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Ugly Duck
09-21-2011, 09:50 PM
Bleeding-heart Liberal Countries (no death penalty):
Canada
United Kingdom
Australia
Germany
Austria
Belgium
Mexico
Denmark
Ireland
Italy
New Zealand
Norway
Portugal
South Africa
Spain

Conservative countries (death penalty):
China
Cuba
North Korea
Iran
Palestinian Authority
United States
Pakistan
Syria
Saudi Arabia
India
Afghanistan

AustinChief
09-21-2011, 10:05 PM
Bleeding-heart Liberal Countries (no death penalty):
Canada
United Kingdom
Australia
Germany
Austria
Belgium
Mexico
Denmark
Ireland
Italy
New Zealand
Norway
Portugal
South Africa
Spain

Conservative countries (death penalty):
China
Cuba
North Korea
Iran
Palestinian Authority
United States
Pakistan
Syria
Saudi Arabia
India
Afghanistan

Add Bahamas, Belarus, Belize, Israel, India, Japan, Russia and South Korea to the death penalty countries...

KILLER_CLOWN
09-21-2011, 10:11 PM
Troy Davis execution delayed while US supreme court considers stay

The US Supreme Court has rejected a last-ditch request to halt the execution of Troy Davis, the Georgia death row inmate convicted of murdering a police officer.

The nation's highest court refused to stay the execution of Davis, who had been scheduled to die by lethal injection at 7pm EDT (11pm GMT) at a prison in Jackson, Georgia.

It took the court more than four hours to issue its one-sentence order, an unusually long time in such cases. The delay gave rise to hopes that the judges would agree to a stay.

Brian Kammer, a lawyer for Davis, said in seeking a stay from the supreme court that newly available evidence revealed false, misleading and inaccurate information was presented at the trial, "rendering the convictions and death sentence fundamentally unreliable."

As the first news of a delay came in at the Jackson prison that houses death row, a huge cheer erupted from a crowd of more than 500 protesters that had amassed on the other side of the road.

Davis's supporters kissed each other and threw placards which read "Not in my name" into the air.

But the jubilation was short-lived. Talk of a reprieve from the US supreme court quickly gave way to rumours of a stay, and finally the realisation that the court had only ordered a temporary delay as it considered the matter. The mood then grew more sombre as the waiting game that has now been going on for years with Davis resumed.

Earlier on Wednesday, Georgia's supreme court had rejected a last-ditch appeal by Davis's lawyers over the 1989 murder of off-duty policeman Mark MacPhail, for which Davis had been convicted despite overwhelming evidence that the conviction is unreliable.

A Butts county superior court judge had also declined to stop the execution.

Davis's attorneys had filed an appeal challenging ballistics evidence linking Davis to the crime, and eyewitness testimony identifying Davis as the killer.

The White House declined to comment on the case, saying: "It is not appropriate for the president of the United States to weigh in on specific cases."

At the maximum security prison in Jackson where the execution was scheduled to take place, busloads of Troy Davis supporters from his home town of Savannah came in to register their anger and despair at what they all agree is the planned judicial killing of an innocent man.

Edward DuBose, a leader of the Georgia branch of the NAACP, said it was not an execution, but a "murder".

The protest heard from Martina Correia, Davis's eldest sister, who delivered a statement from about 20 family members gathered around her. She was heavily critical of what she described as the defiance of the state of Georgia and its inability to admit that it had made a mistake.

She pointed out that the state's parole board had vowed in 2007 that no execution would take place if there was any doubt. "Every year there is more and more doubt yet still the state pushes for an execution," she said.

Correia, who has cancer, struggled to her feet in honour of her brother, just a few hours from his probable death. But she exhorted people not to give up.

"if you can get millions of people to stand up against this you can end the death penalty. We shouldn't have to live in a state that executes people when there's doubt."

DuBose gave an account of a 30-minute conversation he had with Davis on death row on Tuesday night. "Troy wanted me to let you know – keep the faith. The fight is bigger than him."

DuBose said that whether the execution went ahead or not, the fight would continue. He said Davis wants his case to set an example "that the death penalty in this country needs to end. They call it execution; we call it murder."

Hundreds of people gathered outside the prison, many wearing T-shirts that said: "I am Troy Davis". The activist Al Sharpton said: "What is facing execution tonight is not just the body of Troy Davis, but the spirit of due justice in the state of Georgia."

Larry Coz, the executive director of Amnesty in the US, which has led the international campaign for clemency, said demonstrations were happening outside US embassies in France, Mali, Hong Kong, Peru, Germany and the UK.

