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View Full Version : U.S. Issues Improving Mexican economy draws undocumented immigrants home from California


Donger
07-29-2011, 01:41 PM
Well, perhaps a small silver lining...

http://www.sacbee.com/2011/07/28/3799513/improving-mexican-economy-draws.html

There are fewer undocumented immigrants in California – and the Sacramento region – because many are now finding the American dream south of the border.

"It's now easier to buy homes on credit, find a job and access higher education in Mexico," Sacramento's Mexican consul general, Carlos González Gutiérrez, said Wednesday. "We have become a middle-class country."

Mexico's unemployment rate is now 4.9 percent, compared with 9.4 percent joblessness in the United States.

An estimated 300,000 undocumented immigrants have left California since 2008, though the remaining 2.6 million still make up 7 percent of the population and 9 percent of the labor force, according to the Public Policy Institute of California.

Among metropolitan areas with more than 1 million residents, Sacramento County ranks among the lowest, with an unauthorized population of 4.6 percent of its 1.4 million residents in 2008, according to Laura Hill, a demographer with the PPIC.

The Sacramento region, suffering from 12.3 percent unemployment and the construction bust, may have triggered a large exodus of undocumented immigrants, González Gutiérrez said.

The best-paid jobs for undocumented migrants are in the building industry, "and because of the severe crisis in the construction business here, their first response has been to move into the service industry," González Gutiérrez said. "But that has its limits. Then, they move to other areas in the U.S. to find better jobs – or back to Mexico."

Hill said it's hard to know whether the benefit of having fewer undocumented migrants outweighs the cost to employers and taxpayers.

California may have to provide less free education to the children of undocumented immigrants and less emergency medical care, she said, but it will also get less tax revenue.

In 2008, at least 836,100 undocumented immigrants filed U.S. tax returns in California using individual tax identification numbers known as ITINS, said Hill, who conducted the tax survey.

Based on those tax returns, the study found there were 65,000 undocumented immigrants in Sacramento County that year, far fewer than in many other big counties.

Sacramento's undocumented population ranked 10th in the state that year, behind Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, Santa Clara, San Bernardino, Riverside, Alameda, Contra Costa and Ventura.

There were an estimated 12,000 undocumented immigrants in Yolo County; 9,000 in the Sutter-Yuba area; and 8,000 in Placer County.

An analysis of local ZIP codes showed that Sacramento (95815, 95823, 95824), West Sacramento (95605), Clarksburg (95612), Esparto (95627), Guinda (95637), Knights Landing (95645), Winters (95694) and Woodland (95776) each had an undocumented population of 10 percent to 15 percent.

Yolo County relies heavily on migrant workers to grow and harvest crops.

"People in construction are now turning to agriculture; it's the start of the tomato season so the harvesters will be jump-started pretty soon," said Woodland Mayor Art Pimentel, whose 55,000 residents are 48 percent Latino, some of them undocumented.

Some aren't sticking around for the upcoming tomato harvest, said Sylvina Frausto, secretary of Holy Rosary Church in Woodland. "Some have a small parcel in Mexico. They own their own home there, so instead of renting here they go back to their small business there."

Many raise animals, run grocery stores or sell fruits and goods on street corners.

"They're going back home because they can't get medical help or government assistance anymore," Frausto said, "And when it's getting so difficult for them to find a job without proper documentation, it's pushing them away."

Anita Barnes, director of La Familia Counseling Center on Franklin Boulevard in Sacramento, said she recently spoke to a high school graduate who had lost his job in a restaurant and was thinking of going back to Mexico.

"He came over with his mom, who was in the process of losing her restaurant job," Barnes said. "It's frightening, especially for the children. They feel this is their country, they don't know anything else, and they find they can't get driver's licenses or jobs."

As its economy rebounds, Mexico "is becoming a better option than it was in the past, but you still have to find a job and reconnect," Barnes said.

While the weakened U.S. economy, rising deportations and tougher border enforcement have led to fewer undocumented migrants, changes in Mexico are playing a significant role, González Gutiérrez said.

Mexico's average standard of living – including health, education and per capita income – is now higher than those in Russia, China and India, according to the United Nations.

Mexico's growing middle class "reduces the appetites to come because there are simply many more options" at home, González Gutiérrez said. "Most people who decided to migrate already have a job in Mexico and tend to be the most ambitious and attracted to the income gap between the U.S. and Mexico."

Mexico's economy is growing at 4 percent to 5 percent, benefiting from low inflation, exports and a strong banking system, the consul said.

Mexico's birthrate is also declining sharply. "As a natural consequence of us transforming from a rural to an urban society, we are running out of Mexicans to export," González Gutiérrez said. "Our society's growing at a rate of 2.1 children per woman – in the 1970s it was more than five."

Once the U.S. economy recovers, the flow of migrants moving north "may go up again, although most likely they will not reach the peak levels we saw in the first half of the decade," González Gutiérrez said.

mlyonsd
07-29-2011, 01:42 PM
Maybe Obama does have an illegal immigration plan after all. It's disguised as his economic plan.

He may be more brilliant than I was giving him credit for.

RNR
07-29-2011, 02:12 PM
I hope the trend continues as far as illegals leaving~

KC native
07-29-2011, 03:09 PM
hey, whaddayaknow, no jobs and they go back home. Funny how that works huh?

HonestChieffan
07-29-2011, 03:12 PM
Its an Obama success story. Destroy the economy and they leave like lice off a dead cat.

vailpass
07-29-2011, 04:09 PM
Turn on the light and some of the cockroaches scramble. Many many remain, we still need an exterminator.

Donger
07-29-2011, 04:31 PM
hey, whaddayaknow, no jobs and they go back home. Funny how that works huh?

10% (in California) is a good start, but you'll note that there are still 2.6 million in that state alone.

BucEyedPea
07-29-2011, 04:40 PM
Maybe Mexico should start a war with Guatemala. That ought to do it, right donger?

Donger
07-29-2011, 04:46 PM
Maybe Mexico should start a war with Guatemala. That ought to do it, right donger?

Whatever keeps their citizens from coming here illegally, sure.

vailpass
07-29-2011, 05:02 PM
Maybe Mexico should start a war with Guatemala. That ought to do it, right donger?

There aren't enough jumper cables in the world to keep that war going.

Jenson71
07-29-2011, 05:28 PM
Actualy, credit to the Bush adminisration is due here for some off this

BucEyedPea
07-29-2011, 05:40 PM
Whatever keeps their citizens from coming here illegally, sure.

I meant for improving their economy.

CrazyPhuD
07-29-2011, 06:40 PM
hey, whaddayaknow, no jobs and they go back home. Funny how that works huh?

It's the no brainer to immigration enforcement, if you want to reduce illegal immigration you don't need to lock down the borders, you just need to prevent them from getting jobs. So implementing changes like requiring SSN validation AND significant penalties for employing illegals and you can resolve much of the issue.

KC native
07-29-2011, 06:49 PM
It's the no brainer to immigration enforcement, if you want to reduce illegal immigration you don't need to lock down the borders, you just need to prevent them from getting jobs. So implementing changes like requiring SSN validation AND significant penalties for employing illegals and you can resolve much of the issue.

Yea, I've repeatedly said that.

mlyonsd
07-29-2011, 07:06 PM
Maybe Mexico can pick up Krugman as an UFA so more will leave.

healthpellets
07-29-2011, 08:35 PM
It's the no brainer to immigration enforcement, if you want to reduce illegal immigration you don't need to lock down the borders, you just need to prevent them from getting jobs. So implementing changes like requiring SSN validation AND significant penalties for employing illegals and you can resolve much of the issue.

so you're anti business?

CrazyPhuD
07-29-2011, 09:27 PM
so you're anti business?

about as close to the exact opposite as you can be since I run my own business. But the simple reality is illegal immigrants are this generation's slaves if we don't fix the problem we're just going to have another class mess on our hands.

The other reality is that people will only do thing when it is in their interest to do so. Right now it is in business interests to support illegal immigration since they will always work for cheaper(i.e. they have little to no negotiating power to do otherwise). So long as the penalty for hiring and using illegal immigrants is small there will be little incentive not to use them. The only way to get them not to hire illegals is to now make it a significant financial disincentive to do so and to give them the tools to not only check employment status but ideally also reduce fraud.

Morally business owners shouldn't need the incentive not to hire illegals but many will do so anyway because there is a financial incentive to do so. SO you have to take that financial incentive away to get them to actually obey the law. Is it really anti-business to ask that other business owners obey the laws already on the books?

Plus which is really more civil for everyone involved? Jailing and deporting people who are here illegally, or having them choose to leave on their own(or not have even come in the first place).

I'm not saying the country should be anti-immigrant, in face you would find me supporting bringing many more people here legally. Right now our immigration system is totally fucked, we are driving out some of the best that other countries have to offer because they are following the system and instead we keep the lowest who ignores the rules entirely with little punishment.

If for business reasons it is decided that we need that extraordinarily cheap labor then we can expand the guest worker programs to bring them back legally. The difference is legal and controlled, versus illegal and unregulated.

Hell the other way to solve the problem outside of enforcement is to merely make them all citizens, then you would again take away the 'cheap' labor factor since they have all the rights and protections of citizens. It would be interesting to see how many lost their jobs within a year, but I would bet it would be high. The difference in this case is that you would see fewer return home. Many might choose to stay and remain on welfare/unemployment rolls.

RNR
07-30-2011, 05:04 AM
It's the no brainer to immigration enforcement, if you want to reduce illegal immigration you don't need to lock down the borders, you just need to prevent them from getting jobs. So implementing changes like requiring SSN validation AND significant penalties for employing illegals and you can resolve much of the issue.

We need both~

healthpellets
07-30-2011, 07:10 AM
If for business reasons it is decided that we need that extraordinarily cheap labor then we can expand the guest worker programs to bring them back legally.

or eliminate the minimum wage...

Ace Gunner
07-30-2011, 09:54 AM
Its an Obama success story. Destroy the economy and they leave like lice off a dead cat.

all this happened over night

















































lol

CrazyPhuD
07-30-2011, 05:57 PM
or eliminate the minimum wage...

Hey you'll get no disagreement from me here, just because until they show me hard data otherwise, I tend to believe it's fantasyland, raising wages artificially just raises costs which are then passed on to the consumer, which you then need to raise minimum wage again because things are more expensive and so forth.....seems a silly cycle....

healthpellets
07-30-2011, 07:00 PM
Hey you'll get no disagreement from me here, just because until they show me hard data otherwise, I tend to believe it's fantasyland, raising wages artificially just raises costs which are then passed on to the consumer, which you then need to raise minimum wage again because things are more expensive and so forth.....seems a silly cycle....

also raises unemployment, creates artificial barriers to entry to the workforce, and takes away the liberty of an individual to contract for his labor at a rate of his choosing.