PDA

View Full Version : Football Marty Schottenheimer and Jerry Glanville hired as head coaches


Buck
03-21-2011, 10:55 AM
mortreport Chris Mortensen
Next UFL splash after Jerry Glanville to Hartford - Marty Schottenheimer on verge of being Coach/GM of Virginia franchise


http://twitter.com/#!/mortreport

Buck
03-21-2011, 10:56 AM
Well I guess that Marty hasn't been hired yet, but he's "on the verge."

ChiefsCountry
03-21-2011, 10:56 AM
Virginia will win alot of regular season games but will choke in the UFL Championship Game.

DMAC
03-21-2011, 11:02 AM
All the players should go play there.

Okie_Apparition
04-12-2011, 09:19 PM
One of the most colorful coaches in NFL history has joined the UFL’s Hartford Colonials as a head coach. And one of the most colorful assistant coaches in NFL history has joined the team, too.

Tim Krumrie, who played and coached in the NFL for 27 years, will serve as the defensive line coach under Jerry Glanville.

“There are three great pro defensive line coaches, and we just got one of them,” Glanville said. “He teaches technique with hustle, hit and chase. I interviewed him about the different things we do . He knew it all. In fact, he has played it all and taught it all. Tim is a real plus for Hartford.”

Krumrie, who shattered his leg during Super Bowl XXIII with the Bengals, developed a reputation for putting incoming linemen through intense hand-to-hand combat sessions during Pro Day workouts.

In 2008, Krumrie’s antics with USC prospects prompted former Trojans coach Pete Carroll to say, “That won’t happen again here.”

“The way I played is exactly the way I coach — 100 mph non-stop,” Krumrie said. “I expect the players to be a non-stop motor. No matter what the situation is, I expect you to chase and run and make that play no matter where you are on the football field. The players have to be in great shape and have tremendous mental toughness and play aggressive. . . . My whole attitude was technique and leverage and just outwork everybody. That’s how I survived.”

Krumrie played from 1983 through 1994 with the Bengals. He coached in Cincinnati from 1995 through 2002, Buffalo from 2003 through 2005, and Kansas City from 2006 through 2009. He was out of the league in 2010

Reerun_KC
04-12-2011, 09:22 PM
Wow hiring Marty? Failing at it's finest.

FAX
04-12-2011, 10:24 PM
I have never really figured Glanville out.

If I remember this correctly, he was with the Falcons when they drafted Fa-Va-Rah and Glanville said something to the effect that "It will take a plane crash for me to play Fa-Va-Rah."

He never seemed to be effective as a head coach, yet he continued to find work. I really don't understand the deal with him.

FAX

cdcox
04-12-2011, 10:33 PM
On the verge of a gleam. Great name for a rock song.

FAX
04-12-2011, 10:41 PM
By the way ... I've done a search and I can't find the thread that contains the particular post I'm seeking. I don't want to start a new thread, so I'm placing this question here. I figure that, since Mr. Buck is a bolt fan, he won't mind ... or he'll be so drunk that he won't notice ... or totally distracted by the posts in the other thread discussing the subject of Mr. DaFace's penis.

Anyhow, I need a recipe and method for cooking up a decent batch of sausage gravy. I have cowboy biscuits down pat, but I don't have any gravy. I bought some "Tennessee Pride" sausage gravy I found in the sausage and bacon section at the market, but it basically sucks. The beautiful and witty Mrs. FAX said she would make fried chicken and chicken gravy for me, but she can't get to it for a couple of weeks. Meanwhile, I am hankering for biscuits and gravy.

The way I figure it, sausage gravy can't be all that difficult, but I searched online and soon realized that each recipe is slightly different. I'm disinclined to experiment with a bunch of unknown recipes, plus I don't want to waste the time and wind up throwing away a bunch of crummy gravy.

Any assistance in this regard would be appreciated.

FAX

FAX
04-12-2011, 10:42 PM
On the verge of a gleam. Great name for a rock song.

You're right, Mr. cdcox. That's not bad.

FAX

cdcox
04-12-2011, 11:20 PM
By the way ... I've done a search and I can't find the thread that contains the particular post I'm seeking. I don't want to start a new thread, so I'm placing this question here. I figure that, since Mr. Buck is a bolt fan, he won't mind ... or he'll be so drunk that he won't notice ... or totally distracted by the posts in the other thread discussing the subject of Mr. DaFace's penis.

Anyhow, I need a recipe and method for cooking up a decent batch of sausage gravy. I have cowboy biscuits down pat, but I don't have any gravy. I bought some "Tennessee Pride" sausage gravy I found in the sausage and bacon section at the market, but it basically sucks. The beautiful and witty Mrs. FAX said she would make fried chicken and chicken gravy for me, but she can't get to it for a couple of weeks. Meanwhile, I am hankering for biscuits and gravy.

The way I figure it, sausage gravy can't be all that difficult, but I searched online and soon realized that each recipe is slightly different. I'm disinclined to experiment with a bunch of unknown recipes, plus I don't want to waste the time and wind up throwing away a bunch of crummy gravy.

Any assistance in this regard would be appreciated.

FAX

The biscuits are the hard part. Gravy is easy.


Take an iron skillet (you can use a regular one, but don't tell Fire Me Boy!) and fry up your Tennessee Pride sausage. Break it up as you are frying it into pieces no bigger than a small marble, or one of DaFace's testicles. Once all the pink is gone, the sausage is done. Turn the heat down to medium. Now take some flour (I don't measure but maybe 1/3 to 1/2 cup?) and sprinkle it all over the sausage and stir it up. All the flour and sausage grease will disappear as it will all attach to the sausage. Cook that mixture for just a minute or so to get rid of the flour taste. Now pour in the milk, stirring. Add the amount of milk to match the consistency of the gravy that you want. Keep stirring. It will thicken as it cooks so you may need to add more milk as you go, which is fine as long as your add it slowly and stir it in good. Now salt and pepper. YOU MUST USE FRESHLY GROUND PEPPER!!!!!!!

You know what to do from here.

Dang, now I have to make biscuits and sausage gravy on Saturday.

FAX
04-12-2011, 11:35 PM
The biscuits are the hard part. Gravy is easy.


Take an iron skillet (you can use a regular one, but don't tell Fire Me Boy!) and fry up your Tennessee Pride sausage. Break it up as you are frying it into pieces no bigger than a small marble, or one of DaFace's testicles. Once all the pink is gone, the sausage is done. Turn the heat down to medium. Now take some flour (I don't measure but maybe 1/3 to 1/2 cup?) and sprinkle it all over the sausage and stir it up. All the flour and sausage grease will disappear as it will all attach to the sausage. Cook that mixture for just a minute or so to get rid of the flour taste. Now pour in the milk, stirring. Add the amount of milk to match the consistency of the gravy that you want. Keep stirring. It will thicken as it cooks so you may need to add more milk as you go, which is fine as long as your add it slowly and stir it in good. Now salt and pepper. YOU MUST USE FRESHLY GROUND PEPPER!!!!!!!

You know what to do from here.

Dang, now I have to make biscuits and sausage gravy on Saturday.

Awesome. I can definitely do that. Thanks so much, Mr. cdcox.

I've been making scratch biscuits for years. I became addicted to biscuits and pie as a child and cannot stand "store-bought" or "restaurant" biscuits in any form and most pie sucks, as well. I finally realized that, if I were going to survive, I had to adapt. So, I asked my mother for the recipes and started practicing. Over the years, I have probably ruined well over a box-car-load of flour. Eventually, however, I developed the skill of making scratch, baking powder biscuits (cowboy biscuits) that rise like little, baking powder souls into heaven as well as old-fashioned, shortening pie crust which I now use for pies, cobbler, little fruit tarts, cinnamon twists, and other pastry-related items.

