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petegz28
04-11-2011, 09:29 AM
To encourage healthful eating, Chicago school doesn't allow kids to bring lunches or certain snacks from home — and some parents, and many students, aren't fans of the policy

Fernando Dominguez cut the figure of a young revolutionary leader during a recent lunch period at his elementary school.

"Who thinks the lunch is not good enough?" the seventh-grader shouted to his lunch mates in Spanish and English.

Dozens of hands flew in the air and fellow students shouted along: "We should bring our own lunch! We should bring our own lunch! We should bring our own lunch!"

Fernando waved his hand over the crowd and asked a visiting reporter: "Do you see the situation?"

At his public school, Little Village Academy on Chicago's West Side, students are not allowed to pack lunches from home. Unless they have a medical excuse, they must eat the food served in the cafeteria.

Principal Elsa Carmona said her intention is to protect students from their own unhealthful food choices.

"Nutrition wise, it is better for the children to eat at the school," Carmona said. "It's about the nutrition and the excellent quality food that they are able to serve (in the lunchroom). It's milk versus a Coke. But with allergies and any medical issue, of course, we would make an exception."

Carmona said she created the policy six years ago after watching students bring "bottles of soda and flaming hot chips" on field trips for their lunch. Although she would not name any other schools that employ such practices, she said it was fairly common.

A Chicago Public Schools spokeswoman said she could not say how many schools prohibit packed lunches and that decision is left to the judgment of the principals.

"While there is no formal policy, principals use common sense judgment based on their individual school environments," Monique Bond wrote in an email. "In this case, this principal is encouraging the healthier choices and attempting to make an impact that extends beyond the classroom."

Any school that bans homemade lunches also puts more money in the pockets of the district's food provider, Chartwells-Thompson. The federal government pays the district for each free or reduced-price lunch taken, and the caterer receives a set fee from the district per lunch.

At Little Village, most students must take the meals served in the cafeteria or go hungry or both. During a recent visit to the school, dozens of students took the lunch but threw most of it in the garbage uneaten. Though CPS has improved the nutritional quality of its meals this year, it also has seen a drop-off in meal participation among students, many of whom say the food tastes bad.

"Some of the kids don't like the food they give at our school for lunch or breakfast," said Little Village parent Erica Martinez. "So it would be a good idea if they could bring their lunch so they could at least eat something."

"(My grandson) is really picky about what he eats," said Anna Torrez, who was picking up the boy from school. "I think they should be able to bring their lunch. Other schools let them. But at this school, they don't."

But parent Miguel Medina said he thinks the "no home lunch policy" is a good one. "The school food is very healthy," he said, "and when they bring the food from home, there is no control over the food."

At Claremont Academy Elementary School on the South Side, officials allow packed lunches but confiscate any snacks loaded with sugar or salt. (They often are returned after school.) Principal Rebecca Stinson said that though students may not like it, she has yet to hear a parent complain.

"The kids may have money or earn money and (buy junk food) without their parents' knowledge," Stinson said, adding that most parents expect that the school will look out for their children.

Such discussions over school lunches and healthy eating echo a larger national debate about the role government should play in individual food choices.

"This is such a fundamental infringement on parental responsibility," said J. Justin Wilson, a senior researcher at the Washington-based Center for Consumer Freedom, which is partially funded by the food industry.

"Would the school balk if the parent wanted to prepare a healthier meal?" Wilson said. "This is the perfect illustration of how the government's one-size-fits-all mandate on nutrition fails time and time again. Some parents may want to pack a gluten-free meal for a child, and others may have no problem with a child enjoying soda."

For many CPS parents, the idea of forbidding home-packed lunches would be unthinkable. If their children do not qualify for free or reduced-price meals, such a policy would require them to pay $2.25 a day for food they don't necessarily like.

"We don't spend anywhere close to that on my son's daily intake of a sandwich (lovingly cut into the shape of a Star Wars ship), Goldfish crackers and milk," education policy professor Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach wrote in an email. Her son attends Nettelhorst Elementary School in Lakeview. "Not only would mandatory school lunches worsen the dietary quality of most kids' lunches at Nettelhorst, but it would also cost more out of pocket to most parents! There is no chance the parents would stand for that."

Many Little Village students claim that, given the opportunity, they would make sound choices.

"They're afraid that we'll all bring in greasy food instead of healthy food and it won't be as good as what they give us at school," said student Yesenia Gutierrez. "It's really lame. If we could bring in our own lunches, everyone knows what they'd bring. For example, the vegetarians could bring in their own veggie food."

"I would bring a sandwich or a Subway and maybe a juice," said seventh-grader Ashley Valdez.

Second-grader Gerardo Ramos said, "I would bring a banana, orange and some grapes."

"I would bring a juice and like a sandwich," said fourth-grader Eric Sanchez.

"Sometimes I would bring the healthy stuff," second-grader Julian Ruiz said, "but sometimes I would bring Lunchables."

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/education/ct-met-school-lunch-restrictions-041120110410,0,4567867.story?page=1

petegz28
04-11-2011, 09:31 AM
But parent Miguel Medina said he thinks the "no home lunch policy" is a good one. "The school food is very healthy," he said, "and when they bring the food from home, there is no control over the food."

This sounds like someone who wants to school to raise their child for them.

mikey23545
04-11-2011, 09:33 AM
You will be assimilated.

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 09:34 AM
My first job was at a daycare, I worked with preschoolers. We had "sack lunch day" every Thursday in the Summer time, where children brought in their own lunches.