"We will not stop fighting until we live in a world where no state thinks it can kill innocent people."

After winning three delays since 2007, Davis lost an appeal for clemency this week when the Georgia pardons board denied his request, despite serious doubts about his guilt.

Some witnesses who testified against Davis at trial later recanted, and others who did not testify came forward to say another man did it. But a federal judge dismissed those accounts as "largely smoke and mirrors" after a hearing Davis was granted last year to argue for a new trial, which he did not win.

Davis refused a last meal. He planned to spend his final hours meeting with friends, family and supporters.

Davis has received support from hundreds of thousands of people, including a former FBI director, former president Jimmy Carter and Pope Benedict XVI.

Parliamentarians and government ministers from the Council of Europe, the EU's human rights watchdog, had earlier called for Davis's sentence to be commuted.

Renate Wohlwend of the council's parliamentary assembly said: "To carry out this irrevocable act now would be a terrible mistake, which could lead to a tragic injustice".

The US supreme court gave him an unusual opportunity to prove his innocence last year, but his attorneys failed to convince a judge he did not do it.

State and federal courts have repeatedly upheld his conviction.

Prosecutors say they have no doubt they charged the right person, and MacPhail's family lobbied the pardons board Monday to reject Davis's clemency appeal. The board refused to stop the execution a day later.

"He has had ample time to prove his innocence," said MacPhail's widow, Joan MacPhail-Harris. "And he is not innocent."

Spencer Lawton, the district attorney who secured Davis's conviction in 1991, said he was embarrassed for the judicial system that the execution has taken so long.

"What we have had is a manufactured appearance of doubt which has taken on the quality of legitimate doubt itself. And all of it is exquisitely unfair," said Lawton, who retired as Chatham County's head prosecutor in 2008.

"The good news is we live in a civilized society where questions like this are decided based on fact in open and transparent courts of law, and not on street corners."

Davis supporters pushed the pardons board to reconsider his case.

They also asked Savannah prosecutors to block the execution, although Chatham County district attorney Larry Chisolm said in a statement he was powerless to withdraw an execution order for Davis issued by a state superior court judge.

"We appreciate the outpouring of interest in this case; however, this matter is beyond our control," Chisolm said.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/sep/22/troy-davis-execution-delayed?newsfeed=true

blaise
09-21-2011, 10:11 PM
I don't see why I should care what another country's views are on the death penalty. Either you support it as a method of punishment or you don't.

AustinChief
09-21-2011, 10:13 PM
And let's not forgot those paragons of freedom Albania, Cambodia, Columbia, Haiti, Rwanda, Serbia and Turkey... all of which have no death penalty....

Gonna have to call EPIC BULLSHIT on your thread here... sorry.

blaise
09-21-2011, 10:14 PM
Isn't Norway the place where they're only going to keep the guy who killed 80 people in prison for like 20 years?

JonesCrusher
09-21-2011, 10:26 PM
http://wackyiraqi.com/wtf/best_thread_ever.jpg
(http://www.google.com/imgres?q=best+thread+ever&um=1&hl=en&client=firefox-a&sa=N&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&biw=1366&bih=624&tbm=isch&tbnid=dZkM9gqgGchrBM:&imgrefurl=http://www.azfixed.com/vanilla2/comments.php%3FDiscussionID%3D3987%26page%3D5&docid=KskunQCfPFg5kM&w=267&h=400&ei=qbd6TsetGIPbgQeyjumrAQ&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=750&vpy=137&dur=26319&hovh=275&hovw=183&tx=63&ty=299&page=1&tbnh=119&tbnw=81&start=0&ndsp=26&ved=1t:429,r:4,s:0)

BigMeatballDave
09-21-2011, 10:35 PM
Doesn't California have the death penalty?

Edit: Yes they do. States decide whether or not to have capital punishment. Uber fail, UD.

mikey23545
09-21-2011, 11:52 PM
I think we need to find out where the U.N. stands on the death penalty.

lostcause
09-22-2011, 01:37 AM
Doesn't California have the death penalty?

Edit: Yes they do. States decide whether or not to have capital punishment. Uber fail, UD.

Yes, states decide. However, if the federal government outlawed the death penalty - it would be abolished unilaterally. Of course that would impact a lot of jobs in Texas.

Chief Faithful
09-22-2011, 05:56 AM
Yes, states decide. However, if the federal government outlawed the death penalty - it would be abolished unilaterally. Of course that would impact a lot of jobs in Texas.

