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Rain Man
09-10-2011, 09:54 PM
A few quick flooring questions if you don't mind.

1. How much does it cost to put down about 1,000 square feet of hardwood in an office-type environment? Assume it's the most popular type of wood and ... what else? It's all in one irregularly shaped room. (We're talking rough, rough estimates here - I won't sue you if you're wrong.)

2. In an office-type environment, is one better off to use hardwood or to go with Pergo or some similar material? And if the answer is Pergo, how much would Pergo cost in Question 1? (The office environment is very low-traffic for the most part, and pretty much all people walking.)

3. How much is it to use a slightly above average carpet instead of wood/Pergo?

4. If I wanted to buy a big rug with a company logo on it (like 12'x12', and a comfy indoor rug and not a welcome mat), where's my best deal on that? (And do you want to give me a bid?)

RJ
09-10-2011, 10:38 PM
A few quick flooring questions if you don't mind.

1. How much does it cost to put down about 1,000 square feet of hardwood in an office-type environment? Assume it's the most popular type of wood and ... what else? It's all in one irregularly shaped room. (We're talking rough, rough estimates here - I won't sue you if you're wrong.)

2. In an office-type environment, is one better off to use hardwood or to go with Pergo or some similar material? And if the answer is Pergo, how much would Pergo cost in Question 1? (The office environment is very low-traffic for the most part, and pretty much all people walking.)

3. How much is it to use a slightly above average carpet instead of wood/Pergo?

4. If I wanted to buy a big rug with a company logo on it (like 12'x12', and a comfy indoor rug and not a welcome mat), where's my best deal on that? (And do you want to give me a bid?)


1) A lot depends on labor costs in your market and how it would be installed - nailed, glued or floated. So this is vague but the range might be $5-$10 per s/f.

2) Do you own or lease the space? Wood is usually more expensive than laminate but if it's a space you own you'll be adding value. Laminates might range from about $4-$8. laminates designed for commercial use would be a little more but might not be necessary if the area is light to moderate traffic.

3) A mid to high-mid commercial carpet completely installed would be probably $2.50-$3.00 s/f. Low end stuff could be found for under $2.00. If you want it to last buy a nylon product, if you want it more temporary buy a polypropylene.

4) Sorry, no clue, but I do know people who do such things.


In commercial work, prices often vary depending on who is moving furniture and equipment, whether night and weekend work is required and generally how much of a PITA the job will be. Making the work easier will save you $$.

As always, I advise to Support Your Local Flooring dealer. They'll usually give you better value and better service than the home centers.

Offer not valid in Puerto Rico.

Hope this helps.

notorious
09-10-2011, 10:44 PM
Concrete or wood subfloor?


I am thinking a raw distressed wood with Lobasol oil. In a commercial enviroment the dings and scratches will blend with the distessed wood and the Lobasol oil can be blended to touch up worn areas.


9-15/foot for material and install depending on your wood species. Laminate will hold up better then a pre-finished wood floor in a commercial enviroment, but it looks fake in comparison.

RJ
09-10-2011, 10:57 PM
Concrete or wood subfloor?


I am thinking a raw distressed wood with Lobasol oil. In a commercial enviroment the dings and scratches will blend with the distessed wood and the Lobasol oil can be blended to touch up worn areas.


9-15/foot for material and install depending on your wood species. Laminate will hold up better then a pre-finished wood floor in a commercial enviroment, but it looks fake in comparison.


I'm thinking he's on concrete/gypcrete.

Do you like to glue down 3/4" solids? Some of the adhesive manufacturers say they will warranty but I can't get past my skepticism.

notorious
09-10-2011, 10:59 PM
I'm thinking he's on concrete/gypcrete.

Do you like to glue down 3/4" solids? Some of the adhesive manufacturers say they will warranty but I can't get past my skepticism.

Engineered all the way.


3/4" Solid moves to much for me to feel safe putting in on concrete over a large area, especially if it is wide planks, hickory, etc. Concrete is almost always bleeding some moisture, and even though Denver is fairly consistant in humidity, it would still keep me up at night.

RJ
09-10-2011, 11:02 PM
Engineered all the way.


3/4" Solid moves to much for me to feel safe putting in on concrete over a large area, especially if it is wide planks, hickory, etc. Denver is fairly consistant in humidity, but it would still keep me up at night.

I agree. I was curious if I was maybe just being stubborn.

notorious
09-10-2011, 11:04 PM
I agree. I was curious if I was maybe just being stubborn.

Nope, you are being safe and smart.


Most reps rarely use the products they push, so the information is usually skewed (No offense ;)).


I've heard some good ones before.

RJ
09-10-2011, 11:17 PM
Nope, you are being safe and smart.


Most reps rarely use the products they push, so the information is usually skewed (No offense ;)).


I've heard some good ones before.


