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HonestChieffan
06-10-2011, 09:30 PM
Dems must be so proud.


http://weaselzippers.us/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/alg_charles_rangel_ferraro_funeral.jpg


NEW YORK (AP) — Disgraced Congressman Anthony Weiner is getting support from a Democratic colleague who knows a little something about having a rough year.

U.S. Rep. Charles Rangel told reporters Friday that he still believes Weiner can be an effective lawmaker, “if the press gets off his back.”

He suggested that other members of Congress had done things more immoral than Weiner, who admitted this week to sending racy messages and explicit photographs of himself to women he didn’t know.

Rangel says Weiner, “wasn’t going with prostitutes. He wasn’t going out with little boys.”

Last year, Rangel was himself censured by the House for ethics violations.
http://online.wsj.com/article/AP530651241f1544ceb9c85dec8830dd2d.html


And the head swamp creature has said she won't ask him to quit. Sleazy old hag. Remember she was gonna "drain the swamp".

http://weaselzippers.us/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Pelosi-Getty-Images.jpg

WASHINGTON (AP) – Amid increasing calls for Rep. Anthony Weiner to resign, House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi says the decision should be up to the congressman and his New York constituents.

The former speaker said in San Francisco that she believes the decision should be made by “the individual member” and the people in his district.

Weiner, a seven-term Democrat, has admitted sending sexually explicit photos and messages over the Internet to a half dozen women over the past three years. Pelosi has asked the House Ethics Committee to investigate whether Weiner used any government resources.

Weiner told a newspaper Thursday he would not resign. At least nine House members and three senators said he should quit.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110610/ap_on_go_co/us_congressman_twitter_photo_pelosi

NewChief
06-10-2011, 09:37 PM
Evidently he was messaging 17 year old girls, though. What a douche.

LiveSteam
06-10-2011, 09:47 PM
Its amazing how they look like mother & son.

lostcause
06-11-2011, 12:27 AM
The chick was probably hot... I don't understand why this is an issue.

fan4ever
06-11-2011, 02:13 AM
What an edorsement. Keep it up...I'm loving it.

RedNeckRaider
06-11-2011, 05:32 AM
Evidently he was messaging 17 year old girls, though. What a douche.

I wish more posters would have the integrity you have. Rather it is a right or left scandal there is always so many who resort to comparing a scandal from the other side. Never willing to simply hold these so called leaders of our country accountable. Now if you would just agree with me more often... ;)

Chief Henry
06-11-2011, 07:20 AM
Evidently he was messaging 17 year old girls, though. What a douche.

spot on :thumb:

notorious
06-11-2011, 07:23 AM
Are they avoiding what really matters?


He is a piece of shit liar.

Dave Lane
06-11-2011, 07:33 AM
I pretty much always assume married guys are going to deny it at first. They always do.

Personally I could care less he's sending pics of his junk ala Farve as long as the women tell him to stop and he does. The 17 year old thing is more of an issue to me. It's kinda like Larry Craig who never resigned, scouting out men in a public bathroom in an airport. I mean I don't care that he's gay, but the other parts are troubling.

I really wish we'd return to 50s era politics and leave peoples private lives alone. As long as it doesn't affect the performance of their duties I really do not give a shit.

RedNeckRaider
06-11-2011, 07:38 AM
I pretty much always assume married guys are going to deny it at first. They always do.

Personally I could care less he's sending pics of his junk ala Farve as long as the women tell him to stop and he does. The 17 year old thing is more of an issue to me. It's kinda like Larry Craig who never resigned, scouting out men in a public bathroom in an airport. I mean I don't care that he's gay, but the other parts are troubling.

I really wish we'd return to 50s era politics and leave peoples private lives alone. As long as it doesn't affect their performance of their duties I could real not give a shit.

I disagree as I feel all who hold positions of power in our country should be held to a higher standard. Also the fact he sent them out not knowing the age of who was receiving them. It puts his judgment in question and also leaves him open to black mail. Not a situation I want someone in power to willingly put themselves in~

Dave Lane
06-11-2011, 07:44 AM
I disagree as I feel all who hold positions of power in our country should be held to a higher standard. Also the fact he sent them out not knowing the age of who was receiving them. It puts his judgment in question and also leaves him open to black mail. Not a situation I want someone in power to willingly put themselves in~

It's an impossible standard. Everyone is going to do something stupid eventually. Having these ridiculous standards is what would open them to blackmail in the first place, if nobody gave a shit what blackmail is possible?

I think we have gone from a country of smart leaders to a country of shrewd posers that do everything to look "perfect" rather than real or substantive. I understand your point I'm just sick of the act I see over and over.

tmax63
06-11-2011, 08:03 AM
I disagree that it's an impossible standard.I think his actions show an amazing lack of self control, piss poor decision making and selfishness. I personally think societal standards have become too lax and it's part of the reason our country is where it's at today. He has put his family life at risk. Just because people do something doesn't make it right. I'm not saying roll time back to the "good old days", I just saying if more people gave a shit and had a little higher standards of conduct we'd be better off individually and as a country.

