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View Full Version : U.S. Issues CDC vaccine scientist who downplayed links to autism indicted by DOJ in alleged fraud


KILLER_CLOWN
04-28-2011, 10:04 AM
(NaturalNews) CDC researcher Poul Thorsen, who famously headed up the "Denmark Study" that many claim disproved any link between autism and vaccines, has been indicted in Atlanta by a federal grand jury on charges of wire fraud, money laundering and defrauding research institutions of grant money.

Poul Thorson is a scientist who formerly worked for the CDC, and over the last several years, he oversaw millions of dollars in grant money that was used to conduct research to "prove" that vaccines have no link to autism. Dr. Thorson's research papers include the famous "Danish Study" entitled Thimerosal and the occurrence of autism: negative ecological evidence from Danish population-based data. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/...)

This paper concludes that thimerosal, the mercury-based preservative used in vaccines around the world, has no statistically significant link to autism. It is one of the key papers used by vaccination proponents who argue that thimerosal is safe to inject into young children. That Poul Thorson's credibility is now being called into question by a federal indictment of fraud and money laundering will, of course, have ripple effects throughout both the vaccine industries and autism support groups (more about that below).

Be sure to see our "Web of Alleged Fraud" chart which accompanies this article: http://www.naturalnews.com/files/We...

Follow the money
According to the official announcement of the indictment, Thorsen was awarded grant money by the CDC as far back as the 1990s. He arranged for the grant money to be awarded to an entity in Denmark, where he provided "input and guidance" for the research projects.

From 2000 to 2009, the CDC awarded $11 million in grant money to two Denmark government agencies to study, among other things, the possible link between vaccines and autism. In 2002, Thorsen moved to Denmark and became the "principal investigator" for the grant money, responsible for administering the research money that the CDC awarded.

But here's where things get interesting: According to the Dept. of Justice, Thorsen began allegedly stealing grant money by submitting fraudulent expense documents that were supposedly related to the Danish study. These fraudulent expense documents were given to the Danish government, Aarhus University and Odense University Hospital, the institutions involved in the research.

From February 2004 through June 2008, says the DOJ indictment, Thorsen allegedly submitted over a dozen fraudulent invoices requesting reimbursement for expenses that were fabricated. Interestingly, these allegedly fraudulent invoices were signed by a laboratory section chief at the CDC, indicating that someone inside the CDC was either duped by Thorsen or potentially involved in the alleged fraud.

What was Thorsen claiming in these allegedly fraudulent invoices requesting reimbursement? He claimed that a CDC laboratory had conducted work in conjunction with the research and was owed funds out of the grant money. These invoices were then handed over to Aarhus University, where Thorsen held a faculty position. Aarhus then transferred "hundreds of thousands of dollars to bank accounts held at the CDC Federal Credit Union in Atlanta," says the DOJ.

But here's the clever part: Those bank accounts were not official CDC accounts at all. They were allegedly private bank accounts belonging to none other than Dr. Poul Thorsen.

Once the money was transferred into Thorsen's private accounts, Thorsen "allegedly withdrew it for his own personal use, buying a home in Atlanta, a Harley Davidson motorcycle, and Audi and Honda vehicles, and obtaining numerous cashier's checks, from the fraud proceeds," says the DOJ.

According to government documents, Dr. Poul Thorsen, one of the key researchers in "disproving" any link between vaccines and autism, allegedly defrauded the scientific research community of over one million dollars.

See the chart we've assembled for this to help show you the web of money and influence at work here:
http://www.naturalnews.com/files/We...

Aarhus distances itself from Thorsen
More details are revealed through a statement issued in January by Aarhus University, which sought to sever its ties with Thorsen. It says, "Unfortunately, a considerable shortfall in funding at Aarhus University associated with the CDC grant was discovered. In investigating the shortfalls associated with the grant, DASTI and Aarhus University became aware of two alleged CDC funding documents as well as a letter regarding funding commitments allegedly written by Randolph B. Williams of CDC's Procurement Grants Office which was used to secure advances from Aarhus University. Upon investigation by CDC, a suspicion arose that the documents are forgeries." (http://www.rescuepost.com/files/tho...)

This letter goes on to state that Dr Thorsen was essentially hoodwinking others into thinking he was still a faculty member at Aarhus University:

In March 2009, Dr. Thorsen resigned his faculty position at Aarhus University. In the meantime, it has come to the attention of Aarhus University that Dr Thomsen has continued to act in such a manner as to create the impression that he still retains a connection to Aarhus University after the termination of his employment by the university. Furthermore, it has come to the attention of Aarhus University that Dr Poul Thorsen has held full-time positions at both Emory University and Aarhus University simultaneously. Dr Thorsen's double Full-time employment was unauthorised by Aarhus University, and he engaged in this employment situation despite the express prohibition of Aarhus University.

