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Lzen
03-09-2011, 09:33 AM
My garage was broken into and robbed the other day. This is the first time I will be filing a theft claim on my insurance in the 14 years I've lived in this house. So, I'm filling out the insurance paperwork and itemizing everything that was stolen. The claims agent I talked to on the phone said that anything more than 2 years old doesn't need to have a receipt. Well that's great because who keeps receipts on all their stuff anyway.

But there is a form that is a release so that they can look at my purchases. I don't like the idea of this for several reasons (not everything I had in there would even have a record of purchase - cash or they could mistake one thing that may have been a gift or duplicate item, etc.). Is this a normal thing for them to ask nowadays? And do I really have to sign this in order to get my claim processed. I'm not really comfortable with giving them access to my financial purchasing info because I really don't trust insurance companies.

Saul Good
03-09-2011, 09:37 AM
My garage was broken into and robbed the other day. This is the first time I will be filing a theft claim on my insurance in the 14 years I've lived in this house. So, I'm filling out the insurance paperwork and itemizing everything that was stolen. The claims agent I talked to on the phone said that anything more than 2 years old doesn't need to have a receipt. Well that's great because who keeps receipts on all their stuff anyway.

But there is a form that is a release so that they can look at my purchases. I don't like the idea of this for several reasons (not everything I had in there would even have a record of purchase - cash or they could mistake one thing that may have been a gift or duplicate item, etc.). Is this a normal thing for them to ask nowadays? And do I really have to sign this in order to get my claim processed. I'm not really comfortable with giving them access to my financial purchasing info because I really don't trust insurance companies.

You don't have to sign that. Who is your insurance carrier?

Saul Good
03-09-2011, 09:38 AM
Also, nothing HAS to have a receipt. It may impact how you are paid, though. (You might only get partial value up front and then full value once you replace the items.)

Lzen
03-09-2011, 09:41 AM
You don't have to sign that. Who is your insurance carrier?

American Family.

ReynardMuldrake
03-09-2011, 09:43 AM
Can't you just send them a copy and redact everything they don't need to know?

DMAC
03-09-2011, 09:44 AM
No, dont sign that. Just communicate well with your adjuster about everything.

Lzen
03-09-2011, 09:46 AM
Can't you just send them a copy and redact everything they don't need to know?

Perhaps you didn't understand. They sent me a form that releases all of my purchasing info to them. That grants them access to any retailer's records of my purchases. I don't know if I'm being paranoid, but I really don't like the idea of that.

alnorth
03-09-2011, 09:48 AM
You shouldn't have to sign that. It may impact how quickly you are paid, but if you aren't in a huge hurry, they will probably agree to pay part now and the rest after you have replaced what you lost and sent them documentation on how much it cost you to replace everything.

Bwana
03-09-2011, 09:49 AM
I really don't trust insurance companies.

As well you shouldn't.

I wouldn't sign that, because it looks like one extra piece of ammo they have, to try to bend you over with.

DMAC
03-09-2011, 09:50 AM
Perhaps you didn't understand. They sent me a form that releases all of my purchasing info to them. That grants them access to any retailer's records of my purchases. I don't know if I'm being paranoid, but I really don't like the idea of that.

They can just do it the old fashioned way and be happy doin it.

ReynardMuldrake
03-09-2011, 09:54 AM
Perhaps you didn't understand. They sent me a form that releases all of my purchasing info to them. That grants them access to any retailer's records of my purchases. I don't know if I'm being paranoid, but I really don't like the idea of that.

Is it information you don't have access to? There should be a way to send them only the information they need. But then I don't know anything about insurance claims.

alnorth
03-09-2011, 09:58 AM
Obviously, it is understandable that an insurance company would get squirrelly over a theft or "mysterious disappearance" claim. They don't like those, because that is a common source of fraud. (need money? Want a new TV? Call your insurance company and tell them your $5,000 TV was stolen)

If you are a good 14-year claim-free customer, they should drop the hassle that they would give to a brand-new customer who handed them a theft claim as soon as the ink on their policy was dry, and just pay you.

Saul Good
03-09-2011, 10:21 AM
By the way, they didn't steal the original Picasso I loaned you for your garage, did they?

Phobia
03-09-2011, 10:25 AM
I hope you'll return my 4-wheeler now, Lzen. I really missed it this winter.

Buehler445
03-09-2011, 10:27 AM
I would just talk to you insurance guy and tell him that you don't have purchase records for all of it. Are they wanting release to talk to the people you bought it from or are they wanting access to all your receipts and shit?

Make the motherfucker that has been collecting your premiums all this time earn his fucking money and tell you what is going on and what your options are.
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Mr. Plow
03-09-2011, 10:30 AM
Perhaps you didn't understand. They sent me a form that releases all of my purchasing info to them. That grants them access to any retailer's records of my purchases. I don't know if I'm being paranoid, but I really don't like the idea of that.

Been purchasing a lot of porn lately, haven't you?

Lzen
03-09-2011, 11:30 AM
One other thing that really sucks is that my cousin let my son use some of his drum equipment. Double bass, ride, hi hat, splash crash....all those were nice and expensive. I hope the insurance company doesn't give me any grief about replacing that stuff.

WilliamTheIrish
03-09-2011, 11:38 AM
Make the mother****er that has been collecting your premiums all this time earn his ****ing money and tell you what is going on and what your options are

Buehler has it right. 14 years as a good customer means something if your insurance agent has any kind of customer retention skills. This happened to me after 18 years with the same insurance agent.

I told him, "I pay, you replace. Keep this form for your fraudulent customers".

He came through. And I have learned that you don't bargain with these companies. My guy did me right, but they tried to short me on a LOT of items. I made one call to the agent and it was resolved.

It's their job to keep as much of your money as they can. It's your job to get as much back as you possibly can. Don't settle. It can be an intimidating process. But stick to it.

alnorth
03-09-2011, 01:08 PM
Buehler has it right. 14 years as a good customer means something if your insurance agent has any kind of customer retention skills. This happened to me after 18 years with the same insurance agent.

I told him, "I pay, you replace. Keep this form for your fraudulent customers".

He came through. And I have learned that you don't bargain with these companies. My guy did me right, but they tried to short me on a LOT of items. I made one call to the agent and it was resolved.

It's their job to keep as much of your money as they can. It's your job to get as much back as you possibly can. Don't settle. It can be an intimidating process. But stick to it.

Another bit of insight I can give fits in well with your story.

Long, long, long-term 10+ year loyal customers are uncommon, and claims from them are even less common. (someone who nickels and dimes the company every year will have been cancelled long ago) If they aren't cancelled for filing excessive numbers of claims, people in general are also not very loyal to their insurance company and will shop a lot, jumping as soon as they can save a few bucks.

Consequently, the vast majority of claims are from people who have only been with that company sometime between 0-5 years, they probably wont stick around even if they get great service, and the agent doesn't get the claim, the company handles claims. Because of their experience with people often trying to defraud the company, sometimes the adjuster doesn't pay attention to that odd occasional loyal customer and takes a one-size fits all hassling approach.

Even though agents don't handle claims, when they think they might lose a really good client due to someone in the company hassling them they can call the company for you to rattle some cages, saying in effect: "hey jackass, wake up. This guy has been with us 14 years and never filed a claim, and he's not asking for the moon here. Stop treating this like a brand-new policy!"

mikeyis4dcats.
03-09-2011, 01:23 PM
I hope you'll return my 4-wheeler now, Lzen. I really missed it this winter.

and your nail guns.

Phobia
03-09-2011, 01:27 PM
and your nail guns.

I know! Seriously though, how many nail guns does one guy need? I have 9. I had 12. I might be able to use 2 at any one time but my quality of work really suffers when I try that.