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SNR
02-18-2012, 11:43 PM
Backstory to this:

I ran into some trouble with deadlines about three months ago when... well, let's just say my work productivity wasn't the level it should be. I had trouble sitting in one place for long periods of time and getting reading done.

Now, this is a problem I've always had going all the way back to elementary school. I normally crack open books for the purposes of my job's research and to supplement me with anything I'm curious about. I haven't read a leisure book in... man, it must be years now. And when I do jump in and read a book, I can only stand to do 10 pages at a time and then take a long break. Sometimes when the writing is more dense (like in an academic journal) it takes me a long time to figure out just what the fuck these guys are saying.

I told my wife about the missed deadlines, and while she was pissed, she also seemed concerned. She said it's very possible that I have some form of Adult ADD. She has a friend whose husband was recently diagnosed with it, and was told that he's actually had it his entire life. I'm probably in the same boat- that I have had the disorder since I was a kid, but I just learned coping mechanisms when I was young and struggled through it. And since I never had behavior problems in school or at home as a child, nobody really noticed it.

After going through hours and hours of tests with a clinical psychologist, she said that I absolutely have a form of ADD, and wrote me a prescription for some medication.

I've been on this stuff for about two months, and holy shit. I'm a new person. I'm completing assignments, breezing through small tasks, and I'm not clumsily forgetting appointments or anything else. It's working so well that I'm now WEEKS ahead of my planned work. And my wife says I'm just a calmer, more secure person to be around.
=========================

Soooo... I ask because while I've never totally dismissed the idea of ADD/ADHD, it was clear to me from multiple studies that the condition is way over-diagnosed. Especially among school children, and disproportionately among young boys.

It's quite possible that the way I was living my life before the drugs I was taking was absolutely normal, and that I just had a rather busy brain. Whatever. But I absolutely can not ignore the fact that the quality of my life (and work) has risen dramatically since I got tested and started doing something about it.

I'm wondering if any of you guys have ADD/ADHD, or have family with the condition. What do you see out of this?

NewChief
02-19-2012, 06:13 AM
Welcome to the world of government-sponsored amphetamines. Worked great for Germany as well. ;)

In all seriousness, my wife is the same way. She's a total space cadet who can't focus and gets easily distracted while working (actually, I feel the same way now that the internet plays into my work). Adderall absolutely does help, but we've known that speed increases productivity and focus for years. Hunters in the Amazon have used some form of chemical aid to assist them in their focus during hunting for centuries if not a millenia.

I'm really torn on the whole deal. Yes, I think that there are people who truly have some sort of ADD/ADHD. I also think that almost anyone could say, "I have a hard time focusing and getting my work done" and that Adderall (or any ADD medicine) will help with that issue. I'm just unsure of the longterm effects of using speed to treat this condition.

I honestly think it might have to do with more and more of our work is abstract in nature requiring very little physical toil. In the past, only those who were suited for such work chose it, and most others could find other avenues more suited to their temperaments. Now, though, we're forcing more and more people into abstract tasks with very little in the way of tangible completion satisfaction.

In education among youth, we're forcing them to sit for hours on end with very little stimulus when they're used to a ton of stimuli due to the world they've come of age in (multimedia). This leads to lack of focus because the classroom is boring. This leads to kids acting up and not performing. Provide them with medicine, and they're suddenly able to focus and find the lessons interesting because it makes up for the lack of stimulation.

Pioli Zombie
02-19-2012, 06:19 AM
I couldn't read all that, what?

headsnap
02-19-2012, 06:47 AM
:)

notorious
02-19-2012, 07:40 AM
Parenting.

MagicHef
02-19-2012, 08:02 AM
SNR, when you are doing a task that you enjoy (maybe even just a hobby) do you have any trouble focusing on it?

SNR
02-19-2012, 09:41 AM
NewChief: I've definitely thought the same thing. What I don't like about medicating children is that it's not just some kind of speed medicine we're giving them, but it's a behavioral medicine like ritalin. Also, I'm taking a drug called Vyvanse, which isn't as "potent" as Adderall, but lasts longer. I know it doesn't really matter, but in case you were wondering, there it is.