No offense taken. I'm the type of salesman who informs more than pushes. The solid vs engineered topic is one that I deal with frequently. Here in New Mexico we have a dry climate and usually go over concrete. I know I lose some sales by advising against solid woods but better that than to go back and replace them later.

Hey, I think we've hijacked Rain Man's thread.

Rain Man
09-11-2011, 12:05 AM
Thanks, fellas.

It's a space we're considering leasing, and we'd be in for about five years. The layout of the space is that there's an enormous front room/lobby that's got a kitchen area in it, and we're leaning against carpeting for that reason. We want something nice that will pop when visitors walk in, but I was afraid of the cost of hardwood, which is being suggested.

It's in a downtown high-rise, so I suspect it's a concrete floor.

Are the costs you're estimating counting installation, or is that separate?

Many thanks for the input, too.

Rain Man
09-11-2011, 12:07 AM
And what about bamboo? Is bamboo a viable option?

RJ
09-14-2011, 08:37 PM
I think we were both talking installed prices, though I should mention that labor prices vary between markets.

I sell a lot of bamboo. If you use bamboo I would suggest a strand woven product glued to the concrete. But I would also tell you that if you talked to 10 different flooring people you'd probably get 10 different opinions about bamboo.

Would your office decor work well with bamboo?

Dave Lane
09-15-2011, 09:32 AM
Kevin, Here's a floor I did at my house last year for $.72 a square foot. No flooring installer would like it but it looks interesting and contemporary to me but maybe you are looking for more traditional.

Donger
09-15-2011, 09:35 AM
Kevin, Here's a floor I did at my house last year for $.72 a square foot. No flooring installer would like it but it looks interesting and contemporary to me but maybe you are looking for more traditional.

Are those square holes in the floor?

Dave Lane
09-15-2011, 09:37 AM
Yes

Groves
09-15-2011, 09:38 AM
Kevin, Here's a floor I did at my house last year for $.72 a square foot. No flooring installer would like it but it looks interesting and contemporary to me but maybe you are looking for more traditional.

I'll bite.

Are those holes for ice fishing? ever changing volleyball standards? cool "see the downstairs" windows?

Donger
09-15-2011, 09:42 AM
Yes

Okay.

Dave Lane
09-15-2011, 09:42 AM
For glass blocks.

ChiTown
09-15-2011, 09:43 AM
For glass blocks.

for wha? I no get

Dave Lane
09-15-2011, 09:43 AM
Okay.

I figured a Donger question deserved a Donger response.

:D

Dave Lane
09-15-2011, 09:45 AM
Here's without the glass blocks but you probably get the idea its very cool and I figured if I was building on to the house what not try something different. it turned out way cool.

ChiTown
09-15-2011, 09:47 AM
Here's without the glass blocks but you probably get the idea its very cool and I figured if I was building on to the house what not try something different. it turned out way cool.

It's certainly unique. What room is that in your house, if I may ask?

Dave Lane
09-15-2011, 09:49 AM
Here's the wall next to the room and separates my office from the man cave.

Donger
09-15-2011, 09:49 AM
It's certainly unique. What room is that in your house, if I may ask?

The disco.

Dave Lane
09-15-2011, 09:50 AM
It's certainly unique. What room is that in your house, if I may ask?

The man cave of course :)

ChiTown
09-15-2011, 09:52 AM
The man cave of course :)

That's what I assumed, but I didn't see a bar, TV or any sort of bean bag, so I thought I'd ask.

Dave Lane
09-15-2011, 09:56 AM
Here's how it looks with furniture

mikeyis4dcats.
09-15-2011, 11:16 AM
nice lumber stamps......a belt sander would do wonders.

Dave Lane
09-15-2011, 11:58 AM
Ehhh I thought about doing it and then they kinda grew on me. Its a retro industrial look so why the hell not.

Ceej
09-15-2011, 12:15 PM
Pardon my ramble. I'm in Vegas and replying via my phone. The main concern is durability. Laminate is by far the most durable product we carry. Those range from .69-$2.99/sf. Obviously the cheaper laminates you get what you pay for. If you'd prefer a wood product we recommend something distressed or the strand bamboos. Our strand bamboos start at $3.99/sf. We also have 4 which are SOLID 3/8" or 9/16" floating bamboos. However, I'm going to assume this is a relatively wide open, square office area. It's recommended to put in some sort of transition piece between 25-30 constant running feet. Also too we offer a product called Elastilon. Essentially it turns any solid floor in to a floating wood floor. The adantages of that is 40-50% more efficient install, you can walk on it right after it's installed and it allows wood to breathe more so than glue does. Anyway, I'm not plugging my company at all just giving you opptions. Basic floating installation starts at 1.99/sf, glue or nail down is 2.69/sf. Hope this helps.

Dave Lane
09-15-2011, 12:17 PM
Oh and my floor was $.57 a foot after I looked it up plus install of course. Solid 3/4" wood.