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Rausch
06-13-2011, 12:02 PM
Yes.

Your perception is the "low dose over long term vs. high dose over short term" argument.

This is HIGH DOSE RADIATION.

It stays.

Much longer than what we've already blasted our southwest with over HUNDREDS of tests,what was leaked in two high-dose disposal mishaps, and exactly the kind of nasty that happened in chernobyl.

4th and Long
06-13-2011, 12:16 PM
You really don't understand how radiation punishes the human body, do you?...
I do.

Hi. My name is Melvin. I was the Tromaville Health Club mop boy. Look what toxic waste has done for me!

http://www.reviewstl.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/toxic-avenger-poster.jpg

Donger
06-13-2011, 12:19 PM
Your perception is the "low dose over long term vs. high dose over short term" argument.

This is HIGH DOSE RADIATION.

It stays.

Much longer than what we've already blasted our southwest with over HUNDREDS of tests,what was leaked in two high-dose disposal mishaps, and exactly the kind of nasty that happened in chernobyl.

Not for us, it isn't.

4th and Long
06-13-2011, 12:22 PM
Rausch needs to look up the term, "half life" before he continues his argument.

Rausch
06-13-2011, 12:22 PM
Not for us, it isn't.

Ok.

Rausch
06-13-2011, 12:27 PM
Rausch needs to look up the term, "half life" before he continues his argument.

When you dump tons of water on an exposed and radioactive nuclear rod what do you think happnes?....

Donger
06-13-2011, 12:28 PM
When you dump tons of water on an exposed and radioactive nuclear rod what do you think happnes?....

The rods are cooled.

loochy
06-13-2011, 12:29 PM
When you dump tons of water on an exposed and radioactive nuclear rod what do you think happnes?....

Unicorns are created?

http://www.jeffgothelf.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/unicorn.jpg

Rausch
06-13-2011, 12:31 PM
The rods are cooled.

You are more intelligent than this.

Water alone does not prevent a meltdown once you have lost control of the rods.

Dave Lane
06-13-2011, 12:31 PM
The rods are cooled.

That reminds me of the joke when I was a kid,


What do you call a new bride?

A cooling system for a hot rod.

Dave Lane
06-13-2011, 12:32 PM
You are more intelligent than this.

Water alone does not prevent a meltdown once you have lost control of the rods.

Yes it does.

Rausch
06-13-2011, 12:33 PM
Yes it does.

And it sends how many TONS of radioactive vapor, freely, into the air?

Hydrae
06-13-2011, 12:34 PM
Rausch needs to look up the term, "half life" before he continues his argument.

Are you talking about the 50 days for Stronium 89 or the 26+ years for Stronium 90?

Donger
06-13-2011, 12:35 PM
You are more intelligent than this.

Water alone does not prevent a meltdown once you have lost control of the rods.

Once the core melts, there isn't anything you can do except keep pumping water on it. Hopefully, the corium is contained inside the PV, as well as the radioactive water.

In the case of Fukushima, it seems clear that there were melts in at least three of the reactors, and that there was/were leaks in the PV(s). I'm not arguing that there hasn't been unintentional and intentional releases of radiation from this event.

Donger
06-13-2011, 12:36 PM
That reminds me of the joke when I was a kid,


What do you call a new bride?

A cooling system for a hot rod.

LMAO

Rausch
06-13-2011, 12:37 PM
Are you talking about the 50 days for Stronium 89 or the 26+ years for Stronium 90?

Or the 3 days, on average, it takes for that to blow to the west coast.

Not that I'm a big fan of the west cost. I'm not.

Dave Lane
06-13-2011, 12:37 PM
Once the core melts, there isn't anything you can do except keep pumping water on it. Hopefully, the corium is contained inside the PV, as well as the radioactive water.

In the case of Fukushima, it seems clear that there were melts in at least three of the reactors, and that there was/were leaks in the PV(s). I'm not arguing that there hasn't been unintentional and intentional releases of radiation from this event.

But getting the core cool with water is the key to stopping the problem.

Rausch
06-13-2011, 12:40 PM
But getting the core cool with water is the key to stopping the problem.

And as you pour more water on that nasty $#it immediately sublimates into the air.

Fuck it.

Nevermind.

Back to your nachos...

Donger
06-13-2011, 12:42 PM
Or the 3 days, on average, it takes for that to blow to the west coast.

Not that I'm a big fan of the west cost. I'm not.

We haven't detected Strontium 90 from Fukushima at any appreciable levels here.

Donger
06-13-2011, 12:43 PM
But getting the core cool with water is the key to stopping the problem.

Since the cores were SCRAMed, the issue was decay heat. Still is. But, yes, what you state is accurate.

Rausch
06-13-2011, 12:47 PM
We haven't detected Strontium 90 from Fukushima at any appreciable levels here.

With a nice tie and some dental work you'll look good at the presser...

4th and Long
06-13-2011, 12:48 PM
Are you talking about the 50 days for Stronium 89 or the 26+ years for Stronium 90?
Stronium 90 has a half life of 28.8 years.

Donger
06-13-2011, 12:48 PM
With a nice tie and some dental work you'll look good at the presser...

You are suggesting that we have detected Strontium 90 from Fukushima here at appreciable levels?

4th and Long
06-13-2011, 12:48 PM
Strontium 90 was the name of a short-lived 1977 British band with members Mike Howlett (bass, vocals), Sting (bass, vocals), Stewart Copeland (drums), and Andy Summers (guitar). The band is most notable for introducing Summers to Sting and Copeland, as this trio would go on to massive success as The Police.

4th and Long
06-13-2011, 12:49 PM
You are suggesting that we have detected Strontium 90 from Fukushima here at appreciable levels?
That or he's taking a crack at your heritage.

Rausch
06-13-2011, 12:52 PM
Stronium 90 has a half life of 28.8 years.

Japan to Cali in 3 days.

Right now the cancer rates in Cali are 1/8th that of the midwest.

Despite my consistent $3it talking I'd take no joy in seeing those rates even out...

Rausch
06-13-2011, 12:55 PM
That or he's taking a crack at your heritage.