RedNeckRaider
06-11-2011, 08:05 AM
It's an impossible standard. Everyone is going to do something stupid eventually. Having these ridiculous standards is what would open them to blackmail in the first place, if nobody gave a shit what blackmail is possible?

I think we have gone from a country of smart leaders to a country of shrewd posers that do everything to look "perfect" rather than real or substantive. I understand your point I'm just sick of the act I see over and over.

Having our government held to no morality standard puts us on par with third world countries. If a person cannot control their personal life choices and actions I certainly do not want them making choices and taking actions for all of us.

I understand humans are flawed and make mistakes. I also believe we can do much better than what we talking about here. I raised my kids and try to live my life with the code that honor, honesty and character are things that cannot be taken from you, they must be given away.

I certainly do not think for one second we cannot find people that are decent and have integrity to lead our country To settle for anything less does not do this land or its people any justice~

Dave Lane
06-11-2011, 08:05 AM
I disagree that it's an impossible standard.I think his actions show an amazing lack of self control, piss poor decision making and selfishness. I personally think societal standards have become too lax and it's part of the reason our country is where it's at today. He has put his family life at risk. Just because people do something doesn't make it right. I'm not saying roll time back to the "good old days", I just saying if more people gave a shit and had a little higher standards of conduct we'd be better off individually and as a country.

You think this stuff is new in any way shape or form? God are you naive, wow. Ok well maybe the texting part is new but married politicians hitting on women? LMAO

tmax63
06-11-2011, 08:12 AM
Not at all. It has just made it easier to screw up than it used to be. Absolute power corrupts absolutely. Turning a blind eye to it only allows it to spread faster. That's why I'm also in favor of term limits and other limits on our politicians.

Stinger
06-11-2011, 08:13 AM
It's an impossible standard.
Sorry I disagree here..... We all have choices we have to make everyday, right or wrong. Staying faithful to your wife/life partner not an impossible standard. Giving truthful reasons for your vote or why you did something to your constituents not and impossible standard. Voting for your constituents and not for some lobbies interest not and impossible standard. Lowering standards so people can get by is a very slippery slope we have all been accustom to. IMO

Everyone is going to do something stupid eventually. Yes but the level of stupidity is in question here. We all do stupid things, that's human nature but on what level.

Having these ridiculous standards is what would open them to blackmail in the first place, if nobody gave a shit what blackmail is possible? We all have choices in life do we want someone who is making a correct choice or one that serves his own interests?

I think we have gone from a country of smart leaders to a country of shrewd posers that do everything to look "perfect" rather than real or substantive.

I whole heartedly agree.

Dave Lane
06-11-2011, 08:16 AM
Having our government held to no morality standard puts us on par with third world countries. If a person cannot control their personal life choices and actions I certainly do not want them making choices and taking actions for all of us.

I understand humans are flawed and make mistakes. I also believe we can do much better than what we talking about here. I raised my kids and try to live my life with the code that honor, honesty and character are things that cannot be taken from you, they must be given away.

I certainly do not think for one second we cannot find people that are decent and have integrity to lead our country To settle for anything less does not do this land or its people any justice~

That's your opinion and in a very black and white world I understand it. However the real world is very gray. I'm not condoning bad behavior but bad behavior is what got the US to where it is. The politicians of old were not held to the standards of today's pols. Therefore a lot of the best and brightest minds would rather not face the wilting light of massive scrutiny. No one can survive a witch hunt. Not you, not me, no one. It's limits our pool of candidates drastically and generally without reason.

It's good there are idealistic people like you and I approve of you teaching your children to do they right thing. They will often not do so, but the effort is commendable.

NewChief
06-11-2011, 08:20 AM
I think we have gone from a country of smart leaders to a country of shrewd posers that do everything to look "perfect" rather than real or substantive.

So true. It's not just leaders politically. So many business "leaders," (and I'm not talking about honest businessmen here) are snake oil salesmen with no substance. They're manipulators, sociopaths, and self-marketers who don't really offer anything other than bullshit and illusion. They're, plain and simple, hustlers.

RedNeckRaider
06-11-2011, 08:27 AM
That's your opinion and in a very black and white world I understand it. However the real world is very gray. I'm not condoning bad behavior but bad behavior is what got the US to where it is. The politicians of old were not held to the standards of today's pols. Therefore a lot of the best and brightest minds would rather not face the wilting light of massive scrutiny. No one can survive a witch hunt. Not you, not me, no one. It's limits our pool of candidates drastically and generally without reason.

It's good there are idealistic people like you and I approve of you teaching your children to do they right thing. They will often not do so, but the effort is commendable.

We shall have to agree to disagree on this. It is rather presumptuous of you to predict the behavior of my children (who are full grown adults) I will not claim they have not made mistakes or bore you with their accomplishments. I will say both are outstanding people and I can assure you that they would neither participate or condone the disgusting actions we speak of~

Chief Henry
06-11-2011, 08:44 AM
I disagree that it's an impossible standard.I think his actions show an amazing lack of self control, piss poor decision making and selfishness. I personally think societal standards have become too lax and it's part of the reason our country is where it's at today. He has put his family life at risk. Just because people do something doesn't make it right. I'm not saying roll time back to the "good old days", I just saying if more people gave a shit and had a little higher standards of conduct we'd be better off individually and as a country.