MagicHef: Kind of, yeah. Unless it's something where I can just completely shut down and not concentrate like watching TV, I do sometimes have problems focusing on activities I enjoy. For instance, exercising. I haven't gotten back into the exercise routine since taking Vyvanse, but before the drug, I couldn't stand going to the gym just because it was so boring. Playing basketball or frisbee is completely different, but the other stuff was hard to get me to go even 10 minutes.

patteeu
02-19-2012, 09:48 AM
Cocaine will make you feel like superman.

BucEyedPea
02-19-2012, 09:53 AM
I honestly think it might have to do with more and more of our work is abstract in nature requiring very little physical toil. In the past, only those who were suited for such work chose it, and most others could find other avenues more suited to their temperaments. Now, though, we're forcing more and more people into abstract tasks with very little in the way of tangible completion satisfaction.

In education among youth, we're forcing them to sit for hours on end with very little stimulus when they're used to a ton of stimuli due to the world they've come of age in (multimedia). This leads to lack of focus because the classroom is boring. This leads to kids acting up and not performing. Provide them with medicine, and they're suddenly able to focus and find the lessons interesting because it makes up for the lack of stimulation.

I think you're hitting on one the causes. Is it any wonder why more boys get put on ritalin in schools. At least that's what I recall. Especially growing boys need to go out and use their bodies, run around and all that during the day for intervals. I also think new ed methods contribute to the problem. Anyhow, we get pills now for nearly everything. Modern medicine is too focused on treating symptoms and not causes. All drugs have side effects.

NewChief
02-19-2012, 10:09 AM
NewChief: I've definitely thought the same thing. What I don't like about medicating children is that it's not just some kind of speed medicine we're giving them, but it's a behavioral medicine like ritalin. Also, I'm taking a drug called Vyvanse, which isn't as "potent" as Adderall, but lasts longer. I know it doesn't really matter, but in case you were wondering, there it is.

MagicHef: Kind of, yeah. Unless it's something where I can just completely shut down and not concentrate like watching TV, I do sometimes have problems focusing on activities I enjoy. For instance, exercising. I haven't gotten back into the exercise routine since taking Vyvanse, but before the drug, I couldn't stand going to the gym just because it was so boring. Playing basketball or frisbee is completely different, but the other stuff was hard to get me to go even 10 minutes.

Heh. I'm familiar with Vyvanse. Do you have to set your alarm in the morning to take it? One of my wife's coworkers had it, and she had to set her alarm to take it at like 5am, so it would wear off in time for her to fall asleep at a decently early time in the evening. If she waited until like 8am to take it, she'd be up until 2am.

SNR
02-19-2012, 11:50 AM
Heh. I'm familiar with Vyvanse. Do you have to set your alarm in the morning to take it? One of my wife's coworkers had it, and she had to set her alarm to take it at like 5am, so it would wear off in time for her to fall asleep at a decently early time in the evening. If she waited until like 8am to take it, she'd be up until 2am.I actually take it at 10 AM, and I'm good to go at midnight. I usually go to sleep around 1 AM anyway.

SNR
02-19-2012, 11:50 AM
Cocaine will make you feel like superman.Nah. I have trouble studying with cocaine.

patteeu
02-19-2012, 01:24 PM
Nah. I have trouble studying with cocaine.

Maybe if you mix it with valium! :)

MagicHef
02-19-2012, 02:13 PM
NewChief: I've definitely thought the same thing. What I don't like about medicating children is that it's not just some kind of speed medicine we're giving them, but it's a behavioral medicine like ritalin. Also, I'm taking a drug called Vyvanse, which isn't as "potent" as Adderall, but lasts longer. I know it doesn't really matter, but in case you were wondering, there it is.

MagicHef: Kind of, yeah. Unless it's something where I can just completely shut down and not concentrate like watching TV, I do sometimes have problems focusing on activities I enjoy. For instance, exercising. I haven't gotten back into the exercise routine since taking Vyvanse, but before the drug, I couldn't stand going to the gym just because it was so boring. Playing basketball or frisbee is completely different, but the other stuff was hard to get me to go even 10 minutes.

Yeah, I didn't really mean physical activity vs desk work (assumimg that's what your job is). For instance, I was unaware that most mechanical engineers basically fill out paperwork all day when I chose my major in college. I could easily sit at a desk all day long designing parts or making circuit diagrams, but I can go maybe 5 minutes writing installation manuals or making budget reports before I have to do something else. For some reason, it wasn't much of a problem for me in school, but now I really can't make myself sit and do something I am not interested in.

|Zach|
02-19-2012, 02:47 PM
My experiences have been very similar SNR. I am just now getting serious about what is going on and what I need to do to be more efficient. Because I didn't have behavior problems through school and was socially well adjusted it really went under the radar.

