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View Full Version : Life Hardwood flooring question(s)


Frankie
03-04-2012, 10:40 AM
I have pulled out all the hardwood planks from a bedroom to re-use in my recently done addition and match the existing flooring in rooms that were expanded. I still came up short and found out (too late) that newer hardwood flooring IS available to match my 30 year old existing flooring (2 1/4" x 3/4").

On a rare stroke of luck our local Lowes was selling all of theirs out for $6.5/bundle. At that dirt cheap price I could not pass up buying the 23 bundles they had left. I'll end up with more than 400 Sf worth of unfinished hardwood flooring to use in future projects. Here's my question(s):

1- I have already left the 2 bundles I'll use immediately in the house to acclimate to the inside conditions. But the other 21 bundles I want to store away for a couple of years. Can I store them in my unheated garage?

Also,

2- Using the my own recycled hardwood I have inevitably ended up with a few spots were there are very small gaps between planks. The worst of them are no more than 2 mm apart. I'd like to fill those gaps with durable fillers before I sand the whole thing and refinish. Can I use regular wood filling or can you recommend a more industrially strong substitute?

Thanks in advance for the advice.

Ebolapox
03-04-2012, 10:42 AM
yellawood.

go bowe
03-04-2012, 10:44 AM
pm notorious...

Bwana
03-04-2012, 11:04 AM
pm notorious...

This, he is the flooring guru.

Phobia
03-04-2012, 11:09 AM
You can store the hardwood anywhere except outside. It should be placed where it will be installed 48-72 hours prior to installation though.

Notorious will recommend a good filler for you but I think virtually any filler will crack out eventually with the natural expansion and contraction of the wood combined with the planks moving slightly with traffic. This is why recycling hardwood isn't necessarily ideal. Unless you're incredibly meticulous, you'll never get it cleaned up sufficiently for a perfect fit. There's always going to be little splinters and debris from vacated fasteners in the tongues and grooves preventing a full seat.

Frankie
03-04-2012, 02:15 PM
You can store the hardwood anywhere except outside. It should be placed where it will be installed 48-72 hours prior to installation though.So then I actually CAN store them flat in the garage and not worry about seasonal heat and cold affecting them. Right? As long as they are not stored under rain or snow I should be OK, I assume.

Notorious will recommend a good filler for you but I think virtually any filler will crack out eventually with the natural expansion and contraction of the wood combined with the planks moving slightly with traffic. This is why recycling hardwood isn't necessarily ideal. Unless you're incredibly meticulous, you'll never get it cleaned up sufficiently for a perfect fit. There's always going to be little splinters and debris from vacated fasteners in the tongues and grooves preventing a full seat.

I have found that out too late. I actually can live with the very slight gaps and they are very few. I just thought if there's a way to improve on it I should before I commit to sanding and refinishing it.

scho63
03-04-2012, 03:09 PM
Here's my question(s):

1- Can I store them in my unheated garage?

2- Can I use regular wood filling or can you recommend a more industrially strong substitute?

Thanks in advance for the advice.

1-As long as you protect the wood from any direct moisture sources, you should be fine. The only issue you need to be careful of is extreme moisture swings where the wood could over-dry if it is a very dry winter and warp after a few years. Acclimation is the key to when you will finally reuse it.

2-I would strongly urge you to mix saw dust from the wood you just cut into your filler rather than use it by itself.

I've worked on some of the highest end residences in New York City-here is one of my suppliers
http://parquetbydian.net/home.html

Frankie
03-04-2012, 08:21 PM
1-As long as you protect the wood from any direct moisture sources, you should be fine. The only issue you need to be careful of is extreme moisture swings where the wood could over-dry if it is a very dry winter and warp after a few years. Acclimation is the key to when you will finally reuse it.

2-I would strongly urge you to mix saw dust from the wood you just cut into your filler rather than use it by itself.

I've worked on some of the highest end residences in New York City-here is one of my suppliers
http://parquetbydian.net/home.html

Thanks dude. It's easier for me to store them in my garage than in my basement. Nice to know I can do that.

Hog Farmer
03-04-2012, 10:53 PM
Yep, sand your floor and use the sawdust mixed with white glue for filler.

Also I would advise keeping your extra flooring in the fridgerator so the temperasture on them is constant.

notorious
03-05-2012, 06:56 AM
So then I actually CAN store them flat in the garage and not worry about seasonal heat and cold affecting them. Right? As long as they are not stored under rain or snow I should be OK, I assume.



I have found that out too late. I actually can live with the very slight gaps and they are very few. I just thought if there's a way to improve on it I should before I commit to sanding and refinishing it.


If you are storing wood on concrete, make sure you put a few pallets underneath or prop the wood up with at least a board every 1-1/2 feet to avoid warping. If it's new concrete put some plastic underneath the wood to prevent the wood from taking on moisture from the bleeding concrete.

As for filler, if you are using a good brand, I have not run into any issues using it straight. In fact, many manufacturers DO NOT want you to mix sawdust with it to prevent bubbling, causing destabliization, etc. I stick to the manufacturers suggestions to avoid any customer complaints in the future.

If you have large gaps, spot fill the big gaps, but leave the others alone unless you have an excellent humidity control system in the house.

tooge
03-05-2012, 06:59 AM
pallets work well. Just dont ever, i mean ever store them in mid air

sodcat
03-05-2012, 07:20 AM
Could you put the gaps near the walls where they could be covered by the base boards?

Lzen
03-05-2012, 07:24 AM
pallets work well. Just dont ever, i mean ever store them in mid air

Or they might break apart? :hmmm:

Frankie
03-05-2012, 07:56 AM
Also I would advise keeping your extra flooring in the fridgerator so the temperasture on them is constant.Never thought of that. Thanks.
LMAO

If you are storing wood on concrete, make sure you put a few pallets underneath or prop the wood up with at least a board every 1-1/2 feet to avoid warping. If it's new concrete put some plastic underneath the wood to prevent the wood from taking on moisture from the bleeding concrete.

As for filler, if you are using a good brand, I have not run into any issues using it straight. In fact, many manufacturers DO NOT want you to mix sawdust with it to prevent bubbling, causing destabliization, etc. I stick to the manufacturers suggestions to avoid any customer complaints in the future.

If you have large gaps, spot fill the big gaps, but leave the others alone unless you have an excellent humidity control system in the house.Thanks. I shall obey.

Could you put the gaps near the walls where they could be covered by the base boards?Unfortunately no. They occurred where they wanted to occur. I detected no rhyme or reason for their showing up.

siberian khatru
03-05-2012, 08:03 AM
Disappointed. Thought this thread was about bikini waxes.

scho63
03-05-2012, 07:13 PM
As for filler, if you are using a good brand, I have not run into any issues using it straight. In fact, many manufacturers DO NOT want you to mix sawdust with it to prevent bubbling, causing destabliization, etc. I stick to the manufacturers suggestions to avoid any customer complaints in the future.


I was told by a few manufacturers the only reason they don't want you to do this is for any claims that come back at them if the filler fails.

I'm sure you know filler can pop out in Summer when humidity can blow up floors. You probably don't have as much as the East Coast with the ocean/bay but I hear St Louis can get super humid in the summer