One kid brought a can of surge, a sleeve of ritz crackers, a can of easy cheese, and a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. His mom was a doctor.

petegz28
04-11-2011, 09:35 AM
My first job was at a daycare, I worked with preschoolers. We had "sack lunch day" every Thursday in the Summer time, where children brought in their own lunches.

One kid brought a can of surge, a sleeve of ritz crackers, a can of easy cheese, and a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. His mom was a doctor.

And?

Mr. Laz
04-11-2011, 09:36 AM
seventh-grader shouted to his lunch mates in Spanish and English.

this is more irritating than the lunch BS

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 09:36 AM
And?

COOL STORY BRAH

No point. We did take the surge and easy cheese away from him.

petegz28
04-11-2011, 09:37 AM
Personally I can see where it is more healthy to shove a bunch of processed, sodium-loaded, canned foods into your kid as opposed to letting them have a soda and chips with their bologne samich.

petegz28
04-11-2011, 09:38 AM
COOL STORY BRAH

No point. We did take the surge and easy cheese away from him.

Why? Is cheese bad? The surge I can maybe understand because of the hyperactivity at such a young age.

Crush
04-11-2011, 09:39 AM
COOL STORY BRAH

No point. We did take the surge and easy cheese away from him.


You bastard. Surge was the greatest thing ever and you took it from him.

DaFace
04-11-2011, 09:39 AM
Sounds a little weird, but if parents can't figure out how to feed their kids in a way that will help them avoid obesity, I can't blame the school for trying to step in.

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 09:39 AM
Why? Is cheese bad? The surge I can maybe understand because of the hyperactivity at such a young age.

No, it was a can of easy cheese (propellant based) and he was 4 years old. Figure it out.

Crush
04-11-2011, 09:40 AM
Parental and personal responsibility is slowly being eroded in this country. JFC.

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 09:40 AM
You bastard. Surge was the greatest thing ever and you took it from him.

Gave it to him after nap time. :thumb:

petegz28
04-11-2011, 09:40 AM
Sounds a little weird, but if parents can't figure out how to feed their kids in a way that will help them avoid obesity, I can't blame the school for trying to step in.

I think this has more to do with it than the health of the child..

Any school that bans homemade lunches also puts more money in the pockets of the district's food provider, Chartwells-Thompson. The federal government pays the district for each free or reduced-price lunch taken, and the caterer receives a set fee from the district per lunch.

petegz28
04-11-2011, 09:41 AM
No, it was a can of easy cheese (propellant based) and he was 4 years old. Figure it out.

You mean you didn't want to change his shitty drawers??? ROFL

eazyb81
04-11-2011, 09:41 AM
I hated the nasty school lunch.

I brought pizza, beef jerky, pepperoni sandwiches, chips, gushers, etc to lunch almost every day.

Somehow I turned out fine and never became fat.

Crush
04-11-2011, 09:42 AM
Sounds a little weird, but if parents can't figure out how to feed their kids in a way that will help them avoid obesity, I can't blame the school for trying to step in.

I disagree. It is not the school's responsibility to act as a third parent.

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 09:42 AM
You mean you didn't want to change his shitty drawers??? ROFL

Haha - no, how would a 4 year old be able to apply the correct amount of cheese to a cracker without making a mess? Their small motor skills aren't developed yet.

eazyb81
04-11-2011, 09:42 AM
Sounds a little weird, but if parents can't figure out how to feed their kids in a way that will help them avoid obesity, I can't blame the school for trying to step in.

Why is it the school's responsibility though?

I'm not aware of how schools will be directly impacted by kids getting fat.

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 09:43 AM
I disagree. It is not the school's responsibility to act as a third parent.

Not to play devils advocate - but I imagine in many cases they are playing the role of #1 parent.

petegz28
04-11-2011, 09:43 AM
Haha - no, how would a 4 year old be able to apply the correct amount of cheese to a cracker without making a mess? Their small motor skills aren't developed yet.

It was a good teaching opportunity you passed up!!! :p And maybe a shot at some free cheese.

DaFace
04-11-2011, 09:43 AM
I think this has more to do with it than the health of the child..

Do you personally believe that the lunches brought by kids from home, on average, are more healthy than the lunches provided by schools? If so, your schools must've been a lot different than mine.

mikey23545
04-11-2011, 09:43 AM
Sounds a little weird, but if parents can't figure out how to feed their kids in a way that will help them avoid obesity, I can't blame the school for trying to step in.

Wow.

JBucc
04-11-2011, 09:43 AM
If they eat the same school food as the rest of the country it is definately not healthy

sedated
04-11-2011, 09:43 AM
Dominguez
Carmona
Martinez
Torrez
Medina
Gutierrez
Valdez
Ramos
Sanchez
Ruiz

I wonder what the predominant ethnicity is for that school.

DaFace
04-11-2011, 09:44 AM
Why is it the school's responsibility though?

I'm not aware of how schools will be directly impacted by kids getting fat.

It's not the school's responsibility to teach kids discipline either, but that's the role they're forced to play.

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 09:44 AM
It was a good teaching opportunity you passed up!!! :p And maybe a shot at some free cheese.

Yeah...we learned the hard way the first time. That cheese isn't the easiest stuff to clean up either.

Crush
04-11-2011, 09:47 AM
Yeah...we learned the hard way the first time. That cheese isn't the easiest stuff to clean up either.

I assume some kid got doused in cheese.

NewChief
04-11-2011, 09:47 AM
One of the kids in my son's kindergarten class brings a family-sized bag of M&Ms for his "snack" every day.

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 09:48 AM
I assume some kid got doused in cheese.