True, but some of us are fighting to see less big central government control. The current move toward fascist policies is very disturbing.

Interesting how Davis is so interested in saving his own life, but demonstrated so little interest in the lives of others.

stevieray
09-22-2011, 06:21 AM
....don't fret, UD, liberals made sure that at least 1000 unwanted babies will die everyday.

BucEyedPea
09-22-2011, 06:56 AM
Bleeding-heart Liberal Countries (no death penalty):
Canada
United Kingdom
Australia
Germany
Austria
Belgium
Mexico
Denmark
Ireland
Italy
New Zealand
Norway
Portugal
South Africa
Spain

Conservative countries (death penalty):
China
Cuba
North Korea
Iran
Palestinian Authority
United States
Pakistan
Syria
Saudi Arabia
India
Afghanistan

China and Cuba are Conservative countries? Since when?

ClevelandBronco
09-22-2011, 07:28 AM
It's comforting to see that the point isn't cluttering your head, honey.

patteeu
09-22-2011, 07:50 AM
It's comforting to see that the point isn't cluttering your head, honey.

LMAO Clutter-free!

ChiTown
09-22-2011, 07:50 AM
Add Bahamas, Belarus, Belize, Israel, India, Japan, Russia and South Korea to the death penalty countries...

Stop it. UD is trying to make a point. Let him continue on his run to being Top 'Tard

mlyonsd
09-22-2011, 08:25 AM
Can someone give me a reason why I should give a flying **** what other countries do?

KILLER_CLOWN
09-22-2011, 08:29 AM
Can someone give me a reason why I should give a flying **** what other countries do?

Because every other country hates us for our freedoms. ;)

ROYC75
09-22-2011, 09:31 AM
Makes me wonder how UD makes it through duck season every year ?

http://cdn.kmdl101.com/LPs/pp//duck-hunt-lp-10/images/Duck_Hunt_LPs.gif

NaptownChief
09-22-2011, 09:33 AM
One thing I can make out from those lists is that I have a hunch the Death Penalty countries wouldn't have one of their major cities destroyed by deadbeat kids night after night looting and not be able to stop it.

Very proud to live in a country that has a spine and a big brass set.

fan4ever
09-22-2011, 11:58 AM
...maybe Obama can go on another apology tour for our barbarism...I haven't seen him kiss the ass of any other world figures lately...his lips must be getting dry.

Lzen
09-28-2011, 11:33 AM
Troy Davis execution delayed while US supreme court considers stay

The US Supreme Court has rejected a last-ditch request to halt the execution of Troy Davis, the Georgia death row inmate convicted of murdering a police officer.

The nation's highest court refused to stay the execution of Davis, who had been scheduled to die by lethal injection at 7pm EDT (11pm GMT) at a prison in Jackson, Georgia.

It took the court more than four hours to issue its one-sentence order, an unusually long time in such cases. The delay gave rise to hopes that the judges would agree to a stay.

Brian Kammer, a lawyer for Davis, said in seeking a stay from the supreme court that newly available evidence revealed false, misleading and inaccurate information was presented at the trial, "rendering the convictions and death sentence fundamentally unreliable."

As the first news of a delay came in at the Jackson prison that houses death row, a huge cheer erupted from a crowd of more than 500 protesters that had amassed on the other side of the road.

Davis's supporters kissed each other and threw placards which read "Not in my name" into the air.

But the jubilation was short-lived. Talk of a reprieve from the US supreme court quickly gave way to rumours of a stay, and finally the realisation that the court had only ordered a temporary delay as it considered the matter. The mood then grew more sombre as the waiting game that has now been going on for years with Davis resumed.

Earlier on Wednesday, Georgia's supreme court had rejected a last-ditch appeal by Davis's lawyers over the 1989 murder of off-duty policeman Mark MacPhail, for which Davis had been convicted despite overwhelming evidence that the conviction is unreliable.

A Butts county superior court judge had also declined to stop the execution.

Davis's attorneys had filed an appeal challenging ballistics evidence linking Davis to the crime, and eyewitness testimony identifying Davis as the killer.

The White House declined to comment on the case, saying: "It is not appropriate for the president of the United States to weigh in on specific cases."

At the maximum security prison in Jackson where the execution was scheduled to take place, busloads of Troy Davis supporters from his home town of Savannah came in to register their anger and despair at what they all agree is the planned judicial killing of an innocent man.

Edward DuBose, a leader of the Georgia branch of the NAACP, said it was not an execution, but a "murder".