No.

Donger
06-13-2011, 01:00 PM
Japan to Cali in 3 days.

Right now the cancer rates in Cali are 1/8th that of the midwest.

Despite my consistent $3it talking I'd take no joy in seeing those rates even out...

You don't need to worry about it, Rausch. No one beyond a few miles from the the plant does.

Rausch
06-13-2011, 01:09 PM
You don't need to worry about it, Rausch. No one beyond a few miles from the the plant does.

Last argument before bed: the SPREAD of the radiation won't go beyond a few miles but the radiation will last for decades.

3 plants were compromised (to some degree.)

Japan has outright lied the entire time about the condition of its reactors.

Donger
06-13-2011, 01:15 PM
Last argument before bed: the SPREAD of the radiation won't go beyond a few miles but the radiation will last for decades.

Yes, that's correct. There are in process of cleaning up the radioactive water, however.

3 plants were compromised (to some degree.)

Reactors, not plants.

Japan has outright lied the entire time about the condition of its reactors.

They were cautious about using the word "meltdown" for good reason: 1) It might have created panic. 2) They weren't positive that a melt(s) had taken place. 3) "Meltdown" means different things to different people. The core can technically melt with no breach of the PV, a melt with a slight breach of the PV (what happened at Fukushima), or a melt with a massive breach of the PV (Chernoybl).

Valiant
06-13-2011, 01:43 PM
Just send melvin from tromaville to clean up.

Dave Lane
06-13-2011, 02:02 PM
If there had been a full meltdown of the core without any containment vessel breach it wouldn't have been any big deal at all. Meltdown is not the key word here. And the water released in the ocean is a meaningless amount.

As an aside, as Donger is always loath to do, radiation is with us everyday. There is a background amount of radiation from radon, watchfaces, the sun and hundreds of other sources. There is no escape and in background levels its generally harmless. The added radiation from Japan is below detectable levels here. There are trace amounts of Strontium 90 everywhere. This event added very little to the Strontium 90 on the surface of the earth.

Rausch
06-13-2011, 02:13 PM
Yes, that's correct. There are in process of cleaning up the radioactive water, however.

THEY'RE.

Fucking...strangle you.


Reactors, not plants.

Yes, I meant plants.

The things that house reactors.

A breach does not mean a meltdown, it means a leak of radioactivity...




They were cautious about using the word "meltdown" for good reason: 1) It might have created panic. 2) They weren't positive that a melt(s) had taken place. 3) "Meltdown" means different things to different people. The core can technically melt with no breach of the PV, a melt with a slight breach of the PV (what happened at Fukushima), or a melt with a massive breach of the PV (Chernoybl).

I'm sure our government would be "cautious" as well...

Donger
06-13-2011, 02:22 PM
THEY'RE.

****ing...strangle you.

LMAO. Sorry for the error.


Yes, I meant plants.

The things that house reactors.

A breach does not mean a meltdown, it means a leak of radioactivity...

You may have meant that, but that is wrong. There are multiple reactors at that one plant. Each reactor is surrounded by a pressure vessel that is surrounded by a containment vessel and then a structure. There were melts of the cores in at least three of the reactors at the plant. There were also breaches in some of the PVs, resulting in the release of radiation.

I'm sure our government would be "cautious" as well...

Probably, but our government isn't the only outfit that measures radiation here. Numerous universities also do so.

Donger
06-13-2011, 02:22 PM
If there had been a full meltdown of the core without any containment vessel breach it wouldn't have been any big deal at all. Meltdown is not the key word here. And the water released in the ocean is a meaningless amount.

As an aside, as Donger is always loath to do, radiation is with us everyday. There is a background amount of radiation from radon, watchfaces, the sun and hundreds of other sources. There is no escape and in background levels its generally harmless. The added radiation from Japan is below detectable levels here. There are trace amounts of Strontium 90 everywhere. This event added very little to the Strontium 90 on the surface of the earth.

I loath to makes asides?

4th and Long
06-13-2011, 02:23 PM
THEY'RE.

****ing...strangle you.
LMAO

Rausch is doing it again! LMAO

loochy
06-13-2011, 02:24 PM
THEY'RE.

Fucking...strangle you.



LMAO:LOL:

Yeah, I know that grammatical errors are frustrating but CALM DOWN MAN!

Dave Lane
06-13-2011, 02:25 PM
I loath to makes asides?

Or lengthy commentary.

Donger
06-13-2011, 02:27 PM
Or lengthy commentary.

Oh. Yes, that's true.

Donger
06-13-2011, 02:28 PM
LMAO:LOL:

Yeah, I know that grammatical errors are frustrating but CALM DOWN MAN!

It really wasn't a grammatical error. I just mistakenly typed "There" instead of "They."

Rausch
06-13-2011, 02:29 PM
LMAO. Sorry for the error.

You argue the particulars of nuclear physics and fuck up basic grammar.
















Ok, now you see how It feels.

Insert picture of sympathetic asian guy here because fat and drunken Germans don't really garner much sympathy...




You may have meant that, but that is wrong. There are multiple reactors at that one plant. Each reactor is surrounded by a pressure vessel that is surrounded by a containment vessel and then a structure. There were melts of the cores in at least three of the reactors at the plant. There were also breaches in some of the PVs, resulting in the release of radiation.

There are 5 nuclear plants in Japan that I know of and 3 reported damage. Only the the one in (fukishima?) garnered headlines...

loochy
06-13-2011, 02:32 PM
Insert picture of sympathetic asian guy here because fat and drunken Germans don't really garner much sympathy...



http://www.contemporarynomad.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/01/blog_shigeo_osawa.jpg

Donger
06-13-2011, 02:38 PM
You argue the particulars of nuclear physics and **** up basic grammar.
















Ok, now you see how It feels.

Insert picture of sympathetic asian guy here because fat and drunken Germans don't really garner much sympathy...

It wasn't a grammar error. I just typed the wrong word.


There are 5 nuclear plants in Japan that I know of and 3 reported damage. Only the the one in (fukishima?) garnered headlines...