:clap:

Dave Lane
06-11-2011, 09:03 AM
So true. It's not just leaders politically. So many business "leaders," (and I'm not talking about honest businessmen here) are snake oil salesmen with no substance. They're manipulators, sociopaths, and self-marketers who don't really offer anything other than bullshit and illusion. They're, plain and simple, hustlers.

Exactly.

Dave Lane
06-11-2011, 09:07 AM
We shall have to agree to disagree on this. It is rather presumptuous of you to predict the behavior of my children (who are full grown adults) I will not claim they have not made mistakes or bore you with their accomplishments. I will say both are outstanding people and I can assure you that they would neither participate or condone the disgusting actions we speak of~

Its easy to predict the behavior of human beings. We are all weak and have moments of bad decision making. I'll bet they have both texted their "junk" to females already. Its seems pretty popular today. As much as when we were children we refused to think of our parents having sex, we think of our children in the same idealized light. Its just not reality.

Dave Lane
06-11-2011, 09:09 AM
Oh and congrats on raising what sound to be very fine pair of adults. Just don't think they didn't do the same stupid shit we did when we were young. Either you turned a blind eye or they didn't get caught. Its inevitable that every generation repeats all this and probably a good thing overall to get this out of your system when you are young.

fan4ever
06-12-2011, 09:14 AM
I guess it boils down to what you expect out of a human being; the ability to rise above the rabble or to be pulled down into it. Personally, I prefer not just believing in the former, but expecting it as well...whether it's an "unrealistic" standard or not...and certainly excepting the consequences when you do falter...it's how we learn.

fan4ever
06-12-2011, 09:20 AM
This thread kind of reminds me of this speech from "Second Hand Lions".

This may be considered "naive" or such, but it addresses some of the ideals we should try and embrace, realistic or not.

" Sometimes the things that may or may not be true are the things a man needs to believe in the most. That people are basically good. That honour, courage and virtue mean everything ; that power and money ... money and power mean nothing. That good always triumphs over evil. And I want you to remember this.... that love....true love never dies ! Remember that boy ... remember that. Doesn't matter if it is true or not, a man should believe in those things , because those are the things worth believing in...... got that ? "

Mr. Kotter
06-12-2011, 09:48 AM
Yeah...it's a good thing Republicans can claim the high ground on this, of course. Yeah, none of them have every been caught doing similar crap. Yep, it's great to have one of our political parties all squeaky clean so they can, with credibility, claim the moral high ground--and be a "light" to the rest of society.

LMAO

How about demonizing individual idiots, rather than employing a guilt by association approach.

Baby Lee
06-12-2011, 09:58 AM
Yeah...it's a good thing Republicans can claim the high ground on this, of course. Yeah, none of them have every been caught doing similar crap. Yep, it's great to have one of our political parties all squeaky clean so they can, with credibility, claim the moral high ground--and be a "light" to the rest of society.

LMAO

How about doing the precise opposite of what I just did

I too love irony.

notorious
06-12-2011, 09:58 AM
How about demonizing individual idiots, rather than employing a guilt by association approach.


This is something almost everyone in DC agrees on.

Dave Lane
06-12-2011, 09:59 AM
Yeah...it's a good thing Republicans can claim the high ground on this, of course. Yeah, none of them have every been caught doing similar crap. Yep, it's great to have one of our political parties all squeaky clean so they can, with credibility, claim the moral high ground--and be a "light" to the rest of society.

LMAO

How about demonizing individual idiots, rather than employing a guilt by association approach.

The really sad thing is that the Neo-Republicans think that things have gotten "worse" somehow, when the complete opposite is true. I don't want to go into all of the people like Coolidge but think of the United States without virtually all the founders and in particular Franklin and Jefferson. No way they pass the "new virtuous" right wing tests.

Disqualifying Franklin and Jefferson on their well known sexual proclivities for serving this country would have been a massive loss.

Mr. Kotter
06-12-2011, 10:00 AM
I too love irony.

One man's irony, is another man's reality check. :shrug:

headsnap
06-12-2011, 10:01 AM
I too love irony.

:LOL:

Mr. Kotter
06-12-2011, 10:01 AM
This is something almost everyone in DC agrees on.

Not HCF--he's become the right's version of jAZ of years past. Blind ideologue.

RedNeckRaider
06-12-2011, 10:01 AM
How about demonizing individual idiots, rather than employing a guilt by association approach.

I agree and how about people not defending these shitbags just because they are in the same party~

Mr. Kotter
06-12-2011, 10:03 AM
I agree and how about people not defending these shitbags just because they are in the same party~

No disagreement about that--except that phenomena is not unique to one party either.

HonestChieffan
06-12-2011, 10:04 AM
No disagreement about that--except that phenomena is not unique to one party either.

But you do agree he should resign or be forced out, correct?

RedNeckRaider
06-12-2011, 10:05 AM
No disagreement about that--except that phenomena is not unique to one party either.

No it is not and I find it despicable every time I see it happen~

banyon
06-12-2011, 10:10 AM
I pretty much always assume married guys are going to deny it at first. They always do.