I have done enough to get by in life but the more my business ramps up the more apparent it is that some of these problems are really costing me big time. Thanks for your story.

SNR
02-19-2012, 02:48 PM
Yeah, I didn't really mean physical activity vs desk work (assumimg that's what your job is). For instance, I was unaware that most mechanical engineers basically fill out paperwork all day when I chose my major in college. I could easily sit at a desk all day long designing parts or making circuit diagrams, but I can go maybe 5 minutes writing installation manuals or making budget reports before I have to do something else. For some reason, it wasn't much of a problem for me in school, but now I really can't make myself sit and do something I am not interested in.Are you still a mechanical engineer or did you switch to a different field?

I pretty much got my degree to teach at the college level. I never cared about writing or new research, but it's pretty difficult to get hired by a university if you don't churn out new stuff and represent the university in some way. Anyway, teaching has never been a problem for me. I enjoy lectures, and I enjoy chatting with students. If I don't set up deadlines with conference committees or get involved with an editor, however, I would never fulfill the research part of my job.

SNR
02-19-2012, 02:54 PM
My experiences have been very similar SNR. I am just now getting serious about what is going on and what I need to do to be more efficient. Because I didn't have behavior problems through school and was socially well adjusted it really went under the radar.

I have done enough to get by in life but the more my business ramps up the more apparent it is that some of these problems are really costing me big time. Thanks for your story.Are you taking medication for it, or are you finding ways to institute structure and organization? Admittedly, that's the next step for me: actually reforming my life and habits. It would be nice if I didn't have to pay for this medication (even with health insurance) for my entire life. And like others have said in this thread, I have no clue what the long-term effects of Vyvanse are.

At least for now, though, I'm getting things accomplished. And that's what I wasn't doing before.

Shag
02-19-2012, 03:04 PM
I'm very intrigued by this. I've wondered for a number of years now if I may have some form of adult ADD, due to a variety of reasons. How did you go about having this diagnosed?

|Zach|
02-19-2012, 03:11 PM
Are you taking medication for it, or are you finding ways to institute structure and organization? Admittedly, that's the next step for me: actually reforming my life and habits. It would be nice if I didn't have to pay for this medication (even with health insurance) for my entire life. And like others have said in this thread, I have no clue what the long-term effects of Vyvanse are.

At least for now, though, I'm getting things accomplished. And that's what I wasn't doing before.

This is a real challenge for me because I run my own show work wise. And I do enough to do ok for myself but it is becoming apparent to me that some of these issues are keeping me from going to that next level.

I have not talked to a pro (but plan to) and am hitting the lifestyle organizational changes first. I have had some limited success in small areas but it still feels like this huge beast that makes my productivity simply lock up sometimes. I look forward to sitting down with someone that helps people for a living.

SNR
02-19-2012, 03:21 PM
I'm very intrigued by this. I've wondered for a number of years now if I may have some form of adult ADD, due to a variety of reasons. How did you go about having this diagnosed?Lots of paperwork and questionnaires. They prefer to have a family member or somebody who has known you since childhood present at the testing so they can perhaps provide a more objective account of your activities. It's important to answer the questions honestly and to the best of your ability, but sometimes you can't help but overindulge on specific events that may not have anything to do with the disorder. For instance, they were asking me about my mood the past three months. Well, I was stressed in that period trying to do my job and meet my deadlines. I was on the road a lot, my mom's been sick, etc. So I was pretty stressed, which makes you feel bad, which reflects itself in the answers on the questionnaire.

The psychologist/shrink you meet will go over all of your answers, so perhaps it's better to make a mental note of which questions seem ambiguous or open-ended to you so you can discuss them.

I can tell you that even though I had no severe behavioral problems as a child, the test revealed quite a few different ways in which I coped with ADD. One of them was lying. I lied to my parents and friends all the time. That's a very common coping mechanism that children with ADD use. They know they're smart, they do well in school, so when they forget lots of things or problems blow up in their face, they lie to maintain their status as "smart" and "good" kids.

Dunno if that helps. I can't remember a lot of the questions and my questionnaires are in a medical file at the office. But I'd be glad to share any more experiences.