To the best of my knowledge, none of the other plants experienced any radiation leaks.

Donger
07-06-2011, 10:33 AM
Good news. The reactors are now utilizing recycled water for cooling and extraneous sources are no longer required.

Dave Lane
07-06-2011, 10:38 AM
Well except for the 200,000 dead it all went pretty well. :thumb:

Dave Lane
07-06-2011, 10:38 AM
Oh and the Japan sinking into the ocean thingie, but I guess thats next week.

Donger
07-06-2011, 10:40 AM
Well except for the 200,000 dead it all went pretty well. :thumb:

LMAO

Donger
07-06-2011, 10:41 AM
Oh and the Japan sinking into the ocean thingie, but I guess thats next week.

HAARP is down for the next few weeks.

loochy
07-06-2011, 10:53 AM
HAARP is down for the next few weeks.

...speaking of HAARP and conspiracies...

I just watched "A Beautiful Mind" for the first time the other day. I imagine that Teedubya is like Nash, except Teedubya has pictures of radar rings taped up all over his office.

Donger
07-06-2011, 10:59 AM
...speaking of HAARP and conspiracies...

I just watched "A Beautiful Mind" for the first time the other day. I imagine that Teedubya is like Nash, except Teedubya has pictures of radar rings taped up all over his office.

Oh yeah. I forgot about the radar rings.

As an aside to that, it should be noted that Atlantis will be in orbit (if all goes well) next week.

Donger
07-21-2011, 12:14 PM
They've now got the reactors stable and expect cold shutdown in a few months. Radiation is down to about two million times less than peak levels.

loochy
07-21-2011, 01:10 PM
They've now got the reactors stable and expect cold shutdown in a few months. Radiation is down to about two million times less than peak levels.

So we're not all dead? How did that happen?

Also, what ever happened to googlegoolge? Did he get banned forever? I miss his racist rants about white women with black guys.

Rams Fan
07-21-2011, 01:13 PM
So we're not all dead? How did that happen?

Also, what ever happened to googlegoolge? Did he get banned forever? I miss his racist rants about white women with black guys.

He was banned. For forever.

Donger
07-21-2011, 01:23 PM
So we're not all dead? How did that happen?

Also, what ever happened to googlegoolge? Did he get banned forever? I miss his racist rants about white women with black guys.

As of today, no, not a single person has died from radiation exposure.

Donger
07-27-2011, 10:32 AM
IAEA sees "significant progress" on Japan atom crisis

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/07/22/japan-nuclear-fukushima-idUSLDE76L0YF20110722

(Reuters) - Significant progress has been made in efforts to contain and stabilise the situation at Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant, the head of the United Nations atomic agency said on Friday.

In a statement issued ahead of a visit to Japan next week, Director General Yukiya Amano of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said Tokyo Electric Power Co's plan to achieve a cold shutdown by early 2012 "could be possible."

Japan's government said on Tuesday it was on track with efforts to take control of Fukushima but cautioned that a final clean up of the world's worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl in 1986 would take many years.

Tokyo's update on progress to shut down reactors at the plant came four months after a massive earthquake and tsunami knocked out cooling systems at the complex and triggered a series of core meltdowns and explosions.

The Fukushima crisis has prompted a rethink of nuclear power plans worldwide, as well as plans for stricter checks on atomic facilities to avoid any repeat of the disaster.

A cold shutdown means that the uranium at the core is no longer capable of boiling off the water used as a coolant.

Amano stated that "the IAEA welcomes the significant progress the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) has achieved overall in implementing its 'Road Map' to contain and stabilise the situation," the Vienna-based agency said in a statement.

Amano, a veteran Japanese diplomat, said TEPCO was ahead of the road map schedule in some areas, without giving details.

"Based on their progress to date, the IAEA notes that their plan to achieve 'cold shutdown' by early next year could be possible," the statement said.

Amano will visit the Fukushima plant on July 25.

Donger
08-09-2011, 08:35 AM
Japan to lift some nuclear evacuation advisories

http://news.yahoo.com/japan-lift-nuclear-evacuation-advisories-111849727.html

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's government has decided to lift evacuation advisories in some areas more than 12 miles (20 kilometers) from the damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, opening the way for tens of thousands of people to return home, officials said Tuesday.

The advisories warned residents to be prepared to leave in case of worsening conditions at the plant. Although only a warning, many people fled their homes out of fear for their safety or because mandatory evacuation orders in nearby areas deprived them of city services.

Officials said the lifting will allow about 25,000 people covered by the advisories to return home in about a month.

A 12-mile no-go zone, in place since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami sent the nuclear plant into a meltdown, will remain in force. Officials said mandatory evacuation orders will also remain in place in several high-radiation areas outside the 12-mile exclusion zone.

The massive quake and subsequent tsunami destroyed power and cooling functions at the nuclear plant, causing three reactor cores to melt and triggering fires and explosions that spread large amounts of radioactive particles outside the complex.

More than 80,000 residents fled their homes after the disaster. Tens of thousands remain unable to return because of the radiation threat.

Officials at Tokyo Electric Power Co., the utility that operates the plant, and the government have said in recent weeks that the reactors have stabilized and the amount of radiation being released is now minimal.

"We have hoped to let evacuees return to their ordinary lives as soon as possible. It took five months to finally start the process," said Goshi Hosono, a Cabinet minister in charge of the nuclear crisis. "We will carry this out very cautiously."

Officials say most of the radiation in the reactor cores leaked out earlier in the crisis and what's left inside does not pose much danger. TEPCO has been injecting nitrogen into the reactors as a precaution to prevent further hydrogen explosions, said Osamu Suda, a Cabinet Office official in charge of evacuees.

Areas where the evacuation advisories are being lifted must work out plans within several weeks to decontaminate buildings and restart public services for the returning residents, Suda said. A government panel is currently compiling guidelines for the decontamination to address concerns from residents and support their resettlement process.

Also Tuesday, officials said they are considering allowing residents of areas within a 1.9-mile (3-kilometer) radius of the plant to make their first brief visit to their homes later this month.

