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HonestChieffan
08-12-2011, 07:19 AM
And we wonder why we are in the economic shitter we are in...


30,000 college students kicked out of food aid program in Michigan

State's new eligibility rules to save $75M; more students got aid than thought
Paul Egan/ Detroit News Lansing Bureau

Lansing Michigan has removed about 30,000 college students from its food stamp program close to double the initial estimate saving about $75 million a year, says Human Services Director Maura Corrigan.

Federal rules don't allow most college students to collect food stamps, but Michigan had created its own rules that made nearly all students eligible, said Brian Rooney, Corrigan's deputy director. As a result, the number of Michigan college students on this form of welfare made the state a national leader. For example, Michigan had 10 times the number of students on food stamps as either Illinois or California, Rooney said.

Cutting off the students is part of what Corrigan says is an effort to change the culture of the state's welfare department and slash tens of millions of dollars of waste, fraud and abuse.

"Maybe (students) could go get a part-time job that's what I did," said Corrigan, a former justice of the Michigan Supreme Court who attended Detroit's Marygrove College and University of Detroit Mercy School of Law.

"We want to encourage people to be self-sufficient, not to be dependent on the government," she said in an interview with The Detroit News.

But critics say state funding has shrunk and tuition has skyrocketed since Corrigan attended college in the late '60s and early '70s. They cite Michigan's still-battered economy and say the suffering the cuts will create won't be apparent until after cash-strapped students return to campuses this fall.

Corrigan, appointed by Republican Gov. Rick Snyder in January to head the $6.9 billion Department of Human Services, has also ordered administrators to start looking at applicants' assets, not just their income. That move follows an uproar after it was revealed Leroy Fick of Auburn remained eligible for food stamps and continued using them after he won $2 million in the state lottery TV show "Make Me Rich!" in June 2010.
If cutting millionaires off food stamps is a no-brainer, some say cutting off most students is less clear cut.

Kayla Neff, a 19-year-old Spanish and computer science student at Central Michigan University who qualified for food stamps in September, said it's tough to find a job in Michigan, particularly for students with little experience.

Neff said she and her father share about $150 a month in grocery money from the program, which "made all the difference in the world," but her eligibility is now under review.

"Students should be focusing on their education, not whether or not they'll be able to eat dinner or whether they can manage to find a job and balance it on top of their studies," Neff said in a Friday email interview from Mount Pleasant.

CMU was singled out by Corrigan as having publicized students' eligibility for food stamps on the university's website. University spokesman Steven Smith said Friday he wanted to research the issue, but "I am confident no official CMU site would promote this kind of activity."

The number of students taken off food stamps was close to double the estimate of 10,000 to 18,000 before the policy change was implemented in April.
Under the federally funded program, college students generally aren't eligible, Rooney said. But Michigan had created an exception for those participating in a valid employment and training program. Employment training was defined as attending college, he said.
Corrigan said one large Michigan school, which she did not identify, had 3,500 students on the program.

Many see using food stamps while attending school as a scam, and former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick described it in much that way in his new autobiography.
Kilpatrick, who was recently released from state prison after serving time for violating probation and awaits trial on federal corruption charges, revealed he used food stamps when he attended Florida A&M University in the late 1980s and early 1990s. At the time, his mother was a state representative and his father was a top Wayne County official.
"The food stamp game is an old hook-up in neighborhoods from Detroit to Tallahassee," Kilpatrick said in the book. "If you could get them, especially as a struggling college student, then you did."

Though still commonly known as food stamps, the state's Food Assistance Program now uses debit cards called Bridge Cards to provide assistance to eligible recipients.
Even after the recent removal of 30,000 college students from the food stamp program, close to 2 million Michigan residents one in five are on the program, Rooney said.
Not all college students have been kicked off food stamps. For instance, single moms who go to school can still be eligible, as can certain students who work at least 20 hours a week.

