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View Full Version : General Politics Brownback joining Perry's God Squad on 8-6


Simplex3
06-12-2011, 05:54 PM
This may actually be a blessing. Maybe the rational people can get something done when all the Christ-ers are down in Texas.

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2011/jun/06/brownback-attend-texas-prayer-rally-behalf-our-tro/
Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback to attend Texas prayer rally 'on behalf of our troubled nation'

June 6, 2011, 1:47 p.m. Updated: 6 June 2011, 7:42 p.m.

Topeka — Gov. Sam Brownback plans to attend a daylong Christian rally of prayer and fasting in Houston that organizers say is aimed at helping the country during its “historic crisis.”

Brownback accepted an invitation to the Aug. 6 event at Reliant Stadium from Texas Gov. Rick Perry, according to Brownback’s spokeswoman Sherriene Jones-Sontag. Both Perry and Brownback are Republicans.

Jones-Sontag said Brownback will pay his own expenses.

Perry, who has reportedly been considering a presidential run, said on the event’s website, “Right now, America is in crisis: we have been besieged by financial debt, terrorism, and a multitude of natural disasters. As a nation, we must come together and call upon Jesus to guide us through unprecedented struggles, and thank Him for the blessings of freedom we so richly enjoy.”

The organizer of the event, which is called The Response, is the American Family Association. On its website, the AFA states its mission “is to inform, equip, and activate individuals to strengthen the moral foundations of American culture, and give aid to the church here and abroad in its task of fulfilling the Great Commission.”

The event website described the United States as in a “historic crisis” and “has not honored God.” The event is free and open to the public but requires registration, which can be found at registration.afa.net. Fasting is recommended, but there will be some food vendors and water for sale.

In 2009, while serving in the U.S. Senate, Brownback was one of the speakers on a live video “PrayerCast” to oppose health care reform that was then being debated in Congress. That event was sponsored by the Family Research Council.

Perry’s invitation to governors across the country to attend the event raised concerns with the Interfaith Alliance, which describes itself as an organization that promotes policies that protect religion and democracy.

“Gov. Perry has every right to pray or fast in private or with others,” said Interfaith Alliance President Dr. C. Welton Gaddy. “However, when he uses his public office in any way to promote a sectarian event, he has crossed a line that the framers of our Constitution did not want crossed for the good of both religion and government,” he said.

Originally published at: http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2011/jun/06/brownback-attend-texas-prayer-rally-behalf-our-tro/

Fishpicker
06-12-2011, 06:06 PM
“Right now, America is in crisis: we have been besieged by financial debt, terrorism, and a multitude of natural disasters. As a nation, we must come together and call upon Jesus to guide us through unprecedented struggles, and thank Him for the blessings of freedom we so richly enjoy.”

:cuss: this country is doomed if this guy becomes President.

Chiefshrink
06-12-2011, 06:56 PM
:cuss: this country is doomed if this guy becomes President.

And your reasoning???

Brock
06-12-2011, 07:03 PM
2 douches that were just made for each other.

orange
06-13-2011, 12:49 AM
Now there's a great gig - food vendor at a fast.

Fishpicker
06-13-2011, 12:54 AM
And your reasoning???

because this country hasn't been besieged by debt. we took it on. I don't like pols that hide behind prayer and religion. We've had enough of that with G.W. Bush.

Dallas Chief
06-13-2011, 03:07 PM
I never understand the resentment that so many here in the DC voice towards Christians- particularly towards Christian politicians. Do they not have the right to their own spiritual beliefs and the expression thereof; just as those that are not believers have the same right to express theirs. Are Christians somehow imposing on you just by being believers in a power higher than themselves?

I for one find daily prayer to be quite therapeutic. It gives me a chance to reflect on my day, to be thankful for my many blessings, and to meditate on my problems whereby I may find a better path to resolution. Why that would be offensive to anyone is beyond me...

vailpass
06-13-2011, 03:12 PM
I never understand the resentment that so many here in the DC voice towards Christians- particularly towards Christian politicians. Do they not have the right to their own spiritual beliefs and the expression thereof; just as those that are not believers have the same right to express theirs. Are Christians somehow imposing on you just by being believers in a power higher than themselves?

I for one find daily prayer to be quite therapeutic. It gives me a chance to reflect on my day, to be thankful for my many blessings, and to meditate on my problems whereby I may find a better path to resolution. Why that would be offensive to anyone is beyond me...

If the politician were muslim you couldn't say a damned word about their religion as part of their politics without being attacked by the same people who have no problem Christian bashing.
Fortunately they don't represent the majority in this country.

Jaric
06-13-2011, 03:25 PM
I never understand the resentment that so many here in the DC voice towards Christians- particularly towards Christian politicians. Do they not have the right to their own spiritual beliefs and the expression thereof; just as those that are not believers have the same right to express theirs. Are Christians somehow imposing on you just by being believers in a power higher than themselves?

I for one find daily prayer to be quite therapeutic. It gives me a chance to reflect on my day, to be thankful for my many blessings, and to meditate on my problems whereby I may find a better path to resolution. Why that would be offensive to anyone is beyond me...

Of course they have a right to express their opinions.

However, there is no protection from people judging them for expressing those opinions.

orange
06-13-2011, 03:32 PM
Perry Prayer Event Faces New Criticism

By ERIK ECKHOLM

Gov. Rick Perry’s call for a “day of prayer and fasting on behalf of our troubled nation,” which has been criticized for being exclusively Christian, is open to people of any faith — “who will feel the love, grace and warmth of Jesus Christ in that assembly hall,” the event’s chief spokesman explained on Monday in a statement that provoked new charges that the event is intended to convert non-Christians.

The prayer day, to be held in a Houston stadium on Aug. 6, has drawn sharp attacks from supporters of the separation between church and state, who note that public prayer events normally welcome people of all faiths. While Mr. Perry, the governor of Texas, is hosting this event, it is being paid for and organized by the American Family Association and other conservative evangelical groups that stress the infallibility of the Bible and condemn homosexuality as immoral.

Mr. Perry has rejected the charge of exclusion, telling The New York Times on Friday that “it is Christian-centered, yes, but I have invited and welcome people of all faiths to attend.”

On Monday, Eric Bearse, the event’s spokesman, who formerly worked as Mr. Perry’s communications director, gave a longer explanation in an interview on American Family Radio, a network run by the family association:

“A lot of people want to criticize what we’re doing, as if we’re somehow being exclusive of other faiths. But anyone who comes to this solemn assembly, regardless of their faith tradition or background, will feel the love, grace, and warmth of Jesus Christ in that assembly hall, in that arena. And that’s what we want to convey, that there’s acceptance and that there’s love and that there’s hope if people will seek out the living Christ.”

The liberal group People for the American Way first reported Mr. Bearse’s comments and added its objections to those already voiced by Americans United for Separation of Church and State, the Interfaith Alliance and others. In Texas and elsewhere, the event is perhaps drawing further scrutiny as Mr. Perry considers a run for the Republican presidential nomination.

“Gov. Perry has every right to practice his own faith, but he has no right to use his official position to try to convert others,” said Michael Keenan, president of People for the American Way, in a statement on Monday.

http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/13/perry-prayer-event-faces-new-criticism/

orange
06-13-2011, 03:37 PM
...Response, being planned in partnership with the American Family Association and scheduled for August 6 in Houston's Reliant Stadium, is deeply disturbing for so many reasons that I will not even try to name them all. Instead, I will limit myself to the top three.

First, Response presumes not only that prayer is the best response to what ails us as a nation, it presumes that the response must specifically be Christian prayer and the restoration that can only be found through bending one's knee to Jesus (the organizers' language, not my hyperbole). If your idea of a good time is turning contemporary America into a version of Medieval Europe, then this is for you. If not, then not so much. But religious triumphalism is not the only big problem with Response.

Perhaps even more disturbing is the claim found in Response promotional material which suggests that we can rid ourselves of all of our problems, including natural disasters, if we just prayed enough. The corollary to that claim is that our problems, including floods and tornadoes are a punishment from God. People are entitled to any views they want, but public servants charged with keeping us safe and responding when our health, safety or security are challenged better be focused on the this-worldly causes of those threats. When the focus shifts to the theological, they should move their offices from State Houses to the house of worship of their choice.

Finally, the lead partner in organizing Response is the American Family Association, a group which in addition to spreading grotesque falsehoods about gay people (they are more likely to molest children), constantly fights not simply for their own rights as conservative Christians, but to curtail the rights of others in the name of Christianity. We can debate the appropriate place of such groups in America, but choosing them to lead the response in healing what ails our nation makes a pretty scary claim about what defines good American, who is causing our problems and legitimizing the fight against "them" as much as making a case for the importance of prayer. Scary indeed....

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rabbi-brad-hirschfield/rick-perrys-response-thre_b_875641.html

Jaric
06-13-2011, 03:39 PM
Perhaps even more disturbing is the claim found in Response promotional material which suggests that we can rid ourselves of all of our problems, including natural disasters, if we just prayed enough. The corollary to that claim is that our problems, including floods and tornadoes are a punishment from God. People are entitled to any views they want, but public servants charged with keeping us safe and responding when our health, safety or security are challenged better be focused on the this-worldly causes of those threats. When the focus shifts to the theological, they should move their offices from State Houses to the house of worship of their choice.

If that's the case, these people clearly never read the Book of Job (one of my favorite books in the bible by the way)

Simplex3
06-13-2011, 05:01 PM
I never understand the resentment that so many here in the DC voice towards Christians- particularly towards Christian politicians. Do they not have the right to their own spiritual beliefs and the expression thereof; just as those that are not believers have the same right to express theirs. Are Christians somehow imposing on you just by being believers in a power higher than themselves?

I for one find daily prayer to be quite therapeutic. It gives me a chance to reflect on my day, to be thankful for my many blessings, and to meditate on my problems whereby I may find a better path to resolution. Why that would be offensive to anyone is beyond me...

These people are specifically saying that this prayer is part of a solution and/or a way to arrive at that solution. I'm not telling Brownback he can't go, but I want everyone to know the guy they elected governor took time out of his schedule to do a rain dance.

If the politician were muslim you couldn't say a damned word about their religion as part of their politics without being attacked by the same people who have no problem Christian bashing.
Fortunately they don't represent the majority in this country.

I would absolutely jump on anyone of any faith with both feet for this. The media in general will only bash Christians, but not for the reason you're implying. The media will only bash Christians for the same reason they'll only bash whites or men. The media will only bash the (sometimes perceived) majority.

Jaric
06-13-2011, 05:03 PM
These people are specifically saying that this prayer is part of a solution and/or a way to arrive at that solution. I'm not telling Brownback he can't go, but I want everyone to know the guy they elected governor took time out of his schedule to do a rain dance.


This sounds so much cooler than what he's actually planning on doing.