It was everywhere. Hair, ears....I try to block it out.

sedated
04-11-2011, 09:49 AM
Do you personally believe that the lunches brought by kids from home, on average, are more healthy than the lunches provided by schools? If so, your schools must've been a lot different than mine.

its a reflection of the parent. and if the parents are f@ck-ups, the kids probably will be too, no matter how "hard" the school tries.

we shouldn't all be forced to satisfy the needs of the lowest common denominator, especially when its forced regulation by a government that has proven itself to be almost completely incompetent.

and, just like everything, this probably has more to do with money than health.

dirk digler
04-11-2011, 09:50 AM
One of the kids in my son's kindergarten class brings a family-sized bag of M&Ms for his "snack" every day.

Damn...

Looking at the stats childhood obesity has doubled or tripled since I was in school. I remember that we had very few fat kids but they are everywhere now.

petegz28
04-11-2011, 09:51 AM
Do you personally believe that the lunches brought by kids from home, on average, are more healthy than the lunches provided by schools? If so, your schools must've been a lot different than mine.

I think it is cheaper for the parents and in most cases I'd say generally it's 6 one-half dozen the other. My schools lunches were all loaded with sodium because everything can from a can. There was nothing "fresh". So I see no real difference.

NewChief
04-11-2011, 09:51 AM
Damn...

Looking at the stats childhood obesity has doubled or tripled since I was in school. I remember that we had very few fat kids but they are everywhere now.

Yeah, no surprise... but the kid is the heaviest in the class. He's also, from what I've gathered through observing him, from one of the poorer families.

petegz28
04-11-2011, 09:53 AM
And what is a kid to do if they serve something he doesn't like? Go hungry?

NewChief
04-11-2011, 09:53 AM
I think it is cheaper for the parents and in most cases I'd say generally it's 6 one-half dozen the other. My schools lunches were all loaded with sodium because everything can from a can. There was nothing "fresh". So I see no real difference.

School lunches still kind of suck, but there is a pretty big movement afoot to change that. Our district is moving to more and more "fresh" food. The problem is that a lot of the kids won't eat it. The cafeterias have to provide options, so they might have a healthy, fresh option, but the majority of the kids will pick that slice of greasy, nasty pizza.

eazyb81
04-11-2011, 09:53 AM
It's not the school's responsibility to teach kids discipline either, but that's the role they're forced to play.

That doesn't answer my question though.

I just don't see how any school can become judge and jury of what constitutes a healthy and allowable lunch. What too much subjectivity for my taste.

Garcia Bronco
04-11-2011, 09:53 AM
LOL...I'd tell them to fuck off.

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 09:53 AM
And what is a kid to do if they serve something he doesn't like? Go hungry?

Fuck em. Don't raise such a fucking picky eater.

petegz28
04-11-2011, 09:54 AM
School lunches still kind of suck, but there is a pretty big movement afoot to change that. Our district is moving to more and more "fresh" food. The problem is that a lot of the kids won't eat it. The cafeterias have to provide options, so they might have a healthy, fresh option, but the majority of the kids will pick that slice of greasy, nasty pizza.

I can see how that would be better than letting them bring their own slice of greasy pizza. :evil:

petegz28
04-11-2011, 09:54 AM
**** em. Don't raise such a ****ing picky eater.

Yea, I am sure you were so easy to feed.

DaFace
04-11-2011, 09:54 AM
I think it is cheaper for the parents and in most cases I'd say generally it's 6 one-half dozen the other. My schools lunches were all loaded with sodium because everything can from a can. There was nothing "fresh". So I see no real difference.

Well, I guess I can't speak for schools outside of Colorado. Here's the doc put out by the Colorado Dept of Ed about it:

http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdenutritran/download/pdf/WPNutritionGuidelinesforSchoolsAFHK.pdf

Of course, we also have one of the lowest obesity rates in the country, so maybe not all areas have guidelines like that.

NewChief
04-11-2011, 09:55 AM
And what is a kid to do if they serve something he doesn't like? Go hungry?

You'd be surprised at the number of kids who get by on a carton of milk during the day for this very reason (my son does it all the time). He usually eats one of the things on his plate and a carton of milk. I go and eat lunch with him pretty regularly, and the majority of trays I see from kids have one thing completely eaten out of them, and the rest is just left there.

We used to send his lunch with him, but due to his poor fine-motor skills, he'd make a mess and end up dropping half of his food when opening the containers each day. They requested that we just let him eat the school food.

We're looking at putting him on a gluten free diet, though, so he'll be moving back to food we send in the near future.

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 09:56 AM
Yea, I am sure you were so easy to feed.

I was. I do recall at a young age wanting to order a cheeseburger and fries at a chinese restaurant. DENIED, HAD TO ORDER CHINESE.

Of course, not being a picky eater had it's disadvantages, I like pretty much everything...so I ate it all.

sedated
04-11-2011, 09:56 AM
My schools lunches were all loaded with sodium because everything can from a can. There was nothing "fresh". So I see no real difference.

I saw a special about school lunches a while back, where (IIRC) the only thing that was made fresh was the brownie for dessert. And the nutritional value was awful.

But that's pretty much how the food industry is these days. Pump it up with hormones and steriods, suck out the nutrition, then inject it with sodium and chemicals. Thanks, FDA. And capitalism.

DaFace
04-11-2011, 09:57 AM
I guess I'm probably just more sympathetic due to my wife's situation. She works at a school where essentially all students are on free/reduced lunches. Many of their students survive on diets of microwave dinners and frozen pizzas at home, so their school lunch is about the healthiest meal they have access to.