MagicHef
02-19-2012, 03:31 PM
Are you still a mechanical engineer or did you switch to a different field?

I pretty much got my degree to teach at the college level. I never cared about writing or new research, but it's pretty difficult to get hired by a university if you don't churn out new stuff and represent the university in some way. Anyway, teaching has never been a problem for me. I enjoy lectures, and I enjoy chatting with students. If I don't set up deadlines with conference committees or get involved with an editor, however, I would never fulfill the research part of my job.

I'm still a mechanical engineer, albiet an unemployed one currently. I could always force myself to do well enough to be a contributer and stick around during good times, but once layoffs came around I didn't last long. I do have an interview this week for a position that is much more design work, so hopefully that will end up being something I can do better. I am also designing and building something in my spare time that, if successful, would allow me to start my own company doing something that I enjoy.

I am hesitant to try any sort of medication because to be honest, I'm pretty good at the stuff I enjoy, and I don't want to risk messing with that. On the other hand, if no one wants an employee with those skills, I'm kind of out of luck.

I think we're in pretty similar situations, but it sounds like there's not really any way for you to avoid doing the things you aren't interested in, while there's a slim chance for me. Sorry.

Shag
02-19-2012, 05:56 PM
Lots of paperwork and questionnaires. They prefer to have a family member or somebody who has known you since childhood present at the testing so they can perhaps provide a more objective account of your activities. It's important to answer the questions honestly and to the best of your ability, but sometimes you can't help but overindulge on specific events that may not have anything to do with the disorder. For instance, they were asking me about my mood the past three months. Well, I was stressed in that period trying to do my job and meet my deadlines. I was on the road a lot, my mom's been sick, etc. So I was pretty stressed, which makes you feel bad, which reflects itself in the answers on the questionnaire.

The psychologist/shrink you meet will go over all of your answers, so perhaps it's better to make a mental note of which questions seem ambiguous or open-ended to you so you can discuss them.

I can tell you that even though I had no severe behavioral problems as a child, the test revealed quite a few different ways in which I coped with ADD. One of them was lying. I lied to my parents and friends all the time. That's a very common coping mechanism that children with ADD use. They know they're smart, they do well in school, so when they forget lots of things or problems blow up in their face, they lie to maintain their status as "smart" and "good" kids.

Dunno if that helps. I can't remember a lot of the questions and my questionnaires are in a medical file at the office. But I'd be glad to share any more experiences.

Thanks. How did you get the whole process started? Just talk to your GP?

ClevelandBronco
02-19-2012, 09:47 PM
If I subjected myself to the formal diagnostic process today, I imagine that I'd be diagnosed with some functional form of ADD. However, I'm not going to get diagnosed formally, thank you very much.

I'm really not interested in the least in operating outside my natural capabilities and/or inclinations, and there's no way on God's green Earth I'd allow myself to be treated with drugs for such a condition anyway. (But that's just me. Drug therapy might very well be the best option for someone else.)

I'll very happily remain this way. I just can't think of a single reason to want to change other than to make myself more like the majority of people out there. And given my dim view of the intelligence, talents, abilities, and priorities of the majority of people out there, I think I'd have to be insane to want to adapt to their ways.

You can call me a snob even about my disorders.

beach tribe
02-19-2012, 09:52 PM
<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ln0lhfn19vY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

beach tribe
02-19-2012, 09:55 PM
I get Adderall about once every 4 months or so.

Can't stay on that shit all the time.

"Zoom Zoom Zoom"

SNR
02-19-2012, 10:43 PM
If I subjected myself to the formal diagnostic process today, I imagine that I'd be diagnosed with some functional form of ADD. However, I'm not going to get diagnosed formally, thank you very much.Probably not, actually. I have no idea what you're like in real life, but I'll just say that there's a reason this thing takes hours to complete. It's not just a "Oh you find yourself wanting to watch TV instead of do work? You've got ADD alright!" kind of thing.

I totally respect people's wishes to avoid medication. You're in charge of your own life, and most people have methods and ways of working through busy minds. Hell, I'm still uneasy about taking this stuff. When I get used to having it in my system after awhile, and I can better gauge in what ways I have difficulty concentrating and how I can better organize myself, I'll absolutely consider going off the meds.

Do you reject the idea of ADD/ADHD completely, or do you recognize it but believe in better ways of increasing concentration?

