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Stewie
02-17-2012, 06:22 AM
Interesting article. A bit long but well worth it.

Motorists should be wary of mislabeled or inferior motor oil

By STEVE EVERLY

The Kansas City Star


The motor-oil industry has some advice for motorists: Be careful.
The routine oil change has become fertile ground for deception and consumer fraud. In a tough economy, sales of cheaper oil have risen, and the industry says more of that oil is substandard, which over time can cause excessive engine wear and even engine failure.

The industry estimates that 10 to 20 percent of motor oil has some problem — from overall poor quality to being outdated, misbranded or used for the wrong purpose. And the problems crop up for so-called bulk oil, pumped from tanker trucks to many quick-lube shops and larger auto repair centers, and for oil sold in quart cans to do-it-yourselfers and some smaller mechanic shops.

In response, the American Petroleum Institute trade group and regulators in Missouri and several other states are making plans to increase licensing and testing, and to improve labeling and tracking of motor oil throughout its supply chain.

More than half the motor oil in the country is sold in quick-lube shops, which mainly do oil changes, radiator flushes and filter replacements, rather than more extensive auto repair. Most of them are freestanding, though some are attached to repair shops or auto dealerships.

The industry says that the great majority take steps to ensure they’re using good-quality oil. Still, the businesses that rely on bulk oil exist in a regulatory void that makes it difficult to determine whether the shops themselves are passing off substandard oil or whether they are unwittingly buying bad oil from suppliers.

Hundreds of companies make, blend and distribute bulk oil, and they haven’t had to comply with labeling rules drawn up decades ago when most oil was sold in quarts and other packaged containers.

That can leave buyers of bulk oil unsure about brand and grade. Oil can fall below specifications needed to protect engines. Or oils with different viscosities or thicknesses can be mixed together, which can cause problems because engines are designed to perform best with particular grades and viscosities.

Celeste Powers, executive director of the Independent Lubricant Manufacturers Association, said bulk oil was the “weak link” in the quality chain, and her group “believes that misrepresentation of bulk motor oils occurs every day — both intentionally and unintentionally.”

Her group represents 290 small lubricant companies and randomly tests the oil its members produce. But last year, in a letter supporting better testing and monitoring, she wrote that current efforts hadn’t been enough to stop a “significant” percentage of inferior motor oil from being sold.
North Carolina, the one state to routinely test bulk oil, said 10 percent of its initial samples flunked tests — a rate that improved dramatically after word got out that the state was keeping watch. And the American Petroleum Institute says it has tested enough bulk oil to know that some does not meet specifications.

Shell Oil, which owns Pennzoil and Quaker State motor oil, last year told state weights-and-measures officials it was taking aggressive action that “will remain out of consumer view” against lube shops that falsely claim to use the company’s products. The most flagrant offenders were being sued, Shell said, with 10 lawsuits successfully concluded and another 10 being filed. More than 50 investigations were launched across the country.
Shell says it loses an estimated 8 million gallons of Pennzoil and Quaker State brand sales a year to those who “masquerade” by advertising those brands but actually sell something else.

Oil sold by the quart to do-it-yourselfers has its problems, too. Oil meant only for engines built before 1930, for example, can end up on a store shelf next to oil formulated for current models.

Missouri regulators have found used oil being sold as new. And the American Petroleum Institute recently sued two Michigan companies alleging they sold oil that claimed to meet the trade group’s standards but failed tests and could damage engines.

“You can’t assume that everything is fine,” said Tom Glenn, president of the Petroleum Quality Institute of America, which tests motor oil. “I can only guess that we’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg.”

Later this year, the American Petroleum Institute, which licenses motor oil to meet specified standards, will unveil a voluntary program to license oil-change businesses, distributors and others in the supply chain.

To get that seal of approval they will have to meet requirements such as allowing oil testing and keeping a “chain of custody” paper trail so problems with bulk oil can be traced. There will be more tests to ensure that the promised brand is what’s being sold, something possible since many brands are injecting unique chemical markers or additives.

The institute also will work with several states to boost their inspections.
Missouri, which does spot checks of packaged oil, is stepping up its scrutiny this month and expanding into inspections of bulk oil. Ron Hayes, head of the state’s weights and measures division, said the industry supported the consumer-protection initiative.

Kansas doesn’t inspect motor oil, and an official with its weights and measures department said there were no plans to do so.

The National Conference on Weights and Measures, which establishes regulations to be adopted by the states, also could help out. When it meets in July it’s expected to pass a rule to require shops using bulk oil to disclose brand, manufacturer, specifications and other details on the invoices they give customers.

The Automotive Oil Change Association said many shops already voluntarily provided detailed receipts.

Jiffy Lube, which is owned by Shell through its Quaker State and Pennzoil subsidiary, participated in a previous effort to license oil-change businesses.