Of course, when the kids are used to a diet of junk food, it's harder to get them to eat things that are actually healthy. Thus, you prevent them from bringing bags of M&M's for lunch so that they don't have a choice in the matter.

tooge
04-11-2011, 09:57 AM
evading the lunch box filter. foiled again.

dirk digler
04-11-2011, 09:58 AM
Yeah, no surprise... but the kid is the heaviest in the class. He's also, from what I've gathered through observing him, from one of the poorer families.

I feel sorry for that kid. I can't believe parents let their kid eat like that.

Sometimes I took my lunch and it was always a bologna sandwich and some chips but my mom never let me eat candy or drink pop.

Chiefs Rool
04-11-2011, 10:00 AM
Oh My God

Rausch
04-11-2011, 10:00 AM
When I was an Aide I was assigned to a few kids and lunch was part of getting them to behave/conform to social eating habits.

Don't throw food, don't act up, don't skimp now and be hungry later, etc.

The only exceptions were the ritalin kids who had doctor's notes stating that they didn't have to eat.

At all.

Doctors' notes telling them they DIDN'T HAVE TO EAT because the fucking STIMULANTS being given to them removed their appetite.

So the directive handed down was that since these kids were on drugs they didn't have to eat lunch.

This is so ****ed up I wanted to scream and yet it's the norm...

BIG_DADDY
04-11-2011, 10:01 AM
When I was an Aide I was assigned to a few kids and lunch was part of getting them to behave/conform to social eating habits.

Don't throw food, don't act up, don't skimp now and be hungry later, etc.

The only exceptions were the ritalin kids who had doctor's notes stating that they didn't have to eat.

At all.

So the directive handed down was that since these kids were on stimulants they didn't have to eat lunch.

This is so ****ed up I wanted to scream and yet it's the norm...

Unbelievable

Garcia Bronco
04-11-2011, 10:01 AM
It's not the schools responsibility to monitor the diet of these kids. If a kid can't properly get their lunch out that they brought from home; then they don't eat that day. It's how they learn.

sedated
04-11-2011, 10:01 AM
Sometimes I took my lunch and it was always a bologna sandwich and some chips but my mom never let me eat candy or drink pop.

My high school had vending machines full of candy in the lunch room, and several Coke vending machines spread around the school. They made quite a pretty penny off the exclusive deal with Coke, and Coke mut've cleaned up seeing the lines of kids waiting to get their sugar fix.

DaFace
04-11-2011, 10:03 AM
My high school had vending machines full of candy in the lunch room, and several Coke vending machines spread around the school. They made quite a pretty penny off the exclusive deal with Coke, and Coke mut've cleaned up seeing the lines of kids waiting to get their sugar fix.

Mine did too, but many (if not most) schools have cut that out these days.

Rausch
04-11-2011, 10:03 AM
It's not the schools responsibility to monitor the diet of these kids.

Yes, it now is...

eazyb81
04-11-2011, 10:03 AM
Personally, I would be more okay with employers monitoring the diets of employees on the company's healthcare plan than I am schools monitoring students diets.

Would you guys be okay with this?

Garcia Bronco
04-11-2011, 10:05 AM
Yes, it now is...

Says whom?

Rausch
04-11-2011, 10:06 AM
Personally, I would be more okay with employers monitoring the diets of employees on the company's healthcare plan than I am schools monitoring students diets.

Would you guys be okay with this?

:spock:

Rausch
04-11-2011, 10:06 AM
Says whom?

The Federal government...

NewChief
04-11-2011, 10:07 AM
My high school had vending machines full of candy in the lunch room, and several Coke vending machines spread around the school. They made quite a pretty penny off the exclusive deal with Coke, and Coke mut've cleaned up seeing the lines of kids waiting to get their sugar fix.

Yeah. Just diet drinks (which I'm more opposed to than non-diet), fruit drinks, and water in our student vending machines. Of course, the teacher machines still have the "good" stuff, so the kids try to sneak in and use the ones in the lounges and work rooms (or have teacher "friends" buy it for them).

Garcia Bronco
04-11-2011, 10:09 AM
The Federal government...

LOL...the Federal Governemnt doesn't have the right to do that...so do you want to try again?

eazyb81
04-11-2011, 10:09 AM
:spock:

:spock: right back at ya.

The financial impact from fat unhealthy people on this country, and specifically for their employer, is much greater than from fat kids in grade school.

KCUnited
04-11-2011, 10:10 AM
Personally, I would be more okay with employers monitoring the diets of employees on the company's healthcare plan than I am schools monitoring students diets.

Would you guys be okay with this?

Lol, my work would go full Watts Riot at the mere suggestion of this. These people have mastered every menu within a 30 mile radius and have calculated the time, distance, wind conditions, and construction maps to find the most efficient way to get their styrofoam container of the worst shit possible just to get through the day.

The lunch conversation starts here at 8:30 a.m. right after the McMuffin wrapper hits the trash can.

dirk digler
04-11-2011, 10:10 AM
My high school had vending machines full of candy in the lunch room, and several Coke vending machines spread around the school. They made quite a pretty penny off the exclusive deal with Coke, and Coke mut've cleaned up seeing the lines of kids waiting to get their sugar fix.

IIRC we didn't have those when I was in HS but I know they put them in later.

Where I work at they changed all the vending machines last year and just put in water, gatorade and fruit drinks. I haven't seen anybody use them at all.

eazyb81
04-11-2011, 10:10 AM
The Federal government...

LOL at you thinking one school = federal government.

Detoxing
04-11-2011, 10:12 AM
See, this is how a black market develops.