Still, critics say Corrigan's changes are too sweeping and each student's case should be examined on its merits.

Nate Smith-Tyge, director of the Michigan State University Student Food Bank, said the stereotypical profile of the middle-class freshman getting dropped off at the new dorm room by Mom and Dad no longer applies.
"A more nuanced approach would have been more humane," Smith-Tyge said. "This sort of carte blanche decision is going to adversely affect people who really needed it. At what cost does it eliminate some abuse?"
Corrigan also detailed steps she is taking to make sure big lottery winners can no longer get food stamps.

As part of its arrangement for federal funding, Michigan in 2000 opted to determine eligibility based only on income and not consider assets, partly because the program is easier to administer that way, Rooney said.

Starting Oct. 1, assets will also be considered in determining eligibility for new applicants, he said. The assets of existing food stamp recipients will also be examined as their cases are re-evaluated every six months.

"We're going to take a look at everyone in the system," he said.


From The Detroit News: http://detnews.com/article/20110808/POLITICS02/108080356/30-000-college-students-kicked-out-of-food-aid-program-in-Michigan#ixzz1UovUHbDr

LiveSteam
08-12-2011, 07:25 AM
Fuck Michigan
Huskers gonna kick they're asses

Bob Dole
08-12-2011, 08:12 AM
How the hell is that a good idea on any level? Most of the dorm rooms have limited, if any, food prep space. You can't use food stamps for the meal plan because you're buying prepared food. Most dorm rooms are going to cost less than renting a house or an apartment (unless you pile 8 people in a 2 BR and split the rent). Bob Dole would be willing to bet that about 70% of the food stamps issued were sold off for $.50 on the dollar, anyway.

ROYC75
08-12-2011, 08:15 AM
Bob Dole would be willing to bet that about 70% of the food stamps issued were sold off for $.50 on the dollar, anyway.

There is a lot of that going on in the country.

AndChiefs
08-12-2011, 09:11 AM
Everyone I knew that had foodstamps in college used it to have steak dinners a few times a month. That's not to say there's not a legitimate need by some college students but the vast majority use it just because they see they can.

Saul Good
08-12-2011, 11:19 AM
How the hell is that a good idea on any level? Most of the dorm rooms have limited, if any, food prep space. You can't use food stamps for the meal plan because you're buying prepared food. Most dorm rooms are going to cost less than renting a house or an apartment (unless you pile 8 people in a 2 BR and split the rent). Bob Dole would be willing to bet that about 70% of the food stamps issued were sold off for $.50 on the dollar, anyway.

Cheaper than apartments? Dorms are double the price of apartments.

vailpass
08-12-2011, 11:25 AM
College kids on food stamps? OMFG. Is there no shame? Good on Michigan.

Mr. Kotter
08-12-2011, 11:29 AM
This is a legitimate outrage. Food stamps for college kids--just friggin' stupid.

:shake:

Bob Dole
08-12-2011, 11:43 AM
Cheaper than apartments? Dorms are double the price of apartments.

$2500/semester (4 months) is not more expensive than the apartments around here...

vailpass
08-12-2011, 11:49 AM
$2500/semester (4 months) is not more expensive than the apartments around here...

Is food included in dorm prices?

Saul Good
08-12-2011, 11:53 AM
$2500/semester (4 months) is not more expensive than the apartments around here...

I find it very unlikely that you can't find a shitty apartment in your area for less than $625 per bedroom per month.

LOCOChief
08-12-2011, 12:13 PM
Is food included in dorm prices?

Not that I have ever seen.

LOCOChief
08-12-2011, 12:14 PM
I find it very unlikely that you can't find a shitty apartment in your area for less than $625 per bedroom per month.

Yeah and a dorm that is $2,500 per semester is going to be shitty.

vailpass
08-12-2011, 12:15 PM
Not that I have ever seen.

When I was in school dorm kids had room and board plans. I'm guessing this varies by school.