Heartland Automotive Services, the country’s largest Jiffy Lube franchisee, including those in the Kansas City area, said it already disclosed the oil’s brand and grade on customer receipts and had taken measures to ensure its suppliers provided the right products. The company supports any additional measures being considered, a spokesman said, and hopes the rest of the industry will follow.
“We will absolutely support anything that helps consumers get the oil change they should,” said Rob Rajkowski, chief marketing officer for Heartland Automotive.

As engine designs get more efficient and sophisticated, they require the latest classifications of motor oil.

“Really high-quality oil is needed, and it’s going to be even more true in the future,” Matt Snider, an oil lubrication engineer for General Motors, said in an interview.

GM has started licensing its own specification, called “dexos,” to motor-oil companies.

Most auto and engine makers work with the American Petroleum Institute, the Society of Automotive Engineers and other associations to come up with the specifications that various grades of motor oil must meet to get the institute’s certification and to stay up to date with current engines.

The Petroleum Quality Institute of America, which gets some support from the oil industry but uses independent laboratories, began testing packaged motor oil three years ago and is planning to expand into bulk oil.

Glenn, a 32-year veteran of the lube industry, said he knew some problems would be found when testing started, but he had been surprised how many of the difficulties had been serious. He routinely issues consumer alerts about brands that should be avoided.

The group’s tests find major brands such as Castrol and Pennzoil routinely meet the standards, as do many private or store brands, but some lesser known brands fail the tests.

One brand claiming to be a “superior all weather motor oil” had a thinner viscosity than claimed, lacked sufficient detergent additives to help keep engines clean, and contained contaminants, indicating it was at least partly used oil. Another brand had some coolant mixed into it. And two others met no recognized specifications for oil quality.

Glenn, in a trip last fall from Pennsylvania to Illinois, bought 12 quarts of oil from convenience stores, and seven had issues.

“It’s clear something has to be done,” Glenn said.

Kevin Ferrick, manager of the American Petroleum Institute’s oil licensing and certification program, said it would help to expand the labeling rules to bulk oil, and to license installers, distributors and others in the supply chain.

Ferrick had his own experience at a quick-lube shop that voluntarily disclosed information on the receipt, including the oil’s brand and type. It turned out the shop had used a different oil from what Ferrick requested.
But he noticed that on his receipt, and the shop replaced it.

“Our belief is, consumers have a right to know,” he said. “You want to be very careful.”

Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/2012/02/16/3434332/motorists-should-be-wary-of-mislabeled.html#storylink=cpy

bevischief
02-17-2012, 06:28 AM
And this is surprising how?

Stewie
02-17-2012, 06:30 AM
And this is surprising how?

Sorry. I didn't know some people did their own testing on detergents, additives and viscosity of the oil they use. Carry on.

notorious
02-17-2012, 06:31 AM
Change my own oil on all 5 vehicles. As long as the reputable brand name stuff off the shelf doesn't melt my engines down, I will be fine.

Stewie
02-17-2012, 06:33 AM
Change my own oil on all 5 vehicles. As long as the reputable brand name stuff off the shelf doesn't melt my engines down, I will be fine.

I do my own oil changes as well. Not because of this problem, but I've had a couple issues when taking it to an oil change shop.

bevischief
02-17-2012, 06:38 AM
Sorry. I didn't know some people did their own testing on detergents, additives and viscosity of the oil they use. Carry on.

You get what you pay for.

notorious
02-17-2012, 06:39 AM
I do my own oil changes as well. Not because of this problem, but I've had a couple issues when taking it to an oil change shop.

Yep, I know a person that ruined their engine because they didn't put on the drain plug. :facepalm:

Stewie
02-17-2012, 06:42 AM
You get what you pay for.

Unless you change your own oil how do you know what you're getting? Quaker State and Pennzoil estimate that 8 million gallons of their oil are switched for something else. That's significant and just two brands.

Buehler445
02-17-2012, 07:21 AM
There is some shady shit that goes on. Some people need to be tied to a tree and shot.

notorious
02-17-2012, 07:30 AM
There is some shady shit that goes on. Some people need to be tied to a tree and shot.

Tell everyone how many GALLONS of oil your tractors take in one oil change. LMAO

Radar Chief
02-17-2012, 07:30 AM
Yep, I know a person that ruined their engine because they didn't put on the drain plug. :facepalm:

Never, ever let WalMart Service Dept. touch your vehicle.
I won’t even go there for tires anymore.

notorious
02-17-2012, 07:35 AM
Never, ever let WalMart Service Dept. touch your vehicle.
I won’t even go there for tires anymore.

My brother is a pharmacist at Wally World, gets a discount, and one day about 9 years ago decided to replace a tire there.


The tire blew out about 2 hours from home and stranded him there. They over-inflated the tire, over-tightened the lugs to the point where he couldn't get them off, even with a cheater bar.

