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WV
04-26-2011, 06:00 PM
Ok I have a nice set of JA Henckels 4 stars that have been great knives for over 10 years. I've sharpened them myself with a combination of a Henckels handheld Sharpener http://images.buzzillions.com/images_products/03/31/j-a-henckels-international-handheld-knife-sharpener_3692205_175.jpg

and something very similar to these.
http://images.cabelas.com/is/image/cabelas/s7_514318_999_01?

My question is...do you sharpen your own cutlery or do you have it professionally sharpened? I'm intersted in taking them somewhere to have them professionally sharpened and wondered if it was worth it?

kstater
04-26-2011, 06:03 PM
I use my nuts. What with them being made of steel and all.

WV
04-26-2011, 06:03 PM
I use my nuts. What with them being made of steel and all.

With Anti Freeze honing oil correct??

kstater
04-26-2011, 06:04 PM
With Anti Freeze honing oil correct??


I generally stick with what the balls produce themselves naturally.

WV
04-26-2011, 06:06 PM
I generally stick with what the balls produce themselves naturally.

What are you some tree hugging organic hippy!

Just Passin' By
04-26-2011, 06:54 PM
I can't speak for where you live, but I've got a local place that will professionally sharpen knives for $3. I hone and sharpen at home, and then get them professionally done as needed.

It's been great for me.

WV
04-26-2011, 07:04 PM
I can't speak for where you live, but I've got a local place that will professionally sharpen knives for $3. I hone and sharpen at home, and then get them professionally done as needed.

It's been great for me.

We had a sporting goods place that would sharpen for $1 I think, but they did more damage to your knife than anything else. I don't know of any place locally to get them professionally done...was hoping someone had perhaps dealt with mail order sharpening. Thanks though!

Hog Farmer
04-26-2011, 07:05 PM
If you can't sharpen a knife your a friggin loser.

Al Bundy
04-26-2011, 07:07 PM
I use Wusthoff and I sharpen them myself.

Donger
04-26-2011, 07:13 PM
Phobia in 3,2,1...

mlyonsd
04-26-2011, 07:13 PM
That first picture in reality a steel, not a sharpener. Its main purpose is to straighten the edge. The second picture is a true sharpening kit.

It's all about getting the proper edge on the right knife.

For example you wouldn't want a filet edge put onto a larger knife you use to cut up chickens because too fine an edge wouldn't be corrected by a steel.

Sharpening is all about using the proper angle with the various stones. Consider the stones as just different grades of sandpaper. Does your sharpening kit have a mechanism to lock in the blade and a way of selecting different angles depending on the type of edge you want?

I have a Cabelas sharpening kit that looks close to yours. I pick what kind of edge I want and start with the coarse stone and work down to fine. All the way from kitchen scissors down to a paring knife.

I haven't sharpened any of my knives in about 5 years because they have the proper edge and I steel them almost every time I use them.

yhf
04-26-2011, 07:16 PM
I have been using a Spyderco Sharpmaker for a few years now, it keeps the kitchen knives razor sharp but it can be a bit tedious with heavy use pocket knives that may become rather dull before I get around to touching up the edge. I understand that Spyderco makes some more aggressive diamond coated sharpening rods that would speed up the process but I haven't tried em. As for professional sharpening I haven't tried it but I know a few folks that have had mixed results, in some cases the knives wouldn't be all that well sharpened and in others the edge might be scary sharp but the knuckleheads boogered up the side of the blade. Guess you would just have to find the right guy.

Ericgoodchief
04-26-2011, 07:31 PM
$10 bucks probably.


paperwheels will outdo that stone set.

WV
04-26-2011, 07:55 PM
That first picture in reality a steel, not a sharpener. Its main purpose is to straighten the edge. The second picture is a true sharpening kit.

It's all about getting the proper edge on the right knife.

For example you wouldn't want a filet edge put onto a larger knife you use to cut up chickens because too fine an edge wouldn't be corrected by a steel.