Jenson71
08-12-2011, 08:55 PM
Typically, colleges will require dorm students to purchase a meal plan. There is a little leeway on what they got. For instance, my freshman year, I got 14 meals/wk and $250/semester to spend at the campus deli/convenience stores. But I could have gotten 16 meals, or 12 meals, or even 21.

Not many students I know sat in their dorms eating ramen noodles like generations before. Most got big meal plans that gave them access to cafeterias that are immense -- totally overdone. Ideally, a college cafeteria should give out moderate meals that fit nutritional guidelines. But instead, it's a ****ing circus offering tons of choices that nobody really needs. The point for the colleges is to attract students, and when a high school senior enters campus and sees this whole thing, their eyes light up.

There's little reason for college students to go on welfare, even though it's true that state funding for colleges has gone down as a percentage of the college's budget. There are a few reasons for that, but students need to be savvy and thrifty. Eat ramen noodles, find student groups that enjoy free food, go to the church that offers free Tuesday meals afte Youth group. Welfare, though, is hard to justify.

petegz28
08-12-2011, 08:59 PM
Typically, colleges will require dorm students to purchase a meal plan. There is a little leeway on what they got. For instance, my freshman year, I got 14 meals/wk and $250/semester to spend at the campus deli/convenience stores. But I could have gotten 16 meals, or 12 meals, or even 21.

Not many students I know sat in their dorms eating ramen noodles like generations before. Most got big meal plans that gave them access to cafeterias that are immense -- totally overdone. Ideally, a college cafeteria should give out moderate meals that fit nutritional guidelines. But instead, it's a ****ing circus offering tons of choices that nobody really needs. The point for the colleges is to attract students, and when a high school senior enters campus and sees this whole thing, their eyes light up.

There's little reason for college students to go on welfare, even though it's true that state funding for colleges has gone down as a percentage of the college's budget. There are a few reasons for that, but students need to be savvy and thrifty. Eat ramen noodles, find student groups that enjoy free food, go to the church that offers free Tuesday meals afte Youth group. Welfare, though, is hard to justify.

Or get a part time job.....at a food joint even

KCTitus
08-12-2011, 09:02 PM
It was a state run program...so I dont really care since I dont live in Michigan. It's good to see they realized their folly and fixed the problem. A damn site better than the feds.

Garcia Bronco
08-13-2011, 12:39 AM
College kids on food stamps? OMFG. Is there no shame? Good on Michigan.

This. Part if the college experience is to get a job and hold down a full class load.

HonestChieffan
08-13-2011, 06:55 AM
It was a state run program...so I dont really care since I dont live in Michigan. It's good to see they realized their folly and fixed the problem. A damn site better than the feds.

Federal Money.

NaptownChief
08-13-2011, 11:42 AM
I find it very unlikely that you can't find a shitty apartment in your area for less than $625 per bedroom per month.


It was back in 1993 but I decided to go across the river(less than a mile away but the river divided the campus from the slums) and spliting a house with my roommate for a total of $325 per month. We had a nice apartment in the heart of campus the year before that was about $2000 split 4 ways. We decided to save money and just keep the shotgun loaded by my bed.

I wouldn't want my daughter doing that but making sacrifices is what life is all about. I could have had a lot nicer place but I wanted to come out of college without debt and I accomplished that by living cheap and working. Being responsible is a foreign concept to most people these days.

Bwana
08-13-2011, 06:31 PM
It was back in 1993 but I decided to go across the river(less than a mile away but the river divided the campus from the slums) and spliting a house with my roommate for a total of $325 per month. We had a nice apartment in the heart of campus the year before that was about $2000 split 4 ways. We decided to save money and just keep the shotgun loaded by my bed.

I wouldn't want my daughter doing that but making sacrifices is what life is all about. I could have had a lot nicer place but I wanted to come out of college without debt and I accomplished that by living cheap and working. Being responsible is a foreign concept to most people these days.

Good for you and fantastic post. :thumb: