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rrl308
04-16-2011, 05:11 AM
Published April 15, 2011 FoxNews.com


The Commerce Dept. unveiled a plan Friday to create a national cyber-identity system that would give consumers who opt in a single secure password and identity for all their digital transactions.

The National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC) will be a voluntary system designed to protect consumers from online fraud and identity theft -- which hit 8.1 million people last year, at a total cost of $27 billion. The problem: The current system of half-remembered passwords jotted down on post-it notes and based on pets and maiden names simply isn't good enough.

"Passwords just won't cut it here," said Commerce Secretary Gary Locke, who announced the initiative at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. “We must do more to help consumers protect themselves, and we must make it more convenient than remembering dozens of passwords,” he said.

The "identity ecosystem" will create secure online IDs for Americans who elect to join the program, giving them a single credential -- such as a unique piece of software on a smart phone, a smart card, or a token that generates a one-time digital password -- which they can use to log on to a variety of websites.

Instead of having to remember all those disparate passwords, one for each site that conducts a secure transaction, a consumer would use that single credential to log in, with far more security than a password alone would provide, the agency said.

Rest of Article: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/04/15/obama-administration-unveils-internet-id-plan/#content

Fishpicker
04-16-2011, 05:46 AM
boy I sure would like to have all my online accounts tied to one ID. Its easier for everyone that way. something like 70 percent of all identity theft is taken from government records. Then I only need to make one phone call to a Government agency so I can get my new-new ID. hooray for cottage industry.

Simplex3
04-16-2011, 10:33 AM
Is anyone actually stupid enough to trust the *government* with their online security? The fact that they're some of the biggest criminals aside, they're fantastically incompetent.

BucEyedPea
04-16-2011, 10:34 AM
JHC the left are truly totalitarian.

Jaric
04-16-2011, 10:43 AM
lol

what could go wrong?

Simplex3
04-16-2011, 12:48 PM
JHC the left are truly totalitarian.

You know the Republicans are drooling over this as a way to get rid of porn, too.

BucEyedPea
04-16-2011, 01:22 PM
You know the Republicans are drooling over this as a way to get rid of porn, too.

Wouldn't it have to be porn that's already illegal? Like child porn. I mean what can they do if it's legal? I'm not saying you're wrong I just am not making a connection.

KILLER_CLOWN
04-16-2011, 01:42 PM
This should fix all of America's woes.

chiefsnorth
04-16-2011, 02:23 PM
How long before these IDs are merged with your SSN and compulsory for everyone?

orange
04-16-2011, 02:30 PM
http://www.geekologie.com/2010/02/21/borg-cupcakes.jpg

CoMoChief
04-16-2011, 03:24 PM
This is one of the worst ideas ever.

CoMoChief
04-16-2011, 03:27 PM
JHC the left are truly totalitarian.

They believe that they should tell people how to live their lives because people can't decide on their own....simple as that.

orange
04-16-2011, 03:44 PM
Actually, this is a pretty good idea. I'm not sure why a private company hasn't already jumped on this.

First off, this is not your father's password. We're talking about a physical device - in your pocket, like your keys. And we're talking about MBs, not bytes. And 16-bit encryption, private and public keys. Just like real security.

The automatic "government can't do anything right" narcissism is getting in the way of actual thought in this thread. All of you need to look again - the gov't. does some things amazingly well, specifically technology. Just look at WWII or NASA.

As long as it's voluntary, I would have no qualms about this program.

p.s. Do you really think your worldly goods are any safer at a bank or investment firm that has all your numbers anyway? It's the Maddoffs and Sachs of the world who've been stealing billions, not the IRS.

Some will say the IRS does its looting in plain sight - to the degree that you agree, why would this password device matter? They already have your SS number, address, etc.

prhom
04-16-2011, 03:45 PM
Without trying to sound overly paranoid, it would also be a great first step toward eventually enforcing an internet sales tax.

BucEyedPea
04-16-2011, 03:52 PM
Without trying to sound overly paranoid, it would also be a great first step toward eventually enforcing an internet sales tax.

That's a horrific idea. We're finally freer from govt with internet sales only for them to find a way in loot us again.

banyon
04-16-2011, 04:25 PM
Actually, this is a pretty good idea. I'm not sure why a private company hasn't already jumped on this.

First off, this is not your father's password. We're talking about a physical device - in your pocket, like your keys. And we're talking about MBs, not bytes. And 16-bit encryption, private and public keys. Just like real security.

The automatic "government can't do anything right" narcissism is getting in the way of actual thought in this thread. All of you need to look again - the gov't. does some things amazingly well, specifically technology. Just look at WWII or NASA.

As long as it's voluntary, I would have no qualms about this program.

p.s. Do you really think your worldly goods are any safer at a bank or investment firm that has all your numbers anyway? It's the Maddoffs and Sachs of the world who've been stealing billions, not the IRS.

Some will say the IRS does its looting in plain sight - to the degree that you agree, why would this password device matter? They already have your SS number, address, etc.


Last Pass is an extension that will keep/generate passwords. I use it for stuff I don't care about.

headsnap
04-16-2011, 05:00 PM
The automatic "government can't do anything right" narcissism is getting in the way of actual thought in this thread. All of you need to look again - the gov't. does some things amazingly well, specifically technology. Just look at WWII or NASA.



LOL

that'll help your argument...

orange
04-16-2011, 05:06 PM
LOL

that'll help your argument...

It will to people who have a clue:


NASA Spinoffs with Practical Applications

Under the Space Act of 1958, NASA has had a mandate to share all the information it has gained with the public. Here are a few of the practical applications that have resulted from technologies and information learned by space scientists:

•CAT scans
•MRIs
•Kidney dialysis machines
•Heart defibrillator technology
•Remote robotic surgery
•Artificial heart pump technology
•Physical therapy machines
•Positron emission tomography
•Microwave receivers used in scans for breast cancer
•Cardiac angiography
•Monitoring neutron activity in the brain
•Cleaning techniques for hospital operating rooms
•Portable x-ray technology for neonatal offices and 3rd world countries
•Freeze-dried food
•Water purification filters
•ATM technology
•Pay at the Pump satellite technology
•Athletic shoe manufacturing technique
•Insulation barriers for autos
•Image-processing software for crash-testing automobiles
•Holographic testing of communications antennas
•Low-noise receivers
•Cordless tools
•A computer language used by businesses such as car repair shops, Kodak, hand-held computers, express mail
•Aerial reconnaissance and Earth resources mapping
•Airport baggage scanners
•Distinction between natural space objects and satellites/warheads/rockets for defense
•Satellite monitors for nuclear detonations
•Hazardous gas sensors
•Precision navigation
•Clock synchronization
•Ballistic missile guidance
•Secure communications
•Study of ozone depletion
•Climate change studies
•Monitoring of Earth-based storms such as hurricanes
•Solar collectors
•Fusion reactors
•Space-age fabrics for divers, swimmers, hazardous material workers, and others
•Teflon-coated fiberglass for roofing material
•Lightweight breathing system used by firefighters
•Atomic oxygen facility for removing unwanted material from 19th century paintings
•FDA-adopted food safety program that has reduced salmonella cases by a factor of 2
•Multispectral imaging methods used to read ancient Roman manuscripts buried by Mt. Vesuvius


Read more at Suite101: Practical Applications of Space Technology: Discoveries and Developments by NASA and Their Benefit to Society http://www.suite101.com/content/practical-applications-of-space-technology-a98927#ixzz1JjL3N96N

And of course, there's that whole "space" thing.

CoMoChief
04-16-2011, 05:06 PM
Without trying to sound overly paranoid, it would also be a great first step toward eventually enforcing an internet sales tax.

That's exactly what they're trying to do.

For the past few yrs the govt have been trying to get their hands on the internet economic sector, mainly because it's so huge now as opposed to what it was 10 yrs ago.

prhom
04-16-2011, 05:39 PM
That's a horrific idea. We're finally freer from govt with internet sales only for them to find a way in loot us again.

I don't support this at all, I'm just saying that if that's the goal then this type of system would be perfect to enforce it. IF I wanted to set up the government to be in a perfect situation to collect sales tax from internet purchases this is exactly how I'd do it.

I would think something like this would need to have the full support of credit card companies first. Then you could offer some kind of government guarantee to cover x-amount of losses per consumer but only for charges that went through using the new secure ID system. It wouldn't be long before CC companies would only allow charges over the phone or internet using the secure ID to minimize their exposure to fraud losses. Then you'd have the system right where you wanted it. You could see exactly who was getting paid and send them a bill.

KILLER_CLOWN
04-16-2011, 05:40 PM
NASA stands for Never A Straight Answer, fits right in line with the gubment.

headsnap
04-16-2011, 07:23 PM
It will to people who...

orange misses the point yet again...


http://www.wired.com/science/space/multimedia/2008/07/gallery_nasa_50_mistakes


I am a NASA buff and a true fan but I would not trust them to with my passwords!





was that standard or Metric?

and hey, when Congress threatens to cut funding, we'll put out a press release that we have found evidence of alien life!!!!

go bowe
04-16-2011, 09:24 PM
Without trying to sound overly paranoid, it would also be a great first step toward eventually enforcing an internet sales tax.

now if they would apply that same reasoning to pot, we might have a shot at legalization in my lifetime (they better be getting to it)...

Mr. Kotter
04-16-2011, 09:30 PM
now if they would apply that same reasoning to pot, we might have a shot at legalization in my lifetime (they better be getting to it)...

:spock:

LMAO


Well, I actually agree; except we ought to get to the collecting taxes, and the ensuing enhancement of federal revenues soon....heh. Just sayin'.

LMAO

go bowe
04-16-2011, 09:33 PM
http://www.wired.com/science/space/multimedia/2008/07/gallery_nasa_50_mistakes


I am a NASA buff and a true fan but I would not trust them to with my passwords!





was that standard or Metric?

and hey, when Congress threatens to cut funding, we'll put out a press release that we have found evidence of alien life!!!!really a bad idea that will inevitably occur anyway...

imagine how much fun it will be when someone figures out how to hack these things and gets to clean out all of your accounts instead of just one...

go bowe
04-16-2011, 09:35 PM
:spock:

LMAO


Well, I actually agree; except we ought to get to the collecting taxes, and the ensuing enhancement of federal revenues soon....heh. Just sayin'.

LMAO

sooner the better for me...

i'm hoping the price will come down... :bong: :bong: :bong:

Mr. Kotter
04-16-2011, 10:08 PM
sooner the better for me...

i'm hoping the price will come down... :bong: :bong: :bong:

Once the thugs and wanna-be's and lame fuggers are "out" of it....I'm guessin' the price plummets, despite draconian taxation.

Just thinkin' out-loud. Heh. :hmmm:

Fishpicker
04-16-2011, 11:56 PM
the price has already plummeted.

http://www.viceland.com/blogs/en/2011/04/08/weed-dealings-golden-nugs/

an excerpt:

A few years ago you could move to California, grow mediocre cannabis, and sell it for around $4,500 per pound. Not today. There are so many people growing cannabis that a lot of it’s currently sitting around—most likely being stored improperly—while people hope for prices to come back up. But they won’t just pop back up: they can only be carried back up, and that’s an involved process. Right now people are moving out here, and they’re failing. People are opening businesses and closing them months later. I know growers who had to part with flowers for ridiculously low prices—half of what they were getting two years ago.

Read the rest at Vice Magazine: WEED DEALINGS - GOLDEN NUGS - Viceland Today

Hydrae
04-17-2011, 01:31 PM
I don't support this at all, I'm just saying that if that's the goal then this type of system would be perfect to enforce it. IF I wanted to set up the government to be in a perfect situation to collect sales tax from internet purchases this is exactly how I'd do it.

I would think something like this would need to have the full support of credit card companies first. Then you could offer some kind of government guarantee to cover x-amount of losses per consumer but only for charges that went through using the new secure ID system. It wouldn't be long before CC companies would only allow charges over the phone or internet using the secure ID to minimize their exposure to fraud losses. Then you'd have the system right where you wanted it. You could see exactly who was getting paid and send them a bill.

Ok, I worked for a company that was working directly with two major credit card companies to develop and on-line "wallet" that held your credentials securely, much as how this is being described. First thing, the company went bankruptn several years ago even with $300M in investments. I believe a lot of that was due to the company business model more than anything though.

The biggest problem that they were never able to get around was how to have to fill in all the fields properly. If you know anything about coding you will know that each field that is to be filled in has a "name." Not every site os going to ues the same name for similar fields. As such, how does the wallet software know which fields to complete with which information? Unless the sites are streamlined so that the checkout process is the same across the board, this is a difficult if not impossible piece of technology they are suggesting.

BucEyedPea
04-17-2011, 06:19 PM
It will to people who have a clue:


NASA Spinoffs with Practical Applications

Under the Space Act of 1958, NASA has had a mandate to share all the information it has gained with the public. Here are a few of the practical applications that have resulted from technologies and information learned by space scientists:

•CAT scans
Nope – It was a British engineer
http://www.imaginis.com/ct-scan/brief-history-of-ct
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/When_was_the_cat_scan_invented#ixzz1JpGvU2w3

•MRIs
Nope
http://www.ehow.com/about_4599974_who-invented-mri.html


•Kidney dialysis machines
Nope
http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blkidney.htm

•Heart defibrillator technology
Nope- It was two Italian physiologists
http://www.streetdirectory.com/travel_guide/28135/medical_conditions/heart_defibrillators_help_save_lives.html


•Remote robotic surgery
Nope
http://www.ispub.com/ostia/index.php?xmlFilePath=journals/ijh/vol5n1/davinci.xml


•Artificial heart pump technology
•Physical therapy machines
•Positron emission tomography
•Microwave receivers used in scans for breast cancer
•Cardiac angiography
•Monitoring neutron activity in the brain
•Cleaning techniques for hospital operating rooms
•Portable x-ray technology for neonatal offices and 3rd world countries
•Freeze-dried food
•Water purification filters
•ATM technology
•Pay at the Pump satellite technology
•Athletic shoe manufacturing technique
•Insulation barriers for autos
•Image-processing software for crash-testing automobiles
•Holographic testing of communications antennas
•Low-noise receivers

•Cordless tools
Nope
The first cordless tool was actually invented by Robert Ridley, Jr while working at Black & Decker. Martin Marietta contracted with Black and Decker in the mid-to late 1960's to develop a range of cordless tools for the space program.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Who_invented_first_cordless_tool

•A computer language used by businesses such as car repair shops, Kodak, hand-held computers, express mail
•Aerial reconnaissance and Earth resources mapping
•Airport baggage scanners
•Distinction between natural space objects and satellites/warheads/rockets for defense
•Satellite monitors for nuclear detonations
•Hazardous gas sensors
•Precision navigation
•Clock synchronization
•Ballistic missile guidance
•Secure communications
•Study of ozone depletion
•Climate change studies
•Monitoring of Earth-based storms such as hurricanes

•Solar collectors
Nope
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Who_invented_the_first_solar_collector_and_when

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Who_invented_the_first_solar_collector_and_when#ixzz1JpEy8dLq

http://www.benefits-of-recycling.com/whoinventedsolarenergy.html
http://www.solarenergy-solarpower.com/solar-energy.html

•Fusion reactors
•Space-age fabrics for divers, swimmers, hazardous material workers, and others

•Teflon-coated fiberglass for roofing material
Fiberglass developed by Austrian scientists Dr Pollak and Dr Neumann first using it in 1930, NASA was formed on July 29, 1958
Teflon was invented for DuPont in 1938 by Dr. Roy Plunket.
The Agency applied it to heat shields, space suits, and cargo hold liners
http://inventors.about.com/library/inventors/blteflon.htm

•Lightweight breathing system used by firefighters
•Atomic oxygen facility for removing unwanted material from 19th century paintings
•FDA-adopted food safety program that has reduced salmonella cases by a factor of 2
•Multispectral imaging methods used to read ancient Roman manuscripts buried by Mt. Vesuvius


Read more at Suite101: Practical Applications of Space Technology: Discoveries and Developments by NASA and Their Benefit to Society http://www.suite101.com/content/practical-applications-of-space-technology-a98927#ixzz1JjL3N96N

And of course, there's that whole "space" thing.

You forgot the GOLFBALLS!

Anyhow, nothin' there the private sector couldn't do. In fact it did and NASA either used it or made improvements based on their needs if someone really needs a clue. (<--- just usin' your words) Many of those listed are not spinoffs from NASA technology either. It's more like the other way around where NASA uses original breakthroughs of others work and creates something second hand. Great PR site for the spendthrift boondogglers where such things cost 5X more than a private source would have to produce. I don't see how being overcharged for things the private sector can do for less because they're more efficient out of necessity as being a benefit to society. It benefits bureaucrats and their mindsets more. Ya' know they like to stay employed but it's off the taxpayers though.

I just did a few and put them in your quote but I bet money I could find more but it would be time consuming. Meanwhile, I've added the quotes below from

Office of the Chief Techologist-NASA Spinoff ( http://www.sti.nasa.gov/tto/spinfaq.htm)
[ I realized your words were not "invent" but that NASA mades some sort of original breakthrough that lead to spinoffs by others. But I don't see that either. It seems to be more the other way around.]

No, NASA did not invent MRI technology, but it has contributed to its advances over the years, and elements of NASA technology have been incorporated into MRI techniques..

[The Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed the technology known as digital image processing to allow computer enhancement of Moon pictures. ]

Did NASA invent barcodes, quartz clocks, or smoke detectors?
Barcodes were not invented by NASA. NASA developed a special type of barcode for inventory of space shuttle and other space system components that could endure harsh environments, but this should not be mistakened for the original barcode.…. Similarly, NASA was not the first to use quartz as a piezoelectric material for timekeeping. The first quartz clock dates back to 1927. However in the late 1960s, NASA partnered with a company to make a highly accurate quartz clock. ...Further, NASA did not invent the smoke detector.

Are Tang, Teflon, and Velcro NASA spinoffs?
Tang, Teflon, and Velcro, are not spinoffs of the Space Program. General Foods developed Tang in 1957, and it has been on supermarket shelves since 1959….NASA also raised the celebrity status of Teflon, a material invented for DuPont in 1938, when the Agency applied it to heat shields, space suits, and cargo hold liners. Velcro was used during the Apollo missions to anchor equipment for astronauts’ convenience in zero gravity situations. Although it is a Swiss invention from the 1940s, it has since been associated with the Space Program.

BucEyedPea
04-17-2011, 06:21 PM
NASA stands for Never A Straight Answer, fits right in line with the gubment.

And always doing things less efficiently, overbudget and for less quality than someone who has to please a private customer.

durtyrute
04-18-2011, 07:34 AM
This is a horrible idea, but if they want it to happen, they will convience everyone that we "need" it and people will be lining up to get it.

BucEyedPea
04-18-2011, 07:44 AM
The lines should use paddocks to organize the sheep.

Chief Faithful
04-18-2011, 09:18 AM
Commerce Department must have too much money on hand, looks like a place Congress needs to cut the budget.

ClevelandBronco
04-18-2011, 09:20 AM
How long before these IDs are merged with your SSN and compulsory for everyone?

I'll consult the Revelation of St. John and a slide rule and get back to you with my best guess.

chiefsnorth
04-18-2011, 09:25 AM
Without trying to sound overly paranoid, it would also be a great first step toward eventually enforcing an internet sales tax.

What is the deal every time the government wants to expand and take over a new area of life? More money and/or more control.

They want to set up a system whereby they can impose taxes on online purchases. This is the easiest way to do it. It will also be handy in tracking people who the government feels need to be tracked.

You can't elect leftists and expect the government will do anything but look out for it's own interests. It's interests are in expansion of revenue and expansion of power. This would be very helpful.

planetdoc
05-06-2014, 08:29 AM
US to start testing universal internet IDs (http://www.engadget.com/2014/05/06/nstic-government-internet-id/)
(highlights)
In 2011, the government started concocting a plan to issue Americans one online ID they can use across multiple agencies' websites -- sort of like an OpenID for the government. Now, that plan's wheels are turning, and pilot testing's slated to begin this May in Pennsylvania and Michigan.

The initiative, called National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace (NSTIC), was originally devised as a means to prevent fraud and make it easier to verify identities quickly. This initial rollout only involves websites for those applying for government assistance, as it's merely meant to test whether the idea's feasible. But the government hopes this universal ID can replace people's logins for various places on the internet in the future. Obviously, not everyone will be thrilled by this development; after all, we're now very much aware of the NSA's love for snooping. Plus, it's risky using just a single log-in for various services like banking and social security. If you're one of those people, then cross your fingers and hope that NSTIC's completely voluntary, like what the government promised during the project's inception.

HonestChieffan
05-06-2014, 08:37 AM
Why doesn't the government issue every person a password and a voucher to get it Tatted or better yet RFID...

cosmo20002
05-06-2014, 09:10 AM
.

Cochise
05-06-2014, 09:18 AM
more thread necromancy

HonestChieffan
05-06-2014, 09:18 AM
Good news is the Federal Government has lots of excellent contacts in the internet world from using so many to get ObamaCare implemented so smoothly