Sharpening is all about using the proper angle with the various stones. Consider the stones as just different grades of sandpaper. Does your sharpening kit have a mechanism to lock in the blade and a way of selecting different angles depending on the type of edge you want?

I have a Cabelas sharpening kit that looks close to yours. I pick what kind of edge I want and start with the coarse stone and work down to fine. All the way from kitchen scissors down to a paring knife.

I haven't sharpened any of my knives in about 5 years because they have the proper edge and I steel them almost every time I use them.

I think they classify the first one as a sharpener because it does have ceramic wheels along with the steel ones inside. I use it for touch ups mainly.

My other sharpener does have the locking mechanism and it also has the pre drilled holes for the desired angles. My knives stay pretty sharp with little maintenance, so perhaps I am doing what I need to already. I haven't broken out the actual sharpener for a couple of years. I was just looking for other opinions that may be different or may tell me more than I already know.

Thanks.

WV
04-26-2011, 07:56 PM
If you can't sharpen a knife your a friggin loser.

I don't get as much practice as you keeping those hog nuts nice and cleanly shaven! :p

mlyonsd
04-26-2011, 08:27 PM
I think they classify the first one as a sharpener because it does have ceramic wheels along with the steel ones inside. I use it for touch ups mainly.

My other sharpener does have the locking mechanism and it also has the pre drilled holes for the desired angles. My knives stay pretty sharp with little maintenance, so perhaps I am doing what I need to already. I haven't broken out the actual sharpener for a couple of years. I was just looking for other opinions that may be different or may tell me more than I already know.

Thanks.

I use an old fashioned steel probably because I used to be an meat cutter in an earlier life.

Sounds like you know what you're doing. Taking your knives to a 'professional' would just be a waste of time IMO.

GloryDayz
04-26-2011, 08:27 PM
I use a triangle tri-stone. Been in the family for 40+ years and still puts an edge on knives that can shave anything you need. Including all the pornstars in a Tiger Woods night out...

Fish
04-26-2011, 08:33 PM
If you take it to a professional place, you'll expect to pay $5-10 per blade for a decent sharpening. But the problem is that most places are really bad at it and will do more harm for the blade than good. Especially the cheapo places.

If you want it done right, you'll use some good quality stones and do it by hand. The triangle systems aren't nearly as effective. Especially if you have anything other than a standard drop point blade you're trying to sharpen. The stones are where it's at. The difference is quite noticeable.

GloryDayz
04-26-2011, 08:38 PM
If you take it to a professional place, you'll expect to pay $5-10 per blade for a decent sharpening. But the problem is that most places are really bad at it and will do more harm for the blade than good. Especially the cheapo places.

If you want it done right, you'll use some good quality stones and do it by hand. The triangle systems aren't nearly as effective. Especially if you have anything other than a standard drop point blade you're trying to sharpen. The stones are where it's at. The difference is quite noticeable.

My tri-stome is "by hand". What difference are you speaking of? I've used steels and stones, and get the best edge from a stone, but I'm interested in the actual difference you're referring to. Not a science to me, but I cut a LOT of brisket, so I like a sharp knife if my electric slicer isn't an option..

Fish
04-26-2011, 08:38 PM
This is the outfit I get all my sharpening stones and supplies from. Great company if you're looking for some quality stones.

http://www.hallsproedge.com/index.html

Fish
04-26-2011, 08:44 PM
My tri-stome is "by hand". What difference are you speaking of? I've used steels and stones, and get the best edge from a stone, but I'm interested in the actual difference you're referring to. Not a science to me, but I cut a LOT of brisket, so I like a sharp knife if my electric slicer isn't an option..

This is the "triangle system" from the OP that I'm talking about:

http://images.cabelas.com/is/image/cabelas/s7_514318_999_01?


Which isn't nearly as effective as normal bench stones.

GloryDayz
04-26-2011, 08:46 PM
This is the outfit I get all my sharpening stones and supplies from. Great company if you're looking for some quality stones.

http://www.hallsproedge.com/index.html

The bench stones? Heck, I'll give them a try. There's nothing better than a sharp knife when there's 30+ lbs of meat to cut... I'll never give up the tri-stone (I've used it forever, as have the scouts in my troop), but WTH, it's worth a few bucks to try something new...