The protest heard from Martina Correia, Davis's eldest sister, who delivered a statement from about 20 family members gathered around her. She was heavily critical of what she described as the defiance of the state of Georgia and its inability to admit that it had made a mistake.

She pointed out that the state's parole board had vowed in 2007 that no execution would take place if there was any doubt. "Every year there is more and more doubt yet still the state pushes for an execution," she said.

Correia, who has cancer, struggled to her feet in honour of her brother, just a few hours from his probable death. But she exhorted people not to give up.

"if you can get millions of people to stand up against this you can end the death penalty. We shouldn't have to live in a state that executes people when there's doubt."

DuBose gave an account of a 30-minute conversation he had with Davis on death row on Tuesday night. "Troy wanted me to let you know keep the faith. The fight is bigger than him."

DuBose said that whether the execution went ahead or not, the fight would continue. He said Davis wants his case to set an example "that the death penalty in this country needs to end. They call it execution; we call it murder."

Hundreds of people gathered outside the prison, many wearing T-shirts that said: "I am Troy Davis". The activist Al Sharpton said: "What is facing execution tonight is not just the body of Troy Davis, but the spirit of due justice in the state of Georgia."

Larry Coz, the executive director of Amnesty in the US, which has led the international campaign for clemency, said demonstrations were happening outside US embassies in France, Mali, Hong Kong, Peru, Germany and the UK.

"We will not stop fighting until we live in a world where no state thinks it can kill innocent people."

After winning three delays since 2007, Davis lost an appeal for clemency this week when the Georgia pardons board denied his request, despite serious doubts about his guilt.

Some witnesses who testified against Davis at trial later recanted, and others who did not testify came forward to say another man did it. But a federal judge dismissed those accounts as "largely smoke and mirrors" after a hearing Davis was granted last year to argue for a new trial, which he did not win.

Davis refused a last meal. He planned to spend his final hours meeting with friends, family and supporters.

Davis has received support from hundreds of thousands of people, including a former FBI director, former president Jimmy Carter and Pope Benedict XVI.

Parliamentarians and government ministers from the Council of Europe, the EU's human rights watchdog, had earlier called for Davis's sentence to be commuted.

Renate Wohlwend of the council's parliamentary assembly said: "To carry out this irrevocable act now would be a terrible mistake, which could lead to a tragic injustice".

The US supreme court gave him an unusual opportunity to prove his innocence last year, but his attorneys failed to convince a judge he did not do it.

State and federal courts have repeatedly upheld his conviction.

Prosecutors say they have no doubt they charged the right person, and MacPhail's family lobbied the pardons board Monday to reject Davis's clemency appeal. The board refused to stop the execution a day later.

"He has had ample time to prove his innocence," said MacPhail's widow, Joan MacPhail-Harris. "And he is not innocent."

Spencer Lawton, the district attorney who secured Davis's conviction in 1991, said he was embarrassed for the judicial system that the execution has taken so long.

"What we have had is a manufactured appearance of doubt which has taken on the quality of legitimate doubt itself. And all of it is exquisitely unfair," said Lawton, who retired as Chatham County's head prosecutor in 2008.

"The good news is we live in a civilized society where questions like this are decided based on fact in open and transparent courts of law, and not on street corners."

Davis supporters pushed the pardons board to reconsider his case.

They also asked Savannah prosecutors to block the execution, although Chatham County district attorney Larry Chisolm said in a statement he was powerless to withdraw an execution order for Davis issued by a state superior court judge.

"We appreciate the outpouring of interest in this case; however, this matter is beyond our control," Chisolm said.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/sep/22/troy-davis-execution-delayed?newsfeed=true

COP-KILLER IS MEDIA'S LATEST BABY SEAL

September 21, 2011


For decades, liberals tried persuading Americans to abolish the death penalty, using their usual argument: hysterical sobbing.

Only when the media began lying about innocent people being executed did support for the death penalty begin to waver, falling from 80 percent to about 60 percent in a little more than a decade. (Silver lining: That's still more Americans than believe in man-made global warming.)

Fifty-nine percent of Americans now believe that an innocent man has been executed in the last five years. There is more credible evidence that space aliens have walked among us than that an innocent person has been executed in this country in the past 60 years, much less the past five years.

But unless members of the public are going to personally review trial transcripts in every death penalty case, they have no way of knowing the truth. The media certainly won't tell them.

It's nearly impossible to receive a death sentence these days -- unless you do something completely crazy like shoot a cop in full view of dozens of witnesses in a Burger King parking lot, only a few hours after shooting at a passing car while exiting a party.