The federal indictment against Thorsen
Today, Thorsen is facing 13 counts of wire fraud and 9 counts of money laundering. NaturalNews spoke with the Department of Justice and confirmed that extradition proceedings are under way to bring Thorsen to the United States from Denmark, although no particular timetable for that extradition has been announced.

Thorsen now faces up to 260 years in prison from the wire fraud charges, and up to an additional 90 years in prison for the money laundering charges, plus a total of $22.5 million in possible fines. In addition, the federal indictment also contains a so-called "forfeiture provision" which seeks the forfeiture of the personal property Dr. Thorsen allegedly purchased with money he stole from the CDC's grant activities: A house in Atlanta, two cars and a Harley Davidson motorcycle.

The case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Stephen H. McClain and Michael J. Brown, both out of the Northern District of Georgia (Atlanta). This Atlanta office has a well-known reputation for going after crooks, regardless of the political implications. This is the same office, for example, that indicted Atlanta's own mayor for corruption and tax charges in 2004 (http://www.justice.gov/tax/usaopres...).

The prosecuting attorney for that case, Sally Quillian Yates, is the same attorney contributing to this case. She said of Thorsen: "Grant money for disease research is a precious commodity. When grant funds are stolen, we lose not only the money, but also the opportunity to better understand and cure debilitating diseases. This defendant is alleged to have orchestrated a scheme to steal over $1 million in CDC grant money earmarked for autism research. We will now seek the defendantís extradition for him to face federal charges in the United States."

Understand what is being alleged here: That Thorsen stole taxpayer dollars intended for medical research, then pocketed them in his own private bank accounts and used the money to buy luxury items for his personal use. This is a man with a history of strong ties to the CDC, research universities and medical journals. This is a person whose research has been widely quoted by the vaccine apologists who say vaccines are safe. And now, in the midst of all this, how many mainstream newspapers do you see covering Thorsen's indictment and his ties to the CDC? Virtually none.

This is the great untold story of an alleged criminal ring operating inside the CDC, with the purpose of falsifying research that would "disprove" any links between vaccines and toxic side effects.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/032216_Thorsen_fraud.html#ixzz1KpYNPmZ3

BucEyedPea
04-28-2011, 10:07 AM
Yes, I saw this a few days ago.

BIG_DADDY
05-01-2011, 06:53 PM
Are those crickets?

ClevelandBronco
05-01-2011, 06:54 PM
Are those crickets?

They could be, assuming the crickets don't give a flying fuck.

banyon
05-01-2011, 07:53 PM
Once the money was transferred into Thorsen's private accounts, Thorsen "allegedly withdrew it for his own personal use, buying a home in Atlanta, a Harley Davidson motorcycle, and Audi and Honda vehicles, and obtaining numerous cashier's checks, from the fraud proceeds," says the DOJ.

So, you think these things didn't happen?

And that Federal Prosecutors would claim those specific transactions in a complaint if they couldn't prove them?

Wouldn't that be pretty stupid of them?

Oh, of course unless they are in on the conspiracy too, right? Probably getting bribed by the evil pharmaceutical companies, right?

KILLER_CLOWN
05-01-2011, 08:54 PM
So, you think these things didn't happen?

And that Federal Prosecutors would claim those specific transactions in a complaint if they couldn't prove them?

Wouldn't that be pretty stupid of them?

Oh, of course unless they are in on the conspiracy too, right? Probably getting bribed by the evil pharmaceutical companies, right?


So what is your point?

banyon
05-01-2011, 08:56 PM
So what is your point?

It's your thread. What's yours?

KILLER_CLOWN
05-01-2011, 08:58 PM
It's your thread. What's yours?

Do you trust fraudulent liars?

banyon
05-01-2011, 09:01 PM
Do you trust fraudulent liars?

I'm skeptical of people who use hyperbole and redundant rhetoric to support implausible claims, yes.

KILLER_CLOWN
05-01-2011, 09:02 PM
I'm skeptical of people who use hyperbole and redundant rhetoric to support implausible claims, yes.

Dragonspeak for no.

banyon
05-01-2011, 09:19 PM
Dragonspeak for no.

Do you think the guy is being framed by the CDC, the US Attorney's Office, and the FDA because he sells vitamins?


And who believes fraudulent claims?

KILLER_CLOWN
05-01-2011, 09:32 PM
Do you think the guy is being framed by the CDC, the US Attorney's Office, and the FDA because he sells vitamins?


And who believes fraudulent claims?

No, and i was asking if you did.

banyon
05-01-2011, 09:35 PM
No, and i was asking if you did.

Then why post it with no critical comment?

Ultra Peanut
05-02-2011, 01:50 AM
http://i.imgur.com/Hj7tr.gif

KILLER_CLOWN
05-02-2011, 02:24 AM
http://i.imgur.com/Hj7tr.gif

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