Just Passin' By
04-26-2011, 08:49 PM
If you take it to a professional place, you'll expect to pay $5-10 per blade for a decent sharpening. But the problem is that most places are really bad at it and will do more harm for the blade than good. Especially the cheapo places.

I don't know what places you've gone to, but I take mine to the same place the professional chefs take theirs (the place was actually specifically recommended to me by several professional chefs in the area), and the place does a great job. It may just be a matter of finding a good place within reasonable range.

Bump
04-26-2011, 08:51 PM
I've never had cutlery nice enough to worry about sharpening.

booger
04-26-2011, 08:56 PM
:thumb: Good thread man


<iframe title="YouTube video player" width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/F3MlkabgqYM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Work Sharp WSKTS Knife and Tool Sharpener

http://www.amazon.com/Work-Sharp-WSKTS-Knife-Sharpener/dp/B003IT5F14/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1303872535&sr=8-1

thinking about getting one of these for knives and you can adjust the head, take off the guide, and use it as a regular belt sander to sharpen mower blades and garden/yard tools.

75 bucks more or less most places i've looked on the net. Wonder if any CPer has one or sharpens by some sort of belt sander.

Or is this a waste of $$ compared to stones?

Fish
04-26-2011, 08:59 PM
The bench stones? Heck, I'll give them a try. There's nothing better than a sharp knife when there's 30+ lbs of meat to cut... I'll never give up the tri-stone (I've used it forever, as have the scouts in my troop), but WTH, it's worth a few bucks to try something new...

I've been sharpening for a long time now. Mostly due to my love for knives. And it blossomed into a side hobby which I make some money on. I've tried just about every sharpener. Nothing comes close to the edge I can put on with a set of stones. I've got quite a few now. Depending on the the shape the knife is in when I get it, I could use up to 4 different grades of stone on it. The ultra fine surgical black stone can sharpen it down to an nice shiny polish. And the more smooth and polished you can get the bevel, the longer the edge will last.

It's worth the money. As long as you don't damage the stones, they'll outlast you.

WV
04-26-2011, 09:09 PM
I've never had cutlery nice enough to worry about sharpening.

You don't know what your missing if you aren't using quality steel.

:thumb: Good thread man


<iframe title="YouTube video player" width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/F3MlkabgqYM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Work Sharp WSKTS Knife and Tool Sharpener

http://www.amazon.com/Work-Sharp-WSKTS-Knife-Sharpener/dp/B003IT5F14/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1303872535&sr=8-1

thinking about getting one of these for knives and you can adjust the head, take off the guide, and use it as a regular belt sander to sharpen mower blades and garden/yard tools.

75 bucks more or less most places i've looked on the net. Wonder if any CPer has one or sharpens by some sort of belt sander.

Thanks....this thing looks pretty cool for many reasons. I'd have to get pretty good with it before I put my good knives through it though.

If you take it to a professional place, you'll expect to pay $5-10 per blade for a decent sharpening. But the problem is that most places are really bad at it and will do more harm for the blade than good. Especially the cheapo places.

If you want it done right, you'll use some good quality stones and do it by hand. The triangle systems aren't nearly as effective. Especially if you have anything other than a standard drop point blade you're trying to sharpen. The stones are where it's at. The difference is quite noticeable.

My Dad has a stone that he's used for years, but I could never seem to get the motion down. There's a knack to sharpening with a stone free hand and that's why I've always used the triangle system (didn't know it was called that). My dad has since gotten lazy and switched to a electric sharpener.

GloryDayz
04-26-2011, 09:20 PM
I've been sharpening for a long time now. Mostly due to my love for knives. And it blossomed into a side hobby which I make some money on. I've tried just about every sharpener. Nothing comes close to the edge I can put on with a set of stones. I've got quite a few now. Depending on the the shape the knife is in when I get it, I could use up to 4 different grades of stone on it. The ultra fine surgical black stone can sharpen it down to an nice shiny polish. And the more smooth and polished you can get the bevel, the longer the edge will last.