That's what Troy Davis did in August 1989. Davis is the media's current baby seal of death row.

After a two-week trial with 34 witnesses for the state and six witnesses for the defense, the jury of seven blacks and five whites took less than two hours to convict Davis of Officer Mark MacPhail's murder, as well as various other crimes. Two days later, the jury sentenced Davis to death.

Now, a brisk 22 years after Davis murdered Officer MacPhail, his sentence will finally be administered this week -- barring any more of the legal shenanigans that have kept taxpayers on the hook for Davis' room and board for the past two decades.

(The average time on death row is 14 years. Then liberals turn around and triumphantly claim the death penalty doesn't have any noticeable deterrent effect. As the kids say: Duh.)

It has been claimed -- in The New York Times and Time magazine, for example -- that there was no "physical evidence" connecting Davis to the crimes that night.

Davis pulled out a gun and shot two strangers in public. What "physical evidence" were they expecting? No houses were broken into, no cars stolen, no rapes or fistfights accompanied the shootings. Where exactly would you look for DNA? And to prove what?

I suppose it would be nice if the shell casings from both shootings that night matched. Oh wait -- they did. That's "physical evidence."

It's true that the bulk of the evidence against Davis was eyewitness testimony. That tends to happen when you shoot someone in a busy Burger King parking lot.

Eyewitness testimony, like all evidence tending to show guilt, has gotten a bad name recently, but the "eyewitness" testimony in this case did not consist simply of strangers trying to distinguish one tall black man from another. For one thing, several of the eyewitnesses knew Davis personally.
The bulk of the eyewitness testimony established the following:

Two tall, young black men were harassing a vagrant in the Burger King parking lot, one in a yellow shirt and the other in a white Batman shirt. The one in the white shirt used a brown revolver to pistol-whip the vagrant. When a cop yelled at them to stop, the man in the white shirt ran, then wheeled around and shot the cop, walked over to his body and shot him again, smiling.

Some eyewitnesses described the shooter as wearing a white shirt, some said it was a white shirt with writing, and some identified it specifically as a white Batman shirt. Not one witness said the man in the yellow shirt pistol-whipped the vagrant or shot the cop.

Several of Davis' friends testified -- without recantation -- that he was the one in a white shirt. Several eyewitnesses, both acquaintances and strangers, specifically identified Davis as the one who shot Officer MacPhail.

Now the media claim that seven of the nine witnesses against Davis at trial have recanted.

First of all, the state presented 34 witnesses against Davis -- not nine -- which should give you some idea of how punctilious the media are about their facts in death penalty cases.

Among the witnesses who did not recant a word of their testimony against Davis were three members of the Air Force, who saw the shooting from their van in the Burger King drive-in lane. The airman who saw events clearly enough to positively identify Davis as the shooter explained on cross-examination, "You don't forget someone that stands over and shoots someone."

Recanted testimony is the least believable evidence since it proves only that defense lawyers managed to pressure some witnesses to alter their testimony, conveniently after the trial has ended. Even criminal lobbyist Justice William Brennan ridiculed post-trial recantations.

Three recantations were from friends of Davis, making minor or completely unbelievable modifications to their trial testimony. For example, one said he was no longer sure he saw Davis shoot the cop, even though he was five feet away at the time. His remaining testimony still implicated Davis.

One alleged recantation, from the vagrant's girlfriend (since deceased), wasn't a recantation at all, but rather reiterated all relevant parts of her trial testimony, which included a direct identification of Davis as the shooter.

Only two of the seven alleged "recantations" (out of 34 witnesses) actually recanted anything of value -- and those two affidavits were discounted by the court because Davis refused to allow the affiants to testify at the post-trial evidentiary hearing, even though one was seated right outside the courtroom, waiting to appear.

The court specifically warned Davis that his refusal to call his only two genuinely recanting witnesses would make their affidavits worthless. But Davis still refused to call them -- suggesting, as the court said, that their lawyer-drafted affidavits would not have held up under cross-examination.

With death penalty opponents so fixated on Davis' race -- he's black -- it ought to be noted that all the above witnesses are themselves African-American. The first man Davis shot in the car that night was African-American.

I notice that the people so anxious to return this sociopathic cop-killer to the street don't live in his neighborhood.

There's a reason more than a dozen courts have looked at Davis' case and refused to overturn his death sentence. He is as innocent as every other executed man since at least 1950, which is to say, guilty as hell.

COPYRIGHT 2011 ANN COULTER
http://www.anncoulter.com/columns/2011-09-21.html