Personally I could care less he's sending pics of his junk ala Farve as long as the women tell him to stop and he does. The 17 year old thing is more of an issue to me. It's kinda like Larry Craig who never resigned, scouting out men in a public bathroom in an airport. I mean I don't care that he's gay, but the other parts are troubling.

I really wish we'd return to 50s era politics and leave peoples private lives alone. As long as it doesn't affect the performance of their duties I really do not give a shit.

I had thought this too, but apparently he did resign. Just wasn't splashed all over the front page I guess.

<iframe width="425" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/xHC1gf99sq0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

banyon
06-12-2011, 10:17 AM
In her typically tone deaf and tin earred manner, Pelosi has reversed herself and now calls on Weiner to go:

Dem leaders call for Weiner to resign as he enters treatment
By Russell Berman - 06/11/11 01:58 PM ET

http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/165905-three-top-dems-say-its-time-for-weiner-to-resign

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and two other leaders of the Democratic Party on Saturday called on Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.) to resign, shattering any semblance of party support for the embattled congressman, who is requesting a "leave of absence" from the House.

“Congressman Weiner has the love of his family, the confidence of his constituents, and the recognition that he needs help. I urge Congressman Weiner to seek that help without the pressures of being a member of Congress,” Pelosi said in a statement Saturday.

Her call was issued nearly simultaneously with pleas for Weiner to quit from Rep. Debbie Wasserman-Shultz (D-Fla.), the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, and Rep. Steve Israel (D-N.Y.), the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

The coordinated calls escalate the pressure on him to quit following his admission that he sent lewd messages and photos to women via Facebook and Twitter.

Within two hours of those statements, a spokeswoman for Weiner announced that the congressman was requesting a leave of absence from the House and had left earlier in the day “to seek professional treatment to focus on becoming a better husband and a healthier person.”

“In light of that, he will request a short leave of absence from the House of Representatives so that he can get evaluated and map out a course of treatment to make himself well,” the spokeswoman, Risa Heller, said. “Congressman Weiner takes the views of his colleagues very seriously and has determined that he needs this time to get healthy and make the best decision possible for himself, his family and his constituents.”

After Weiner's statement, Pelosi's office did not back off her call for him to quit: "At the time of her statement this afternoon, Leader Pelosi was already aware of Congressman Weiner’s intention to take a leave of absence in order to seek treatment," a Pelosi aide said.

Two Democratic officials said the Democratic leaders' coordinated effort was in the works before news broke that police in Delaware were investigating messages Weiner sent to a 17-year-old girl. Weiner said through a spokeswoman the messages were "not indecent."

Democratic leaders had hoped Weiner would resign on his own, but he refused.

A senior Democratic aide said party leaders have been talking with him throughout the week, and that the coordinated effort to push him out began when he told the Democratic leadership he had decided to seek treatment. The aide said Weiner was informed that the leaders would be issuing a public call for his resignation.

The aide said the statements were released on Saturday to get ahead of the Sunday shows and the return of lawmakers on Monday.

"It is with great disappointment that I call on Representative Anthony Weiner to resign,” Rep. Debbie Wasserman-Schultz (D-Fla.), the newly installed DNC chief, said in her statement. “The behavior he has exhibited is indefensible and Representative Weiner's continued service in Congress is untenable. This sordid affair has become an unacceptable distraction for Representative Weiner, his family, his constituents and the House - and for the good of all, he should step aside and address those things that should be most important - his and his family's well-being."


Wasserman-Schultz spoke out a day before she is to appear on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” where she was expected to face a barrage of questions about Weiner. Democrats have complained that the scandal is distracting from their policy-centered criticism of Republicans on Medicare and other issues.

“Anthony’s inappropriate behavior has become an insurmountable distraction to the House and our work for the American people. With a heavy heart, I call on Anthony to resign,” Israel, a New York colleague of Weiner’s, said in his statement.

A former DCCC head, Rep. Chris Van Hollen (Md.), the ranking Democrat on the House Budget Committee, joined the calls from his colleagues for Weiner to depart.

“Anthony Weiner’s repeated violation of the public trust is unacceptable," Van Hollen said in a statement. "He can best advance the issues he fought for by resigning immediately.”

The push from Pelosi was particularly extraordinary. A longtime aide to the former Speaker told The Hill that they could not remember her calling for a fellow Democrat to resign in the last decade.

Previous DNC chairs Tim Kaine, now a Senate candidate in Virginia, and former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell have also called for Weiner to resign.

The leave of absence requested by Weiner could buy him time to hold on to his seat, particularly if the story fades from the daily headlines.

A Democratic aide said that although a leave of absence is formally “requested,” it is considered a formality and would not be rejected.

“No approval. You ask for, you get,” the aide said.

banyon
06-12-2011, 10:27 AM
Pretty heated on Meet the Press about halfway through:

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HonestChieffan
06-12-2011, 10:39 AM
The crazy googleeyed gal from Florida that is head of the dem party is now changing her tune as well but Clyburn has said he's cool withe the Weiner staying.

banyon
06-12-2011, 10:39 AM
The crazy googleeyed gal from Florida that is head of the dem party is now changing her tune as well but Clyburn has said he's cool withe the Weiner staying.