SNR
02-19-2012, 10:46 PM
Thanks. How did you get the whole process started? Just talk to your GP?My dad's a physician, actually, and knows a clinical psychologist (she's in the office right next to him). So he went ahead and set up the appointment himself.

I would advise talking to your GP about it, definitely. They'll definitely listen to your concerns and will set you up with somebody.

BucEyedPea
02-19-2012, 10:52 PM
I know a kid who was transformed in his attention when it was found he had a tomato allergy. He lost weight too.

suzzer99
02-19-2012, 10:55 PM
Welcome to the world of government-sponsored amphetamines. Worked great for Germany as well. ;)

In all seriousness, my wife is the same way. She's a total space cadet who can't focus and gets easily distracted while working (actually, I feel the same way now that the internet plays into my work). Adderall absolutely does help, but we've known that speed increases productivity and focus for years. Hunters in the Amazon have used some form of chemical aid to assist them in their focus during hunting for centuries if not a millenia.

I'm really torn on the whole deal. Yes, I think that there are people who truly have some sort of ADD/ADHD. I also think that almost anyone could say, "I have a hard time focusing and getting my work done" and that Adderall (or any ADD medicine) will help with that issue. I'm just unsure of the longterm effects of using speed to treat this condition.

I honestly think it might have to do with more and more of our work is abstract in nature requiring very little physical toil. In the past, only those who were suited for such work chose it, and most others could find other avenues more suited to their temperaments. Now, though, we're forcing more and more people into abstract tasks with very little in the way of tangible completion satisfaction.

In education among youth, we're forcing them to sit for hours on end with very little stimulus when they're used to a ton of stimuli due to the world they've come of age in (multimedia). This leads to lack of focus because the classroom is boring. This leads to kids acting up and not performing. Provide them with medicine, and they're suddenly able to focus and find the lessons interesting because it makes up for the lack of stimulation.

I came here to post something very similar to this - but you said it way better. Great post.

As a kid, I'm pretty sure I would have been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD or whatever and given drugs if they had them back in the 70s/80s. I got bored easily in school and was a terrible student. Carried on into college which I barely got through. But luckily I found a career where I get totally sucked into what I'm doing (computer programming) and as long as I'm busy and the work is challenging I have no problems.

I'm glad it worked out this way for me because I feel like I overcame it on my own w/o some magic pill. I think it sends a terrible message to kids that there is some pill to fix all your problems instead of working to overcome them on your own. I realize some kids may be so debilitated it's necessary. But I fear kids like me would have fallen into that category, even though I feel like a much richer person for finding my own way.

SNR obviously you're an adult and know what's best for you. I don't have any issues with an adult coming to a conclusion that some medication is right for them, especially not after the research and introspection that you're obviously putting into it.

KILLER_CLOWN
02-19-2012, 11:27 PM
I thought I may have had this problem since it continued into my adult life, changed my Diet and now i can concentrate much better. I know most will say it's quacky, but i'm a firm believer in changing your diet to better your life. I grew up on Junk food and Soda and that had a lot to do with my struggles in school.

Discuss Thrower
02-20-2012, 12:51 AM
Welcome to the world of government-sponsored amphetamines. Worked great for Germany as well. ;)

In all seriousness, my wife is the same way. She's a total space cadet who can't focus and gets easily distracted while working (actually, I feel the same way now that the internet plays into my work). Adderall absolutely does help, but we've known that speed increases productivity and focus for years. Hunters in the Amazon have used some form of chemical aid to assist them in their focus during hunting for centuries if not a millenia.

I'm really torn on the whole deal. Yes, I think that there are people who truly have some sort of ADD/ADHD. I also think that almost anyone could say, "I have a hard time focusing and getting my work done" and that Adderall (or any ADD medicine) will help with that issue. I'm just unsure of the longterm effects of using speed to treat this condition.

I honestly think it might have to do with more and more of our work is abstract in nature requiring very little physical toil. In the past, only those who were suited for such work chose it, and most others could find other avenues more suited to their temperaments. Now, though, we're forcing more and more people into abstract tasks with very little in the way of tangible completion satisfaction.

In education among youth, we're forcing them to sit for hours on end with very little stimulus when they're used to a ton of stimuli due to the world they've come of age in (multimedia). This leads to lack of focus because the classroom is boring. This leads to kids acting up and not performing. Provide them with medicine, and they're suddenly able to focus and find the lessons interesting because it makes up for the lack of stimulation.