Next thing ya know, you have ho-bo's sitting outside your kid's school selling Snickers bars and Dorritos. Then those bags of Dorritos get marked up and pushed through out the school. All the kids get cracked out and are bouncing off the walls from the Snicker bars.

School work pages are marred by cheese. Cavaties will develop at alarming rates. School officials won't know what to do. They'll just throw money at the situation and start suspending kids with chocolate in their back packs. It won't work though.

And when you come home from work to check on li'll Timmy, he'll be passed out on his bed, his chocolate and Coke filled tummy hanging out of his shirt and his little cheeto stained fingers curled up, what will YOU do?

What Will YOU DO then?

ReynardMuldrake
04-11-2011, 10:14 AM
Do you personally believe that the lunches brought by kids from home, on average, are more healthy than the lunches provided by schools? If so, your schools must've been a lot different than mine.

Seriously? They are putting fast food restaurants in schools now. You don't even have to leave the building to get your junk food fix. When I was a kid, those that packed a lunch usually ate things like sandwiches, those that bought their lunch there ate pizza, cookies, french fries, and ice cream.

It's been a long time though, so maybe things are different now.

Brock
04-11-2011, 10:14 AM
:spock: right back at ya.

The financial impact from fat unhealthy people on this country, and specifically for their employer, is much greater than from fat kids in grade school.

So to carry this out to its logical conclusion, you're in favor of mandatory exercise.

eazyb81
04-11-2011, 10:15 AM
So to carry this out to its logical conclusion, you're in favor of mandatory exercise.

No, just killing everyone with a body fat percentage over 25%. :thumb:

Rain Man
04-11-2011, 10:16 AM
The schools should give each kid a small garden plot and a few chickens and salmon, and they can grow whatever they want for lunch. And hope for rain. We need to develop more self-sufficient children in this next generation.

Detoxing
04-11-2011, 10:17 AM
Seriously? They are putting fast food restaurants in schools now. You don't even have to leave the building to get your junk food fix. When I was a kid, those that packed a lunch usually ate things like sandwiches, those that bought their lunch there ate pizza, cookies, french fries, and ice cream.

It's been a long time though, so maybe things are different now.

Heh.

My HS Served Mcd's and Pizza hut on certain days. Good times.

Garcia Bronco
04-11-2011, 10:18 AM
The schools should give each kid a small garden plot and a few chickens and salmon, and they can grow whatever they want for lunch. And hope for rain. We need to develop more self-sufficient children in this next generation.

How about 40 acres and a mule

Garcia Bronco
04-11-2011, 10:19 AM
:spock: right back at ya.

The financial impact from fat unhealthy people on this country, and specifically for their employer, is much greater than from fat kids in grade school.

then we should just fire that fat people. Let them starve...then they'll be ready to hit the workforce again.

Rain Man
04-11-2011, 10:19 AM
How about 40 acres and a mule

Maybe in suburban schools. I'm not sure we could do that in the cities. Maybe go denser with rice paddies.

dirk digler
04-11-2011, 10:19 AM
Seriously? They are putting fast food restaurants in schools now. You don't even have to leave the building to get your junk food fix. .

Is this really true?

Saulbadguy
04-11-2011, 10:22 AM
Is this really true?

Yes, places like McDonalds/Taco Bell/Pizza Hut/KFC has made its way in to schools for years.

dirk digler
04-11-2011, 10:26 AM
Yes, places like McDonalds/Taco Bell/Pizza Hut/KFC has made its way in to schools for years.

I knew it happened in the past I just didn't realize it was still going on. They are just being used in high school hopefully?

Detoxing
04-11-2011, 10:27 AM
Is this really true?

AHEM *Cough Cough*

Heh.

My HS Served Mcd's and Pizza hut on certain days. Good times.

I guess someone is just too cool to read my posts.

chiefsnorth
04-11-2011, 10:29 AM
Pretty soon the libs will abolish food and have us all eating that Robocop paste.

dirk digler
04-11-2011, 10:31 AM
AHEM *Cough Cough*



I guess someone is just too cool to read my posts.

lol my bad. Does your high school still serve fast food?

sedated
04-11-2011, 10:32 AM
Seriously? They are putting fast food restaurants in schools now. You don't even have to leave the building to get your junk food fix. When I was a kid, those that packed a lunch usually ate things like sandwiches, those that bought their lunch there ate pizza, cookies, french fries, and ice cream.

when I was in middle school, they didn't have that stuff, but they did have a la cart choices, so a lot of my friends would just buy a bag of cookies for their lunch. Then when we got to high school, they had Little Caesars and Subway, plus stuff like chicken fingers and fries.

The kids who actually brought their own lunches did so to avoid the unhealthy school options, so they had healthy stuff and were overall healthier people.

People are going to do what they want, there’s no need to regulate everybody in a futile attempt to save a couple.

NewChief
04-11-2011, 10:33 AM
lol my bad. Does your high school still serve fast food?

The irony is that allowing outside vendors to come in and vend at your school was the "progressive" thing to do at one time because it ensured that kids were getting choice and actually eating the food (albeit fast food). Now there's a blowback against that and having locally-sourced ingredients prepared fresh by the cafeteria staff is the progressive trend.

The great majority, meanwhile, have just plodded along doling out the same old horrible cafeteria slop to their kids, regardless of what trends the outliers are following.

NewChief
04-11-2011, 10:34 AM
when I was in middle school, they didn't have that stuff, but they did have a la cart choices, so a lot of my friends would just buy a bag of cookies for their lunch. Then when we got to high school, they had Little Caesars and Subway, plus stuff like chicken fingers and fries.

The kids who actually brought their own lunches did so to avoid the unhealthy school options, so they had healthy stuff and were overall healthier people.

