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View Full Version : Life Topic about Hard Work and Dedication


Jenson71
03-10-2011, 08:36 AM
Describe a time when you had to work really hard to get or do something. I want to hear good life experiences.

For example (this didn't happen to me): you spent a summer trying to master a particular song on a guitar, so you practiced everyday for two hours. You didn't skip a single day.

I'm sure a number of weight loss stories will fit the bill, too.

I'm thinking back on my life, and outside of some football in high school, there's nothing that I can say I dedicated myself to fully, to the point of 'blood, sweat, and tears.'

And I'm regretful about that.

Rausch
03-10-2011, 08:40 AM
I'm thinking back on my life, and outside of some football in high school, there's nothing that I can say I dedicated myself to fully, to the point of 'blood, sweat, and tears.'

And I'm regretful about that.

Don't feel bad.

Outside of wrestling I can't think of $3it...

Saulbadguy
03-10-2011, 08:41 AM
Never.

luv
03-10-2011, 08:44 AM
Don't feel bad.

Outside of wrestling I can't think of $3it...

Wanna wrestle?

Phobia
03-10-2011, 08:46 AM
This one time I spent all my free time on a football message site and then I got hired by some other football site. Then I left. The end.

Rausch
03-10-2011, 08:47 AM
Wanna wrestle?

How much will it cost me?...

Jenson71
03-10-2011, 08:47 AM
This thread might turn out much less inspiring than I thought.

tooge
03-10-2011, 08:49 AM
Well, once I...no that doesn't count. Then another time I....no, that wasn't hard. I got nothin.

Superturtle
03-10-2011, 08:56 AM
Clubbing baby seals sure is hard work, but the blood, sweat, and tears didn't come from me...

Jenson71
03-10-2011, 09:02 AM
Okay, I've got one. Kind of.

In my second semester of college, all History majors had to take a research class which was taught (for my section) by a lazy goof-off. Worthless class, but you had to write a major paper.

I wrote about the founding of my high school, because I wanted something I could do that was original and realistic (not something like "Renaissance Prostitutes in Northern Italy, 1520-1525").

So for some of my research, I looked through old letters that were archived at the Archdiocese my school was in. I spent about 4-5 trips driving about an hour and a half (one way) going through the letters and other documents. Wrote a 25 page paper, and got an A. I also interviewed two people still alive that were involved in the school (established in 1958).

It wasn't too hard, though. And it was kind of fun to go through the archives and talk with the head archivist, an old priest.

rockymtnchief
03-10-2011, 09:05 AM
I spent a summer determined to show Texans that us Montana boys could ride bulls just as good as them. For 5 months we drove from Colorado to Texas to ride every weekend. In the end, I finished #17. Not too bad for only being able to ride once or twice a week.

Jenson71
03-10-2011, 09:06 AM
I spent a summer determined to show Texans that us Montana boys could ride bulls just as good as them. For 5 months we drove from Colorado to Texas to ride every weekend. In the end, I finished #17. Not too bad for only being able to ride once or twice a week.

Nice. 17th in the state? In a rodeo? I assume you had prior bull riding experience before the summer?

Saulbadguy
03-10-2011, 09:18 AM
I passed College Algebra without opening the book.

rockymtnchief
03-10-2011, 09:19 AM
Nice. 17th in the state? In a rodeo? I assume you had prior bull riding experience before the summer?

Yeah, I'd been riding Montana/Wyoming/North Dakaota/South Dakota for years before I headed down there. I guess I should've clarified that:p

luv
03-10-2011, 09:38 AM
How much will it cost me?...

That's negotiable.

keg in kc
03-10-2011, 09:47 AM
This thread might turn out much less inspiring than I thought.Yeah, unfortunately I don't have any real inspirational stories either. My biggest hurdles are hard work and dedication, so I'm pretty much stuck being a cautionary tale for younger folks. There's a lot of regrets I have because of the kind of person I am and the kind of makeup that I have. Can't stick to anything, I generally go whichever way the wind blows me and I invariably choose the easy path instead of the right path (I don't mean in a moral sense, like breaking the law or anything like that, just regular life choices). I'm not at a good place financially because of that and I never will be. Basically it's too late for me but I try to help out with "Don't be me in 20 years" speeches whenever I can. Just find something you love and do it, whatever it is, whatever it takes.

Demonpenz
03-10-2011, 09:50 AM
last year I decided after my Grandma died that I needed to follow my calling of being a stand up comedian. I started carrying around a notebook and writing down all my jokes. Started going to every open mic just being workhorse. It was grueling and I subjected myself to alot of shit that was tough. I could be sitting on the couch right now but I am putting in hours and hours of work in. I would txt friends meet up with people to write skits. Listening to mp3's writing, updated facebook and twitter for new material. It probably took some years off my life and made my stomach hurt daily, but it was worth it every once in awhile someone will come up to me and say how they wish they had the balls that I do. I didn't cure cancer or anything. I was just a Demon with a dream. A dream about writing jokes and making people laugh.

Pants
03-10-2011, 10:18 AM
I passed College Algebra without opening the book.

I got an A in Calculus I in college without opening the book or paying any attention in class.

(Of course I had taken Calc I and II in HS the year before that).

kepp
03-10-2011, 10:31 AM
...to the point of 'blood, sweat, and tears.'

Most of us are Chiefs fans, right?

eazyb81
03-10-2011, 10:36 AM
Two years after graduating college, I realized I hated my dead-end brainless job. I ended up studying my ass off to try to get accepted to a top business school. I studied for the GMAT for months, took the test, and had an underwhelming score. I initially said screw it, but decided I couldn't live with myself unless I gave it one more shot. So I studied for another 3-4 months nonstop for the test, took it a second time, and crushed it. Ended up getting accepted to my top school, left my job in KC, as well as all my friends and family, with essentially $0 in savings. Took on $100+K in debt, studied my ass off for two years, put thousands on my credit card on recruiting/networking/coffee trips to New York to try and land a job in finance during the worst recession in modern history. Two days before graduating I found out I landed my dream job (after literally a four month long interview process), where my compensation was many, many multiples of what I could have earned if I took the safe route and stayed in my prior situation.

Dave Lane
03-10-2011, 10:41 AM
Too many to pick one.

Fried Meat Ball!
03-10-2011, 10:42 AM
I was part of management team for the ground-up build and launch of the first ever fully HD (studio and field) network television station. I worked with a relatively small team for 8 months some very long, hard hours for our 8/8/08 launch. Leading up to the morning of launch, I worked for something like 32 hours straight. It was one of the hardest things I've ever been a part of, but probably the most rewarding, and down the road has paid dividends.

Iowanian
03-10-2011, 10:45 AM
I started a business in 2007 in a profession with an 80-90% failure rate in the first 3 years...during good times.


I'm still here. You do the math.

Buehler445
03-10-2011, 10:57 AM
You nerds are seriously talking about math?

Its not what you're looking for but here's mine. I loved basketball. I worked my ass off in middle and high school. And I mean worked hard. I'd lift weights at 6:00 AM and play basketball whenever I could. I did all the skills camps and when it came to the season, I practiced as hard or harder than anyone else. I always did what the coaches said and worked on my game. And I'm not just saying that, I was dedicated.

I got pretty big and fast and strong and had some really pretty good skills. But when it came to games I hardly played. So ulitimately I was a failure. It took going to college and playing rec ball to realize that I let my head get in the way. I was so worried about doing what the coaches wanted that I didn't play the game. So I put in who knows how many years worth of work and all I got was an understanding of the game and failed miserably at becoming a basketball player.

Bottom line: You can't do anything you want because you work hard. It takes talent. It takes the right mindset. But you can't force anything.

My take is you have to optimize your life. You have to work hard at the opportunities that you get. But hard work does not create opportunities. Somewhere there is a balance of achievement, relaxation, and family. You have to manage these from a holistic standpoint to achieve happiness.
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MOhillbilly
03-10-2011, 11:17 AM
i knew shit about electronics, went to canon school for a month and didnt score below a 95%.

Phobia
03-10-2011, 12:47 PM
I didn't cure cancer or anything. I was just a Demon with a dream. A dream about writing jokes and making people laugh.
At least you got half of it right.

pr_capone
03-10-2011, 12:57 PM
I went into the recruiting office weighing 289 asking what I needed to do to enlist in the Army. They scheduled me for an asfab test and told me I needed to drop a ton of weight.

It took me 2 months of working out on a daily basis, watching what I ate, and going in to the recruiting office once a week but in 7 weeks I dropped 57 pounds and enlisted. My time in the Army was short lived though. 2 years later I shredded my knee and was given a medical discharge... 2 weeks before deploying.

Dave Lane
03-10-2011, 01:04 PM
2 years later I shredded my knee and was given a medical discharge... 2 weeks before deploying.

Now that took great planning AND dedication.

Dayze
03-10-2011, 02:07 PM
i managed to get through 4 years of the Navy without punching any superiors.

longest 4 years; hated about 95% of it. Travel, and meeting cool people were the only real 'pluses.
the school I needd for my job was the hardest thing I'd ever done academically. On several different occasions I thought I wasn't going to make it through school, but ended up with the equivalent of an 'A' etc.

Those 4 years were quite an accomplishment for me - someone who has strong opinions, has a low threshold for BS - ; never felt so good the day I left base and drove home for good.

Jenson71
03-10-2011, 02:19 PM
Spring Break starts in a few days. I'm going to New Orleans for volunteer legal aid work. It will be fun. I'm glad I'm doing this, and relieved too. Because two days ago my dad called and told me my grandpa, 88, had fallen and was in the hospital. And that's all he knew but there was talk about dialysis, feeding tubes, and hospice.

I would not have thought twice about cancelling my trip if it were my grandpa's last few days alive. But yesterday, the talk was very postive. No dialysis, no feeding tube, no stroke, no broken bones (amazingly). He's getting back to his assisted living apartment soon, too. Though not all is good: he's on oxygen, and Hospice is coming in, which they can if you are in your last year.

I'm going to New Orleans, and when I come back, there is going to be just about a month and a half before exams start. And I haven't started outlining my four courses.

My goal is to come back here on May 10, and add an epic post in this thread about the hardest 50 or so days I've ever been through.

Rain Man
03-10-2011, 05:44 PM
I've been working to topple a corrupt county government for about a year now. Seven people started out as the problem, and I've got it down to four now. Two of those are about to go down, so I'm winning.

mlyonsd
03-10-2011, 06:05 PM
Married at 20, wife was 18. I was in college working part time, she was working FT at the city library. Together we brought home about $500 net. Rent was $200, all other bills came out of the rest. Our first grocery bill was $114 (had to buy everything) and I can remember thinking we'd be moving in with her parents within 6 months.

Homemade tacos were a highlight for eating on Saturday night. Going out for two beers with my classmates happened once a month. Spending a weekend putting in a new clutch or valve cover gaskets was normal.

I don't remember it leaving me wanting for much though.

I have two current dedication addictions. The first is to work out for an hour at least 5 times a week. The second is on every August 13th I go to the local hot dog shop and top my previous personal best of eating dogs at lunch. This August I will shoot for 12.

Bearcat
03-10-2011, 06:12 PM
Calc II, Sr year in college... I took Calc I my freshman year, IIRC, and kept putting off II. I got like a 45-50% on my first test, and worked harder at it than any previous class and ended up with a high B.

Grad school... my undergrad GPA wasn't great (when I say I worked harder at Calc II than any previous class...) and I couldn't land an IT job. I studied what seemed like every freakin' night for 2 years, regardless of the class, doing problems over and over... I probably filled a few of notebooks with all the homework problems. The Calc II effort doesn't even really compare, since it was one class and ~3 months of solid effort. It was the hardest I had ever worked to achieve a goal up to that point.

As for learning a language or instrument, training for a marathon, etc; I suck. If I can't see myself using the skill several months down the road or keeping in shape for whatever reason, etc; I have a hard time trying at all. My mind is very set on 'use it or lose it', so I tend to only be motivated when I can learn something, then apply it, then keep applying it (well, besides Calc II). I'm the opposite of those who seem to pick up a new hobby each week.

BigRedChief
03-10-2011, 06:26 PM
See luv's thread

cdcox
03-10-2011, 06:49 PM
Okay, I've got one. Kind of.

In my second semester of college, all History majors had to take a research class which was taught (for my section) by a lazy goof-off. Worthless class, but you had to write a major paper.

I wrote about the founding of my high school, because I wanted something I could do that was original and realistic (not something like "Renaissance Prostitutes in Northern Italy, 1520-1525").

So for some of my research, I looked through old letters that were archived at the Archdiocese my school was in. I spent about 4-5 trips driving about an hour and a half (one way) going through the letters and other documents. Wrote a 25 page paper, and got an A. I also interviewed two people still alive that were involved in the school (established in 1958).

It wasn't too hard, though. And it was kind of fun to go through the archives and talk with the head archivist, an old priest.

Well, that's pretty much how these things go. You can go along with the flow in life, color inside the lines, do your 9 to 5 and have a nice life. This is great for some people, but others (and I count myself in this latter group) end up having periodic urges to put in some additional effort, take some risks, and color outside the lines to accomplish something that is important to them. And it isn't that painful, because we are doing something we enjoy doing or consider worthy of our effort.

I left a real job in KC, sold sold our house, and drug my wife to grad school so I could get my PhD and become a college professor. That was a lot of hard work, a big sacrifice, and somewhat of a risk.

I decided to completely change my research direction about 10 years ago. Not very many people do this. Again there was a lot of hard work and some risk taking involved. I've really enjoyed the new research area, and I consider that to be a great decision.

All of my nfl-forecast.com stuff has been a lot of hours working on it without much return except for personal satisfaction.

Back in December, one of my colleagues asked me to work on a research problem that they were kind of stuck on. I was already going to be on the paper and I had a really full plate already. I also had a personal project that I really wanted to put some time into. I ended up saying "yes" even though I had no idea how I was going to meet all my commitments. I ended up cracking the research problem (after many hours of work), and have still managed to keep my personal project going, and kept up with most other things. However, to do all of this, I ended up putting off another major project and I'll be paying for that in March and April.

I have a strong tendency to color outside the lines, despite the fact that it always causes me extra work, and sacrifice, because I really don't have much choice in the matter. It's the way I'm wired. Once an idea wraps itself around my cerebral cortex, it won't let go. I might put it off for a while, but sooner or later, its "Geronimo!!!!" and off the cliff I go.