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View Full Version : Science To quote Digg: "Science. It works, bitches."


jAZ
10-17-2011, 11:39 PM
http://digg.com/news/science/quantum_levitation_2

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BigMeatballDave
10-17-2011, 11:43 PM
Holy Shit

aturnis
10-17-2011, 11:45 PM
Super cool.

Caseyguyrr
10-17-2011, 11:50 PM
there are just some things i will never understand

AustinChief
10-17-2011, 11:54 PM
I made one of those WAY back in 1988! Mine was a Yttrium - Barium - Copper Oxide superconductor. I did the whole magnet float thing... woulda been WAY cooler if I had built a track though... man that just looks like a fun toy!

teedubya
10-17-2011, 11:55 PM
Next stop... landspeeders?

http://www.originalprop.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/tatooine-cantina-sandtrooper-landspeeder-high-definition.jpg

This is pretty cool.

aturnis
10-18-2011, 12:20 AM
So, if that thing is on the track, and you slap it really hard, and the only friction being are, how long would that sucker keep moving?

NJChiefsFan
10-18-2011, 12:25 AM
Man I love physics. Wish I understood more about it. I read the books and take some knowledge away, but not enough.

Phobia
10-18-2011, 12:26 AM
Move it to D.C.?

teedubya
10-18-2011, 12:27 AM
So, if that thing is on the track, and you slap it really hard, and the only friction being are, how long would that sucker keep moving?

From watching that video, the magnetic charge seems to slow it down a bit over time.

AustinChief
10-18-2011, 12:52 AM
So, if that thing is on the track, and you slap it really hard, and the only friction being are, how long would that sucker keep moving?

Well the friction of the air will slow it down but you also have to remember that after it warms up over 90-130 Kelvin (depending on what type of material it is) it will stop superconducting and no longer lock to the magnetic field.

aturnis
10-18-2011, 01:06 AM
Well the friction of the air will slow it down but you also have to remember that after it warms up over 90-130 Kelvin (depending on what type of material it is) it will stop superconducting and no longer lock to the magnetic field.

So....

AustinChief
10-18-2011, 01:36 AM
So....

Well, depending on the temperature of the room... I would imagine it would go from around 80K to 130K in a matter of minutes at which point it would no longer "float"... I could easily see it spinning around the track for that long.

crazycoffey
10-18-2011, 01:42 AM
Pretty cool, but will it work on the bitches?

nstygma
10-18-2011, 02:13 AM
here's another similar

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/6lmtbLu5nxw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Tribal Warfare
10-18-2011, 02:39 AM
Next stop... landspeeders?


nah......

http://www.cracked.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/hoverboard.jpg

hoverboards are the next logical step

Archie F. Swin
10-18-2011, 07:13 AM
The only downside...that steamy little urinal cake is the cause of all cancer. Sorry.

aturnis
10-26-2011, 10:40 PM
Sweetness! (http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2011-10/video-quantum-levitating-hoverboard-lets-students-glide-air-or-magnets)

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/_F-VVmMD4_k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

ThaVirus
10-26-2011, 11:08 PM
It's amazing what people can do with this so-called, "science" stuff. Makes you wonder what they're cooking up in laboratories out there that we have no fucking clue about...












Paging Teedubya...

jAZ
10-26-2011, 11:15 PM
http://news.discovery.com/space/stunning-video-of-a-spinning-world-111026.html

In the tradition of sharing amazing views of our planet from our orbiting "place in space" here's yet another incredible video from the International Space Station (ISS):

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Looking north as the ISS passed southeast over North America on the night of October 18, this video offers a great perspective of our planet as a globe spinning in space! (Which, of course, it is.)

We also get an awesome view of the aurora borealis, quite a few US cities, some lightning flashing in clouds over the southeastern states... and a bit of airglow as well. What a tour!

Here's another sequence from the same flyover, showing a southeast-facing view:

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Multiple still images taken by the Expedition 29 crew were combined to make these videos.

The International Space Station will mark its 11th anniversary of continuous human occupation on Nov. 2, 2011. As of August 2011 there have been 135 launches to the space station since the launch of the first module, Zarya, on Nov. 20, 1998. The space station, including its large solar arrays, spans the area of a U.S. football field (including the end zones) and weighs 861,804 pounds.