Arguably the most well thought-out and reasoned post to ever grace this godforsaken subforum. Well played sir.

ClevelandBronco
02-20-2012, 01:07 AM
Do you reject the idea of ADD/ADHD completely, or do you recognize it but believe in better ways of increasing concentration?

No, I rather like it and think I'll keep it.

BCD
02-20-2012, 01:11 AM
I've used Adderal recreationally.

I love it. I can definitely see how someone could become addicted.

I've also used Ritalin and Dexidrine in the same manner.

I got the Dexidrine from a guy I worked with. His mother was prescribed it for Narcolepsy. I used it when my son was born. I was up 36hrs.

Setsuna
02-20-2012, 01:52 AM
All this stuff is a myth. Adults choose not to be interested in something. And children are children. Yall are blind.

patteeu
02-20-2012, 06:01 AM
I came here to post something very similar to this - but you said it way better. Great post.

As a kid, I'm pretty sure I would have been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD or whatever and given drugs if they had them back in the 70s/80s. I got bored easily in school and was a terrible student. Carried on into college which I barely got through. But luckily I found a career where I get totally sucked into what I'm doing (computer programming) and as long as I'm busy and the work is challenging I have no problems.

I'm glad it worked out this way for me because I feel like I overcame it on my own w/o some magic pill. I think it sends a terrible message to kids that there is some pill to fix all your problems instead of working to overcome them on your own. I realize some kids may be so debilitated it's necessary. But I fear kids like me would have fallen into that category, even though I feel like a much richer person for finding my own way.

SNR obviously you're an adult and know what's best for you. I don't have any issues with an adult coming to a conclusion that some medication is right for them, especially not after the research and introspection that you're obviously putting into it.

And here I thought you were always high on something. :p

BucEyedPea
02-20-2012, 08:40 AM
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/02/19/article-0-11CEE3E4000005DC-401_634x389.jpg

Revealing of inflation at the same time! Oh wait! There's no inflation.

Fish
02-20-2012, 10:17 AM
Backstory to this:

I ran into some trouble with deadlines about three months ago when... well, let's just say my work productivity wasn't the level it should be. I had trouble sitting in one place for long periods of time and getting reading done.

Now, this is a problem I've always had going all the way back to elementary school. I normally crack open books for the purposes of my job's research and to supplement me with anything I'm curious about. I haven't read a leisure book in... man, it must be years now. And when I do jump in and read a book, I can only stand to do 10 pages at a time and then take a long break. Sometimes when the writing is more dense (like in an academic journal) it takes me a long time to figure out just what the fuck these guys are saying.

I told my wife about the missed deadlines, and while she was pissed, she also seemed concerned. She said it's very possible that I have some form of Adult ADD. She has a friend whose husband was recently diagnosed with it, and was told that he's actually had it his entire life. I'm probably in the same boat- that I have had the disorder since I was a kid, but I just learned coping mechanisms when I was young and struggled through it. And since I never had behavior problems in school or at home as a child, nobody really noticed it.

After going through hours and hours of tests with a clinical psychologist, she said that I absolutely have a form of ADD, and wrote me a prescription for some medication.

I've been on this stuff for about two months, and holy shit. I'm a new person. I'm completing assignments, breezing through small tasks, and I'm not clumsily forgetting appointments or anything else. It's working so well that I'm now WEEKS ahead of my planned work. And my wife says I'm just a calmer, more secure person to be around.
=========================

Soooo... I ask because while I've never totally dismissed the idea of ADD/ADHD, it was clear to me from multiple studies that the condition is way over-diagnosed. Especially among school children, and disproportionately among young boys.

It's quite possible that the way I was living my life before the drugs I was taking was absolutely normal, and that I just had a rather busy brain. Whatever. But I absolutely can not ignore the fact that the quality of my life (and work) has risen dramatically since I got tested and started doing something about it.

I'm wondering if any of you guys have ADD/ADHD, or have family with the condition. What do you see out of this?

tl;d....BUTTERFLY!!!

BIG_DADDY
02-20-2012, 05:24 PM
It's usually diet an or lack of physical activity. There is another major factor but I won't open that can of worms here.

KILLER_CLOWN
02-20-2012, 05:28 PM
It's usually diet an or lack of physical activity. There is another major factor but I won't open that can of worms here.

Queensryche "Don't ever trust the needle...it lies" ;)