Residents of the no-go zone and other high-risk areas will not be able to move back to their homes at least until the crippled reactors are stabilized further, Suda said. TEPCO and the government plan to bring the reactors to that status by early January.

Some experts say that target is too ambitious.

loochy
08-09-2011, 08:36 AM
I find nuclear power absolutely fascinating. I kind of wish I had taken that career path instead of the one I did.

Ebolapox
08-09-2011, 08:36 AM
TEH D00M!

Donger
12-16-2011, 08:59 AM
Japan PM says tsunami-hit nuclear plant is stable

http://news.yahoo.com/japan-pm-says-tsunami-hit-nuclear-plant-stable-101639982.html

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's prime minister announced Friday that the country's tsunami-damaged nuclear plant has achieved a stable state of "cold shutdown," a crucial step toward the eventual lifting of evacuation orders and closing of the plant.

Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda's announcement was intended to reassure the nation that significant progress has been made in the nine months since the March 11 tsunami sent three reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant into meltdowns in the worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl in 1986.

But experts say the plant 140 miles (230 kilometers) northeast of Tokyo remains vulnerable to problems and its surroundings are contaminated by radiation and closing the plant safely will take 30 or more years.

"The reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant have reached a state of cold shutdown," Noda said. "Now that we have achieved stability in the reactors, a major concern for the nation has been resolved."

Radiation released from the plant has been significantly reduced, and additional safety measures installed at the plant ensure stability even in the event of another major disaster, he said.

Noda said he hopes conditions will improve quickly so that the people who have been displaced by the crisis can return home "even a day sooner."

"There are many issues that remain," Noda said. "Our battle is not over."

The government's official endorsement of the claim by Tokyo Electric Power Co. that the reactors have reached cold shutdown status is a necessary step toward revising evacuation zones around the plant and shifting the focus from simply stabilizing the facility to actually starting the arduous process of shutting it down.

But Noda acknowledged the assessment has some important caveats.

The government said Fukushima Dai-ichi has reached cold shutdown "conditions"— a cautious phrasing reflecting the fact that TEPCO cannot measure the temperatures of melted fuel in the damaged reactors in the same way as with normally functioning ones.

Even so, the announcement marks the end of the second phase of the government's lengthy roadmap to completely decommission the plant.

International Atomic Energy Agency chief Yukiya Amano praised TEPCO and the government for making "significant progress" in reaching the goal.

Officials can now start discussing whether to allow some evacuees to return to less-contaminated areas — although a 12-mile (20-kilometer) zone around the plant is expected to remain off limits for years to come. The crisis displaced some 100,000 people.

"We hope this will be a step toward allowing our residents to return home, but the road ahead is long and difficult," Fukushima Gov. Yuhei Sato told reporters.

Noda said the government will step up decontamination efforts and will ready 1 trillion yen ($12.8 billion) for urgently needed projects next year. He also said 30,000 workers will be trained.

A cold shutdown normally means a nuclear reactor's coolant system is at atmospheric pressure and its reactor core is at a temperature below 212 degrees Fahrenheit (100 degrees Celsius), making it impossible for a chain reaction to take place.

According to TEPCO, temperature gauges inside the Fukushima reactors show the pressure vessel is at around 70 C (158 F). The government also says the amount of radiation now being released around the plant is at or below 1 millisievert per year — equivalent to the annual legal exposure limit for ordinary citizens before the crisis began.

Yet, the complex still faces numerous concerns, triggering criticism that the announcement of "cold shutdown conditions" is based on a political decision rather than science. Nobody knows exactly where and how the melted fuel ended up in each reactor, and the plant is struggling with the vast amount of radioactive water that has collected in the reactor basements and nearby storage areas. Officials, including nuclear and environment minister Goshi Hosono, admitted the possibility of mechanical glitches, water leaks or other unexpected troubles down the road, but said ample protection is now in place to avert another disaster.

TEPCO President Toshio Nishizawa apologized for the accident, and vowed to further stabilize the plant and reduce its radiation release until it is finally closed.

Akira Yamaguchi, a nuclear physicist at Osaka University, said the government's definition of cold shutdown is disputable.

"But what's most important right now is that there aren't any massive radiation leaks any more," he said.

Putting longer-term issues aside, he warned that much of the backup equipment installed at the plant since the crisis began is makeshift and may break down. He said winter cold could test their strength.

Hydrae
12-16-2011, 09:06 AM
That is good news.

I wonder, did the power company pay for new homes for all those in the 12 mile zone?

Donger
12-16-2011, 09:09 AM
That is good news.

I wonder, did the power company pay for new homes for all those in the 12 mile zone?

I wouldn't think so. I would imagine that their insurance would cover that?

The bigger question is: where are they going to bury those 200,000 dead?

Fish
12-16-2011, 09:13 AM
Yeah... and now there's all sorts of lovely new wildlife around the area...

http://img192.imageshack.us/img192/576/cyclopspig.jpg

headsnap
12-16-2011, 09:27 AM
Yeah... and now there's all sorts of lovely new wildlife around the area...

http://img192.imageshack.us/img192/576/cyclopspig.jpg

yup, the deformity in a Chinese pig is related to the tragedy in Japan...

bevischief
12-16-2011, 09:31 AM
Check these out if you think this is over.
http://enenews.com/mainichi-absolutely-progress-being-made-fukushima-plant-reporter-japanese-media-turned-away-issue-story

http://enenews.com/breaking-officials-investigating-meltdowns-question-whether-nuclear-explosions-destroyed-fukushima-reactors-tepco-not-in-a-position-to-comment

http://enenews.com/gundersen-bloomberg-actually-going-blow-face-extraordinarily-hot-nuclear-cores-cold-shutdown-declared

Donger
12-16-2011, 12:34 PM
Check these out if you think this is over.
http://enenews.com/mainichi-absolutely-progress-being-made-fukushima-plant-reporter-japanese-media-turned-away-issue-story

http://enenews.com/breaking-officials-investigating-meltdowns-question-whether-nuclear-explosions-destroyed-fukushima-reactors-tepco-not-in-a-position-to-comment

http://enenews.com/gundersen-bloomberg-actually-going-blow-face-extraordinarily-hot-nuclear-cores-cold-shutdown-declared

LMAO

Gov’t officials investigating Fukushima want to know if “nuclear” explosions destroyed reactors

LMAO

Donger
03-15-2012, 02:12 PM
One year later (give or take). Update: no one has died from radiation.

loochy
03-15-2012, 02:16 PM
One year later (give or take). Update: no one has died from radiation.

OH MY GOD DONGER THIS WAS WORSE THAN CHERNOBYL MELTDOWNS CAUSE NUKLER EXPLOSIONS BOOM

Donger
03-15-2012, 02:17 PM
OH MY GOD DONGER THIS WAS WORSE THAN CHERNOBYL MELTDOWNS CAUSE NUKLER EXPLOSIONS BOOM

Four times worse, wasn't it? 200,000 dead!@

LMAO

Donger
08-16-2012, 08:38 AM
It's not quite 200,000 dead people, but I thought this was neat. I actually like butterflies.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/aug/16/fukushima-radiation-butterflies

Has Fukushima radiation created mutant butterflies?



Last March, the 9.0 magnitude Tōhoku earthquake triggered a tsunami that sent over 45-foot waves of water crashing down on the reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant, causing the largest nuclear disaster since Chernobyl in 1986. While health officials scrambled to quickly stabilize the situation, it was unclear how much radiation had made it out of the plant—and how it could affect people, plants, and animals who came into contact with it.

Preliminary studies concluded that most of the 140,000 people in the surrounding areas of Fukushima had probably been exposed to relatively low doses of radiation that probably wouldn't lead to any adverse health effects. But a new study published last week in Nature has shown that the radiation is causing a particularly sensitive population—the pale grass blue butterfly—to develop a slew of uncommon and potentially lethal physical abnormalities.

Researchers collected butterflies immediately following the nuclear meltdown and six months later, both from the surrounding areas of Fukushima and from various other localities in Japan where the butterfly is common. As compared with the butterflies collected from elsewhere in the country, Fukushima butterflies showed some abnormally-developed legs, dented eyes, deformed wing shapes, and changes to the color and spot patterns of their wings, with an overall abnormality rate of around 12 percent.

Mutations included malformed antennae, dented eyes, bent wings, and abnormal color patterns. Photo courtesy of Joji M. OtakiMutations included malformed antennae, dented eyes, bent wings, and abnormal color patterns. Photo courtesy of Joji M. Otaki

While these levels of mutations were still relatively mild, perhaps more alarming were the same data on butterflies collected six months later, in September of last year. The overall rate of similar mutations among these butterflies was around 28 percent, while this number skyrocketed to around 52 percent in the second generation produced from the collected butterflies.

To make sure that the mutations were really caused by the radiation from Dai-ichi power plant, the researchers exposed normal butterflies to similar low levels of radiation that were released following the tsunami and saw comparable results. Since the Fukushima butterflies were also being exposed internally by eating leaves affected by radiation, they also fed normal butterfly larvae radiated plants and saw similar mutations emerge. Based off this, the researchers concluded that the mutations being seen in the Fukushima butterflies are due both to external and internal contact with radiation.

The study renews worries that humans, too, might be affected by the released radiation in the Fukushima area, but the researchers insist that this is not an easy line to draw. "Humans are totally different from butterflies and they should be far more resistant," the head scientist on the study, Joji M. Otaki, told The Japan Times. So while the butterfly study is the first to definitively link Fukushima radiation to physical mutations in any organism, they are certainly not the only ones to be exposed; it remains to be seen if similar effects can be seen across species. Let's hope not.

durtyrute
08-16-2012, 08:41 AM
Damn Dongy, you post stuff about Nukes, spy planes, bombs, and Iran.........

http://images.cheezburger.com/completestore/2009/8/16/128949323439706062.jpg

Donger
08-16-2012, 08:54 AM
Damn Dongy, you post stuff about Nukes, spy planes, bombs, and Iran.........

http://images.cheezburger.com/completestore/2009/8/16/128949323439706062.jpg

I'd rather not share that information.

Dave Lane
08-16-2012, 08:55 AM
So we're not all dead? How did that happen?

Also, what ever happened to googlegoolge? Did he get banned forever? I miss his racist rants about white women with black guys.

Thats Vailpass and his mudshark comments.

loochy
08-16-2012, 10:03 AM
Thats Vailpass and his mudshark comments.

If googlegoogle carved "chiefsplanet" into his leg on a youtube video would you unban him?

Donger
08-16-2012, 10:07 AM
Thats Vailpass and his mudshark comments.

Reported.

mikey23545
08-16-2012, 10:09 AM
It's not quite 200,000 dead people, but I thought this was neat. I actually like butterflies.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/aug/16/fukushima-radiation-butterflies

Has Fukushima radiation created mutant butterflies?



Last March, the 9.0 magnitude Tōhoku earthquake triggered a tsunami that sent over 45-foot waves of water crashing down on the reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant, causing the largest nuclear disaster since Chernobyl in 1986. While health officials scrambled to quickly stabilize the situation, it was unclear how much radiation had made it out of the plant—and how it could affect people, plants, and animals who came into contact with it.

Preliminary studies concluded that most of the 140,000 people in the surrounding areas of Fukushima had probably been exposed to relatively low doses of radiation that probably wouldn't lead to any adverse health effects. But a new study published last week in Nature has shown that the radiation is causing a particularly sensitive population—the pale grass blue butterfly—to develop a slew of uncommon and potentially lethal physical abnormalities.

Researchers collected butterflies immediately following the nuclear meltdown and six months later, both from the surrounding areas of Fukushima and from various other localities in Japan where the butterfly is common. As compared with the butterflies collected from elsewhere in the country, Fukushima butterflies showed some abnormally-developed legs, dented eyes, deformed wing shapes, and changes to the color and spot patterns of their wings, with an overall abnormality rate of around 12 percent.

Mutations included malformed antennae, dented eyes, bent wings, and abnormal color patterns. Photo courtesy of Joji M. OtakiMutations included malformed antennae, dented eyes, bent wings, and abnormal color patterns. Photo courtesy of Joji M. Otaki

While these levels of mutations were still relatively mild, perhaps more alarming were the same data on butterflies collected six months later, in September of last year. The overall rate of similar mutations among these butterflies was around 28 percent, while this number skyrocketed to around 52 percent in the second generation produced from the collected butterflies.

To make sure that the mutations were really caused by the radiation from Dai-ichi power plant, the researchers exposed normal butterflies to similar low levels of radiation that were released following the tsunami and saw comparable results. Since the Fukushima butterflies were also being exposed internally by eating leaves affected by radiation, they also fed normal butterfly larvae radiated plants and saw similar mutations emerge. Based off this, the researchers concluded that the mutations being seen in the Fukushima butterflies are due both to external and internal contact with radiation.

The study renews worries that humans, too, might be affected by the released radiation in the Fukushima area, but the researchers insist that this is not an easy line to draw. "Humans are totally different from butterflies and they should be far more resistant," the head scientist on the study, Joji M. Otaki, told The Japan Times. So while the butterfly study is the first to definitively link Fukushima radiation to physical mutations in any organism, they are certainly not the only ones to be exposed; it remains to be seen if similar effects can be seen across species. Let's hope not.


I wonder how diligently environmentalists had to search for something to shed tears over?...

Here lie the bodies of our butterfly compatriots!...

LMAO

Saulbadguy
08-16-2012, 10:26 AM
mothra is up next. fuck. If you see a couple of 6 inch fairies singing about a moth, get the hell out of there.

Frazod
10-25-2013, 12:10 PM
7.3 magnitude quake just hit in the same area. Tsunami warning issued.

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/10/25/73-magnitude-earthquake-hits-japan/

Buck
10-25-2013, 12:12 PM
Fuck. What was the magnitude of the last one?

Edit: 9.0 back then. Almost 200x stronger I believe.

ct
10-25-2013, 01:14 PM
tsunami alerts lifted, all is well

at least as 'well' as it was a couple hours ago...

Donger
01-07-2014, 08:08 AM
It has begun...

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/LcQLxT49ZP0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Halfcan
01-07-2014, 09:44 AM
Godzilla coming soon!

Rausch
01-07-2014, 09:49 AM
So much for low cancer rates in Cali...

GordonGekko
01-07-2014, 09:51 AM
Godzilla coming soon!

Godzirra?

RedDread
01-07-2014, 09:54 AM
Godzilla coming soon!

This summer to a theater near you!

Discuss Thrower
01-07-2014, 09:59 AM
Godzirra?

GOJJIRRA

siberian khatru
01-07-2014, 10:06 AM
<img style="-webkit-user-select: none; cursor: -webkit-zoom-in;" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_VpXDQXroJCo/TUWeP-LYwAI/AAAAAAAABA0/GG3TLveqFhw/s1600/slipperman.jpg" width="350" height="431">

Discuss Thrower
01-07-2014, 10:08 AM
<img style="-webkit-user-select: none; cursor: -webkit-zoom-in;" src="http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_VpXDQXroJCo/TUWeP-LYwAI/AAAAAAAABA0/GG3TLveqFhw/s1600/slipperman.jpg" width="350" height="431">

At least ask Clay for permission before you plaster pics of his last lay here.

Donger
01-07-2014, 10:10 AM
You guys aren't funny. This is going to kill a lot of people.

ClevelandBronco
01-07-2014, 10:28 AM
You guys aren't funny. This is going to kill a lot of people.

How sure are you?

LoneWolf
01-07-2014, 10:31 AM
You guys aren't funny. This is going to kill a lot of people.

Define a lot.

suzzer99
01-07-2014, 10:34 AM
I read the comments on some original site that posted that YouTube video. Once actual scientists and nuclear engineer showed up, all the crazy talk ended. Levels are still below any kind of danger. I think it's in my browser history at work – I'll look for it.

Buck
01-07-2014, 10:36 AM
So why was this bumped?

Donger
01-07-2014, 10:40 AM
Define a lot.

200,000

Donger
01-07-2014, 10:41 AM
How sure are you?

78.625%

Donger
01-07-2014, 10:44 AM
So why was this bumped?

Post 1580

Hog Farmer
01-07-2014, 11:11 AM
Define a lot.

The Oakland Raiders and SanDiego Chargers.

After Peyton retires we'll own the AFCW!

Buck
01-07-2014, 11:17 AM
Post 1580


On my Tapatalk app all it says is "It has begun" and there is no photo or video that's why I was wondering.

JD10367
01-07-2014, 11:17 AM
This summer to a theater near you!

I've heard a lot of amazing sound in my IMAX theaters over the past 24 years I've been in the industry; tops on the list is when I saw the "Godzilla" trailer last week and he uttered the classic Godzilla cry at the end. Absolute shivers down the spine.

ClevelandBronco
01-07-2014, 11:18 AM
Standing down.

saphojunkie
01-07-2014, 11:28 AM
Can I ask why all of Japan isn't dying of radiation poisoning? I mean, if it's at dangerous levels in San Francisco, wouldn't Tokyo being dying by the day?

Honest question.

gblowfish
01-07-2014, 11:34 AM
Snow on the ground in St. Louis right now has twice its normal level of radiation....
http://beforeitsnews.com/weather/2014/01/proof-radioactive-snow-st-louis-missouri-2442276.html

Hog Farmer
01-07-2014, 11:34 AM
Can I ask why all of Japan isn't dying of radiation poisoning? I mean, if it's at dangerous levels in San Francisco, wouldn't Tokyo being dying by the day?

Honest question.

The Japs were exposed to radiation back in WWII when we dropped our loads on them. The survivors have passed on immunity to their offspring.

We on the other hand will all die.

ptlyon
01-07-2014, 11:43 AM
when we dropped our loads on them.