So, should Vitter go too?

HonestChieffan
06-12-2011, 10:44 AM
So, should Vitter go too?

who is he and what did he do?

banyon
06-12-2011, 10:53 AM
who is he and what did he do?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Vitter#Prostitution_scandals

Prostitution scandals
[edit] D.C. Madam

In early July 2007, Vitter's phone number was included in a published list of phone records of Pamela Martin and Associates, a company owned and run by Deborah Jeane Palfrey, also known as the "D.C. Madam", convicted by the U.S. government for running a prostitution service. Hustler identified the phone number and contacted Vitter's office to ask about his connection to Palfrey.[18][19] The following day, Vitter issued a written statement:
“ This was a very serious sin in my past for which I am, of course, completely responsible. Several years ago, I asked for and received forgiveness from God and my wife in confession and marriage counseling. Out of respect for my family, I will keep my discussion of the matter there — with God and them. But I certainly offer my deep and sincere apologies to all I have disappointed and let down in any way.[20] ”

The statement containing Vitter's apology said his telephone number was included in phone records dating from his days as a member of the House of Representatives.[6] Phone records show that Vitter's number was called by Palfrey's service five times, the first on October 12, 1999, and the last on February 27, 2001.[21] Two calls were placed while House roll call votes were in progress.[22][23]

On July 16, 2007, after a week of self-imposed seclusion, Vitter emerged and called a news conference. Standing next to his wife, Vitter asked the public for forgiveness. Following Vitter's remarks, Wendy Vitter, his wife, spoke. Both refused to answer any questions.

As background, several news outlets reported that in May 1999, Vitter replaced Congressman Bob Livingston after Livingston resigned due to an adultery scandal.[1][27][28] Vitter said about Livingston's decision to resign, "It's obviously a tremendous loss for the state. I think Livingston's stepping down makes a very powerful argument that Clinton should resign as well and move beyond this mess", referring to Bill Clinton's Monica Lewinsky scandal.

Vitter will not face criminal charges due to the statute of limitations.

Vitter incurred significant legal and public relations expenses in his efforts to avoid giving testimony in the Palfrey trial and to respond to the ethics complaint. Consequently, his attorneys sought permission from the Federal Election Commission to use campaign funds to pay for these expenses. The Commission, along partisan lines, couldn't agree whether funds could be used for reimbursing costs related to the Palfrey trial but did allow them to pay for expenses connected to the Ethics Committee complaint.


Canal Street Madam

On July 10, 2007, Jeanette Maier, the "Canal Street Madam", alleged that Vitter was a customer on more than one occasion in the 1990s, when Maier was identified by federal prosecutors as operating a $300 per hour brothel.[36] The Times-Picayune reported that "Maier offered no evidence or documents to support her claim."[37] A polygraph (lie detector) test was arranged for a New Orleans prostitute who claimed Vitter hired her and had sexual intercourse with her. The prostitute passed the test.[38]


Reaction

While the Louisiana state Republican Party offered guarded support,[39] national Republicans offered forgiveness.[40] The Nation predicted that the Republican Party would be in a "forgiving mood", pointing out if Vitter did step down, then Governor of Louisiana, Kathleen Blanco, a Democrat, would likely appoint a Democrat to take Vitter's place until a special election took place, thus increasing Democratic control over the Senate.

Republican Senator Sam Brownback told Bloomberg Television on October 5, 2007, that Vitter should be censured by the Senate. He said, "I think you could see something like that taking place. If you look at the actual crime itself and the discussion across the country– and as a Republican– this is bad."[44]

In a similar vein when the Eliot Spitzer prostitution scandal — Spitzer being then governor of New York — hit the headlines, commentators contrasted the end-results: Spitzer resigned while Vitter stayed on.[45][46][47] In response, Jeff Crouere, a New Orleans conservative political commentator, called on Vitter to resign, saying he was an ineffective representative and reflected poorly on the state.[48] Other local political figures differed with Crouere. Democratic political consultant James Carville said the two cases were entirely different: Spitzer's situation developed from an active investigation and as a former prosecutor and governor he had powerful enemies. In contrast, Carville described Vitter as "Louisiana’s junior senator and nobody really knows him or cares that much about him," but concluded that, "if they paid with their own money, I don’t think either one should resign." The Louisiana Republican governor Bobby Jindal said, "Senator Vitter has already addressed this.... The people of New York can deal with the Governor of New York.”[49] Additionally, one gauge of the scandal's impact — local fundraising — indicated that Vitter has weathered the controversy well: first quarter 2008 finance reports show that he made, according to The Times-Picayune, an "impressive haul".[50] Another gauge, voter approval, indicates Vitter is, as of June 2008, still popular with Louisiana voters.[51]

Following the June 2009 admission of Nevada Senator John Ensign that he had an affair with an employee of his Senate office, the Louisiana Democratic Party called on Senator Vitter to resign his leadership position (as a deputy whip) in the Senate, arguing that because Ensign had resigned his position as Republican Policy Committee Chairman of the United States Senate, Vitter should do the same.[52]

HonestChieffan
06-12-2011, 11:07 AM
I'd say he should have resigned.

I'm sure some would say what he did and what Weiner did are substantially different especially considering Weiners little screw up now seems to involve underage girls. And his lying to everyone and attempting to lay it off on media or whatever was a bit of a reach.

banyon
06-12-2011, 11:16 AM
I'd say he should have resigned.

I'm sure some would say what he did and what Weiner did are substantially different especially considering Weiners little screw up now seems to involve underage girls. And his lying to everyone and attempting to lay it off on media or whatever was a bit of a reach.

I agree it's both, but there are double standards all over the place on this crap in both parties.

HonestChieffan
06-12-2011, 11:23 AM
Its a lack of standards that cause the issue.

Mr. Kotter
06-12-2011, 11:28 AM
But you do agree he should resign or be forced out, correct?

Absolutely. It's your blanket indictment of "Democrats" that's silly.

Dave Lane
06-12-2011, 11:40 AM
I had thought this too, but apparently he did resign. Just wasn't splashed all over the front page I guess.

<iframe width="425" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/xHC1gf99sq0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

He retracted 48 hours later.

Dave Lane
06-12-2011, 11:43 AM
Its a lack of standards that cause the issue.

Then we desperately need to get Franklin off the $100 and Jefferson off the nickel and off of Mt Rushmore immediately.

Dave Lane
06-12-2011, 11:43 AM
Founding fathers must be so proud.

HonestChieffan
06-12-2011, 11:43 AM
Absolutely. It's your blanket indictment of "Democrats" that's silly.


If he was a R and any one defended him Id toss the same blanket. WtF difference does it make what party he is in in the first place.

Anyone who condones his action and defends him has no standards of their own.

Dave Lane
06-12-2011, 11:53 AM
If he was a R and any one defended him Id toss the same blanket. WtF difference does it make what party he is in in the first place.

Anyone who condones his action and defends him has no standards of their own.

No one has defended his actions in this thread or anywhere else so you can stop getting all twittered (big pun here)

My point is if we continue to force perfection on our politicians we will be the most vapid empty shirts we deserve. It's one of the few times I agree with the past. Personal lives should be off limits or we loose way more than we gain.

HonestChieffan
06-12-2011, 11:55 AM
So you would tolerate Weiners actions?

Dave Lane
06-12-2011, 12:04 PM
So you would tolerate Weiners actions?

I find them wrong and inexcusable, but i think this shit is way overboard.

For the record I could care less that Larry Craig is hunting gay men for sex in public bathrooms too, so party affiliation isn't the issue. If we are going to disqualify every one who has ever groped a female, drunk or otherwise, or flashed a woman or group, or mooned somebody, who the fuck is going to serve?

Seriously if these are your tests for candidates you will get exactly the candidates you deserve. Self serving, manipulative, empty shirt, worthless do nothings because those are the only types that will fulfill your requirements.

HonestChieffan
06-12-2011, 12:05 PM
I find them wrong and inexcusable, but i think this shit is way overboard.

For the record I could care less that Larry Craig is hunting gay men for sex in public bathrooms too, so party affiliation isn't the issue. If we are going to disqualify every one who has ever groped a female, drunk or otherwise, or flashed a woman or group, or mooned somebody, who the **** is going to serve?

Seriously if these are your tests for candidates you will get exactly the candidates you deserve. Self serving, manipulative, empty shirt, worthless do nothings because those are the only types that will fulfill your requirements.

So you believe he should resign or be booted out?

Chiefshrink
06-12-2011, 12:39 PM
One of my closest friends went through the process of potentially joining the FBI a few yrs back. He passed with flying colors but then decided to back out in the end deciding it wasn't for him.

But during the process, he was put through the polygraph routine and he answered many questions in reference to his own marriage. After it was all over with, he asked why so many questions about his marriage and the status of his marriage. They simply told him, "This may sound old fashioned, but what we have found over time from our own records and experiences, a man who cannot control his own impulses to the point he betrays his own wife, will more likely than not betray his own country when push comes to shove". The agent said we like to hire committed Christians and Mormons because they are trustworthy more often than not when push comes to shove.

Then one of the agents who had a good sense of humor about it in order to lighten the mood, said and "we have a great role model and founder in the most corrupt transvestite homosexual to inspire us to follow this model of high character recruiting."

|Zach|
06-12-2011, 12:41 PM
When I saw this thread I thought it was about Patteau on ChiefsPlanet.

banyon
06-12-2011, 01:19 PM
He retracted 48 hours later.

Jeez, you're right, I stand corrected.

His "retraction of resignation" speech:

WASHINGTON — Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, vowed to serve the remainder of his term Thursday despite losing his bid to withdraw his guilty plea for disorderly conduct in an airport men's restroom.

Craig, who had vowed to resign if unable to withdraw his plea, said he was considering appealing Thursday's decision by a Minnesota judge. The judge ruled some of the senator's legal arguments were "illogical."

"As I continued to work for Idaho over the past three weeks here in the Senate, I have seen that it is possible for me to work here effectively," Craig said. "I will continue my effort to clear my name in the Senate Ethics Committee, something that is not possible if I am not serving in the Senate."

The third-term lawmaker issued his statement not long after Idaho Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter said he had selected a replacement for Craig.

Craig's reversal stunned colleagues, particularly Republican leaders who hoped to put the politically embarrassing episode behind them. Craig initially said he would resign Sept. 30 and then said he would stay on as his legal case continued.

His announcement Thursday to stay in office through the 2008 election but not run for re-election left GOP senators furious. "I believe the best thing for him to do is keep his word," said Sen. John Ensign of Nevada, chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee. Ensign said the Ethics Committee investigation would be difficult for Craig and his family.

Other GOP senators agreed. "He ought to keep his word," said Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma.

Republicans are powerless to enforce any other internal punishment on Craig until the ethics panel completes its inquiry.(just like the Weiner case I guess)

Republicans already stripped him of his senior positions on committees.

Hennepin County District Court Judge Charles Porter rejected Craig's request to withdraw his plea, writing in a 27-page ruling that Craig had pleaded guilty because he wanted to plead guilty.

"The defendant chose to not appear [in court] and to enter his plea by mail just so he could avoid any such ... inquiry into his conduct," Porter wrote. "He kept many of the facts out of the record in so doing. He cannot now complain that he should not have been allowed to take advantage of an approved method to enter a misdemeanor plea."

Craig said he was "extremely disappointed with the ruling" and his lawyers would "explore my additional legal options."

Craig's announcement to stay in office was the latest turn in the saga, beginning with the revelation Aug. 27 that he had quietly pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct stemming from his June 11 arrest in a sting operation at a men's restroom at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.

After his arrest and guilty plea became public, Craig held a news conference and said his actions — tapping his feet and bumping the foot of the undercover officer, swiping his hand under the stall divider — were innocent behavior and not solicitations for sex, as the officer charged.

He said he "overreacted" by pleading guilty because his home-state newspaper, The Idaho Statesman, was investigating his sexual orientation. "I am not gay," he said.

http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=20071005&slug=craig05

stevieray
06-12-2011, 01:32 PM
LMAO

How about demonizing individual idiots, rather than employing a guilt by association approach.

says the guy demonizing the Tea Party almost every chance he gets.

as for the rest of your post, the left here spend waaay more time trying to dish out their own version of morality, usually using a negative to validate a negative.

Mr. Kotter
06-12-2011, 02:55 PM
says the guy demonizing the Tea Party almost every chance he gets.

as for the rest of your post, the left here spend waaay more time trying to dish out their own version of morality, usually using a negative to validate a negative.

Like it or not, the two major parties are as close to choosing meaningful consensus political agenda as we have. Like it or not, third party movements are only meaningful as a protest vote for those disenchanted with both parties. While disenchantment, at times, is understandable, and even necessary (Perot in 1992, for example), historically it only serves to prod one of the two major parties into concessions on issues that lead to third party challenges. While the two party system has it's flaws, marginalizing extemist protest politics isn't one of them. It's been a useful and wise "check" on zealots within society.

As third party movenments go, the Tea Party movement is a latest installment of the politics of misguided arrogance and anger--the modern incarnation of the Dixiecrats protest of integration, and George Wallace's campaign of hate and division. Teddy Roosevelt called factions on the extreme, the "lunatic fringe." Unless something drastic changes with the candidates and rhetoric of the "Tea Party," it's a label that is quite apt.

fan4ever
06-12-2011, 03:39 PM
No one has defended his actions in this thread or anywhere else so you can stop getting all twittered (big pun here)

My point is if we continue to force perfection on our politicians we will be the most vapid empty shirts we deserve. It's one of the few times I agree with the past. Personal lives should be off limits or we loose way more than we gain.

I don't think anyone demands or expects perfection but I don't think it's unreasonable to expect acceptable behavior, and how is this exceptable...personal life or not?

I had a pal go into business with a guy who we both knew cheated on his wife on a number of occassions. I warned my pal saying "If this guy cheats on his wife, who's supposed the be the most important person in his life, imagine what he'll do to you". My words came to fruition in less than a year. How you behave in your personal life is a large indicator as to how you'll behave in your professional life IMO.

That being said, I do realize some people, such as athletes, politicians, and people in the entertainment industry, are subject to much more opportunity and temptation than the rest of us, no doubt. I really applaud the few that can keep their morals in place...no matter which party or line of work they're in.

fan4ever
06-12-2011, 03:41 PM
One of my closest friends went through the process of potentially joining the FBI a few yrs back. He passed with flying colors but then decided to back out in the end deciding it wasn't for him.

But during the process, he was put through the polygraph routine and he answered many questions in reference to his own marriage. After it was all over with, he asked why so many questions about his marriage and the status of his marriage. They simply told him, "This may sound old fashioned, but what we have found over time from our own records and experiences, a man who cannot control his own impulses to the point he betrays his own wife, will more likely than not betray his own country when push comes to shove". The agent said we like to hire committed Christians and Mormons because they are trustworthy more often than not when push comes to shove.

Then one of the agents who had a good sense of humor about it in order to lighten the mood, said and "we have a great role model and founder in the most corrupt transvestite homosexual to inspire us to follow this model of high character recruiting."

Funny, I read your post after I posted above...obviously we agree.

Dave Lane
06-12-2011, 08:54 PM
So you believe he should resign or be booted out?

Neither. Finish his term and go home just like Craig.

HonestChieffan
06-12-2011, 09:01 PM
Neither. Finish his term and go home just like Craig.

So you support him remaining a congressman.

Dave Lane
06-12-2011, 09:02 PM
I don't think anyone demands or expects perfection but I don't think it's unreasonable to expect acceptable behavior, and how is this exceptable...personal life or not?

I had a pal go into business with a guy who we both knew cheated on his wife on a number of occassions. I warned my pal saying "If this guy cheats on his wife, who's supposed the be the most important person in his life, imagine what he'll do to you". My words came to fruition in less than a year. How you behave in your personal life is a large indicator as to how you'll behave in your professional life IMO.

That being said, I do realize some people, such as athletes, politicians, and people in the entertainment industry, are subject to much more opportunity and temptation than the rest of us, no doubt. I really applaud the few that can keep their morals in place...no matter which party or line of work they're in.

Great idealistic viewpoint. But why do you hate America? Cuz you hate the founding fathers. :)

Not sure if you know this, or realize it but all the presidents other than maybe a handful had mistresses on the side and usually lots of them. It wasn't even considered a big deal in the past. Nobody cared. There was a nod and a wink and that was it. Now it seems sexual repression and moral indignation is everywhere. It like suddenly we have descended into Victorian times once again.

So again, should we redo Mount Rushmore or not?

Because most of the founders are out...

And personally my experience is the christians are the very first to **** somebody over. I have a couple tenants that are churches and they are the worst pay most bad checks of anyone I rent to. Anyone that tells me "Have a blessed day" or they are a man of god causes me to clamp my sphincter because I know whats coming next.

banyon
06-12-2011, 10:21 PM
Neither. Finish his term and go home just like Craig.

His disgrace distracts from the issues.

Endeavor to set a higher standard than the "they did it too" of current parlance.

Dave Lane
06-12-2011, 10:30 PM
His disgrace distracts from the issues.

Endeavor to set a higher standard than the "they did it too" of current parlance.

I'm not using Craig to justify Weiner. They are both disgraced and they can both finish their terms as far as I care (Craig did). I really don't see either one like murder or corruption which I would have no mercy on. Corruption = gone tomorrow in my book. There's not really any charges pending I'm aware of. This is a non criminal issue and I really don't care. If he resigns because he can't do his job then that's fine too. I'm just not going to witch hunt a guy out of office for texting his junk to people. Its stupid as a public official but I don't care.

fan4ever
06-13-2011, 10:45 AM
Great idealistic viewpoint. But why do you hate America? Cuz you hate the founding fathers. :)

Not sure if you know this, or realize it but all the presidents other than maybe a handful had mistresses on the side and usually lots of them. It wasn't even considered a big deal in the past. Nobody cared. There was a nod and a wink and that was it. Now it seems sexual repression and moral indignation is everywhere. It like suddenly we have descended into Victorian times once again.

So again, should we redo Mount Rushmore or not?

Because most of the founders are out...

And personally my experience is the christians are the very first to **** somebody over. I have a couple tenants that are churches and they are the worst pay most bad checks of anyone I rent to. Anyone that tells me "Have a blessed day" or they are a man of god causes me to clamp my sphincter because I know whats coming next.

Hate my founding fathers? I don't even hate Weiner; just feel he should be a more virtuous person with the power he yields. He's at the very least been exposed as an arrogant liar.

You make good points...I just believe you can either start out with fairly high standards or there will come a day when we're going to be pretty amazed at how little we expect out of these people...I'm already pretty amazed at what people are willing to just shine on.

ForeverChiefs58
06-13-2011, 11:38 AM
oops, I thought this thread was going to be about direcshun.

Jaric
06-13-2011, 11:42 AM
It's an impossible standard. Everyone is going to do something stupid eventually. Having these ridiculous standards is what would open them to blackmail in the first place, if nobody gave a shit what blackmail is possible?

I think we have gone from a country of smart leaders to a country of shrewd posers that do everything to look "perfect" rather than real or substantive. I understand your point I'm just sick of the act I see over and over.

:spock:

It's an impossible standard to ask our elected officials not to send pictures of their junk out over twitter?


Is that really that hard to refrain from doing? What am I missing here?

vailpass
06-13-2011, 11:51 AM
:spock:

It's an impossible standard to ask our elected officials not to send pictures of their junk out over twitter?


Is that really that hard to refrain from doing? What am I missing here?

Loon would be talking out of the other side of his mouth if the lying pervert had an R in front of his name instead of a D.

Jaric
06-13-2011, 12:10 PM
Loon would be talking out of the other side of his mouth if the lying pervert had an R in front of his name instead of a D.

It just seems odd to me that people apparently think it's too much to ask for members of congress not to go around sending pictures of the penis to women via twitter. Allegedly in one case to a minor.

I understand that to expect moral perfection is a fools errend. But at the same time I'd like to think there is a line at which we can all collectively say, "ok, you're over the line there pal."