It's been a life-long struggle, but worth it in the long run, I think. The beautiful and witty Mrs. FAX appreciates my efforts on the pie front and I make biscuits for the family breakfast every Christmas morning. Fresh, hot, scratch biscuits straight out of the oven with fresh, creamery butter, and peach preserves for breakfast ... nothing better in the world.

FAX

cdcox
04-12-2011, 11:45 PM
I know what you mean about the love of certain delicious things driving a man to the kitchen.

For me it was my mom's cinnamon roll recipe. They are kind of a sticky bun and they are soooo good. I managed to watch her make those and get the recipe before her Alzheimer's kicked in. It's a great living memory.

Pie crust is another passion of mine. However, I screwed up when my wife made a very good pie one time and I let slip the opinion that my pie crust (shortening based) was better than hers (oil based). Well, that was the last pie my wife ever made. Less pie (even with an oil crust) is a bad thing.

Scratch biscuits I just added to the repertoire in the last year. First batch stunk, second were pretty dang good.

Thig Lyfe
04-12-2011, 11:48 PM
Wonder if any prominent NFL players will end up playing in the UFL this year? Other than Samie Parker, of course.

Deberg_1990
04-13-2011, 06:56 AM
Wonder if any prominent NFL players will end up playing in the UFL this year? Other than Samie Parker, of course.

Dante Culpepper and Jeff Garcia played in the UFL last season.

InChiefsHell
04-13-2011, 08:17 AM
Dante Culpepper and Jeff Garcia played in the UFL last season.

And looked like shit doing it.

Thig Lyfe
04-13-2011, 09:12 AM
Dante Culpepper and Jeff Garcia played in the UFL last season.

I mean current, non-shitty players who would go because the NFL is locked out.

Fire Me Boy!
04-13-2011, 10:11 AM
The biscuits are the hard part. Gravy is easy.


Take an iron skillet (you can use a regular one, but don't tell Fire Me Boy!) and fry up your Tennessee Pride sausage. Break it up as you are frying it into pieces no bigger than a small marble, or one of DaFace's testicles. Once all the pink is gone, the sausage is done. Turn the heat down to medium. Now take some flour (I don't measure but maybe 1/3 to 1/2 cup?) and sprinkle it all over the sausage and stir it up. All the flour and sausage grease will disappear as it will all attach to the sausage. Cook that mixture for just a minute or so to get rid of the flour taste. Now pour in the milk, stirring. Add the amount of milk to match the consistency of the gravy that you want. Keep stirring. It will thicken as it cooks so you may need to add more milk as you go, which is fine as long as your add it slowly and stir it in good. Now salt and pepper. YOU MUST USE FRESHLY GROUND PEPPER!!!!!!!

You know what to do from here.

Dang, now I have to make biscuits and sausage gravy on Saturday.

cdcox, I sense these things, when things are not as they should be (like making sausage gravy in anything other than an iron skillet). I mean really... how many football threads do you see me in, yet here I am.

Mr. FAX, the universe demands an iron skillet.

And lots of freshly ground pepper for sausage gravy.

SNR
04-13-2011, 11:22 AM
Wonder if any prominent NFL players will end up playing in the UFL this year? Other than Samie Parker, of course.This doesn't answer your question, but it caused me to wonder about the former Chiefs in the UFL. I found this list (http://www.ufl-football.com/players) and recovered from it:

Jason Baker
Ricardo Colclough
Devard Darling
George Foster (not a former Chief, but it made me lawl)
Adrian Jones
Maurice Price
Todd Sauerbrun

Not much at all. I remember they used to have such all-stars like Darnell Alford, Alex Sulfsted, Richard Smith, and Jeris McIntyre. Man, I thought some of those guys were dead.

SNR
04-13-2011, 11:23 AM
Ooooh, and Tre Stallings, too.

I'll take "Former hopes and dreams for the future of the Chiefs offensive line by coaches and GMs who in reality didn't really give a shit about it" for $1000, Alex