Biggest collection of morons in place, along with Invesco and the Black Hole.

Talk about pissed off. ROFL

Lzen
02-17-2012, 07:36 AM
I do my own oil changes as well. Not because of this problem, but I've had a couple issues when taking it to an oil change shop.

This. Glad they mention that Castrol always meets specs because that's my preferred brand. Although I'm surprised that Pennzoil also does. I have heard (years ago) that Pennzoil was not that great. And this is from 2 "car guys". One was even a mechanic.

Lzen
02-17-2012, 07:39 AM
My brother is a pharmacist at Wally World, gets a discount, and one day about 9 years ago decided to replace a tire there.


The tire blew out about 2 hours from home and stranded him there. They over-inflated the tire, over-tightened the lugs to the point where he couldn't get them off, even with a cheater bar.

Biggest collection of morons in place, along with Invesco and the Black Hole.

Talk about pissed off. ROFL

Wow, that's bad. I have a similar story although not as bad. My sister had her oil changed at Walmart several years ago. Drove home (about 3 miles) and there was smoke coming from under the hood. We popped the hood and found that they had left the oil cap off and (luckily) it was still sitting on top of the engine. She obviously needed more oil as a bunch had sprayed out into the engine compartment, but she was lucky it didn't do any damage.

ROYC75
02-17-2012, 07:42 AM
This. Glad they mention that Castrol always meets specs because that's my preferred brand. Although I'm surprised that Pennzoil also does. I have heard (years ago) that Pennzoil was not that great. And this is from 2 "car guys". One was even a mechanic.

I've used Pennzoil for 40 years in my personal vehicles,no problems. Now my semi trucks I used Rotella in them and had no trouble.

Radar Chief
02-17-2012, 07:43 AM
My brother is a pharmacist at Wally World, gets a discount, and one day about 9 years ago decided to replace a tire there.


The tire blew out about 2 hours from home and stranded him there. They over-inflated the tire, over-tightened the lugs to the point where he couldn't get them off, even with a cheater bar.

Biggest collection of morons in place, along with Invesco and the Black Hole.

Talk about pissed off. ROFL

Had a buddy that got an oil/filter change along with air filter change and while driving it home started wondering what the new noise under the hood was. When he got home he popped the hood and found that while they did change the air filter they didn’t put the air cleaner assembly back on and some dumbass had left their 9/16” wrench on top of the engine so it was just rattling around waiting to get caught in something.

Fish
02-17-2012, 07:44 AM
Yep, I know a person that ruined their engine because they didn't put on the drain plug. :facepalm:

How? How on earth would that even be possible? I mean, you'd be left with a 5qt. puddle and a trail of oil. How could you just not notice something like that during cleanup or pulling away? How does that person survive daily life?

notorious
02-17-2012, 07:45 AM
How? How on earth would that even be possible? I mean, you'd be left with a 5qt. puddle and a trail of oil. How could you just not notice something like that during cleanup or pulling away? How does that person survive daily life?

It's amazing, I know.


You would almost have to try to accomplish that kind of ineptitude.

notorious
02-17-2012, 07:46 AM
I've used Pennzoil for 40 years in my personal vehicles,no problems. Now my semi trucks I used Rotella in them and had no trouble.

I use Pennzoil, too, but for some reason I feel dirty about it.

KCUnited
02-17-2012, 07:48 AM
How? How on earth would that even be possible? I mean, you'd be left with a 5qt. puddle and a trail of oil. How could you just not notice something like that during cleanup or pulling away? How does that person survive daily life?

Weed. I worked at a full service car wash that did oil changes. They had a stoner in there who was constantly leaving off the cap, plugs, air filter assemblies. It was amazing really, he finally left on his own to operate an ice cream truck.

Stewie
02-17-2012, 07:51 AM
Weed. I worked at a full service car wash that did oil changes. They had a stoner in there who was constantly leaving off the cap, plugs, air filter assemblies. It was amazing really, he finally left on his own to operate an ice cream truck.

http://www.bam.org/viewdocument.aspx?did=6154

Radar Chief
02-17-2012, 07:51 AM
Weed. I worked at a full service car wash that did oil changes. They had a stoner in there who was constantly leaving off the cap, plugs, air filter assemblies. It was amazing really, he finally left on his own to operate an ice cream truck.

:LOL:

http://www.imcdb.org/i058133.jpg

Radar Chief
02-17-2012, 07:52 AM
http://www.bam.org/viewdocument.aspx?did=6154

Beat me by >< that much.

Stewie
02-17-2012, 07:53 AM
Beat me by >< that much.

I'd say great minds think alike, but I don't qualify.