It's worth the money. As long as you don't damage the stones, they'll outlast you.

I saw a lot of differnt sizes on the site. Any particular sweet-on their stones. Mine are 10" and I think they're awesome, but I think anything shorter would be hard to use for long blades like I use. Thoughts?

Fish
04-26-2011, 09:55 PM
I saw a lot of differnt sizes on the site. Any particular sweet-on their stones. Mine are 10" and I think they're awesome, but I think anything shorter would be hard to use for long blades like I use. Thoughts?

Depends on the type of knife. I mostly sharpen kitchen knives. And just about any kind of kitchen knife would be more than comfortable on a 10" stone.

You can use a shorter stone on a long knife, it's just a pain in the ass to do so.

Phobia
04-26-2011, 10:19 PM
I have a couple of the same things mentioned here but I'm on the cusp of giving a pro the opportunity to breathe new life into my blades. Frankly, I've only in the past 3 or 4 years gotten into quality blades and I'm embarrassed to admit that when something gets dull beyond my sharpening capabilities I just acquire something new. But I've assembled a sufficient collection where I'll be willing to give a guy a few bucks to do it really well.

HonestChieffan
04-27-2011, 06:46 AM
Ambrosi Brothers in KC is fantastic at renewing the edge on any knife.

Fire Me Boy!
04-27-2011, 07:18 AM
Ambrosi Brothers in KC is fantastic at renewing the edge on any knife.

Those guys (or at least the one I spoke to the one time I went in there) had no idea about Asian knives and claimed all kitchen knives has 20-degree angle, and that's how they'd sharpen them.

I argued for a minute, while he kept saying over and over that Asian knives and Asian-style knives never had 15 degree angles and that he'd never heard of a knife having a different angle.

I promptly took my knives and left and never returned.

Most of my kitchen knives are handmade Japanese blades, and that guy wasn't getting near my knives ever again.

I finally broke down and bought an electric sharpening system that Cook's Illustrated highly recommended for Asian blades (and Western style, too).

HonestChieffan
04-27-2011, 07:21 AM
Those guys (or at least the one I spoke to the one time I went in there) had no idea about Asian knives and claimed all kitchen knives has 20-degree angle, and that's how they'd sharpen them.

I argued for a minute, while he kept saying over and over that Asian knives and Asian-style knives never had 15 degree angles and that he'd never heard of a knife having a different angle.

I promptly took my knives and left and never returned.

Most of my kitchen knives are handmade Japanese blades, and that guy wasn't getting near my knives ever again.

I finally broke down and bought an electric sharpening system that Cook's Illustrated highly recommended for Asian blades (and Western style, too).

What one? Do you like it?

MOhillbilly
04-27-2011, 07:27 AM
stones and paper wheels.

Fire Me Boy!
04-27-2011, 07:40 AM
What one? Do you like it?

The Chef's Choice 1520 Angle Select (http://www.amazon.com/ChefsChoice-AngleSelect-Diamond-Electric-Sharpener/dp/B001CA5LZ6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1303911518&sr=8-1).

It works very well. I had some blades that were very dull, and in a matter of 2 or 3 minutes I had them easily shaving my arm. One blade took probably a dozen swipes down the sharpening stones to form a consistent burr, and then 4 or 5 swipes down the polishing stone, and that was the toughest.

tooge
04-27-2011, 07:44 AM
I sharpen my hunting and kitchen knives a few times a year with a red whet stone, but use the metal blade honer almost every time I cook. I only use the honer on the fillet knife though and it stays razor sharp.

Phobia
04-27-2011, 08:29 AM
The Chef's Choice 1520 Angle Select (http://www.amazon.com/ChefsChoice-AngleSelect-Diamond-Electric-Sharpener/dp/B001CA5LZ6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1303911518&sr=8-1).

