, halved and thinly sliced
* 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled and minced
* 1 tablespoon garlic, minced
* 1 pinch cayenne (more or less to taste)
* salt
* fresh ground black pepper
* 6 cups vegetable stock or water
* 2 (1/2 lb) sweet potato, peeled and cut into thick slices or 2 yams, peeled and cut into thick slices
* 8-12 plum tomatoes, cored and halved (canned are fine, drain and reserve liquid for another use)
* 1/2 lb collard greens or kale, washed thoroughly and cut into wide ribbons
* 1/4 cup chunky peanut butter

Use the flat side of a wide knife or cleaver or a small food processor to break the peanuts into large pieces.

Put the oil in a deep skillet or medium saucepan over medium-high heat. When hot, add the onion, ginger and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are soft, 3-5 minutes.

Add cup of the peanuts and the cayenne. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Stir in the stock and sweet potatoes, bring to a boil, and turn the heat down to medium-low so that the soup bubbles gently. Partially cover the pan and cook, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes are just tender, about 10 minutes.

Stir in the tomatoes, collards and peanut butter. Cover and cook until the collards are tender, 5 to 8 minutes. Taste, adjust the seasoning, and serve garnished with the remaining peanuts.

Variation: Creamy peanut soup Like velvet, but peanutty velvet: Omit the collards or kale. Then in step 3, along with the peanut butter, stir in 1 cup rice milk, or coconut milk, either made from scratch or canned (use can, slightly less than 1 cup, with a little water). Use an immersion blender to puree the soup in the pan. Or cool the mixture slightly, pour into a blender, and puree carefully. Gently reheat the soup, taste and adjust the seasoning, and garnish with the remaining peanuts.

Simply Red
02-27-2011, 05:46 PM
Mark Bittman's Senegalese Peanut Soup

SERVES 4

* 3/4 cup shelled roasted peanuts
* 2 tablespoons peanut oil
* 1 medium red onion, halved and thinly sliced
* 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, peeled and minced
* 1 tablespoon garlic, minced
* 1 pinch cayenne (more or less to taste)
* salt
* fresh ground black pepper
* 6 cups vegetable stock or water
* 2 (1/2 lb) sweet potato, peeled and cut into thick slices or 2 yams, peeled and cut into thick slices
* 8-12 plum tomatoes, cored and halved (canned are fine, drain and reserve liquid for another use)
* 1/2 lb collard greens or kale, washed thoroughly and cut into wide ribbons
* 1/4 cup chunky peanut butter

Use the flat side of a wide knife or cleaver or a small food processor to break the peanuts into large pieces.

Put the oil in a deep skillet or medium saucepan over medium-high heat. When hot, add the onion, ginger and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are soft, 3-5 minutes.

Add cup of the peanuts and the cayenne. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Stir in the stock and sweet potatoes, bring to a boil, and turn the heat down to medium-low so that the soup bubbles gently. Partially cover the pan and cook, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes are just tender, about 10 minutes.

Stir in the tomatoes, collards and peanut butter. Cover and cook until the collards are tender, 5 to 8 minutes. Taste, adjust the seasoning, and serve garnished with the remaining peanuts.

Variation: Creamy peanut soup Like velvet, but peanutty velvet: Omit the collards or kale. Then in step 3, along with the peanut butter, stir in 1 cup rice milk, or coconut milk, either made from scratch or canned (use can, slightly less than 1 cup, with a little water). Use an immersion blender to puree the soup in the pan. Or cool the mixture slightly, pour into a blender, and puree carefully. Gently reheat the soup, taste and adjust the seasoning, and garnish with the remaining peanuts.

Ginger amt. seems high - I may modify that part - asite from that - BRING IT ON! - TY!

NewChief
02-27-2011, 05:55 PM
Ginger amt. seems high - I may modify that part - asite from that - BRING IT ON! - TY!

Hah. I though it was low and added -more- ginger. I really like ginger, though.

RJ
02-27-2011, 10:49 PM
I feel the need to mention this, though it has nothing to do w/ the OP - Next time you grill shrimp, try dusting heavily w/ cayenne - let it grill onto the surface of the fish, naturally you'll want to salt them as well, then proceed to brush w/ OO or butter, but it's odd, SOMETHING seems to happen when you grill or flame that particular seasoning (cayenne)

It may be a chemical reaction, whatever it is, but it's loses it's 'hotness' factor and turns into a WONDERFUL little flavor addition to the finished grilled shrimp.

My point is cayenne works awesomly on grilled shrimp, just a fast fact while we're discussing food yet again. ;)


I'll remember that. Shrimp grilling season is nearly upon us!

Simply Red
02-27-2011, 10:58 PM
I'll remember that. Shrimp grilling season is nearly upon us!

please try it out, i promise it's not unbearably hot.