Silock
02-17-2012, 07:58 AM
Amsoil FTW

BigMeatballDave
02-17-2012, 08:04 AM
Mobile 1 Synthetic

Radar Chief
02-17-2012, 08:11 AM
I’ve heard some really good things about Royal Purple but crap is that stuff expensive.
I run Rotella in my Jeep engine. Pretty good stuff for those old motors and it seems to like it, good oil pressure.

Silock
02-17-2012, 08:14 AM
I’ve heard some really good things about Royal Purple but crap is that stuff expensive.
I run Rotella in my Jeep engine. Pretty good stuff for those old motors and it seems to like it, good oil pressure.

For things like Royal Purple and Amsoil, it's cheaper to just find a few friends and buy in bulk.

Stewie
02-17-2012, 08:23 AM
I’ve heard some really good things about Royal Purple but crap is that stuff expensive.
I run Rotella in my Jeep engine. Pretty good stuff for those old motors and it seems to like it, good oil pressure.

I've always wondered about the more expensive synthetics. I'm sure they're additives are proprietary but are they worth it? You can get a deal like this on Castrol synthetic and a Bosch Distance Plus filter.

http://shop.advanceautoparts.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/content_motor-oil___

Phobia
02-17-2012, 08:24 AM
I’ve heard some really good things about Royal Purple but crap is that stuff expensive.
I run Rotella in my Jeep engine. Pretty good stuff for those old motors and it seems to like it, good oil pressure.

I ran some Royal Purple in a couple of my rigs for a while. It was okay. Never ran it in the diesel though. Can't afford $200 oil changes.

penguinz
02-17-2012, 08:33 AM
I’ve heard some really good things about Royal Purple but crap is that stuff expensive.
I run Rotella in my Jeep engine. Pretty good stuff for those old motors and it seems to like it, good oil pressure.The rotella has the zinc in it that the old jeep engines love.

Radar Chief
02-17-2012, 08:55 AM
I've always wondered about the more expensive synthetics. I'm sure they're additives are proprietary but are they worth it? You can get a deal like this on Castrol synthetic and a Bosch Distance Plus filter.

http://shop.advanceautoparts.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/content_motor-oil___

That is the question isn’t it. I’ve never been able to justify the cost myself.
If I were looking to squeeze every last ounce of performance out of a vehicle I might be more inclined to use it because I have seen several back to back comparisons that show Royal Purple does make an engine spin freer and pick up a few ponies.

Radar Chief
02-17-2012, 08:58 AM
The rotella has the zinc in it that the old jeep engines love.

Well, my Jeep engine originally came out of a Corvette ;) but same thing, it’s still an old high nickel block with an old forged crank and tolerances made for an oil like Rotella.

Kerberos
02-17-2012, 11:14 AM
Amsoil FTW

Yup

THE ONLY oil I use is Amsoil.

I only use their best and I go 1 year or 25K miles before I change. I do change the filter at 6 months but I rarely get 25K in a year.

When I had my Seadoo I ONLY used Amsoil and never had a problem that was oil related EVER. And it was about $8 a gallon cheaper than the Seadoo oil made by Castrol.

I boycotted Castrol a couple years back after the BP oil spill in the gulf.... BP owns Castrol.

kepp
02-17-2012, 11:18 AM
Yep, I know a person that ruined their engine because they didn't put on the drain plug. :facepalm:

I almost had that happen once. Took my car in for an oil change then drove it home not suspecting anything. A couple hours later I just happened to squat down by the car (I think I dropped something, maybe) and saw a puddle of oil under it. I guess they just hand tightened the plug or something. I've been changing my own oil ever since.

kepp
02-17-2012, 11:21 AM
Now my semi trucks I used Rotella in them and had no trouble.

It's good with a block of Velveeta too.

Buehler445
02-17-2012, 12:46 PM
Tell everyone how many GALLONS of oil your tractors take in one oil change. LMAO

10. 15 in the combine and sprayer and 12 in the truck.

Kerberos
02-17-2012, 02:32 PM
I ran some Royal Purple in a couple of my rigs for a while. It was okay. Never ran it in the diesel though. Can't afford $200 oil changes.

Good Friend in NY is still my Amsoil sponsor as I am a preferred buyer. He has a Ford SD with Power Stroke Diesel. He installed the Amsoil bypass filtering system and uses Amsoil Synthetic Diesel oil and regularly gets 35K to 40K out of an oil change.

He starts sending samples around 25K and they let him know when it's time to change oil.

It may cost $150+ to change oil including filter changes every 15K but how much do you spend changing oil every 5k to 7K? It saves money in the long run.

Otter
02-17-2012, 02:34 PM
Sorry. I didn't know some people did their own testing on detergents, additives and viscosity of the oil they use. Carry on.

What's wrong with Stewie? Haven't yo been to the lab?

WV
02-17-2012, 02:37 PM
Mobile 1 Synthetic

This