People are going to do what they want, there’s no need to regulate everybody in a futile attempt to save a couple.

My high school (I graduated in 1992) had a salad bar option, and that was actually one of the most popular choices. I didn't eat it every day, but I did eat it quite a bit. I think I ate a slice of pizza (sold by one of the clubs) most days that I didn't eat the salad bar.

Inspector
04-11-2011, 10:40 AM
Pretty soon the libs will abolish food and have us all eating that Robocop paste.

The taco flavored Robocop paste isn't too bad.

Especially if you add some Terminator 3 imitation cheese sauce.

Rain Man
04-11-2011, 10:42 AM
I was in high school back in the early 80s, and they had a cafeteria and a snack bar. The cafeteria food always smelled bad to me for some reason, so I never ate there once. Never even tried it. Plus, admittedly, it was a very uncool thing to eat a cafeteria lunch. I would generally get a milk shake at the snack bar to tide me over, because they didn't have anything else I liked, and then would eat a big dinner at the steak house where I worked.

Once a week or so I'd run out with a friend and get lunch at a fast food place. We had something like a 25-minute lunch, but somehow we'd get out to our car, drive to Taco Bell or Wendy's or something, and make it back. We'd even eat in the restaurant, and I have no idea today how we managed to accomplish all of that.

They also had a soda machine available to all students, but it was inside a chain link enclosure and was only opened at certain times of day. I never bought a soda in all four years of high school because it seemed expensive to buy a can when I could go buy a two-liter bottle that evening for the same price.

Frosty
04-11-2011, 10:48 AM
One high school I went to had the typical lunch lady counter. I never once ate hot lunch there the entire three years I went there. The other had a burger bar and I would occasionally get a burger and fries but I generally brought my own lunch or didn't eat. Neither school had vending machines and you weren't allowed to eat or drink anything in class. I also walked uphill to school in the snow both ways.

My sons eat gluten free so can't eat school lunch. They both choose not to take a lunch and just eat something when they get home. We make sure they have a healthy, filling breakfast to tide them over.

Bowser
04-11-2011, 10:50 AM
This high school just needs to take its kids to Applebees.

mikey23545
04-11-2011, 10:52 AM
:spock: right back at ya.

The financial impact from fat unhealthy people on this country, and specifically for their employer, is much greater than from fat kids in grade school.

Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state....

NewChief
04-11-2011, 10:52 AM
My sons eat gluten free so can't eat school lunch. They both choose not to take a lunch and just eat something when they get home. We make sure they have a healthy, filling breakfast to tide them over.

Do their schools allow this? They must be beyond elementary age? I don't think that they allow that in elementary school. We're looking at moving one of our kids to GF due to sensory/behavioral issues, and we're worried how that's going to go with his school lunch routine (he's in kindergarten right now).

Swanman
04-11-2011, 10:58 AM
I can understand the point that the school may need to step in if a kid is brings a six-pack of Moutain Dew and 12 candy bars for his lunch. But this is also going to affect the kid whose parents pack a decent healthy lunch for him/her. Let's be honest, school lunches are shit and they can't be terribly healthy. As with everything, an arbitrary rule is a bad idea without some level of discretion. Problem is, idiots usually have trouble with things like thinking critically.

Rain Man
04-11-2011, 10:58 AM
One of my enduring memories from school lunches is when I was standing in line behind a kid and we were chatting. He had a handful of dimes and something looked funny about them. I asked to see them, and they were all the solid silver pre-1965 dimes that at the time were worth something like 50 cents or a dollar each. (I can't remember the amount, but it was much more than a dime.) I asked him where he got them, and he said that he didn't have lunch money so he got them from his father's coin collection. I gave up my lunch that day and gave him something like 20 cents each for them by scraping up every penny I could raise, and we were both happy.

chiefsnorth
04-11-2011, 11:04 AM
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state.
Must live so as to best serve state....

If you write over in the alcove, the telescreen can't see you.

Frosty
04-11-2011, 11:10 AM
Do their schools allow this? They must be beyond elementary age? I don't think that they allow that in elementary school. We're looking at moving one of our kids to GF due to sensory/behavioral issues, and we're worried how that's going to go with his school lunch routine (he's in kindergarten right now).

They started four years ago, when my youngest was 10. I think he was in 4th grade then and we didn't have any problem with the school. At that time, he just took a lunch. My wife did talk to the person in charge of the school lunches but there was pretty much nothing he could eat. Otherwise, we have never had a problem, other than one of my son's friends dicking with him and contaminating his lunch (which is part of the reason he doesn't eat at school).

Molitoth
04-11-2011, 11:35 AM
If my school would've outlawed Peanut Butter and Jellies, I would've went Columbine on thier asses.

dirk digler
04-11-2011, 12:11 PM
The irony is that allowing outside vendors to come in and vend at your school was the "progressive" thing to do at one time because it ensured that kids were getting choice and actually eating the food (albeit fast food). Now there's a blowback against that and having locally-sourced ingredients prepared fresh by the cafeteria staff is the progressive trend.

The great majority, meanwhile, have just plodded along doling out the same old horrible cafeteria slop to their kids, regardless of what trends the outliers are following.

Makes sense. My g/f was telling me at her HS they allowed people with cars to go take a lunch break off school property if they wanted to as long as they came back on time.

So I have come to the conclusion I got screwed when I was in hs. Not only did I not have hot women teachers putting out, but no fast food lunches at school and no lunch break off school property. Fuck this bs

eazyb81
04-11-2011, 12:15 PM
Makes sense. My g/f was telling me at her HS they allowed people with cars to go take a lunch break off school property if they wanted to as long as they came back on time.


One of my HS did this also. It was as awesome as it sounds.

ClevelandBronco
04-11-2011, 12:21 PM
All I know is that if we fucked with the beets, they made us eat them.

FAX
04-11-2011, 12:24 PM
One of my greatest fears has come to pass. Complete cultural dominance by the sloppy joe generation.

FAX

dirk digler
04-11-2011, 12:26 PM
One of my HS did this also. It was as awesome as it sounds.

I am sure it was asshole :p

Frosty
04-11-2011, 12:27 PM
Makes sense. My g/f was telling me at her HS they allowed people with cars to go take a lunch break off school property if they wanted to as long as they came back on time.

My son's high school has open campus. However, there aren't any fast food restaurants in town so the kids all go to the gas station and buy energy drinks and candy bars. :doh!:

Rain Man
04-11-2011, 12:29 PM
All I know is that if we ****ed with the beets, they made us eat them.

I remember in first grade that they would often serve spinach in the cafeteria, and no one liked spinach except one kid. So at one point this kid went around to everyone in the class and asked for our spinach, which we gladly gave him. Then he went back to his table with a heaping tray full of spinach, happily sitting down with plans to munch on it like a manatee in the Everglades. However, the principal saw him, and in keeping with the social mores of the 1969-1970 school year, he picked the kid up out of his seat and gave him a spanking right there in the cafeteria. I had no idea that it was against the rules to eat lots of spinach. Maybe the principal thought he was violating some gluttony rule or something. It was a bit of a mystery to all of us.

dirk digler
04-11-2011, 12:31 PM
My son's high school has open campus. However, there aren't any fast food restaurants in town so the kids all go to the gas station and buy energy drinks and candy bars. :doh!:

That is probably just as healthy as McDonald's or Sonic

ClevelandBronco
04-11-2011, 12:31 PM
I remember in first grade that they would often serve spinach in the cafeteria, and no one liked spinach except one kid. So at one point this kid went around to everyone in the class and asked for our spinach, which we gladly gave him. Then he went back to his table with a heaping tray full of spinach, happily sitting down with plans to munch on it like a manatee in the Everglades. However, the principal saw him, and in keeping with the social mores of the 1969-1970 school year, he picked the kid up out of his seat and gave him a spanking right there in the cafeteria. I had no idea that it was against the rules to eat lots of spinach. Maybe the principal thought he was violating some gluttony rule or something. It was a bit of a mystery to all of us.

So much for the idea that it was a simpler time.

sedated
04-11-2011, 12:31 PM
at her HS they allowed people with cars to go take a lunch break off school property if they wanted to as long as they came back on time.

when I was in middle school, the high schoolers got open lunch.
when I got to high school, they restricted it to seniors only.
halfway through my junior year, they announced that the current year was the last that seniors could have open lunch.

I got screwed, but we just snuck out anyway. Ironically, those of us that snuck out for lunch ended up not going back, because we were worried we'd get caught on the way back in.

Demonpenz
04-11-2011, 12:33 PM
off subject but I remember one time being spanked for liking spinich

dirk digler
04-11-2011, 12:33 PM
I remember in first grade that they would often serve spinach in the cafeteria, and no one liked spinach except one kid. So at one point this kid went around to everyone in the class and asked for our spinach, which we gladly gave him. Then he went back to his table with a heaping tray full of spinach, happily sitting down with plans to munch on it like a manatee in the Everglades. However, the principal saw him, and in keeping with the social mores of the 1969-1970 school year, he picked the kid up out of his seat and gave him a spanking right there in the cafeteria. I had no idea that it was against the rules to eat lots of spinach. Maybe the principal thought he was violating some gluttony rule or something. It was a bit of a mystery to all of us.

To this day I refuse to eat cooked spinach because of how the school served it. It looked like someone ate a bunch of grass then puked it up on a plate.

petegz28
04-11-2011, 12:35 PM
To this day I refuse to eat cooked spinach because of school spinach. It looked like someone ate a bunch of grass than puked it up on a plate.

Ditto. I cannot stand cooked spinach. I would almost puke walking into the cafeteria when they served it because it stunk up the whole place. I will eat spinach salad just fine.

petegz28
04-11-2011, 12:35 PM
off subject but I remember one time being spanked for liking spinich

I actually had a teacher take a ruler to me because I refused to eat my spinach.

Pitt Gorilla
04-11-2011, 12:36 PM
I can't believe so many parents allow their kids to get fat. It's disgusting.

ClevelandBronco
04-11-2011, 12:38 PM
off subject but I remember one time being spanked for liking spinich

I like Brussels sprouts. You want a piece of me?

Rain Man
04-11-2011, 12:41 PM
Maybe the fast food in schools now is an attempt to eliminate the spinach-related violence that was much more common than any of us realized.

Frosty
04-11-2011, 12:41 PM
To this day I refuse to eat cooked spinach because of how the school served it. It looked like someone ate a bunch of grass then puked it up on a plate.

I like cooked spinach in certain dishes (my wife adds it to her lasagna, for example) but it is disgusting by itself.

dirk digler
04-11-2011, 12:42 PM
Ditto. I cannot stand cooked spinach. I would almost puke walking into the cafeteria when they served it because it stunk up the whole place. I will eat spinach salad just fine.

Yep. I admit though I love spinach and queso dip

Just Passin' By
04-11-2011, 12:43 PM
I like Brussels sprouts. You want a piece of me?

