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La literatura
02-29-2012, 01:00 PM
http://www.bankrate.com/financing/retirement/what-i-wish-id-known-at-30/#ixzz1nnpnhKut

By Jennie L. Phipps Bankrate.com
Sunday, February 26, 2012
Posted: 6 am ET

I talked to a young friend the other day -- one who was just about to celebrate his 30th birthday. He was complaining about feeling old. I laughed at him because he just doesn't know what feeling old is.

When I was 30, I thought I'd be young forever. It wasn't until just a few years ago that I began to have an inkling that youth is fleeting and failure to recognize that reality could be costly.

Now, as I navigate my 60s, there are many things I wish I had known when I was my young friend's age, but here are the four most important:

The value of compound interest. If I had steadfastly invested 10 percent of my paycheck every payday for the last 30 years, retirement planning would be a breeze, and I wouldn't have to worry about how I was going to pay the bills in retirement.

Things don't matter. I was cleaning out the attic a few months ago and found boxes jam-packed with expensive toys and athletic equipment my sons begged me to buy. Twenty years later, some of the stuff still looks brand new. I don't want it; they can't be persuaded to take it. When they asked for this stuff in the first place, why didn't I just say no?

People can't be replaced. The last Christmas my grandmother was alive, she begged me to bring the kids to visit. I was feeling strapped and told her we'd try to get there in the summer. By then, she was dead, and no amount of money could replace the memories we didn't have.

Regrets, I've had a few, mostly about what I didn't do rather than what I did. For instance, 40 years ago, I had a chance to buy a large piece of property on the Atlantic Ocean in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., for a very small price. My father offered me the money to pay for it, but I didn't want to be bothered or tied down, and I refused his gift. Once in a while, I drive by the buildings that are there now and scold myself for my stupidity.

To my young friend, mazel tov.

listopencil
02-29-2012, 01:02 PM
?

People can't be replaced. The last Christmas my grandmother was alive, she begged me to bring the kids to visit. I was feeling strapped and told her we'd try to get there in the summer. By then, she was dead, and no amount of money could replace the memories we didn't have.




This is huge, and should be one of the cornerstones of your life as a human being.

tooge
02-29-2012, 01:05 PM
That you don't really need to hyperextend your tongue to get the job done

Inspector
02-29-2012, 01:07 PM
My youngest son just turned 30 last Monday. I'll have to send him this. Cool.

suds79
02-29-2012, 01:12 PM
I'm 33. Feel likely I'm completely different from 23. You do a lot of maturing in that time. At the same time, the feeling old thing happens because I still think I'm 23 but just can't do the same things athletically. I'm about as injury prone as they get.

But appreciate the thoughts. Always like to learn some things from people with prospective.

My wife works for a financial advising firm so I'm glad to say we've got your 1st point in check. Good advise.

Bump
02-29-2012, 01:58 PM
That is true, my biggest regret in life is when my mom asked me to drive my father to the hospital and I couldn't be bothered and went and hung out with my friends, I was 18. He died there, I really wish I would have hung out with him that one last time.

Rain Man
02-29-2012, 01:58 PM
Regrets, I've had a few, mostly about what I didn't do rather than what I did.


I like this. Well put.

Rain Man
02-29-2012, 02:00 PM
That is true, my biggest regret in life is when my mom asked me to drive my father to the hospital and I couldn't be bothered and went and hung out with my friends, I was 18. He died there, I really wish I would have hung out with him that one last time.

Ouch. That's an unfortunate thing, but I suspect many 18 year-olds would make the same mistake.

Okie_Apparition
02-29-2012, 02:01 PM
I regret wanting to draft Sanchez

loochy
02-29-2012, 02:49 PM
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-9KwYaTGeF_E/Teoup6kk-LI/AAAAAAAAAdA/DbsLc_o7JpQ/s1600/no+shit+sherlock+2.jpg

Nah, but seriously I guess there are quite a few folks around that don't realize these type things.

Fat Elvis
02-29-2012, 03:21 PM
I wish that I had known that the Chiefs still weren't going to draft a franchise QB 16 years later...I wouldn't have wasted so many Sundays watching them fail again and again and again.

bobbymitch
02-29-2012, 03:26 PM
Let me tell you, the older you get the more regrets you accumulate.

Saulbadguy
02-29-2012, 03:26 PM
#2 and #3 are outright lies.

La literatura
02-29-2012, 03:34 PM
#2 and #3 are outright lies.

LMAO

PunkinDrublic
02-29-2012, 03:46 PM
Life's too short to spend time in the DC forum arguing with complete fucking morons.

La literatura
02-29-2012, 04:12 PM
Life's too short to spend time in the DC forum arguing with complete fucking morons.

That has to be true.

Fat Elvis
02-29-2012, 04:21 PM
I wish that I had known about the iPad. Apple stock was under $8/share.

Setsuna
02-29-2012, 04:52 PM
#2 and #3 are outright lies.

Trollerific bro, trollerific.

saphojunkie
02-29-2012, 05:03 PM
On a long enough timeline, surfing ends in disaster. 100% of the time.

boogblaster
02-29-2012, 05:13 PM
Life's too short to spend time in the DC forum arguing with complete ****ing morons.

Life's too short for any thing stupid .. but some things stupid were fun ......

BWillie
02-29-2012, 05:15 PM
Things I wish I knew when I was 18 now that I am 28.

Going to college is a waste of time.
Move as far away from your family as possible so you don't have to go to multiple family gatherings expending many of your precious weekends.
Buy a house and rent it to people right away. Pay more to principal, own two houses out right by the time you are 30 and retire.
Work at a golf course instead of doing things you don't like to do.
Take poker more seriously.
Instead of having a girlfriend, only hookers and cocaine.

Claynus
02-29-2012, 05:16 PM
Things I wish I knew when I was 18 now that I am 28.

Going to college is a waste of time.
Move as far away from your family as possible so you don't have to go to multiple family gatherings expending many of your precious weekends.
Buy a house and rent it to people right away. Pay more to principal, own two houses out right by the time you are 30 and retire.
Work at a golf course instead of doing things you don't like to do.
Take poker more seriously.
Instead of having a girlfriend, only hookers and cocaine.

LMAO

Mad props, brah.

La literatura
03-01-2012, 10:03 AM
So I want to know: 1) How to actively use rejection as a fuel for positive change? and 2) How to improve.

Tips, please.

Saulbadguy
03-01-2012, 10:12 AM
So I want to know: 1) How to actively use rejection as a fuel for positive change? and 2) How to improve.

Tips, please.

1. Hatred
2. Pick up a book once in awhile

Slainte
03-01-2012, 10:56 AM
#4 sounds like a canard...

Bearcat
03-01-2012, 11:27 AM
So I want to know: 1) How to actively use rejection as a fuel for positive change? and 2) How to improve.

Tips, please.

1) Be open and willing to accept constructive criticism... if it doesn't take much for you to get defensive, people are less likely to honest and direct negative feedback. Accept that not everyone may like you (I think you've posted about that before), just as you're not required to like everyone. A lot of it comes down to getting over yourself and being open to other people's opinions, experiences, etc.

2) You'll have to be a little more specific, but #1 above and Saul's post are good places to start, I guess...

El Jefe
03-01-2012, 11:32 AM
That is true, my biggest regret in life is when my mom asked me to drive my father to the hospital and I couldn't be bothered and went and hung out with my friends, I was 18. He died there, I really wish I would have hung out with him that one last time.

Man that is terrible, that's a burden I feel sorry you have to carry.