It works very well. I had some blades that were very dull, and in a matter of 2 or 3 minutes I had them easily shaving my arm. One blade took probably a dozen swipes down the sharpening stones to form a consistent burr, and then 4 or 5 swipes down the polishing stone, and that was the toughest.

Nice. It looks like it's on sale too. They marked it from $169.99 down to $169.95.

Fire Me Boy!
04-27-2011, 08:37 AM
Nice. It looks like it's on sale too. They marked it from $169.99 down to $169.95.

I think I paid full price. :banghead:

Fire Me Boy!
04-27-2011, 08:39 AM
Nice. It looks like it's on sale too. They marked it from $169.99 down to $169.95.

I used to be like you. I'd generally just buy new knives when they got dull. I garbaged the bad knives, but I always kept the knives that were good. So now, I have a bunch of sharper-than-new good knives. :)

kindra68
04-27-2011, 08:44 AM
just bought a "JCK Original KAGAYAKI CarboNext Series KC-5 Gyuto 210mm"
and i haven't had to yet.
i need to get a stone or two

Fish
04-27-2011, 08:58 AM
I have a couple of the same things mentioned here but I'm on the cusp of giving a pro the opportunity to breathe new life into my blades. Frankly, I've only in the past 3 or 4 years gotten into quality blades and I'm embarrassed to admit that when something gets dull beyond my sharpening capabilities I just acquire something new. But I've assembled a sufficient collection where I'll be willing to give a guy a few bucks to do it really well.

I don't consider myself a "Pro" by any means. But I'd be happy to sharpen some knives for you if you're interested. Give me a call or a PM. I'd give you a deal for some word of mouth advertising...

Fire Me Boy!
04-27-2011, 09:19 AM
just bought a "JCK Original KAGAYAKI CarboNext Series KC-5 Gyuto 210mm"
and i haven't had to yet.
i need to get a stone or two

Did you get that from www.japanesechefsknife.com? Those guys rule.

This guy is better: www.watanabeblade.com/english/

:D

Fish
04-27-2011, 09:22 AM
Those guys (or at least the one I spoke to the one time I went in there) had no idea about Asian knives and claimed all kitchen knives has 20-degree angle, and that's how they'd sharpen them.

I argued for a minute, while he kept saying over and over that Asian knives and Asian-style knives never had 15 degree angles and that he'd never heard of a knife having a different angle.

I promptly took my knives and left and never returned.

Most of my kitchen knives are handmade Japanese blades, and that guy wasn't getting near my knives ever again.

I finally broke down and bought an electric sharpening system that Cook's Illustrated highly recommended for Asian blades (and Western style, too).

Yeah. Not surprising.

I had a nice Japanese knife brought to me by a friend quite a while back that they had taken to a place to get sharpened but were very unhappy with. The knife had a single bevel, but the place they took it to tried to sharpen it as if it were a double bevel blade. It was horrible. It took me a long long time to get the bevel reshaped correctly.

Phobia
04-27-2011, 09:28 AM
I don't consider myself a "Pro" by any means. But I'd be happy to sharpen some knives for you if you're interested. Give me a call or a PM. I'd give you a deal for some word of mouth advertising...

If you've got the skills and equipment to charge money then you're a pro. You're setup to do both japanese and western?

Phobia
04-27-2011, 09:29 AM
Yeah. Not surprising.

I had a nice Japanese knife brought to me by a friend quite a while back that they had taken to a place to get sharpened but were very unhappy with. The knife had a single bevel, but the place they took it to tried to sharpen it as if it were a double bevel blade. It was horrible. It took me a long long time to get the bevel reshaped correctly.

I have a 10" single bevel that I messed up myself before I realized what it was.