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/brussels-sprouts-lardons-recipe/index.html

NewChief
04-11-2011, 12:48 PM
My son's high school has open campus. However, there aren't any fast food restaurants in town so the kids all go to the gas station and buy energy drinks and candy bars. :doh!:

We have open campus at the moment as well, and we're in the middle of a fast-food district. We're getting a new high school, soon, and it's going to have a large enough cafeteria to serve everyone. So.... they're going to close campus for lunch. It's going to have a nasty effect on the local economy, I'm afraid.

On the plus side: fewer of my students will be high in the afternoon.

Detoxing
04-11-2011, 12:52 PM
On the plus side: fewer of my students will be high in the afternoon.

hehe

FAX
04-11-2011, 12:59 PM
This one time, the Vatican killed a whole town full of spinach eaters.

FAX

HonestChieffan
04-11-2011, 01:06 PM
To this day I refuse to eat cooked spinach because of how the school served it. It looked like someone ate a bunch of grass then puked it up on a plate.


Our school had black olives. Government provided gallon cans of them. They put bowls out on table and were were required to eat 3. Id take my 3 and usually roll them under another table. Mind you...this was about 1962. We were still doing duck and cover drills for civil defense and watching movies about atom bombs.

3 classroom school with 6 grades and three teachers who would blister your ass for such things. I still rolled em, and still hate em.

Rain Man
04-11-2011, 01:08 PM
This one time, the Vatican killed a whole town full of spinach eaters.

FAX


Pope Brutus XII did that, I think. He couldn't risk all of the Protestants obtaining super strength.

Simplex3
04-11-2011, 01:14 PM
No, just killing everyone with a body fat percentage over 25%. :thumb:

...because just not providing medical care is stupid.

By the way, do you drink? I hope not, because those who are maybe damaging their liver should probably go too.

trndobrd
04-11-2011, 01:24 PM
Our highschool had a closed lunch, no students were permitted to leave. The choices were the regular cafeteria line, the snack bar or just go hang out in the student smoking area.

Rain Man
04-11-2011, 01:26 PM
Our highschool had a closed lunch, no students were permitted to leave. The choices were the regular cafeteria line, the snack bar or just go hang out in the student smoking area.

This must have been before the days of student methadone clinics.

sedated
04-11-2011, 01:33 PM
On the plus side: fewer of my students will be high in the afternoon.

that's why I got high in the morning and at lunch - so the teachers would just think I had naturally red eyes.

KCUnited
04-11-2011, 01:38 PM
Hopefully a benefit of this ban will discourage these kids from participating in "food days" when they make it to the work force. I'm still getting the stank eye for bringing in low fat mayo and low fat cheese slices when my team was assigned condiments on the last food day.

mlyonsd
04-11-2011, 01:40 PM
Wow. Every day at a pre-determined time during lunch an all student food fight should ensue until the rule is recinded.

sedated
04-11-2011, 01:56 PM
Hopefully a benefit of this ban will discourage these kids from participating in "food days" when they make it to the work force. I'm still getting the stank eye for bringing in low fat mayo and low fat cheese slices when my team was assigned condiments on the last food day.

one guy's (unemployed...errrr, "stay at home") wife makes sweets all the time and he brings them into the office. The chicks (all obese) consistently devour all of it well before lunch.

NewChief
04-11-2011, 02:01 PM
one guy's (unemployed...errrr, "stay at home") wife makes sweets all the time and he brings them into the office. The chicks (all obese) consistently devour all of it well before lunch.

Probably while slamming 44oz monster mugs of Diet Coke.

KCUnited
04-11-2011, 02:05 PM
I made the mistake of bringing in some hummus and pita for a food day thinking it may be a "lighter" alternative to chips and dip. You'd thought I'd ask them to work Thanksgiving by the way that went over.

These people can't meet their work goals for shit, but gatdam if they can't coordinate a 12 person lunch delivery from a place 2 counties over in the 45 minutes their allotted for lunch. It's amazing really.

CoMoChief
04-11-2011, 02:05 PM
heh, this is retarded.

trndobrd
04-11-2011, 02:27 PM
I made the mistake of bringing in some hummus and pita for a food day thinking it may be a "lighter" alternative to chips and dip. You'd thought I'd ask them to work Thanksgiving by the way that went over.

These people can't meet their work goals for shit, but gatdam if they can't coordinate a 12 person lunch delivery from a place 2 counties over in the 45 minutes their allotted for lunch. It's amazing really.


Next 'food day' or office party you should bring cheese cake marked for Bob, Sally, and Mary. In a separate container bring celery and carrot sticks for Bertha, Gertrude, and Louie.

Wyndex
04-11-2011, 02:53 PM
18 years ago when I was in kindergarten I would take my own lunch to school, lunch was typical shit:

a pb&j
some cookies
a squeeze it

I was 5 years old god damnit

A teacher saw my squeeze it and took it from me, a whole ordeal began where the school argued with my Mom over whether a squeeze was appropriate to bring. Their argument was that a squeeze it was soda, it was not a fruit drink.

HemiEd
04-11-2011, 03:02 PM
Parental and personal responsibility is slowly being eroded in this country. JFC.

Fortunately we have those people that feel it is their responsibility to step in, and force their will on the dead beats. All they need is our money to support these endeavors.

ClevelandBronco
04-11-2011, 03:18 PM
This one time, the Vatican killed a whole town full of spinach eaters.

FAX

It's important to note that the vast majority of vegetable-related killings today are done for the honor of Islam.

crispystl420
04-11-2011, 05:21 PM
One of the kids in my son's kindergarten class brings a family-sized bag of M&Ms for his "snack" every day.

Holy shit! What constitutes a "family size bag" ? How many ounces?