Oh the irony

mnchiefsguy
01-07-2014, 11:54 AM
Here is another article about the radiation effects and media cover-up that a local news anchor here in KC posted on facebook:

http://www.thedailysheeple.com/36-signs-the-media-is-lying-to-you-about-how-radiation-from-fukushima-is-affecting-the-west-coast_012014

LoneWolf
01-07-2014, 12:49 PM
Finding it hard to give a Fukushima about this.

Just Passin' By
01-07-2014, 12:50 PM
Finding it hard to give a Fukushima about this.

THINK OF THE CHILDREN!

Cochise
01-07-2014, 12:51 PM
Here is another article about the radiation effects and media cover-up that a local news anchor here in KC posted on facebook:

http://www.thedailysheeple.com/36-signs-the-media-is-lying-to-you-about-how-radiation-from-fukushima-is-affecting-the-west-coast_012014

The Daily Sheeple...

LoneWolf
01-07-2014, 12:53 PM
THINK OF THE CHILDREN!

They have a greater chance of one day becoming Spider-Man. Whoo Hoo!

The_Doctor10
01-07-2014, 01:30 PM
http://www.policymic.com/articles/78287/fukushima-radiation-scare-stories-are-going-viral-on-the-internet-are-they-real-or-fake

California will be fine. Sit down.

Fish
01-07-2014, 01:42 PM
http://www.policymic.com/articles/78287/fukushima-radiation-scare-stories-are-going-viral-on-the-internet-are-they-real-or-fake

California will be fine. Sit down.

That's a great informative link, thanks.

If people are still interested, I'd recommend checking out the source article that your link is getting data from: http://deepseanews.com/2013/11/true-facts-about-ocean-radiation-and-the-fukushima-disaster/

Lots of good stuff there.

Regarding the ocean die off we're seeing lately.... It's true that sea life is on a downturn right now. But not necessarily from Fukushima, because it's been steadily happening for quite some time, long before the Fukushima mess. Much of it has to do with the die off of phytoplankton that's been happening for hundreds of years now. Which is really really serious shit in the grand scheme of things. Phytoplankton are the base food for all life in the oceans from the bottom up.

More info on that: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=phytoplankton-population

ptlyon
01-07-2014, 01:47 PM
That's a great informative link, thanks.

If people are still interested, I'd recommend checking out the source article that your link is getting data from: http://deepseanews.com/2013/11/true-facts-about-ocean-radiation-and-the-fukushima-disaster/

Lots of good stuff there.

Regarding the ocean die off we're seeing lately.... It's true that sea life is on a downturn right now. But not necessarily from Fukushima, because it's been steadily happening for quite some time, long before the Fukushima mess. Much of it has to do with the die off of phytoplankton that's been happening for hundreds of years now. Which is really really serious shit in the grand scheme of things. Phytoplankton are the base food for all life in the oceans from the bottom up.

More info on that: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=phytoplankton-population

Hope you get your Phytoplankton, Fish

Donger
01-07-2014, 02:43 PM
On my Tapatalk app all it says is "It has begun" and there is no photo or video that's why I was wondering.

There is a video.

notorious
01-07-2014, 04:37 PM
Wow, with all of that radiation in San Fran the men are going start looking like women and vice-versa.


Oh, wait.

threebag02
01-07-2014, 04:42 PM
Godzilla coming soon!

Can you hear him breathing hard?

mnchiefsguy
01-07-2014, 04:54 PM
The Daily Sheeple...

Not vouching for the source...it was merely the convergence of browsing CP and my facebook feed. LOL

JD10367
01-07-2014, 05:44 PM
Wow, with all of that radiation in San Fran the men are going start looking like women and vice-versa.


Oh, wait.

And the women will start growing penises! Oh, wait...

HonestChieffan
01-07-2014, 05:50 PM
And the women will start growing penises! Oh, wait...

Very Wookie like

Donger
01-09-2014, 10:45 AM
Thanks be to God...

http://www.sfgate.com/health/article/Coast-getting-little-radiation-from-Fukushima-5125645.php

Scientists reported Wednesday that low levels of radiation from Japan's Fukushima disaster first detected off the California coast two years ago have been declining ever since and remain well below any levels considered unsafe for humans.

The scientists, from UC Santa Cruz and Stony Brook University in New York, were responding to public concerns raised this week by an Internet video claiming that dangerously high radiation levels had been detected in the sands of Pacifica State Beach.

The video has gone viral and shows an unidentified man carrying a commercial Geiger counter that displays radiation counts purportedly rising to "alert" levels as he walks along the beach often frequented by surfers.

An Internet "news" site is claiming that news of the radioactivity is being suppressed by unnamed government sources.

Geiger counters are unsophisticated and do measure radiation levels, but they are unable detect the source of radioactivity. More sophisticated tests of beach sand in the Pacifica area by public health officials show that the radiation has come from natural sources - most probably from ancient rocks eroded in the bluffs above.

"There is no public health risk at California beaches due to radioactivity related to events at Fukushima," the California Department of Public Health said Tuesday.

"Recent tests by the San Mateo County Public Health Department show that elevated levels of radiation at Half Moon Bay are due to naturally occurring materials and not radioactivity associated with the Fukushima incident," it said.

The first detection of low-level radiation crossing the Pacific from the damaged Fukushima nuclear reactors following the devastating 2011 earthquake and tsunami was reported in The Chronicle on May 29, 2012. The report was based on an article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and interviews with its authors, Daniel J. Madigan, then a marine ecologist at Stanford's Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove, and Nicholas Fisher, a marine scientist at Stony Brook University.

In a telephone interview this week, Fisher, an internationally known specialist in radiation hazards, said that continued sampling of low radiation levels from Fukushima on the California coast shows "they have gone down ever since." The most recent report from Fisher's group is published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

At UC Santa Cruz, Daniel Hirsch, a lecturer on nuclear policy, called the low levels of radiation being reported now in California as "trivial."

"No one here in the Bay Area should be concerned about eating fish," he said in a phone interview.