Phobia
04-27-2011, 09:31 AM
I used to be like you. I'd generally just buy new knives when they got dull. I garbaged the bad knives, but I always kept the knives that were good. So now, I have a bunch of sharper-than-new good knives. :)

I have an awesome chef's knife for sale, actually. Anybody interested?

http://www.amazon.com/Wusthof-979779-Classic-6-Inch-Cooks/dp/B00005MEGR

Fire Me Boy!
04-27-2011, 09:38 AM
I have an awesome chef's knife for sale, actually. Anybody interested?

http://www.amazon.com/Wusthof-979779-Classic-6-Inch-Cooks/dp/B00005MEGR

I'd be interested if it were 7" or 8"... I'm not a fan of the 6" chef's knife.

And I have a bad feeling about where this thread is about to go.

Phobia
04-27-2011, 09:55 AM
I'd be interested if it were 7" or 8"... I'm not a fan of the 6" chef's knife.

And I have a bad feeling about where this thread is about to go.

Yeah, I already have a 6" chefs knife I like and I'm probably going to end up keeping one of these but I bought 3 of them at auction and haven't gotten around to putting them on the bay yet.

Fire Me Boy!
04-27-2011, 10:00 AM
This one is the very first "good" knife I ever got. My brother bought it for me Christmas one year. I've got more expensive knives for sure, but this one's my favorite.

http://www.amazon.com/Tojiro-8-25-Gyuto-Made-Japan/dp/B004HGIYMO

I absolutely love this thing.

Fish
04-27-2011, 10:01 AM
If you've got the skills and equipment to charge money then you're a pro. You're setup to do both japanese and western?

Yes, I can do both. Same stones used for both, just different technique.

Phobia
04-27-2011, 10:04 AM
This one is the very first "good" knife I ever got. My brother bought it for me Christmas one year. I've got more expensive knives for sure, but this one's my favorite.

http://www.amazon.com/Tojiro-8-25-Gyuto-Made-Japan/dp/B004HGIYMO

I absolutely love this thing.

I might have to pick up one of those. I don't get wrapped up in expense. I have an expensive knife that is usually one of the last I'll reach for. In fact, I reach for a cheap Home Shopping Network product I got at auction before that one.

Fire Me Boy!
04-27-2011, 10:14 AM
I might have to pick up one of those. I don't get wrapped up in expense. I have an expensive knife that is usually one of the last I'll reach for. In fact, I reach for a cheap Home Shopping Network product I got at auction before that one.

I absolutely love that knife. Very comfortable, easy to use and can hold an edge for quite a while.

Do note, though - it's a 15-degree angle, so no Western sharpeners on it. :)

BigOlChiefsfan
04-27-2011, 10:44 AM
This Article (http://www.sosakonline.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=80&Itemid=35) may be useful for you do-it-yourself types. The mousepad/wet-dry sandpaper trick to get a convex grind works like a charm - but it's a time consuming job the first time. After that you can literally touch it up w/just a gray cardboard tablet-back. I carry a piece of wet-dry finish sandpaper in my wallet on fishing trips, etc...to let me touch up an edge.

MoreLemonPledge
04-27-2011, 11:25 AM
I've heard you can just use Brandon Marshall's stomach.

WV
04-27-2011, 12:44 PM
Did you get that from www.japanesechefsknife.com? Those guys rule.

This guy is better: www.watanabeblade.com/english/

:D

I've been looking at high grade Sushi knives for years, but have never taken the plunge. You've peaked my interest once again. Thanks I think. :hmmm:

MOhillbilly
04-27-2011, 12:46 PM
A dull blade leaves a jagged wound.

just sayin.

Fire Me Boy!
04-27-2011, 12:46 PM
I've been looking at high grade Sushi knives for years, but have never taken the plunge. You've peaked my interest once again. Thanks I think. :hmmm:

Oh man, it's an expensive obsession. I'd been over mine for a couple years, but now it's back.

MOhillbilly
04-29-2011, 08:29 AM
FTR i use arkansas stones for a hone and finish the edge with a franz swaty.

kindra68
04-29-2011, 09:05 AM
Did you get that from www.japanesechefsknife.com? Those guys rule.

This guy is better: www.watanabeblade.com/english/

:D

yes

thank you!

i might go ahead and get from them this time (watanbeblade)
even thought i still want a http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/SHIKITsuchimeDamascusSeries.html