Cochise
01-09-2014, 10:54 AM
It should be easy to determine if the contamination was from Fukushima, right? It would be Cesium 137

Donger
01-09-2014, 11:00 AM
It should be easy to determine if the contamination was from Fukushima, right? It would be Cesium 137

That's just what they want us to think.

Cochise
01-09-2014, 11:00 AM
Experts say beach radiation unrelated to Fukushima

Posted: Tuesday, January 7, 2014 2:27 pm |

The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi reactor meltdown in Japan is not the cause of abnormally high radiation levels discovered recently along Surfer's Beach, according to an analysis by independent experts. But exactly why a swath of the local coastline is showing about 14 times the baseline radiation level remains a curious mystery.

San Mateo County health officials reiterated on Tuesday that the beach radiation did not pose a public hazard.

People across the country expressed an interest in radiation on the Coastside in recent days after an online video shot at Surfer's Beach led some to believe what they were seeing was the first major landing of radioactive material on the West Coast attributable to the Japanese disaster. First posted on Dec. 23 on YouTube, the seven-minute video shows the meter of a Geiger counter as an unidentified man off-camera measures different spots on the beach south of Pillar Point Harbor. The gadget’s alarm rings as its radiation reading ratchets up to about 150 counts per minute, or roughly five times the typical amount found in the environment.

The amateur video went viral, drawing more than half a million views to date, and spurring government inspectors to conduct their own surveys.

After watching the clip, El Granada electrical engineer Steven Weiss grabbed his own radiation measurement equipment to test the radiation reports for himself.

On Monday, Weiss carried a Geiger counter in each hand for a second survey of Surfer's Beach. As he descended to the waterline, the readings on his gadgets climbed. He tested various spots: the side of the bluffs and the white sand closest to the waterline, both registering levels that were high but not suspiciously so as far as he was concerned. But when he placed the sensors down near a line of black silt along the back of the beach, the meters on both his gadgets spiked. The counters registered about 415 counts per minute. A cpm of 30 is considered the baseline for radioactivity typically found in the air.

“It's not normal. I've never seen 400 cpm when I just wave my Geiger around.” he said. “There has to be something radioactive for it to do that.”

Weiss is no amateur; for 40 years he has made a living designing Geiger counters, most recently for International Medcom Inc. After he verified the hotspot, he took a sample of the dark sediment and sent it to his company's main offices in Sebastopol for analysis.

International Medcom CEO Dan Sythe later put the dirt sample in a spectrum analyzer to view the radioactive “signature” of the particles, the photon energy associated with each isotope. What he found was different from cesium-137, the fissile material used in the Fukushima reactors. He would know – since the 2011 meltdown, Sythe has visited Japan nine times to help map the cesium fallout.

Instead he was seeing radium and thorium, naturally occurring radioactive elements.

“It doesn’t mean that it‘s OK. It's not something you'd want your baby playing in,” Sythe said. “All we’re saying is this radiation is not from Fukushima.”

Sythe summarized his findings on his blog in the hopes that it would dispel a sense of panic spreading on the Internet that Fukushima radiation was hitting U.S. shores. People were posting online claiming that the West Coast would soon be “toast,” he said, so it was vital to get better information online.

The radiation scare followed a constellation of other alarming news in recent months. Last month, marine biologists announced that starfish were mysteriously disintegrating along the West Coast, a trend that has not been linked yet to any cause. Past computer simulations had indicated that radioactive cesium-137 from the Fukushima reactors could begin appearing on West Coast shores by early 2014. Those findings, published in August by the Institute for Cross-Disciplinary Physics and Complex Systems in Spain, also noted that any radioactive material that crossed the Pacific would likely be diluted and fall below international safety levels.

Public fear and paranoia has clouded the Fukushima issue since the start of the disaster, said Dan Hirsch, a nuclear policy lecturer at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He believes the problem stems from a vacuum of data from the government, prompting amateur sleuths with Geiger counters to seek their own answers. He pointed out that the Environmental Protection Agency gave assurances to the public in 2011 that the Fukushima radiation posed no public health risk. But later a 2012 audit revealed that many of the EPA’s radiation monitors were out of service at the time of the Fukushima disaster.

For some, that fed the perception that the government had something to hide, he said.

“I'm frustrated because the government should be doing a better job, and the people who are fearmongering are just fanning the flames,” Hirsch said.

The viral video posted last month began spreading on the Internet before government officials took notice. County health officials first learned of the video four days after was uploaded, and they sent their own inspector out to the beach the next day. Using a different unit, the county inspector measured the beach to have a radiation level of about 100 micro-REM per hour, or about five times the normal amount. REM stands for “Roentgen equivalent man,” a measurement of the dosage and statistical biological effects presented by radiation.

Although the radiation levels were clearly higher than is typical, San Mateo County Health Officer Dean Peterson emphasized that it was still not a dangerous level for humans. A person would need to be exposed to 100 microREMs of radiation for 50,000 hours before it surpassed safety guidelines by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, he explained.

Peterson forwarded the matter to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and state Department of Public Health, agencies with more expertise on analyzing radioactivity. Both of those agencies were contacted by the Review this week, but officials said they were still investigating the situation.

Peterson said he thought it was important to go forward with his information to assure the public that local beaches were still safe.

“I’m completely confident that what we have on the beach is not a public health threat,” he said.

Nonetheless, the presence and concentration of natural thorium and radium at Surfer’s Beach left experts puzzled. Both elements are actually common at beaches. In fact, a 2008 study by the Journal of the Serbian Chemical Society found similar concentrations at Southern California beaches.

Sythe offered a couple possible explanations. A vein of thorium could be spilling out from the nearby coastal bluffs, he suggested. Alternatively, he heard mention of an old oil pipe running nearby the beach. Oil pipelines had a tendency to collect heavy radioactive minerals, he said.

Peterson thought the minerals could be just washing up with the salt water from the shores. The radioactive materials all were just past the high tide line, so it made sense that would be where the minerals would build up, he said.

“The conditions that are out on the beach could be the same conditions that have been out there for millennia,” he said.

Donger
01-09-2014, 11:07 AM
What he found was different from cesium-137, the fissile material used in the Fukushima reactors.

:spock: